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The Ubyssey Mar 14, 1967

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Array Vol. XLVII, No. 57
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,  B.C., TUESDAY,  MARCH   14,  1967
Council hits
drug crusade
— al harvey photo
NITOBE JAPANESE GARDENS reflect calm  and serenity of Vancouver's
spring as relaxing students find life is not all academics.
Arrest protest today
Student council Monday blasted
local news media for the current
"sensationalist" campaign against
marijuana and LSD.
The resolution read in part "The
AM|S issues a strong public criticism
of the public news media and especially the Vancouver Sun for its sensationalist presentation of the drug
question and by implication its attack
on the integrity of our university . . .
"The AMS urge both city council
and the provincial government to constitute an objective inquiry commission ... to investigate all aspects of
the drugs marijuana and LSD.
Two UBC doctors Monday night
told council of the effects of taking
LSD and marijuana.
Dr. A. M. Johnson, head of health
services at UBC, and Dr. James
Foulks, head of the faculty of pharmacology, said that restrictive LSD
and marijuana legislation would not
"contribute to the control of the abuse
of these drugs."
"The law hasn't come to grips with
the situation," said Johnson.
Foulks said LSD and marijuana
belong in the same list as amphetamines—drugs which require a doctor's
prescription.
Johnson said there Were 14 stu
dents in the university hospital this
past year suffering from the effects
of LSD.
"One ounce of LSD is enough to
give 3'0,00Q people a ride," he said.
"It's colorless, odorless and tasteless."
Asked by new AMS secretary
Cathy Kerr if any service could be
provided to determine a person's predisposition toward the drugs, Johnson
said no.
"The individual is' in the worst
position to judge his predisposition to
LSD."
AMS first vice-president Charlie
Boylan charged Monday that Dr. Pat
McGeer's remarks on LSD are a
threat to academic freedom.
He was referring to statements
made by the Liberal MLA in the provincial legislature last week.
McGeer, on leave from a UBC research job, called for the dismissal of
university professors who promote to
use of the drug by students.
"McGeer's remarks represent a real
threat to academic freedom on this
campus," Boylan told The Ubyssey
Monday.
"They are a reflection of creeping
anti-intellectual Reaganism and should
be squashed.
Athletes inefficient
Two Simon Fraser Academy teaching assistants were arrested Monday
at Templeton Secondary school after
a student demonstration was broken
up by police and school administration.
The demonstration was centered
around last week's suspension of
Templeton student Peter Haines.
Haines had written a book of
poetry which authorities thought
criticized too harshly a student and
teacher.
The two SFA teachers, Martin
Loney and William Lyre, were arrested for creating a disturbance.
They spoke and handed out leaflets  to   about   500   students   in   the
school lunch-hour. The leaflets told
students of their "civil rights" and
urged them to leave school indefinitely.
Friends of the pair plan a demonstration in front of the school at noon
today to protest he arrests and the
alleged suspension of 66 students who
attended the rally.
The group urges UBC and SFA
students to join in the protest against
the supressions of freedom.
Haines was suspended after he refused to withdraw several pamphlets
which insinuated that a student had
taken LSD and critici-sed a teacher
on a  "personal"  level.
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Focus Editor
AMS split Monday over the March
22 fee-raise referendum.
Commerce president - elect Peter
Uitdenbosch attacked the request for
a $3 AMS fee increase as "ridiculous".
The referendum will be held the
day before the general meeting. If
the vote fails, council will seek to
cut the athletics' operating grant by
about  $10,000.
"Why ask for more money when
it is available from athletics?" said
Uitdenbosch.
"I have looked at their record and
I can see much more efficiency is
possible.
"Basketball teams had two games
with Hawaii. Total gate was 6000
people, and they made only $800 in
gate receipts. Why? Because over
5000 got in with activity cards.
"If they had dispensed with A
cards last year and charged some
reasonable entrance fee like 75 cents,
they could have made $4500 on that
one series, which is what they made
on the sale of all the A cards sold
this year."
Uitdenbosch pointed out that a
possible source of income was lost
by the commission taken on A card
sales.
To Page 3
See: 'JOCKS
PRESENT SYSTEM...
...STIFLES  CREATIVITY
Council okays increased academia
Student council has agreed  to  increase  academic activities at UBC.
Alma Mater Society Monday received a brief
submitted by Ubyssey editor John Kelsey, suggesting ways the AMS should be moving to meet
the needs of all students.
The   brief   accused   student   government   of
ignoring   the  needs   of   students
who come to university seeking
an   intellectual   experience   and |
don't find it.
"This group is completely I
cheated by the university," the |
brief charged.
"To be meaningful to students I
in more than a trivial sense, the
Alma Mater Society must devote
some   of  its   colossal  energy  to
their curricular affairs," it said.
"Rather than further limiting
our paltry intellectual activity, the society should
KELSEY
seriously examine its priorities and insert itself
into curricular affairs."
Among   recommended   steps   were:
Council support for pass-fail courses for students wishing to study outside their disciplines.
Expanded academic activities  committee and
a special events speaker bureau.
A research program supported by student
funds, designed to study assigned projects
through retreats of informed scholars.
A new definition of education and a reappraisal
of university systems, including a student-run
free university.
Council organization of challenge lectures
next year.
Close liaison with the faculty committee and
coordinated activity for mechanical reforms of
the  university.
The report named four groups of students who
come to university.
There are those who want a meal ticket,
concentrated in the technical faculties and soaking up the skills necessary to maintain society.
These students are adequately served by
undergraduate societies and AMS activities.
There are dilettantes, the loafers, who usually
fail anyway.
There are those who wish a general education
followed by a profession that is slightly more
than a meal ticket. The AMS meets few of this
group's needs.
And there are those who are looking for a
real education and can't get it.
"They finish an academic career only after
gaining a nihilistic cynicism or drugged mysti-
ism, or may drop out entirely to pursue independent studies as an artist or factory worker,"
says the report. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   14,   1967
CYC treads narrow path;
fights social injustice
By MIKE VALPY
(Special lo CUP)
Valpy is communications
director for the Company of
Young Canadians, and a
former Ubyssey city editor.
There is this editorial
writer for a northern New
Brunswick daily newspaper
—probably a man who takes
his responsibilities to his
community seriously.
Probably he likes young
people in general and probably he has nothing against
Boy Scouts, Canadian University Service Overseas or
the Canadian Union of Students.
But then there's the other
group.
"This little band of malcontents," he calls it, "this
unhappy breed, is a dangerous and disgusting growth
and those who spawned it
should put an end to it —
quickly   and   mercifully."
"Its utterances," he writes,
"appear to be scarcely-veiled calls for civil disobedience, for the overthrow of
society as it now stands, for
the denigration of all the
virtues and' achievements of
society."
And its members? "Some
. . . are nothing more nor
less than beatniks, out to
tear down Canada and its
way  of  life."
If this is true, then they're
tearing down Canada with
the government's blessing
and the public's funds. The
man is talking about the
Company of Young Canadians, a Crown corporation.
It's been two years almost
to the day—April 5, 1965—
since the Company was first
introduced in the Speech
from the Throne.
It's been two years in embryo, two years figuring out
how to be relevant to the
mood of Canadian youth,
two years trying to stay on
the tightrope between Boy
Scout and beatnik, two years
trying to legitimize social
activism and two years
ducking shrapnel from
Parliament, the press, the
boys who call it beatnik
and the beatniks who call it
boy scout.
Two years — and 66 volunteers in 30 projects, in
the outports of Newfoundland and British Columbia,
in the big cities and small
towns of the east, across the
Prairies, putting social action on $35 a month plus
room and board.
The Company's organizing committee, after a six-
month study of youth, reached two conclusions:
• that the generation of
Canadians now coming to
maturity was unusually
aware of the menace implicit in the perpetration of
social  injustices;
• that an increasing number of young people wished
to involve themselves in a
term of voluntary service
with the aim of participating in the solution of difficult human and social problems   and,   in  the   process,
opening up opportunities for
their own self-growth.
On a foundation of these
tenets, the Company was
brought itno existence by
an act of Parliament, hailed
as a "good thing", given
unique freedom from Parliamentary control, a first
year's budget of $1.2 million
and then dropped from public consciousness until the
first day of Centennial year
when the press discovered
a handful of CYC members
in a demonstration outside
the U.S. consulate in Toronto.
The Company's image has
deteriorated  ever  since.
Public criticism has grown
into a dangerous distortion
of what the Company is
about—hurting the flow of
applications in the process;
in effect, threatening the
Company's existence — this
attitude  has  changed.
The Company is an experiment, a recognition by
government of the growing
dissatisfaction among young
people   and   of  youth's   de
mands for social change and
the right to participate —
now — in the course of
Canada's future.
It has a role to protect—
its relevance to the expression of the total Canadian
youth community and the
gap it spans between government, establishment, arid
one generation and the demands and goals of the next.
At the moment, Company
recruiting teams are visiting campuses across the
country, looking for potential volunteers and explaining to a largely ignorant
public what their organizations is about.
It is as much a part of
the Committed Generation
as the civil rights movement
of the American South.
Its recruiters are looking
for young people who are
tough, who have reached beyond an awareness of social
problems to the point of asking how these problems can
be solved: bad schools, alienation, poverty, unequal opportunity.
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TEACHERS
Teachers interested in this dynamic and rapidly growing centre of British
Columbia may obtain full details concerning available positions, working
conditions, salary and fringe benefits by arranging for an appointment at
our "Trustee Day" booth in the armouries on Wednesday, March 15th,
1967. Follow-up interviews will be held in the Personnel Building on
Thursday and Friday, March 16th and  17th .
Appointments for off campus interviews on Monday and Tuesday, March
13th and 14th, may be arranged by phoning the Prince George delegation  at the Doric-Howe Motor Hotel.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No.  57 - PRINCE  GEORGE OFFERS:
— 50  additional  teachers  each   year
— Opportunity  for  administrative experience
— Summer   School   bonus  for   1967   summer  credits
— Low rental   teacherages   in   rural   areas
— Supervisory staff assistance
— May and June internship for selected  students
— Fare and boarding allowance for practice teaching
— Central   school   for   special   classes   and  occupational   students
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KITIMAT
There will opportunities for appointments at all grade levels and in almost
every subject area in both the elementary and secondary fields for
September.  1967.
Modern, well-equipped schools—progressive educational programmes—
active support for professional in-service programmes—full credit for
equivalent teaching experience outside B.C.—summer school assistance of
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Persons interested in teaching in School District No. 80 (Kitimat) are
invited to contact district representatives at the Office of Student Services
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Interviews  will  be  held  9:00  a.m.  - 5:00  p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 16
FRIDAY,  MARCH   17 Tuesday, March 14, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
ANTI-COMMUNIST ...
... ANTI-INTELLECTUAL
U.S. 'fantasms' probed
HENRY
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
The American illusion of unlimited corporation profits has generated" fantasms" of
anti-communism and anti-intellectualism,
said a U.S. anthropologist at UBC Friday.
Dr. Jules Henry, professor of anthropology and sociology at Washington University,
St. Louis, spoke to 200 persons on the topic,
The U.S.A.: From Barbarism to Decadence
without Civilization?, a, part of a centennial
program sponsored by the UBC extension
department.
All one-sided economic
systems generate anti-intellectualism, he said, but no
other advanced country has
before developed the anti-
communist nightmare.
"The extent of this fan-
tasm is in direct proportion
to our economic insatiability," he said.
"The fantasm added to
fear leads to restriction of
free speech and further
anti-intellectualism."
Henry said the recent University of California "fiscal violence" was a manifestation
of this.
"Americans do and do not want university education for their children," he said.
"They want students tooled up for occupations, but not enlightened."
Another manifestation of anti-intellectualism, said Henry, is the disappearance of
the ideal of socialism after World War I.
As a result, he said, there is no antidote
to the fantasm and no organized forces to
save us from destruction.
American aspiration for boundless profit
has led to investment abroad, said Henry.
"As Asia is one of the last frontiers for
capital investment and war-nourished industries abroad create more capital we have
had to wage a continuous war in southeast
Asia since World War II."
The U.S. has created a road of no return,
said Henry. It now has to protect its overseas
investments.
"Although all great nations have been
barbaric/' he said, "we have now reached a
climax of barbarism which cannot be justified on any basis.
"There is great hope for the U.S. still if
it ever gives up the war in Vietnam," he said.
"The government has great tolerance to dissent and a   vast welfare program."
Protest is not as ineffective as some think,
said Henry.
"People want things to happen too
quickly."
Negro unity urged
in  'Black Power'
MONTREAL (CUP) — The president of
the Student Non-Violent Co-ordinating Committee recently urged negroes to find their
strength in unity.
"Black people should not weaken their
ranks by falling for integration," Stokely
Carmichael told an over-flow crowd of Sir
George Williams University students.
Carmichael, who coined the phrase "black
power", went on to explain how negroes are
denying their heritage and selling themselves
short as they try to "make it" in the white
man's world.
A few black people do make it, robbing
their fellow man of leaders, he said, referring
to U.S. senator Edward Brooke who says he
wants to be treated as an individual, not as a
negro.
"Black professors should go to black colleges to teach, and technicians and professionals should see to the ghettoes first.
- "The language of integration has confused
all this," Carmichael claimed. "In order to
have decent educations and decent houses,
the blacks must move into white neighborhoods and white schools.
"This implies the inferiority of the
blacks."
HAPPY DAYS
UBC will have a four-day holiday
on the Easter weekend.
A spokesman in the registrar's office
said Monday the university will be
closed March 24 to 27 inclusive, opening
again Tuesday, March 28.
The UBC calendar did not state
there would be a holiday on Monday.
Protesters barred from ship
A U.S. Navy security officer and a Vancouver policeman jointly maintained guard
at a Canadian Pacific wharf gate Saturday
afternoon to prevent UBC anti-war demonstrators from boarding the visiting American
destroyer, USS Jouett.
This was the scene which ended an hour
of speeches at the city courthouse witnessed
by about 150 people and a march of about
500 demonstrators down to the American
destroyer.
At the courthouse the crowd listened
through the roar of the city fountain and
the frequent jeering of anti-war hecklers to
speeches by members of the UBC Vietnam
Day Co-ordinating committee, Gabor Mate,
and visiting U.S. Vietnam Day co-ordinator
from California Kipp Dawson.
As the rally progressed individuals passed
through   the   crowd   distributing   placards,
and pro and anti-war pamphlets.
Others sold copies of the Young Socialist
Forum magazine and anti-war tracts by
Bertand Russell.
Their numbers dwindling, the ralliers
arrived at the dock gate to be told the wharf
had been closed.
—kurt hilger photo
"GODDAM   ELEPHANTS,"   says   Joe   Workman,   trying   to
erase  huge  footprint  from   fresh   cement   in   dry   wadi   in
front of the library.
Jocks  should pay
From Page 1
"Each athlete gets 50 cents on each activity card he sells —
a loss of over $12000 to their budget."
He objeced to the $76,000 grant given to extramural
athletics, pointing out that this amounted to about $75 per
athlete.
"Commerce students get an AMS grant of 65 cents per
student.  Science gets about  14 cents per student.
"UBC is known for having the biggest extramural program in North America. I say we are living far beyond our
means. If this type of spending continues, we can expect to
see an illuminated revolving sign out by the gates with a
picture of a body-builder and a Gaglardi motto beneath, 'Sorry
for the academic  inconvenience'."
Uitdenbosch suggested all athletes pay an expenses tax at
the beginning of the year.
"If all jocks contribute $21.50, which is what it cost me to
go to an academic seminar in Banff this year, it would generate
a revenue of $19,350.
"I don't think the people running this extramural program
know much about business."
Utidenbosch's speech was greeted with applause.
He urged defeat of the $3 fee raise and sharp cuts in the
athletics' grant.
Prof wins award     FORMER PROF DIES
Economics professor Robert Will is off to
England next year on a $7,000 C. D. Howe
memorial fellowship.
In London he will study the methodology
of economics, the approaches and procedures
which economists have used in developing
new knowledge in their field.
Will plans to concentrate in the areas
of econometrics (statistics) and the economist's mathematical procedures.
A former UBC history professor died of a heart attack
Friday in St. Catherines, Ontario.
Geoffrey Davies, 45, was dean of arts and science at
Brock university in St. Catherines. He assumed the post
in 1966 after 17 years at UBC. His last post here was professor of history and international affairs.
Davies was also an executive assistant to UBC president John Macdonald and was secretary to the UBC board
of governors, and executive director of the Bladen commission on higher education.
.GOOD NEWS FROM Tr.E//^lAH,lT MUST BE THE Wi CAME IMI1EDJATELV"
.mOA/r/THE GREAT UHITE AHEAD OF THE B/?/r/S//(youCOAUED,dENEKAL?'
LEADER IS SENDING IROQVSVTfQRCES!COflE IN !_rT          	
W_*_--._rN _«i  <5" >-»_» — _.—.# W*--^^ -«_  «- .  ^ __ J I THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
'  MARCH 14, 1967
Beer money
The Alma Mater Society is like a man trying to
buy beer, see a show and pay the light bill with the
same $3.
The trouble is, he has to get his wife to give him the
$3 before he can do anything.
The wifely students know damn well hubby usually
drinks it all away.
The problem for the new six-man executive, then
is to convince wifey that^the days in the Cecil are over,
and with the $3 he'll either take her out or pay the
hydro — and wifey really doesn't care which.
So hubby mounts his campaign to lure the $3 from
wifey, who sits sipping her coffee lets him twitch — a
few weeks ago, she spurned all his advances and kept
the $3 for herself.
Now, hubby has a budget that is already $29. He
spends $15 on a building that isn't built yet, $5 on extra
mural sports, $3 on administration, $3 on dues to things
like CUS, WUS and registration photographs, and finishes with $3 for the whole campus activity bag.
Before he's going to get that extra $3, wifey is fully
justified in knowing what he will do with it, and what
he's going to do about the money he's already spending
in pethaps the wrong places.
Maybe hubby should pay the light bill and council
should leap into academic affairs with both feet. Right
now, both feet are in the pub and council spends as much
on extra-mural sports for 900 semi-professional athletes
as it does on its whole campus program.
Or perhaps everybody should go to the movies and
hubby's whole $3 — if wifey gives it to him — should
go to undergraduate societies and existing campus
programs.
But right now, hubby-cum-AMS is spending all his
scratch the way grand-dad said he should in his will—
according to referendums and mandates passed by previous generations of students. Today's students have no
say in the spending of the bulk of their activity fee,
because council is bound by what students last year and
ten years ago voted for. Further, council has no priorities
and no idea from students about the direction in which
it should lead.
The Ubyssey is sponsoring a second think-in in
front of the library, Thursday noon, five days before
the annual general meeting of the society. Councillors
will be there. We will be there to debate council. Students should come to debate both sides, with the goal
of telling council what it should be doing. With a
secondary goal of deciding whether to vote for or against
a $3 fee hike, and what it should be spent upon. And
with a third goal of airing some opinions of the university, where it is, and where you are.
C'mon wifey. Hubby's gonna have a sound-track to
make himself heatd and make his pitch for that $3. Don't
give it to him unless you know what it should be spent
on, and until you've told him why.
I  can't decide whether to  knock  off at  700 pages, or keep going and give all the
English 200 students migraine.
Making of a president:
1,000 days of rubbish
By SIMON GRABOWSKI
If you take it for granted that the
present search for a new UBC president is
being carried out with care, intelligence
and a systematic effort to locate and screen
promising candidates, you may be the
victim of a  rosy illusion.
Frederick W. Bolman, author of the
study "How College Presidents Are Chosen"
(conducted for the American Council on
Education) found that the actual techniques
for hunting presidents could stand a lot of
improvement.
His study was based on
i a survey of 116' institutions
that   chose  new   presidents
I between 1959 and 1962, and
1 on more than 100 confiden-
! tial   interviews.   Here   are
some of the more intriguing
| anonymous    quotes,    taken
from a January 1965 article
in   "Science"   which   deals
with Bolman's study.
First,  some  criteria  for
'establishing   the   qualifica-
Grabowski    tions':
"One candidate seemed singularly lacking in interest in financial affairs and particularly in fund-raising. He was looked
down upon by both faculty and board members." — A faculty committeeman.
"The fact that one leading candidate
was a bachelor constituted a problem. Why
hadn't he married? Would campus complications ensue?" — A trustee.
"In one case, a wife completely unsold
her husband, in our eyes. He was perfect
in many respects. But his wife showed not
the slightest interest in the university and
was entirely preoccupied with bringing up
her children. That was her right, of course,
but she simply wasn't the gal to carry on
here." — The   president   of   a   board   of
trustees.
And here are a few examples of the
actual procedures which may be involved
in 'finding the man':
"The members of the faculty selection
committee asked the faculty as a whole
for nominations. This led to some field
fighting. For example, the science faculties
began to push for a scientist who would
help get research funds from the government. Quickly, the social scientists and
humanists on the faculty began to fear such
pressure, and they began bringing pressure
of their own." — A professor.
"By backdoor methods, we obtained lists
of candidates considered by other colleges
that were searching for presidents." — A
professor.
"We excluded all small-college presidents
from the list. They simply would not know
how to get government funds for research . . ."
". . . it was important to get an outsider, in order for the faculty to prove to
itself that it had the power and the potency
to attract a great leader ..." — A faculty
committeeman.
"While a nominee met with the selection committee, his wife would be taken in
tow by the wives of the trustees. They
would show her the president's house, the
town . . . And they would evaluate her."—
A trustee.
The last one is my personal favorite.
Isn't it reassuring to think that your local
lumber baroness and other warm-hearted
female church-club monsters of the B.C.
social scene may not be left sayless as to
who is going to preside over the students'
educational fortunes? Surely, so long as the
North American Atlantis endures, these be-
diamonded she-jackals will be maintained
in their sacred office as ultimate adjudi-
catrices of "fitness" in our society.
LETTERS
$3  vote  yes
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The AMS fee of $29 is not
sufficient to allow our council to rim a program that will
benefit all student groups. For
this reason, it is imperative
that all students support the
AMS $3 fee referendum.
If students are interested
in outside activities, whether
they be clubs, athletics or
academic symposia, they
should realize that cut-backs
in  all   areas  will  probably
occur  if  no  more  money   is
available.
I do not think that sacrificing a large part of our
athletic program to benefit
other organizations is any
solution to the problem. This
is just robbing Peter to pay
Paul. Ther e f o r e , students
should give council a chance
to run a program that can
expand in all areas, not a
skeleton program that leaves
no room for initiative.
MARGARET  DUMPREY
arts 3.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
CHy     Danny Stoffman
News  - - Al Birnie
Photo  Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  Claudia Gwinn
Sports   Sue Oransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus  Kris Emmott
Ass't News   Al Donald
Asst City  Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
It was remarked, some said,
that others said no, it certainly
wasn't, but when or why could
such instances occur, others
wondered, as it occurred thus.
Some wrote: Charlotte Haire,
Norman Gidney, Val Thom, Dave
Cursons, John Rogers, council-
seers Kirsten and Val Zuker,
headmistress Boni Lee and the
foul yet unmitigated Lin Tse-hsu.
Sports? Who but Tony Hodge,
Mike Jessen, Pio Uran, Vicki
Trerise and Jim Maddin, the
swimmer.
Cameras? None but the shutter-
mad Kurt Hilger, Don Kydd and
Willard  Beckel. . Tuesday, March  14,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
ARTS  PLANS...
...FREE GIFTS
Anti-calendar; marks
Arts students will get free anti-calendars
this June in the mail with their marks, if the
arts undergraduate society has its way.
Arts vice-president Harley Rothstein said
Monday AUS will "try to work a deal with
the administration" to have the anti-calendars
mailed out.
"This depends on whether we can distribute the calendars free," he said. "We don't
know how much it will cost to print them
up."
Rothstein said AUS hopes to have all its
25,000 questionnaires back by the end of the
month, compiled by the end of April, with
the calendars printed by June.
Rothstein said 30 students are working
long hours on the calendar and more than
100 are taking questionnaires to classes.
"Faculty response has been surprisingly
good," he said. "Most profs have urged students to complete them and get them back."
A response of 50 per cent for each course
will be considered enough to write a
criticism.
Of 1,000 arts classes, about 400 have not
yet filled out questionnaires, Rothstein said.
Arts US urges students who have not
yet filled out questionnaires to go to Buchanan lounge and get some.
Cops unconcerned
The Advance Mattress Coffeehouse is of
no importance to the Vancouver police even
if it does have magazines in its windows
reading "fuck hate".
"You understand the coffeehouse is of no
importance," said one police spokesman
when interviewed by The Ubyssey Monday.
Last Tuesday police seized several copies
of the so-called "objectionable and obscene"
magazine the East Village Other and a sign
explaining the evening discussion topic, reading The Kennedy Assassination Discussed
Here Tonight.
The magazines were taken after an irate
citizen complained to the police. The officer
"didn't like the sign" and took it with him
with the magazine.
No one at Vancouver police headquarters
knew whether charges had been laid.
About Town Hair Stylists
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An   opportunity   to   learn  the  fundamentals   of   Food
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Initial training in Vancouver.
With Standard Brands Limited.
Campus interviews March 22nd
Apply Student Placement Officer
Elderly poetess protests
A 70-year-old lady from California will read her
protest poetry at UBC Thursday.
Josephine Miles, the poet of "engagement," will read
in Bu. 104 at noon.
A typical Miles poem:
"The largest stock of armaments allows me
A reason not to kill
Defense department does the bleeding for me
As soundly as I will.
Indeed, can cover a much wider area
Than I will ever score
With a single rifle sent me on approval
From a Sears Roebuck store.
Only the psycho, meaning sick in spirit,
Would aim his personal shot
At anybody; he is sick in spirit
As  I am not.
Miss Miles has taught at Berkeley  for  20  years.
The UBC reading is sponsored by Vancouver poetry
centre.
TEACH
ON THE SUNSHINE COAST
IN SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 46
SECHELT
One and a half hours, fiom Vancouver, this District is a good place
in which to teach and to live.
With 2000 pupils and 90 teachers and supervisors; well equipped
modern schools, both large and small, a scenic setting; sunshine; good
access to Vancouver; good salaries and other benefits. School District
No. 46 offers the best of two worlds and is truly a compromise between
the big, impersonal city districts and the remote rural districts. Classes
are small. Sechelt ranked 5th in the recent B.C.T.F. Survey of districts
hiring teachers over entitlement and was one of the 35 School Districts
with  no classes of more than 40  pupils.
It is hard to be specific at this time about other vacancies, but we
are interested in interviewing teachers at all levels'; special consideration
will be given to teachers qualified in Music, Art, or Physical Education.
If no suitable vacancy is evident at the time, applications will be kept on
file until one occurs and we shall then contact the teacher to see if he
or she is still available and interested.
The District Superintendent and the Elementary Supervisor will interview at U.B.C. on March  16th, following Trustee Day.
The District Superintendent of Schools will be interviewing teachers
at the Bayshore Inn on March 27th and 28th during the B.C.T.F. Annual
General Meeting, accompanied by a Secondary Principal. The Elementary
Supervisor and another Secondary Principal will be available for interviews  on March  29th and  30th.
Teachers unable to attend any of these interviews should write for
an illustrated brochure, salary agreement and application form to
Mr. Peter C. Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer, School District No. 46 (Sechelt),
Box 220, Gibsons, B.C., or telephone 926-3717 in Vancouver. (Direct no-
toll  line to Gibsons.)
KRAPP'S LAST TAPE
By Samuel Beckett
Author   of   "Waiting   For   Godot"
With DERMOT HENNELLY   -   Directed by ROB GRAHAM
Thurs., March 16 — 12:30 p.m.
Friday, March 17 - 12:30 p.m.
25 CENTS
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
The increase in AMS fees is essential just to break even
next year. Without it, Athletics will be cut from $5 to $3.70 per
student and Special Events will be sliced $1,000. Undergraduate
Society and Club budgets will be severely reduced.
In addition to allowing the continuation of the present AMS
program next year, the increase would enable badly needed
support to be given to intramurals, the academic program and
housing.
An   AMS  without   $3
is   like   losing  your  navel Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   14,   1967
TODAY
JdUl Sony* Soariy,
presents
JOSE' FELICIANO
Brock 12:30 - 35c
Card Carrying Members Free
Cards may be picked up in hut 8
behind Brock Hall
Give "Her" This Diamond Ring But
Keep The $35 For Yourself"
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Romance flourishes at Grassies on Seymour. So
do basic economics, for those who take advantage of Grassies' 10% Student Preferential Discount Policy. A fully comprehensive
policy which guarantees you priceless savings
on ail their merchandise. And on diamond
rings  a double  investment for  life.
* $350: Retail Value/$315: To You.
566 SEYMOUR - 685-2271
WEDNESDAY BANQUET
Big blocks awarded
UBC athletes will receive their rewards
for this year's sporting efforts this Wednesday at the 1967 Big Block Awards Night and
Reunion Banquet.
The festivities will begin, 6 p.m., at the
Canyon Gardens in North Vancouver. Garde
B. Gardom, MLA for Point Grey, will be the
guest speaker. All students are invited to
attend this function. Tickets are available
at the athletic office for $2.50.
Honorary Non-Undergraduate Award winners are: Dr. C. A. Rowles, Dr. Malcolm McGregor and Luke Moyls.
Honorary Undergraduate Award winners
are: Ian Donald and Ted Elliott.
Special Big Block Awards go to Wayne
Osterhout (rowing) and Bob Puddicombe
(tennis).
Those winning the Big Block for the first
time are: Basketball: Ian Dixon and Neil
Murray. Cross country-track: Dave Aune,
Tony Clark, Don Scott and Sam Vandermeulen. Fencing: Bill Butler. Field hockey:
Keith Harrison and Paul McMillen. Football:
Chip Barrett, Paul Danylieu, Morris Hayden,
Vic Iwata, Sam Kravinchuk, Eric Savies, Ben
Stapleton, Hal Stedham and Bob Byng-Hall.
Gymnastics: Ray Stevenson. Ice hockey:
Dave Chambers, Miles Desharnais, Alan McLean, Doug Purdy, Glen Richards and Jim
McArthur.   Judo:  Yoshiaki  Okita.  Rowing:
Intramurals
The men's and women's intramural track
and field meet gets under way Wednesday.
This week: Wed.—12:45 p.m.—men's 440
yd. heats; 1 p.m.—men's 4 x 110 heats.
Fri. — 12:45 p.m.—men's 100 yd. heats:
12:45 p.m. — men's javelin final; 1 p.m. —
men's 880 yd. heats.
Lloyd Lowenberger, Wayne Osterhout, Brian
Rigby and Alan Roaf.
Rugby: Doug Brazier, Don Crompton,
Rick Hobson, Chuck Plester and Bob Sandilands. Skiing: Jan Atlung, Elwood Peskett,
Tom Ramsay and Bill Shaak.
Soccer: Bruce Ballam, Russell Hillman,
John Humphries, Len Lendvoy, Bill Sinclair,
Asjborn Valdai and Bing Smith.
Swimming: George Fudge.
Tennis: Tony Bardsley, Don McCormack
and Vic Rollins. Volleyball: Bob Boyle, Dale
Ohman and Mike Rockwell.
Weightlifting: Vince Basile. Wrestling:
Ken Kerluke and Chris Nemeth.
The Bobby Gaul Trophy will also be presented.
Thunderettes   in
the field finals
The Thunderette field hockey team won
their second chance to play in the city finals.
Their first chance came on the weekend
of Feb. 11 when two victories left them undefeated in league play. As league champions
they are scheduled to meet the winners of a
city-wide round robin tournament to decide
the city championship.
However, a victory in the semi-finals of
the tournament last weekend placed them in
the finals.
Saturday the Thunderettes defeated King
Edward by a score of 1-0, after a hard-fought
match. Captain Marg Dempsey scored the
Thunderette goal in the first half. Nancy
Bain led the defence in holding off King Ed.
The team meets Kitsilano next weekend.
If they win they are undisputed city champions, if they lose they will play Kitsilano.
A special report to UBC
New  life   policy  backed  by  Stocks
National Life plan provides
hedge against inflation!
Always a pioneer in the life insurance industry, National Life is proud
to report the introduction of the
National Equity Life Insurance Policy which makes available, for the
first time in Canada, a life policy
partly based on common stock investment.
Why common stock? There is a
tendency over the long haul for the
-ost of living to move in the same
direction as the stock market. The
equity element incorporated in the
design of this policy provides buyers with a substantial hedge against
decline in dollar values.
The Equity Policy is basically an ordinary life participating policy with
the same premium rate and regular
dividend scale as for a regular ordinary life policy. Where it is different is that the assets held to
back up the policy are divided and
an amount equal to one-half of the
policy reserve is invested in common stocks.
Over the long term common stocks
have shown a higher rate of return,
inclusive of capital appreciation,
than fixed income investments such
as bonds and  mortgages.
To the extent that the yield from
the common stock investments exceeds the regular net interest earnings of the Company plus 25% for
investment expense an  extra  divi
dend is credited to the policyholder.
This extra, together with the regular dividend, is used to purchase
additional paid-up insurance. Should
the market value of the stocks decrease, the extra dividend could be
negative. If this negative amount is
greater than the regular dividend,
the amount of insurance will decline.
Tables prepared to show how an
Equity Policy would have worked
out had it been issued at various
times in the past demonstrate that
despite wars and stock market collapses the Equity Policy would, over
the long term, have produced an
amount of protection  which  would
have compensated for increases in
the cost of living. In only two
years — at the bottom of the depression — of the forty covered
would the amount of insurance
have fallen below the original face
amount. When compared against
the performance of a regular ordinary life plan with dividends also
used to purchase paid-up insurance
additions the Equity Policy would
have provided more insurance in
36 of 40 years studied.
Complete information on this spectacular new policy, including the
performance tables mentioned
above, may be obtained, without
any obligation, by telephoning Mr.
Dick Penn at MU 5-7231.
NATIONAL LIFE
OF CANADA
VANCOUVER BRANCH
1131  MELVILLE ST.. VANCOUVER 5 - MU. 5-7231
□ Tuesday, March  14,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Olympiad '67-gold wrestler;
record swimmers; hoop upset
The hard-fought Edmonton wrestling
tournament, March 8-9, finished close with
Quebec-Ontario conference's 127Vi points
and the WCIAA's I251/2.
UBC was very capably represented by
WCIAA champions Ken Kerluke and Chris
Nemeth.
Kerluke, at 167 lbs., posted one of the top
performances of the tournament and took the
Gold Medal, defeating four opponents.
• Heavyweight Nemeth wrestled well
against heavier (outweighed 15-25 lbs.) competitors, pinning two opponents. He then lost
to Mitchell of Ontario. Nemeth placed second
in the heavyweight class.
•       •       •
All five Thunderbird swimming competitors in the CIAU Championships went on
to win spots on the CIAU all-Canadian swimming and diving team.
The Birds took a team of four swimmers
and a diver back to Edmonton last week and
garnered third place over all.
Bill Gillespie was the Birds' brightest
star when he won the 200 yd. freestyle
setting a 1:53 CIAU record by 3.9 seconds,
took a second place in the 100 yd. freestyle
and a fourth in the 500 yd. race.
The Birds got another CIAU record when
Jim Maddin won the 400 yd. individual medley event.
Maddin also placed third in the 100 yd.
backstroke event.
Best overall performance for the Birds
was turned in by Bob Walker who took three
second places in the 100 and 200 yd. butterfly events and the 200 yd. IM.
Phil Winch took third place in the 500 yd.
freestyle, fourth in the 200 yd. breaststroke
and tenth in the 50 yd. freestyle.
The Birds' only entry in diving, George
Fudge, took third place on the three metre
board and a fourth on the one.
The UBC medley relay team of Maddin,
Winch, Walker and Gillespie brought honors
back in that event when they both won the
event and broke a Canadian record in the
process.
EDMONTON (CUP) — University of
Toronto swimmers broke five CIAU records
at the swimming championships held at
Olympiad in Edmonton Wednesday and
Thursday. The powerful varsity team was led
by Gaye Stratten who shattered three individual marks in the 100 yd. butterfly, 100
yd. breaststroke and the 200 yd. back stroke.
Toronto compiled a team record of 321
points, tops among the universities, and
helped the OQAA score 606 points, best
among the conferences. The WCIAA was
second with 590 points. Saskatchewan and
UBC with 239 and  188 respectively were
second and third behind Toronto.
• •        •
CALGARY (UNS) — The UBC basketball
Thunderbirds had to settle for the silver
medal in the Canadian Intercollegiate basketball finals held in Calgary this weekend as
part of Second Century Week.
The Windsor Lancers won the championship for the fourth time in five years by defeating the Birds 87-82.
Windsor trailed throughout the hard
fought contest until the ten minute mark of
the second half. The half-time score was
38-34.
Marty Kiatkowski and Angelo Mazzu-
chin led Windsor with 22 and 21 points respectively. Ian Dixon scored 27 points for
the Birds, followed by Neil Murray with 19
points.
Dixon was chosen the most valuable
player of the tournament. He and Bob Molinski were the two Birds chosen for the all-
star team.
In a playoff for the third place bronze
medal at Olympiad '67, Bishop's Gaiters
revenged an earlier loss to Waterloo-Lutheran
by defeating the Golden Hawks 67-55 Saturday in Edmonton.
The Birds had earlier reached the final
by beating the Waterloo team 74-51. Molinski
scored 20 points for the UBC squad to lead
the attack against the bigger but sluggish
Waterloo hoopsters. Right behind him in the
scoring department was Murray with 16
points.
Earlier the Lancers advanced to the finals
with a 75-32 victory over New Brunswick
Red Raiders in Edmonton.
• •        •
EDMONTON (CUP) — The final hockey
game at Olympiad '67 here Saturday was
billed as the National Collegiate Hockey
Championship.
It turned out to be more of a practice
session for the Toronto Varsity Blues, who
nevertheless were awarded their second
straight National title after 60 minutes of official action against Laurentian Voyageurs.
The Blues scored a goal for every three
shots they took at Laurentian goalies Norm
Cecutti and Larry Divigi, for a total of 16
goals. The Voyageurs could only manage two
goals out of the 18 attempts they made
against Toronto's John Wrigley.
Hank Monteith and Brian Jones scored
four goals apiece for Toronto. Gord Cunningham had two goals, while Don Fuller, Pat
Monahan, Bob McClelland, Paul Laurent,
Ward Passi and Steve Monteith shared another six.
Soccer Birds put out Firefighters
By PIO URAN
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds pulled up
their socks Saturday to beat the Firefighters
3-0.
Jim Jamieson scored twice with sizzling
25 yarders while Ash Valdai got one in past
an unprepared goalie.
The first goal came when Jamieson fired
in a 'Harvey Thom pass from outside the 18
yard penalty line. For the second point Ash
Valdai stopped a pass under the nose of the
goalie and between two Firefighter defense-
men and had the ball in before the goalie
could react. Jamieson sparkled again later
in the second half when he put his foot to a
Valdai pass and fired in another long one.
With only two games left this season the
Birds cannot win first place league trophy
but if they hang on to third place they have
a chance for the play-off title.
The next game for the Birds is this Sunday at 2 p.m. when they take on Columbus
at Callister Park.
Columbus will come out fighting for the
win which will put them ahead of league leading Victoria. The Birds are not going to give
up, however, as they are only two points
ahead of North Shore.
Rugger record ruined
Rugby last weekend proved upsetting for
most of the UBC rugby teams.
The Birds never really got going in their
McKechie Cup game against Nor'westers.
They lost 18-3. Nor'westers are a combined
team of about five of the local first division
teams.
The Braves also bowed out as they lost to
Trojans.
Meanwhile, in Victoria the frosh teams
fared somewhat better.
Peter   Meluish   scored   on   a   "picture"
sequence to bring the Totems a 3-3 tie with
Royal Roads.
Tomahawks came up with a smashing
victory over University of Victoria. Coming
out strong in the first two minutes they went
on to win 18-11.
Morrie Lercher finally unleashed himself
as he led the scoring with three tries. Doug
Schick scored another and Geof Taylor added
three converts.
The two frosh teams are now tied for
first in the Intercollegiate league.
U.B.C. CHORAL SOCIETY
PRESENTS
MSfl
u
IL
n
u
UL
FRIDAY,  MARCH   17TH,   1967       BROCK HALL
8  P.M.
ADULTS $1.00
STUDENTS  75   CENTS
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
Stuc'ent teachers seeking employment for the school year
1967-68 may arrange interviews at the Student Personnel
Offices for March 20-22, inclusive, with representatives
from the Supervisory  Staff of  the  District.
E. Marriott,
District Superintendent of Schools,
Box 820, Cloverdale, B.C.
Graduating Students -
A Career In
Elementary School Teaching
There is a great need today for young people with a good education
and professional training to serve as teachers in the elementary schools
of this province and of Canada generally. Particularly is there a need
for young men who may eventually take administrative positions. Many
students in the non-professional faculties of Arts and Science arrive at
the point of grcduation with no definite idea of a future career in mind-
Elementary school teaching may interest you. Currently over 90 graduates
of Arts, Science and other faculties are completing a one-year professional
training course (Programme A3) to prepare themselves for teaching in
elementary schools. The professional Basic Certificate which they will
receive will entitle them to beginning salaries of about $6,000, increasing
annually to a maximum of about $10,000- Opportunities for promotion
and cdmintstralive positions are very good for young men. Admission
requirements: a 65% average in the B.A. or B.Sc. or other Bachelor's
degree or in lieu of this a 65% average in a suitable major. Applicants
for admission to this programme should arrange personal interviews
before September through the office of the Director of the Elementary
Division, Faculty of Education, Room 2515, fifth floor, south wing. Education  Building  (Phone 228-2141).
F.   HENRY  JOHNSON,
Director,   Elementary   Division,
Faculty of Education*
•   Precision mo<J«
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BRING  YOUR  OPTICAL
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Opp. the Army * Navy
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•  Open   Fridays 'til 9  p.m. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   14,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Feliciano strums today
JOSE FELICIANO
CONCERT
Today, noon, Brock lounge.
Admission 35 cents.
VOLUNTEER   SERVICE
Meeting today, noon, Bu.
204.
ARTS US
Important   meeting   noon
Wed. Caf.
ADVANCE MATTRESS
Panel   discussion   on   the
Indian situation in Canada,
tonight, 8:30, Advance Mattress Coffee House.
EAST ASIA SOC
Tickets for Chinese dinner
available      Wednesday,
Joan conies to love
Joan Baez will bring her
message of love and nonviolence to Brock Hall Friday.
She will be accompanied
by Ira Sandperl, Quaker and
spiritual advisor.
Council cash helps
A $70,000 Canada National Research Council
grant will enable UBC chemist James Trotter to reduce
the analytical work of
months to a few weeks.
He works in the field of x-
ray crystallography, a highly specialized field concerned with determining the
structure of molecules.
The grant will pay for automatic equipment -which will
measure the structure of
molecules quicker than original equipment.
Thursday and Friday, in
front of Dean Gage's office.
POETRY   CENTER
California  poet   Josephine
Miles    reads    her    poetry,
Thursday noon, Bu. 104.
AFRICAN   STUDENTS
Dr. Peter Oberlander  discusses housing, planning and
urban    change    in    Africa,
Thursday,  noon,  IH.
STUDENT   COMMUNISTS
Film and talk on East of
the Wall, by Ernie Krist,
Thursday, noon, Ang. 104.
BRIDGE  CLUB
Open pairs championships
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Brock
TV lounge. Open to students
and faculty, 75 cents for
non-members, members 50
cents.
LIBRARY SPEAKER
Inglis Bell discusses opportunities in library work for
people without a library degree, Wednesday, noon, Bu.
225.
UN CLUB
Discussion of Rhodesia,
Wednesday, noon, IH upper
lounge.
Like to Help
CANADA?
CYC Summer
Projects
Leave  name,  address  and
phone number at
Box   18,   Brock   Hall
For further information
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
ONTOLOGY
A  discussion  of the  Vietnam    in   You,   Wednesday,
Bu.  223.
FILM SOC
General meeting of Cinema
16, for election of officers,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 227.
ECONOMICS SOC
Dr. P. Pearse discusses Is
Foreign Aid Charity, Wednesday, noon. Ang. 213.
CHORAL  SOC
Tickets for concert available in Brock ext. 360. Dress
rehearsal Wednesday, Brock.
TFVS
Third floor virgin society
meets Wednesday. Doubles,
rags, poopsie, perg, rodent,
and tree take note. Bring
proof of eligibility.
PSYCH CLUB
Film, Rein forcement
Therapy, in Autistic Children, Wednesday, noon,
Ang. 110.
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built a
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Here's the greatest
invention since contact
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The new all-in-one solution
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And on the
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Lensine exclusive.
Pick up a bottle.
There's nothing
like it at any price.
for contacts
EXPO   '67
EXCURSION
ON $154.00
UBC RADIO
Phone 224-3242
Loc.  33
EXPO   '67
EXCURSION
ON $154.00
UBC RADIO
Phone 224-3242
loc.  33
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost 8c Found
11   Scandals
FOUND: ASSORTED KEYS,
glasses, gloves, and rings. Claim
at Publications Office, Brock Hall.
LOST PLAIN SILVER BROOCH
five dollar reward. Keepsake.
Phone 683-2070 evenings after 5
p.m..	
ONE PAIR MEN'S GLASSES
woodlike frames. Phone Bill, 224-
1631.
MARK PYTLIK, I HAVE YOUR
Math 400 notes. Phone 298-1846
in   evenings.
POUND, ONE KEY 1:30 THURS-
day by Buch. Pool. Owner claim
In   room   307,   Evenings.	
VANCOUVER COLLEGE RING —
1922—found. Claim at Publications
Office,   Brock Hall.	
FOUND  SLIDE  RULE,   433-8070.
FOUND LADYS STERLING RING.
Claim Publications office, Brock
Hall.
Coming Dances
12A
GERMAN CLUB PRESENTS POL-
ka party,. Saturday, March 18,
International House, 8:30-12:30.
Bavarian Band, $1.00 per person.
Alle  Wilkommen.      	
EX-MAGEE   '67
COMMODORE
March   18      —       9:00 - 1:00
$4.50   cpl. 263-3320
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO IN&UR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted  Elliott 224-6707.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — 3121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other jewelry,   $1   up.	
JUST SIT AND KNIT BABY
clothes for Vietnam. Ring 224-
6308.    Evenings   preferred.	
LOOK - AHEAD LIBERALS ARE
voting KENT PEARSON, Thurs.
noon,  Bu.   214.
WOULD INFANTILE BASTARDS
who swiped the black panther
from the Gym, Thurs. night, return  it.
JOSE FELICIANO — TODAY ONE
Show only 12:30 Brock. 35c. Folk
Soc.   Members  free. ■
ELECTRICAL SLACKERS AN-
nual Executive Luncheon, Bay-
shore Inn, $25.00 per plate, Mar.
15th. Admission by invitation only.
©AMP: FIFTH ANNUAL DANCE
Club Competitions, Vancouver
Technical .School. March 18, 8
p.m. Dancers, displays, refreshments.   Tickets:   AMS,   Door.
Wanted
15
WANTED
Additional crew for Cal 28, cruislng-
racing sailboat for 1967. 8 overnight
plus 10 day races. Apply only if
you are really keen to win and prepared to turn up every race — come
hell or high water. Phone: Vern
922-0406,    682-2844.
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO   CHARTER   MAY   6-14;   FOR
information  ph.   224-6734.	
TRAVEL WITH JAMES BOND
March 16 and 17: 12:30. 2:30, 4:30,
7:00,  9:00,  aud.   50c.
FLYING TO SEATTLE, NANAIMO,
Victoria, Comox, Portland, and
many other points. Coming?
Phone   Dave   987-6663.
AUTOMOTIVE   Sc  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
SPRITE MK I $500 and ALFA
Romeo Giuleha Spyder $1,250 ph.
435-8764.
Motorcycles
27
1964 SUZUKI,  80c.c,   like new,  $200
firm, call Dave, after 5 p.m., 224-
7484.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Copying & Duplicating
32
MANY PEOPLE COPY JAMES
Bond. We have the original, Mar.
16 and 17, 1230, 2:30, 4:30, 7:00,
9:00 and 50c. Double bill.
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39A
STUDENTS OF THE GRAPHICS!
Comes the Revelation. Leave your
L.S.D. at home and take a trip
in velvet. You will need your
sanity and brushes, the rest is
up to me.  Peter Klemm.  435-9888.
TODAY ONLY — SPECIAL LOW,
low price — only 35 cents to see
Jose Feliciano;   Brock,   noon.
39-A
HURRY — EXPO EXCURSION. —
Only $154.00. Accommodation,
Breakfast, Travel by Train, Insurance, Expo Pass. Reserve now.
Phone   224-3242.
WHY WRITE THEM — BUY
them. Exams for sale 29c, Bookstore, College Shop. Canteens Ed.
Smokeshop 1st yr. Maths, Physics,
His.,   Eng.   200,   EC.  200.
ALTHO' K.E.D. IS A C.B.M. HE
is still B.I.T.W. A.M.L. the Hairless Cavie.
Typing
43
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8684   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. _6J-4IS«
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurateily typed on I.B.M. Selectric. Phone 325-0368 after 5:30
p.m.	
YOUR MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS
theses, what - have - you, typed
neatly and reliably at reasonable
cost.   224-4561. 	
FULLY EXP. THESES TYPIST.
Be wise, book ahead. Elec. type-
writer   Inger;   872-7380.
WILL   DO   TYPING   —   MY   HOME
Al   5-5541. 	
ESSAYS,    THESES    EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone   733-7819.
ESSAY   AND   THESIS.  ELECTRIC.
Call  Joan,   228-8384.	
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
HOLIDAY COUNSELOR
Personable young lady to answer
visitor's inquiries. Thorough knowledge of greater Vancouver area
essential; beter than average typist
required. Work period is May 15 to
September 8 inclusive. This position
calls for swing shift on certain
evenings and weekends. Salary $210
per  month.
lApply in writing (no phone calls
please) giving age, qualifications,
a brief personal resume and snap
shot to : Miss Elvira Quarin, Secretary, Greater Vancouver Visitors &
Convention Bureau, 650 Burrard
Street,  Vancouver 1, B.C.
STUDENTS: 4th YEAR OR GRAD-
uate to tutor maths, sciences,
grade 7 —i second year university.
1 hr. - 15 hrs. per week. Phone
9:15 - 11:15 p.m.   Tuesday 738-1368.
INSTRUCTION—SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Bel-
ences and arts. 736-6923.	
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.JL.8.
No   contracts.     Phone   IZt-titt.
March   Registration
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
Experienced    tutoring   In
University
Secondary
Elementary   courses
Educational   Consultation
in Industry
THE HUBERMAN  EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE
B.C.  Owned  & Licensed
263-4808        2158    W.   12th        732-553B
TUTORING    IN     UNIVERSITY
maths — first two years by excellent experienced tutor. No contracts.    Reasonable   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
MEN'S   KASTINGER   SKI   BOOTS.
Size 9%. Only $20. Phone 922-7189.
RENTALS  ft  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
ROOM WITH BOND: AUD. MAR.
16 and 17, 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 7:00,
9:00.   Double   bill,   50c.
TWO ROOMS QUIET WITH PRIV-
ate washroom not in basement.
Girls only phone AL 5-6281 days
or RE 8-3354 evenings.
Room ft Board
•a
THIS SUMMER ROOM, PLUS OR
minus board. Live at Psi-U Fraternity house. Information phone
Duncan,   224-9665,  530   -   7:00  p.m.
Houses ft Apts.-Other Cities 87
COLUMBIA PROFESSOR, COMING
to teach 3ummer school, would
like to exchange house with somebody in Vancouver, planning to
spend the summer in New York.
The house, located in a beautiful
residential area, 15 min. from
downtown Manhattan, has 3 bdrs.,
d.r., attic, den & kitchen. For
further details call Rene — AH
3-8428   eves.

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