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The Ubyssey Nov 16, 1979

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Vol. LXII, No. 28
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 16,1979
228-2301
3
TAs pass go,
collect 600
•mgww jp imii ''-"*gt-
ENGROSSED IN STUDY, Denise Helm, arts 2, is blissfully unaware that
her careful attention to beginner's Spanish has allowed vicious Brazilian
manufactured killer Volkswagens to surround her and prepare for sneak attack. Mutant station wagon directs two worker beetles in coordinated
pincer movement while queen van awaits feast at upper right. Volkswagens, product of South American genetic experiment gone awry, were
foiled by alert photog Kevin Finnegan.
'Petition will be upheld'—Armstrong
Student court will find a petition
calling for an Alma Mater Society
constitution referendum valid,
claims the student politician responsible for the petition.
"It will be taken to student court
but there's no way it will be found
invalid," Bruce Armstrong said
Thursday.
The student representative assembly moved the petition to student
court Wednesday after some representatives questioned the method
used to solicit signators.
"People in SRA can ignore this,"
Armstrong said, "but the students
want it."
But one student who signed the
petition, Susan Hughes, says there
was no attachment to the 600-signa-
ture petition explaining the proposed amendments to the constitution.
"I wouldn't have signed it if I
knew it meant I was endorsing the
amendments. I made that clear to
the person who asked me to sign the
petition."
AMS external affairs officer Valgeet Johl said she also questions the
validity of the petition and added
some of the names on the petition
are duplications.
"I don't know when the petition
started but it's doubtful whether it
Student hacks fix Vogt's wagon
By HEATHER CONN
The UBC administration "mis-
perceived" student interest in the
research park during its developing
stages, UBC's vice-president admitted Thursday.
"At no date did the people discussing it perceive any perceptible
student interest in the issue," said
Erich Vogt, vice-president of faculty and student affairs. "I guess
they were wrong on that. It was
brought to senate probably at a
later date than it should have."
He said that if students at any
time had voiced their interest in the
last two years and asked for a public forum, one would have been
held. Vogt, who claimed he had no
direct responsibility for the park,
said he is now in favor of a public
forum to hear student views. He
said he did not want board of governors members present at the
forum and he won't support a moratorium on the discovery park.
"It's intended to be a place where
young industries can get a start," he
said. "The corporations will produce jobs. It's not a rape of campus
by multinationals."
Vogt was on the hot seat at a dinner in Cecil Green park, attended
by about 60 undergraduate society
presidents, student representative
assembly members, UBC alumni,
sorority and fraternity heads.
Sharon LeBlanc, social work undergraduate society president, told
Vogt the discovery park will reinforce the university as a corporate
elite and make UBC even more of a
middle class environment. She added that it will weaken the accessibility of working class students at
UBC.
Liquor glass in hand, Vogt retorted: "You can turn the university into a Marxist seminary if you want."
Engineering undergraduate society president Russ Kinghorn
brought applause and table thump-
ings when he endorsed the discovery
park as a vast employment market,
developing new products and high
technology.
"It's actually the future of this
province and if you don't see it I
think you're rather blind," he told
the gathering.
But Bob Staley, SRA arts representative, accused Vogt of "mind
less academia" and said it was his
responsibility as an administrative
member to anticipate student concerns. Other students voiced the following gripes:
• students don't have any real-
power to influence what companies
the university allows into the research park;
• board of governors treated the
discovery park issue as a private
matter; the issue was discussed in
camera with students who were told
not to tell their constituencies what
transpired;
• the park's nuclear research
and potential accidents could jeopardize the lives of at least "20,000
young people of child-bearing
age."
had been presented to the secretary-
treasurer before the last SRA meeting," she said.
Johl said the lawyers had revised
the proposed amendments after signators had signed the petition endorsing the amendments.
If the student court declares the
petition invalid it will have no legal
status and SRA can ignore it.
Secretary-treasurer Glenn Wong
said it is inconvenient to keep revising petitions.
Arts representative Bob Staley
said he and several other student
politicians were considering their
own petition to maintain the status
quo and demand an end to other
petitions on the constitution.
Staley said he is in the process of
drafting that petition and it might
be ready by next week.
"It's the people that make the
AMS, and the people involved
should spend their time working to
make the AMS work and not wasting time on constitutions," he said.
Staley added that it would have
been more effective for students if
they would have spent their time
working on the letters campaign
that took place last week instead of
the petition.
"If they'd put that sort of effort
into collecting signatures for the letters we'd have a lot more to show
for that week," he said.
It all adds up ta cat's meow
Are you in the doghouse because you can't spell cat?
The bookstore has just the thing for you.
For the same money you would spend on 64 Pit
tokens, you can buy a "Speak and Spell" calculator
that lets you know in soothing tones when you misspell
words of up to five letters.
"A lot of university people buy them for their
kids," said bookstore salesman David Hunt. "We sell
them mainly around Christmas for gifts."
The Speak and Spell has a 250 word vocabulary and
additional modules to boost the capacity are available
for $15.95.
The calculator is the most elaborate in a series of
four learning aids from Texas Instruments, and utilizes
a voice synthesizer to advise users of their shortcom
ings. A non-speaking "Spelling B" is available for $40
and the arithmetic "Datamah" and "Little Professor"
varieties are cheaper still.
And for those students who already know how to
spell and add but still want to contribute to the growing bookstore building fund, a Casio Melody 80
calculator that plays tunes while it computes is also
available.
And for the student who has everything, the
bookstores offers the Casio 8L-10 model. Combining
all the finest qualities of a calculator, a stop watch, an
alarm clock and a cigarette lighter, the 8L-10 is
available to any student with $100 left over from his
tuition and residence payments.
■ffTJIMMIiMM
By TOM HAWTHORN
The drive for a union of UBC
teaching assistants has overcome a
major hurdle — but campus organizers are saving their celebrations for
later.
"We've got the magic number of
TAs we need to apply to the labor
relations board for certification,"
organizer Dave Smith said Thursday. "That's as long as we don't
find out about any nasty surprises."
Smith says they have signed up
almost 600 TAs, which they estimate is two per cent more than the
45 per cent required to apply for a
union. But they still are not confident.
"We don't know whether to be
ecstatic. The UBC administration
has refused to release the names of
all the teaching assistants, so we can
only guess how many we need to
sign up. After we apply to the labor
relations board in three weeks, we'll
find out if we've been shafted."
The union organizers aren't taking any chances. They plan to continue signing TAs until the application is made.
But if the board decides the application does indeed have the signatures of 45 per cent of the potential
bargaining unit, a campus vote for
unionization could occur by late
January.
"It all depends on how good the
university is at delaying things,"
Smith said. "And I'm absolutely
positive they will try. The delay is
all in their interest.
"As soon as they get a union on
their hands, they have to make concessions."
If UBC TAs succeed in unionizing, they will follow Simon Fraser's
TAs who voted to accept a union in
January. Teaching assistants at
Carleton University in Ottawa overwhelmingly supported the formation of a union last month, following a massive provincial government slash in the number of non-
tenured staff.
"We've been fortunate in that
we've had pretty broad support,"
Smith said. "We're dealing with an
archipelago of 55 islands in a sea
called UBC, but we've been able to
get more than half the TAs in 35 of
those 55 departments signed up.
"People have been pretty good
about it. There haven't been as
many shouting matches when going
from office to office as I feared."
But Smith says he feels that the
large amount of markers employed
at UBC represent the largest block
to unionizing.
And sources say the exceptional
number of markers in faculties like
commerce represent the greatest
threat to the TAs' application to the
board.
"There're just so many of us,
and there's a constant turnover,"
said one commerce marker. "It's
virtually impossible to get all of us
signed up."
GADGET
dispels Webster Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16, 1979
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kevin finnegan photo
BASKETBALL PLAYER lines up for shot at tall target who has just noticed Second Coming bursting through
ceiling of War Memorial gymnasium. Ball game was temporarily forgotten at sight of cherubim and seraphim getting wings tangled in rafters while archangels performed upbeat rendition of Dinah Won't You Blow. Mike and
Gabe's All-Angel Band was called back for several encores, forcing cancellation of main act. Roof was miraculously repaired and game resumed.
Dep't covers for Belshaw absence
There will be no problem covering anthropology professor Cyril
Belshaw's classes until Christmas,
the acting head of the department
said Thursday.
"Other members of the department will take his two classes for
the rest of the term," Adrian Marriage said.
Belshaw was detained by French
police Sunday for questioning concerning the death of his wife, whose
body was discovered last spring in
Switzerland.
Marriage said the department
would not be short-staffed despite
the absence of Belshaw and department head Kenelm Burridge, who is
on leave of absence.
The department has no plan's for
Belshaw's classes should he be detained into next term, Marriage
said.
"I guess everyone's hoping it's
not for that long," Marriage said.
Belshaw was in Paris to attend a
professional conference when he
was arrested.
Vigilantes
patrol U of T
TORONTO (CUP) — Eight
rapes in about two months have
spurred a night patrol with dogs,
flashlights and whistles to hunt out
potential rapists at the University of
Toronto campus.
The newly-formed ad hoc committee has already discovered one
possible rapist, a man hiding in
bushes on campus who fled when
approached.
On the first night of patrols Nov.
5, two patrol members noticed
movement in bushes along the
walk. When they approached a man
appeared and started walking away
from them. When they called him
he fled and cleared a fence before
the patrol members could get a description.
Ad hoc committee members say
they are concerned for the safety
and freedom of women on campus
and have protested to authorities
the lack of security measures on
campus. They argue that better
lighting and tighter security is essential for the secluded philosophers'
walk area of the campus, where the
rapes have occurred.
But U of T police have continued
to deny reports to several women's
groups that rapes took place on
campus. Police say if the rapes are
not reported directly they have no
way of knowing whether they really
occurred.
Spokespersons for the groups
said they believe more rapes have
taken place but the women involved
have not reported them.
Committee members decided to
begin the patrols hoping their presence would be enough to deter rapists from stalking the area.
Quebec teachers
vote for walkout
MONTREAL (CUP) — Facing
potential $1,000 fines, teachers
from two Montreal-area community colleges (CEGEP) have voted to
walk out Monday in an illegal
strike.
They're waiting for union leaders
to give the word.
Teachers at Dawson college voted
in favor of an immediate defiance
of Bill 62, government legislation
that outlaws public service strikes.
And Champlain college teachers
voted to give their union a strike
mandate regardless of the application.
The votes are seen as an indication that an illegal strike Monday
by teachers, hospital workers and
public servants in the Common
Front union coalition is a strong
possibility.
Although not all 200,000 public
employees have voted, initial results
indicate that Common Front members will walk out Monday in defiance of the Parti Quebecois move to
cool off the unions.
Union leaders in Hull are urging
CEGEP teachers to vote in favor of
striking and the provincial associa
tion of Protestant teachers has called on its members to disobey the
law.
"We're fed up," said association
spokeswoman Sheena Hanley.
"The government set up rules to
structure negotiations and we
followed them to the letter. But the
government kept changing the rules
in midstream."
But Bob Keaton, executive member of the Dawson teachers' union,
said Thursday he thinks the Parti
Quebecois' losses in three byelections Wednesday will influence the
government and force the PQ to
give the unions a better contract offer to settle the dispute quickly.
The Common Front had planned
a general strike to begin Nov. 13 but
the government introduced the bill
Monday banning strikes for two
weeks, forcing unions to reconsider.
A Common Front spokesperson
said the unions still believe the government could make an acceptable
offer and avert the illegal strike. If
the strike goes ahead those violating
the law could be fined up to $1,000
a day.
'J>-,
Wreck alternatives aired at hearings
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
and PETER FERGUSON
All public proposals on the future of
Wreck beach have finally washed up on Stan
Weston's desk.
UBC's one-man task force on Wreck
beach cliff erosion is currently attempting to
wade through a sea of oceanographic technicality and public concern in order to make his
recommendation to the board of governors
by Dec. 4.
The proposals, presented at four public
meetings last week, range from a plan to turn
severely eroded portions of the cliffs into terraced apartments, to a report calling for only
minor changes in drainage, walking trails and
vegetation.
And although Weston has refused to say
which group's proposals he will support, at
least one ad hoc committee is celebrating
their "victory" at the public meetings.
The Wreck beach committee will hold a
victory party Saturday night because "we
thought the hearings went very well and felt
our presentation was impressive," says committee spokesman Korky Day. "We consider
it even a victory that the thing was even given
a public hearing at all."
The committee's proposal has been the
most high-profile and visible alternative to a
Swan Wooster Engineering Co. Ltd. proposal commissioned earlier by the UBC board.
The proposal calls for:
• the hiring of shore resources consultant
Wolf Bauer to design and oversee the construction of a gravel berm below the Point
Grey cliffs;
• the curtailment of foot traffic on the
top and base of the cliffs;
• the establishment of a program of stabilizing and planting;
• the construction of well-established and
heavily-used footpaths;
• the erection of several single-hole pit
toilets;
• and a complete ban on the construction
of automobile access roads to the beach.
The committee's brief states:
"We are strongly opposed to any access
along the beach of our cliffs. We wish our
beach to retain its natural character and to do
so, means no vehicles down there of any
kind."
"Vehicles are not wanted on the beach for
servicing of outhouses, removal of garbage,
assistance of voluntary lifeguards, for aiding
police, or for emergency rescues."
But another proposal, authored by the
Vladimir Plavsic architectural group, suggests that at least two eroding cliff faces to be
converted to hillside terraced apartment
housing. Vladimir Plavsic said Thursday the
buildings would blend into other vegetated
cliff areas through a terraced garden housing
concept.
"It would provide a useful area that is
otherwise not used very much, like a camouflaged terrace structure," said Plavsic.
He stated in a presentation to Weston that
"the cliff retaining structure in the form of
terraced garden housing would provide accommodation for students, temporary university staff, visiting artists and scientists.
Similar projects are successfully accomplished on the banks and cliffs of many Mediterranean rivieras with public natural beaches."
But Plavsic admitted he does not think
"it's politically possible because so many
people are opposed."
UBC geological science professor Allan
Freeze presented a critique of the Swan
Wooster proposals to Weston and asked that
more extensive studies be conducted before
any further decisions are made on the fate of
the beach.
"I believe that the information provided
by such investigations will allow much less
grandiose attacks on the erosion problem
than proposed in the master plan. While current erosion rates are certainly disarming,
they do not imply impending disaster. There
is time for further assessment," he stated in a
report to Weston.
And a group of UBC geography 315 students believe nothing much should be done to
the cliffs.
"Let us not go forth and tell these people
that the environment must be changed for
their benefit, if this is not true."
But the director of UBC's Museum of Anthropology stated in a critique that he is concerned any cliff changes would seriously affect the grounds surrounding the museum.
"Any proposal to control erosion which
would reduce the natural setting of the museum, endanger its exterior exhibits, or prevent the completion of the original landscape
design would endanger the concept of the
museum and its standing with national museums, private foundations and the public at
large," says director Michael Ames. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16,1979
Fans fly coop for 'Birds
I      'Bring out your dead . . . bring out your 6—4
End admin
monopoly
UBC's TAs won't go directly to jail — they've passed go and collected 600.
That's the magic number of teaching assistants who signed up
for certification to unionize. It's a major step in the game plan for
those who have waited years to gain recognition, equal wages and
fair working hours.
But their attempt to form a full union is still as real as ever. They
haven't hit the centre jackpot yet. Because the UBC administration
refuses to release the names of all of its teaching assistants, the
TAs have no way of knowing exactly how many people they need
to apply for a union.
They haven't thrown in their markers yet. The union organizers
are still signing TAs until the application is made. So if you're a
teaching assistant or marker who feels downtrodden, overworked
and unappreciated, sign up to apply for certification.
After all, you won't be in a monopoly. TAs at Simon Fraser
voted to accept a union last January. Those at Carleton grabbed
onto unionship after the Ontario government massively slashed the
number of the universities' non-tenured staff.
So, the UBC administration had better open its eyes and books
and realize it could have a major labor power force on its doorstep
by late January. It can only hold off for so long, denying people the
rights they've deserved for years.
It's been a long fight but cooperation and team work have paid
off. The hours organizers have spent on meetings, negotiations,
newsletters and beer gardens have paid off in drumming up
substantial support and awareness of their poor status on this campus. We praise their efforts in gaining enough estimated signatures
to gain 45 per cent of the potential bargaining unit. They've
mobilized and brought together previously unlinked masses to form
a cohesive unified body.
There's safety in numbers.
THE UBYSSEY
November 16, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments. 228-2301; Advertising. 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Tough paper today. People kept disappearing in front of Verne McDonald's eyes. "Going to get a
Swiss cheese sandwich at the deli," said Sherry Evans and Randy Hahn; they never came back. "My
favorite movie. How to Murder Your Wife, is on TV," said Heather Conn. "I always preferred Last
Tango in Paris," said Terry Asseltine, Kevin Finnegan and Peter Ferguson as they followed her out the
door. Meanwhile. Julie and Geof Wheelwright said they had some work to do in the library. Tom
Hawthorn, Daniel Ouellette and Kathryn Thurman phoned in to say they ate too much chocolate and
had upset tummies. Maxine Sevack and Peter Menyasz were tossed out for singing "Don't Sleep in the
Subway Darling" once too often. "Gotta go to the dentist," said Shaffin Shariff and John Kula. "And
I've got to go to the hairdresser's," said Monika Schmidtke. "It's Thursday." Wendy Hunt and
Christine Wright phoned in to say they had headaches from too much Swiss Chalet the night before. A
skeptical Marili Moore said that story was as full of holes as Swiss cheese. Kerry Regier and Daniel
Moon were inexplicably late returning from their UNESCO conference in Paris. "Gotta go," said Marcus Gee. Steve Howard and Ralph Maurer. "Gotta meet somebody for lunch. . .
I have read about student apathy
since the first day I picked up a
Ubyssey. Naturally, being a student
myself, I was all set to defend my
colleagues, but after three years, I
am no longer under the illusion that
apathy does not exist. Varsity sport
seems to be a prime victim.
I cannot believe that in a 'hockey
town' such as Vancouver, the UBC
Thunderbirds hockey team can only
draw around 200 fans to see them
play University of Alberta, the current  collegiate champions.  There
should be more fans for any game
than that. University hockey is exciting and well-played, and the
UBC team this year is greatly improved. Hockey fever seems to have
hit the campus, but the fans just are
now attending the 'Birds games.
How come?
It must be admitted that the rink
is cold, but that is a minor
drawback to any enthusiast. For
those students who get thirsty Friday and Saturday nights and would
prefer to spend the night in the Pit,
No art to lounging
The muddled, half-baked ideas
regarding the new use proposed for
the SUB art gallery must be removed from the status of progressive
thinking they are purporting to
hold. It has been suggested that the
functions of art galleries and beverage lounges are mutually compat-
ble. Fanciful images are called to
mind of the ultimate highs that
would be created if one could combine the spiritually uplifting experience of art with the spiritual release
of alcohol.
Well, that's humbug and horse-
shit! One should take 30 seconds to
reflect on how people use art galleries and then how they use lounges.
Art galleries must provide for unrestricted movement of the observers so that they may view an art object from all perspectives and so
that they may freely choose the object on which to reflect. In beverage
There's more to
thumbing than
meets the eye
In response to Mr. DeFazio's letter of Nov. 2, there is more to picking up hitchhikers than first meets
the eye. Consider the driver's viewpoint.
There are some, not all, but some
student hitchhikers who make it
particularly difficult for drivers to
give them rides. A case in point is
those who insist on standing on the
northwest corner of Blanca and
University Blvd. during the peak
traffic period just before 8 a.m.
I for one am not too eager to stop
right at the corner and face the high
risk of being rear-ended by a B.C.
Hydro bus. Hitchhikers would have
a much better chance of procuring a
ride if they were clever enough to
stand where they are visible (not
behind parked cars), and where a
driver can pull over safely. I've tried
it and it works!
There is also the question of
liability. A driver who picks up a
hitchhiker is held liable in the event
of an accident resulting in injury to
the hitchhiker. Perhaps some
drivers consider this. Perhaps not.
One last issue, and a contentious
one, is that of ownership of a car
being a so-called god given right. I
agree that for many, owning a car is
beyond their budgetary limitations.
They simply cannot afford to. But
this is not the case for all of us poor
students, myself being one.
For many of us it is merely a
question of priorities, of how we
want to spend our money. If owning a car means a lot to us, we can,
but only if we are prepared to cut
back on other things — our records,
movies and beer. It's just a matter
of choice.
Despite all this I do give a ride to
the occasional hitchhiker, when my
car is running.
I. Faris
arts 4
S. Holland
geophysics 4
lounges one is expected to take a
seat and respect the privacy of other
patrons. Picture this scene in our
new lounge-cum-gallery "Excuse
me sir, could you please move your
brown cow? I'd like to get a better
look at the painting behind the wall
. . . where are the lights? WILL
SOMEONE PLEASE TURN UP
THE LIGHT!"
Galleries must be well lit in order
that exhibits may be seen. Lounges
are dimly lit because seeing well is
not a prime consideration in
lounges. Add to this the fear of
smoke damage by artists who will
then refuse to exhibit and you have
killed the gallery at UBC.
Whatever happened to the idea of
turning the Barn into a watering
hole at night? Food service's facilities are much more compatible
with the requirements of a lounge.
Perhaps another one of the huts
near Place Vanier could be renovated? Hang some Lauren Harris
prints on the wall and everyone
would be happy, even the most fanciful of us.
John R. Wright
political science 4
Home ec week
wins support
On behalf of the home economics
undergraduate society, I would like
to extend a big THANK YOU to
everyone who supported us during
our first ever home ec week. Special
thanks to Susan Wiles, home ec
week coordinator, Carol Smith,
Cheryl Blinkhorn, Shirley Waters,
Wilf Pfleiderer, Bev Elliot, Charles
Scott, Cindy Millar, Sue Rines,
Marie MacLachan, Ivana Caravag-
gio, Ardelle Harrison, Jude Sakaki,
Janet McKay, Mary Bragg, Lynn —
for buying the first pumpkin and to
Rob — for donating so generously!
Fran Ruigrok
secretary-treasurer
HEUS
why not come out to the games.
You can purchase the same
nourishing brew and still have time
to visit the Pit on your way out after
enjoying the game.
Many students seem to be totally
unaware of the fine calibre of the
sport at the university level, and the
record of the 'Birds team (4-2). It is
unfortunate that the three big wins
they obtained last weekend against
teams in the Great Plains conference were afforded just a short,
one-column write-up lost
somewhere in the middle of general
sports news.
Come on hockey fans, in a town
that can fill a 15,500-plus seat arena
to see the Canucks play at $12 a
shot, surely we can get more than
200 students out to see a great game
of hockey played 'Birds style, for
FREE!
The games are Friday and Saturday nights at 8 p.m., bring your
AMS card for free admission. The
'Birds play Calgary at home this
weekend, let's show some support
tor them.
Darlene Chaplin
education 4
Respect beauty
In response to Mike Fahey,
science 1:
Firstly, The women's committee
does not have the time necessary to
respond to every sexist incident that
occurs on this campus as we are
engaged in many other more important projects. We are available to
counsel women who come to us
with questions or problems and to
make referrals as necessary. We
organize and implement workshops
on various topics such as self-
defence and health concerns. We
are also responsible for the day-today upkeep of the women's centre
and its library.
Secondly, it is not the
toothbrushes pe se that upset me
but the whole broader issue of using
human sexuality as a moneymaking
enterprise.
This type of "prostitution" is
responsible for much of our
society's disrespect for a very
beautiful and personal part of all of
us. The prevalence of this disrespect
is evident in the alarming incidence
of sexual harassment and assault
that occurs. By continuing to support such enterprises we are adding
to the problem rather than working
towards ending it.
M. Star Mahara
nursing 4
Gee, I goofed. . .
About the letter written to the
UBC traffic and security
employees: I retract all those
epithets made about them. I did not
intend my comments to be offensive. I hereby apologize for all those
vulgar comments.
Dave Wong
science 3
Now it's come to this
The Ubyssey would like to apologize to Dave Walsoff for publishing
his name under the Nov. 9 letter 'Babies make me throw up.' The letter
was signed 'Dave Walsoff/education student/Phi Gamma Delta
member' and we assumed it was legitimate. But Walsoff informed us
later that he did not write it.
Because The Ubyssey has been receiving letters that use false names or
"borrow" real student names, we can no longer guarantee to print every
letter submitted.
From now on, writers must personally submit their letters and show a
student card for identification. We regret this inconvenience but we
think it is unfair that innocent students have suffered due to the immaturity and thoughtlessness of others.
Insincere writers have seriously jeopardized the role of our letters
page as an honest open forum for all students. We are sorry to discover
that UBC has its own Lettergate. Friday, November 16,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Friends salute prof
On Friday, Nov. 2 Robert Poutt,
an associate professor of special education, was honored at a tenth an-
iversary celebration of his diploma
program in mental retardation. Approximately 60 friends, family
members, colleagues, diploma
graduates and students staged a surprise party for Bob at the Bayshore
Inn Friday evening. He was presented with several gifts including a
chain saw which he hopes to use on
his property near Prince George.
Briefly, his personal history includes being:
• a teacher of the mentally retarded at Rainier School for seven
years;
• the principal of the state home
and training school for the
mentally retarded in Colorado for
three years;
• the director of education and
training  at   Woodlands   for  three
Students organize
to review park
Since the plans for an industrial
research park on the UBC campus
were announced in September, a
number of questions have been raised. These include the lack of university or community input, the loss of
forest land and possible expansion
into university endowment land
parkland, the nature of the research
to be conducted, and the effect of
such an enterprise on the nature of
the university, teaching standards,
etc.
Requests for public hearings have
been denied. It is time for students
to take action to bring these matters
into an open forum and make our
feelings heard. A motion will be on
the agenda at the Nov. 21 student
representative assembly meeting to
strike an ad hoc committee on the
subject of the research park. We are
asking students who are concerned
about these issues, and may wish to
join this committee, to contact the
undersigned.
Marty Lund
SRA social work rep
732-9703
Kevin Annett
anthropology
228-9491
KORRES
,___" MOVING AND T
PO TRANSFER LTD
MOVING AND T«
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Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
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Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732 9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
years when he was instrumental in
establishing the Ward activity training programs; getting a bus for
Woodlands school and developing a
summer camp for the school;
• an associate professor of special education at UBC from 1968
until the present;
• the director of the diploma
program in mental retardation since
1969.
Several past or present positions
held include:
• member of working committee of the B.C. mental retardation
institute;
• past acting director of
BCMRI;
• board of directors Canadian
association for mental retardation;
• past governor of C. and C. for
B.C.;
• president of AAMD, region I;
• president of CEC Vancouver
chapter;
• 'fellow' in AAMD;
• member of curriculum committee for adult mental retardation
program at Vancouver community
college;
• chairman of provincial committee for mental retardation in
B.C.
At the conclusion of this academic year, 101 students will have
graduated from the diploma program in mental retardation. On behalf of all these students I would
like to express my appreciation for
Bob's direction, assistance and concern, not only for our professional
careers but also for our social and
emotional welfare.
Doug D. MacDonald
23,24
NOVEMBER
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Yes, these fidgety little
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 POSTAL CODE	 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16, 1979
Tween classes
TODAY
SPEAKEASY
Attendance advised at general meeting, noon,
SUB 125.
SUB ART GALLERY
Last day of UBC students' art show, 9:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m., SUB art gallery.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
■   Mandarin class for beginners, noon, Scarfe 200.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate  with   UBC   Liberal  club,   noon.   SUB
auditorium.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Meeting  to discuss model parliament se.jting,
noon, SUB 119.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
First meeting for guitar lessons, noon, SUB 211.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Subcommittee meetings, noon, SUB 1X.
UBC WRESTLING TEAM
Dual  meet with  SFU,  2  p.m.,  War  Memorial
gym.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOC
All welcome at wine, beer and pizza pany, 6:30
p.m., SUB 207.
SUS
First year dance, 7:30 p.m., SUB part\ room.
SATURDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Acadia Park tenants' refugee sponsoring group,
8 p.m.. International House.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mid-autumn disco, 8:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Games night, 8 p.m., St. Mark's College.
RUSSIAN GAMES
Meet to visit Soviet ship, 10:30 a.m., CPR station.
B.C. MENTAL RETARDATION INSTITUTE
Interdisciplinary seminar, 9 a.m., 2765 Osoyoos
Cr.
SUNDAY
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Haida   artist  and   professor  debate  on  art  as
language, 3 p.m.. Museum of Anthropology.
MONDAY
SUB ART GALLERY
Exhibition of works by Robert Linsley until Nov.
30, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., SUB art gallery.
ADOLF HITLER DICTATOR'S CLUB
General meeting, noon, Gage penthouse.
TUESDAY
AMPS
Discourse on tantra yoga philosophy and medita-
Hot flashes
Powder hound*
need ski club
Who wants to go home for the
New Year when you can go skiing
instead? If powder is your particular
preference, the UBC ski club has
just the thing to start the 1980s off
right.
They're organizing a Christmas
ski trip that strangely enough runs
from Jan. 1 to Jan. 6 at Big White.
Return air fare, lifts and con:
dominium accommodation on the
mountaintop are all included in five
days of keeping your tips up.
It's all for under $200, not including plaster casts and hot rum.
Tyrants moei
Now you can find out what Idi
Amin does on quiet nights when
he's run out of worlds to conquer.
Goosesteppers and afficienados
of Horst Wessel's music can get
their ya-yas out at the Adolf Hitler
dictator's club which will meet at
noon Monday in the Gage Towers
penthouse. New members are
welcome.
Shirley MacLachlan at 263-0148
can tell you if it's all true.
Myet a Soviet
Those with a burning desire to
meet up with a Russian sailor to
practise their das and nyets are in
luck this Saturday when the UBC
Russian club meets at the CPR station at the north foot of Seymour
St., then visits a Soviet ship.
Then Tuesday at noon you can
find out even more about the Soviet
Union at a lecture and slide show in
English and Russian in Buch. 2230.
Geometry
explained*
A mother bakes luscious
apple pie in a four-sided
pan. Kid arrives home.
Mother presents pie to kid.
He looks at it and screams,
"But mama, this pie are
squared!" Think about it. At
PJ. Burger & Sons. 15 classic
burgers. And other great stuff.
2966 W. 4th Ave, by
Bavswater. Open dailv from
11:30 a.m.
THURS.. SUN.
7:00
FRI., SAT.
7:00, 9:30
$1.00
SUB AUD.
COFFEE TIME
* We import them green
* We roast them ourselves
* You enjoy superb coffee
AMBASSADOR COFFEE & TEA
&o97   Y\   B WA\   (across from Lens & Shutter)
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run for
election for the following positions: —
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE
- SEVENTEEN students (five
at-large and one from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 21, 1979.
tion, 7:30 p.m., SUB 213.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting and alien project discussion,
noon, SUB 113.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
RUSSIAN CLUB
Speaker on the Soviet Union today, noon, Buch
2230.
LAW SPEAKERS ASSOCIATION
Speech on immigration and the destruction of
English Canada, noon, Law 101.
PRE-MED
Lecture'on obstetrics, noon, IRC 1.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Discussion, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
WEDNESDAY
NDP CLUB
Debate with  debating society on  dirty  tricks,
noon, SUB auditorium.
WOMEN S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion group, noon,
SUB 130.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Submarine dinner and meeting, 5:30 p.m., St.
Mark's College.
THURSDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30, SUB 130.
LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Film on South Africa, noon. Law 101.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Questions and answers on  Christian  Science,
noon, SUB 224.
AMNESTY UBC
Charlie Chaplin's The Great Dictator, noon, SUB
auditorium.
BOTANY STUDENTS' GRAD COMMITTEE
General  meeting to discuss use of grad fees,
noon, biological sciences 3001.
LOOK: IT'S NATIONAL LAMPOON'S
NOVEMBER LOVE ISSUE
This issue of National Lampoon contains some pretty
spicy material. Some people unused to such spicy
humor had to drink glass after glass of water while
reading the love issue.
You can learn alot about all kinds of love from
the November issue. If you're really ignorant, you can
learn one hell of a lot.
But don't take our word for it. Pick up a copy at
your bookstore or newsstand today. And if you get
some kind of a disease, don't blame us. You picked
up the magazine. It's your fault.
'For Cappucino...Expresso...Sandwiches...Cointreau Cake
Carrot Cake...Cafe Latte...Salads...Croissants...Danish.,.
Hot Chocolate...Pate...Cheesecake...Muffins...Brioche...
Bagels...Rum Cake...Hot Milk...Strudel...Quiche...Cider...
and for a Colombian
experience come to...
2134 WESTERN PARKWAY
"IN THE VILLAGE"
DAILY     8-Midnight
WEEKENDS    11-Midnight
eiims
espresso bar
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional lines 50c. Additional days $2.76 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the aay before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Van., B.C V6T 1W5.
5 — Coming Events
5 — Coming Events
65 — Scandals
COME JOIN US in our contemporary
service of praise. Coffee hour to follow.
7:30 p.m. Sunday Nov. 18, 1979. West
Point Grey Presbyterian Church 4397 W.
12th Ave. (12th and Trimblel. Sponsored
by W.P.G. Young Adults.
REINCARNATION and your true feelings
How they work together. Free talk S.U.B.,
211 Wed. Oct. 21. 8:00 p.m. Sponsored by
Vancouver Chapter of Astro Soul.
VANCOUVER'S TOP country rock group
"The Molloy Gang" is available for larger
Xmas parties. Contact Larry at 733-6863 or
Cam or Valerie at 732-1886.
A FRESH APPROACH to the knowledge
that ends all conflict; a discussion of self-
awareness with Riley White. Please call
278-5680.
THINKING OF TRAVELLING IN TURKEY?
Learn all about it at the Subfilms presentation of Midnight Express! Thursday, Sunday at 7:00; Friday, Saturday at 7:00 and
9:30. $1.00 in Sub Theatre.
ACARYA GARGA. Discourse on Tantra
Yoga, Philosophy and Meditation by
Acarya Garga Nov. 20 7:30 p.m. Sub 213.
GSA FOLK NIGHT happens again Friday,
Nov. 16 at 8:00 p. m. in Grad Centre Garden
Room. Some great stuff plus some open
stage so bring your instruments.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
11 - For Sale - Private
GERTRUDE STEINMUTT says a dog is a
dog is a dog. We still have some left at our
first annual zoo sale. The Mall Book Bazaar,
850 Granville, Nov. 11-18.
70 — Services
CHILDREN'S Corner Daycare. Suzuki
Piano Program by Susan Wong, B. Mus.,
UBC: A.R.C.T. Daycare by experienced
personnel. Enrolling 3-4 year olds. 327-4736
evenings.
85 — Typing
15 — Found
WARNING
Bloodthirsty
Love
Opens Tomorrow Night
presented by
GRINNING DRAGON
THEATRE CO.
Nov. 17-Dec. 1
Tues.-Thurs. — 8:30 p.m.
$3.00
ACTOR'S WORKSHOP
280 E. Cordova
(right next to Coroners Office)
Special Midnight Show
SATURDAY 24th
No Show Tues. 27th/Thurs. 29th
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
READING/EDITING/TYPING services.
Books, theses, essasys, reports etc. Expert
assistance offered at Reasonable Rates.
733-2627.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT essay and thesis
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 324-9414.
FAST    EFFICIENT
rates. 266-5053.
typing.    Reasonable
35 - Lost
PAIR OF LADIES glasses. Reddish plastic
frames. Squarish lenses. Please take to lost
and found, Brock Hall.
90 - Wanted
40 — Messages
NEED A HAIRCUT? Male Models needed
for advanced haircutting lessons. No
charge. Please Call 5 Chairs. 682-8555.
65 — Scandals
99 — Miscellaneous
BIG WHITE SKI TRIP! Jan. 1 to Jan. 6.
$195. Includes return airfare, lifts, accomodation on the mountain. Enquire
U.B.C. Ski Club, Room 210 S.U.B. or call
Ian 224-3973.
SUN VACATION in Puerta Vallarta,
Mexico. Dec. 26 - Jan. 8 from $499. Includes airfare, breakfast and room. Call
922-1536 after 6. • PEKING OPERA ... East meets West again
• CODCO ... laughs for the hard of herring
Inside
• KNACK ... getting the hang of imitation
• SKITZOID ... new punk publishing empire
• NOW ... improvising with jazz
• VSO ... carrying on the winning streak
v
• THE ROSE ... Janis by any other name NHHSBB!ft!&Mi
liS.? !•'*,*• '?■-."*'   i.-H. •'      -   S
HI          ^^^^^B
Peking Opera leaps cultural wall
By CHRISTINE WRIGHT
When Chairman Mao ushered in
the Great Cultural Revolution —
"Let a hundred flowers blossom,
weed through the old to bring forth
the new" — the Peking Opera was
almost cast out with the feudal
weeds. Only in recent years has the
political climate of the People's
Republic of China nurtured the
regeneration of this traditional
theatrical form.
The visit of the Peking Opera to
Vancouver was memorable for
reasons beyond the political implications. It offered an opportunity
to witness an exciting spectacle of
color, movement and sound, a
"peek" into a different culture.
The Peking Opera is comparatively new in the long history of
Chinese drama. It inherited the
older traditions of the Han Opera
and the Kun Opera, emerging as a
new theatrical genre in the late
eighteenth century. Acrobatics,
music, dance and mime are all
aspects of the Peking Opera, blended around the folk themes of
classical Oriental theatre.
Because the Peking Opera was
created in a feudal society it was
abandoned as "feudal refuse" during the artistic purges of the
Cultural Revolution. Now its rich
heritage is being restored and opera
members have attempted to
"remove the weeds and keep the
flowers."
Vancouver has the distinction of
hosting the first North American
performance by the Peking Opera in
twenty years.
The performance last Friday
night was a cultural sampler of four
opera fragments. The program was
skilfully designed to show Western
eyes and ears what they've been
missing all these years. Apparently,
they've been missing a lot.
No photograph or film can capture the living energy of those
whirling figures and brilliant colors
as they appear on stage. It is an atmosphere that must be felt as much
as seen.
The actors have complete control
of their bodies. Gestures are stylized and exaggerated without losing
any degree of subtlety. Characters
are established instantly through
movement and voice, achieving individuality without slipping into the
level of caricature. The music from
a small on-stage ensemble is
sometimes strident, sometimes
haunting, yet always it reflects and
narrates the action.
The first of four operatic sketches
was a love-at-first-sight tale entitled
The Jade Bracelet. It highlighted
the mimetic aspects of the Chinese
tradition. With comic subtlety the
characters   evoked    emotions
PEKING OPERA . . ."peek" into Chinese culture for Westerns
through physical gesture, facial ex
pression and vocal intonation. The
audience didn't need to know Mandarin to understand what was going on.
The second work. The Inn of the
Three-Cornered Intersection, exemplified traditional Peking Opera.
It was an amusing display of
choreographed acrobatics — an extended sword-fight between two
men in the dark. The sheer beauty
of the stylized movement, the
physical agility of the performers
and the breathtaking  near-misses
had audience members perched on
the edge of their seats.
In Autumn River an old boatman,
performed by Kong Xinyuan,
assisted a young woman across the
river. On the bare stage, with the
only prop being an oar, a boat on
the river was. instantly created by
the synchronized motions of the
two characters.
The evening reached its climax in
the final work, an extravaganza of
color and motion. The Water Flows
Over the Golden Hill is a Chinese
fairy tale, a fantasy world where
naval   battles   are  fought  among
shimmering waves of blue silk banners and groups of purple-clad fairy
generals sommersault above swirling green flags. The audience rose
instantaneously at the end.
One memory sticks in mind
above all else: the final tableau of
the cast in costume, standing on
stage applauding the audience. It
was a concrete illustration of what
China Month in Vancouver is all
about: cross-cultural exchange.
If you missed the Peking Opera
this time, make sure you see it next
time round. Let's hope it's not
another twenty years.
New Orchestra Workshop has different drum
By DANIEL MOON
It isn't easy to follow the beat of a
different drum. In the case of modern improvisational music it's often
difficult to even find a place to play.
New Orchestra Workshop was
founded two years ago to fill the
vacuum in Vancouver's experimental music scene and to give musicians a place to learn and play.
NOW moved into its present space
at 1616 West 3rd Avenue a year ago
and divides its energies between
workshops and public performances.
Four working units make up the
collective. There is the NOW Quintet which explores territory commonly referred to as avant-garde
jazz. The Contemporary String
Quartet sail their traditional string
instruments into seas far removed
from the well-charted waters of
Beethoven and Bach. Drawing
from established ethnic forms as
well as newer elements Druick, Ellis
and Phillips describe their efforts as
an information tree.
Then there is the mother ship,
the Cord Orchestra, a veritable
Noah's ark of instruments with t/vo
violas, two basses, two saxophones and two trumpets, not to
mention percussion and strings.
This orchestra setting gives everyone a crack at the challenges and
rewards of ensemble improvisation
on a large scale. Satellite partners
include well-known local names
such as Bob Murphy and Bob Bell.
Smilin' Buddha punks might be su--
prised to know that regulars in that
club, AKA, are also involved in the
workshop.
NOW members are not locked into their smaller units but freely
move to jam and exchange ideas.
"The collective is a pool of talent
that we can draw on to work out
ideas we have conceived," says
founding member Paul Cram. For
example if a musician writes a piece
for vibraphone, drums and violin he
can approach others in the workshop and arrange for a performance
of his composition.
The educational theories of Karl
Berger of Woodstock, New York
have heavily influenced the group.
He has conducted four public workshops here in Vancouver and many
NOW participants have travelled to
his east coast retreat.
Berger" s teaching method focuses on sharpening harmonic and
rhythmic awareness but his underlying objective is to awaken the student's sense of self. As a result of
improvisation and interrelation with
others the student can explore his
unique musical persona. The
lessons learned back east are later
put to use in the local setting.
"It involves more than developing musical competence," explains
Lyle Lansall-Ellis. "It includes the
larger aspect of being a member of
a social group and the responsibilities of teaching, financing and presenting live music. There are no
middle men."
The audience must learn to participate, says Cram. "Our music
isn't a product to be consumed. It is
a process in which both musician
and listener must take an active
part."
Vancouverites with an open ear
and an inquiring mind can explore
this unique musical frontier this
weekend. The first annual Creative
Music Festival kicks off tonight at 8
p.m. with the string quartet and the
NOW quintet. Saturday AKA, Bob
Bell and the Cord Orchestra share
the bill and Sunday night's concert
will feature Bob Murphy, Druick/-
Ellis and Victor Koncept. Tickets
are $3 a night and the performances
are at 1616 West 3rd Avenue at the
rear entrance.
NOW quintet gooses around
By DANIEL MOON
"Heads up," said Lyle Lansall-
Smith calling out the name of the
piece but it was just as much a succinct description of the music.
The New Orchestra Workshop
Quintet was performing last Friday
night in their headquarters on West
Third avenue. Ralph Eppel's trom
bone and Paul Cram's saxophone
mimicked geese in the park before
the three other musicians joined in
for a bit of convoluted ensemble
playing.
Suddenly there was only Lansall-
Smith's bowed bass and Paul
Plimley's piano filling the air. Drummer Greg Simpson wasn't far
behind and he soon jumped in kick
ing to form a powerful trio.
In the second composition Simpson had his cymbals sounding like
water splashing on a stone. He
switched to a more conventional
latin rhythm as the quintet sprang
to life but his salsa days with Rio
Bumba seemed to want to pull him
into a comfortable groove.
See PF 8
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16,1979 ■^■l                         aWW^m^mm
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Audience forgets cough
during VSO miracle
ARRAU . . . gulled audience with alertness
By KERRY REGIER
The Vancouver Symphony,
under Kazuyoshi Akiyama's baton,
astonished me a second time on
Monday night. The first was at the
last main series concert when they
played a Haydn concerto superbly.
This time it was another main series
concert in which they played a
Mozart divertimento equally
superbly.
The divertimento for strings K.
136 opened the program. This
lightweight work is not difficult
technically, but the VSO under
Akiyama has had trouble providing
the necessary gentleness. Monday
night was a near-miracle for the
VSO, with perfect poise and
balance being the key.
The orchestra's flawless ensemble enabled them to point up
delicious subtleties of dynamics and.
tonal shading, with an amiable
good humor pervading the whole
that this reviewer would never have
thought the conductor capable of.
So entranced by the music was
the audience that it forgot to cough
between movements.
Following this marvel was
Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto, with Claudio Arrau playing the
solo. Here again, the orchestra
glowed with a warmth that I have
rarely heard from them. Akiyama's
leading tended towards some
heavy-handed and crude rubato
with which he attempted to develop
tension in transition passages. The
effect was unfortunately more sluggish than intense.
Arrau's pianism might be likened
to the drifting of a gull on a sea-
wind. Tremendous strengths and
tensions are involved, and collapse
is always imminent but Arrau's
grace and intelligent alertness provided a perfect balance.
In the passages involving both
solo and orchestra, the pianist and
conductor seemed in perfect unison
in their approach. It was when
Akiyama had to go it alone, so to
Jackson masterminds spiv rock
By KATHRYN THURMAN
"People out for an evening
They have a real good time. . .
I made a stand for the music
I got the smile that says I'm here
to please."
It was no ordinary Joe whose
songs and smile stole the stage
Nov. 2 at the Commodore Ballroom.
It was Joe Jackson, the self-proclaimed mastermind of Spiv Rock
music, who dramatically opened an
extremely lively set with the title cut
from his debut album Look Sharp.
The repertoire relentlessly escalated, starting with the vengeful lyrics and pounding musicianship of
On Your Radio, through the reggae-like modern love ballad of Ger-
aldine and John, and the cynical
proclamation of Sunday Papers,
pouncing onto the sarcastically
humorous title cut of his second album, I'm The Man. And on and on!
Each song fitfully surpassed the
one before it.
Jackson is a tremendously energetic and appealing front man. His
ogling eyes, high forehead and
shredded haircut fearlessly framed
the manic mime movements of his
four modulating appendages. He
slithered, he jumped, he careened,
he bounced.
At one point he even half-ser-
iously attacked a fan who was grabbing for his microphone by lurching
at the guy's shirt collar, while verbally warning him that without a microphone he wouldn't be able to
sing.
Jackson continued this playfully
teasing banter with the audience
between and during many of the
songs, never missing a note nor a
step, always on cue. For one song,
he even prearranged to have members of the Yachts appear on stage
and dance a mess around.
The trio of musicians backing
Jackson swept through the songs
with incredible vitality and confidence. Graham Maby often highlighted his bass playing with uptempo riffs and lightning guitar
strokes. The brash sound of Gary
Sanford's guitar strumming sifted
through the songs more than any of
the other instruments. Dave
Houghton pounded out steady
backbone drumming throughout
the adventurous and excellent set
of new wave music.
Yachts, the opening act, hail
from Liverpool, England. The band
pursued an uneven but determined
mixture of thrashing and technique
that continually crossed between a
pop and a heavy metal sound reminiscent of many British bands of
the early '60s.
Lyricist Henry Priestman delighted the crowd with an energetic display of calisthenic antics in between
plucking at his keyboards and harmonizing on vocals.
Lead vocalist and guitarist Martin
Watson enhanced the snappy and
witty lyrics with a pleasingly pop-
oriented voice and uncluttered
phrasing.
Bob Bellis on drums (and vocals)
and Martin Dempsey on bass (and
vocals) inserted the pulsing fill-ins
that rounded out the band's raw yet
melodic tunes.
Despite a few jagged edges this
band is well worth watching.
speak,  that the clumsy moments
appeared.
After intermission, the orchestra
played Dvorak's too-rarely heard
Sixth Symphony. One of the
remarkable features of the VSO's
performance was the traces of
Bruckner I detected in the first
movement. Akiyama carefully
pointed up dynamic shadings and
noble themes characteristic of the
German composer, tantalizing
nuances dropped for the rest of the
lent tension to the following slow
movement, which dragged a bit.
In the scherzo the contrast between energetic outer sections and
the relaxed inner part was
marvellous, particularly in the transitions which seemed to grow
almost organically.
The breathless finale was taken
at a good fast pace, and led to an
exciting conclusion, a concert
which this reviewer hopes indicates
a new high standard for the Van-
symphony,  though this in a way     couver Symphony.
Johann Strauss gets
some toestapping
By KERRY REGIER
Echoes of a past age of elegance,
splendor and delicacy should have
been recalled Saturday night at the
Orpheum. Instead, the Johann
Strauss Ensemble of the Vienna
Symphony gave a concert that
tended to the soapily sentimental.
Despite the Ensemble's leaning
toward a common dance-band
sound, there was some fine music.
Strauss' Vienna Blood Waltz was
given an emphatic rhythm, de-dum-
de, rather than the usual dum-de-de
heard from amateur waltz bands.
This effect of the accent in the middle lent a real Viennese panache to
the waltz.
Sadly the Ensemble did not keep
up this level of bubbly energy. The
first half of the program, in fact,
was almost entirely devoted to a
pedantic and fussy historical tour,
which the program touted as "From
the Minuet to the Waltz," but was
only bad to worse.
After the intermission there were
a lot of dull slow polkas, waltzes,
and other paraphernalia. The
dullness was occasionally relieved
by a really rousing performance of
one of the familiar Johann Strauss
confections like Emperor Waltz,
and a jovial Fledermaus Overture.
, There were also a few surprises like
the pistol in the Hunting Polka, and
the ridiculous toy bird-whistle in
Joseph Strauss' Austrian Village
Swallows Waltz.
It was largely due to Strauss
himself that the music was dull.
This was a concert consisting of
music which was written to be
danced to, which implies large
numbers of slightly tipsy people
dancing, talking, making merry and
not listening to music at all. The
music merely set a background of
pleasant sounds and a rhythm to
dance to.
Very few of the pieces played
could stand up by themselves.
Those that could such as the
Emperor Waltz and Vienna Blood,
were delightful, but the rest of the
program was really a waste of time.
I felt a constant urge to ask the
lady next to me to dance; only rarely was my attention drawn to the
music itself.
And to top it all off, they never
played the Blue Danube. I still don't
know if I'm pleased or upset by
that.
JACKSON . . . sails through Commodore with Yachts
Friday, November 16,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 Midler puts bloom
back on The Rose
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The Rose is not a particularly
bright movie but it is better than the
current hogwash like Yanks and
When a Stranger Calls. Considering
the negative criticism that has
greeted it since its opening, it's a
pleasant surprise to find the film to
be highly entertaining and energetic
beyond initial expectation.
The Rose
Starring    Bette    Midler,    Alan
Bates and Frederic Forrest
Playing at the Capitol 6
The plot is thin and sketchy. A
rock-and-roll performer ("the
Rose") is commercially successful
but  personally troubled.   She has
fits of depression and temper tantrums, overworks and indulges excessively in drugs and booze.
Her manager, played by Alan
Bates, could care less about her.
She pleads with him for a vacation
but is ridiculed in return. A Texan
(Frederic Forrest) who has gone
AWOL comes to her rescue but only briefly. It's not long before she
slips back to her usual self-destructive behavior and alienates everyone.
Needless to say, the Rose meets
an inevitable end a la Janis Joplin.
But The Rose is not about the life
of Janis Joplin, nor is it about the
See PF 8
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Page Friday 4
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16, 1979 Skitzo shows Skitzoid personality
By DANIEL MOON
Scott Skitzo is a 15-year-old entrepreneur who runs a punk
publishing empire from his parents'
home. So far four issues of Skitzoid
have been shipped from the Richmond residence to selected record
stores in the Vancouver area.
"I was going through a glossy
book called Punk Rock which was
exploiting the music," said Skitzo
"And every second page had a
British fanzine. One of them said
'this whole issue was written during
P.E.' I thought that was pretty
good. It was spontaneous. I didn't
tell anyone I was putting it out."
A typical issue of Skitzoid contains a mad mixture of wit and insanity. The record reviews tend to
fall into the it sucks/it rules polarity
favored by the punkers. Many new
and unknown records are mentioned but readers would probably
benefit by being told more than to
buy them because they're good.
Skitzoid's Hit Parade is a lot more
fun. Apart from the local and
British hits, entries include "Randy
Rampage's clothes, underground
comix, sunglasses, beating up
cops, safety pins, cutting
ourselves, vomit and pulling Wimpy
off the stage." Sick, you say? What
did you expect from "the alternative to the alternative charts?"
When interviewing rock stars,
Scott  Skitzo's grade ten   naivety
can work for him or against him.
His interview with David M. of No
Fun reads like a watered-down
press release. The questions are so
bland and easy they might well
have been asked by David M.'s
mother. His chat with The Dils from
coast. Zippy Pinhead's comment on
being thrown out of school for kicking a teacher in the nuts captures a
reader's attention more than a
rhetorical question about disco to
David M.
Skitzoid's social commentary includes criticism of those who follow
trendy punk fashions: "There
shouldn't be a uniform for this new
rock wave, because uniforms are
fascist.    There   is   no   room   for
San Francisco is ten times more
pointed and probing.
They are asked about their
"authenticity as real punks," about
the situation with the police (Skitzo
uses the word "pigs") and the lack
of good songwriters on the west
fashion in the anti-society." Other
targets are the high price of im-
pored discs and groups who sell out
to the big record companies.
The most striking aspect of Skitzoid's distinctive layout is the artwork. "I tape it on," says Skitzo
when asked how he achieves the
magazine's collage effect.
Photographs of punk idols are juxtaposed with cut-up messages like
"The mechanical nose," "nazi
milk" and "farewell, plastic and
computerized world."
Headlines look like they were put
together by a berserk baby given a
Letraset sample. When Skitzo's
typewriter malfunctions he carries
on with felt pens, cut-up
newspaper headings, or sometimes
he just continues typing the letters
or the alphabet his disabled
machine can still reproduce.
Skitzo has somewhat loosened
his total control on the last issue.
Perhaps in answer to charges of
"There shouldn't be a uniform for this new rock wave, because uniforms
are fascist. There is no room for fashion in the anti-society. "
jr
the next one. I still owe money on
the first issue."
He has started to accept advertisements and the effect that sponsors   will   try  to   exert   upon   his
?
too many holds barred on you. The
only good political party is going to
be your own."
Questioned about his parents' attitude to his publication Skitzo
replies: "When I was growing up
they always encouraged me to be a
punk editor. I wanted to be a doctor
or a lawyer. I finally came to my
senses; this is the job for me." He
claims his dad likes punk music if it
resembles Buddy Holly and that his
mother likes disco.
Scott Skitzo's mom admits they
were surprised  when the project
freedom   remains   to   be
editoria
seen.
His immediate goal is to continue
publishing as usual. His long-term
"Getting up enough money is the biggest hassle in putting out the
magazine. I used to mow lawns and buy records a lot. I still owe money on
the first issue."
megalomania or to the cost of carrying the financial burden alone, he
has included two pages contributed
by friends.
Glenn Sniveling Pathetic Little
Wimp and Brian Bloodshed have
absorbed the printing (more exactly
xeroxing) costs and the savings are
passed on to the consumer. Skitzoid now costs ten cents less for a
newstand price of 35 cents.
"Getting up enough money is the
biggest hassle in putting out the
magazine," says Skitzo. "I used to
mow lawns and buy records a lot.
But as I was going through issues
two and three I was saving up for
goal is to buy out Rolling Stone.
The grade ten editor and
publisher doesn't know if he could
live under communism. "I can't live
under capitalism," he declares. But
when it is pointed out that his venture is a form of capitalism involving
capital, a product, distribution and
sales, he decides that: "I couldn't
live under communism. There are
their son had talked about actually
materialized. Recognizing that it is
an outlet for Scott's creativity, she
is more concerned with his
neglected schoolwork.
As she passes round coffee and
homemade cookies she makes a
mother's suggestion for the story:
"Why don't you take a picture of
Scott and his report card?"
Friday, November 16, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 5 rama
Codco fishing for
ghastly guffaws
By PETER MENYASZ
There's something fishy about
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre.
Codco, that is.
Newfoundland's answer to Monty Python is back in town with another irreverent look at the world
and Newfoundland.
WNOBS
Starring the Codco Five
At the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre
Until Dec. 10
Sometimes the performance tickles like the feathery tendrils of a
jellyfish. Sometimes it reeks of all-
pervasive Newfie cod and sometimes it just stinks.
Codco provides a laugh a minute
for most of the time, providing the
audience with a good $4.50 worth
of entertainment. And the licensing
of the VECC for Codco's run is
guaranteed to provide them a well-
lubricated and responsive audience.
But sometimes the crudity is
overwhelming. There is nothing innately funny about the use of the
words "fuck," "shit," "piss" and
"Jesus Christ." Their use in certain
contexts provides a humorous feeling, but their overuse becomes
numbing.
And the company's irreverent approach to death is funny, but not always. A relative cracking jokes and
faking a stroke at a wake is uproarious, but continued references to
"something black" running out of
the dead man's eyes and mouth are
not.
Particularly engrossing is a dedication of the VECC as a cabaret by
a "gorgeous hunk of priest-flesh."
It's not often a cabaret is dedicated
by a priest. And not often is a cabaret dedicated with stories about
dying alcoholics and drunken, practical-joking sexual organs.
See PF 8
The Oasis in a Desert of
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and Selection,
National Defence Headquarters.
Ottawa, Ontario.   K1A 0K2
OR
Commanding Officer
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre
547 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3H6
P<ige Friday 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16, 1979 The Old Beekeeper
The old bee-keeper sat in a wide
wicker-chair in front of his bees.
They always set him there. He
couldn't get up without help
anymore. He couldn't walk
anymore. He waited for the day
when he would rise from the
wicker-chair, high above the house
and the blooming linden in which
the bees hummed; higher than the
queen bees climb on warm spring
days.
Great, heavy clouds drew across
the broad valley below him and
threw dark shadows on the fields
and over the meadows. He was
alone with his grandchild.
A pheasant croaked nearby.
"What kind of an animal is that?"
asked the little one.
"A pheasant."
"Why is his voice so ugly?"
"His voice isn't ugly, we just
don't understand his language."
"Do you understand what the
bees say?"
"Hardly."
The old bee-keeper looked down
into the broad valley.
"What do you see down there?"
"It is getting dark, a
thunderstorm will come."
"If Mama and Papa don't come
home before them, you'll have to
stay sitting here and will get wet.
I'm still too small, I can't guide
you."
The old bee-keeper waited.
"How old are you anyway?"
"Eighty-four."
"Is that very old?"
"That is very old."
"Will the bees also become
eighty-four years old?"
"No."
"When will the bees die?"
"At most the bees will reach five
years of age."
"Then they'll die when they're as
old as I am. Why do they die so
young?"
"The bees are old at five years of
age."
"Is a bee of five in reality already
eighty-four years old?"
"Maybe even older."
"And when is a bee as old as I
am?"
"After a few days."
The little one jumped around his
grandfather and shouted: "I'm only
a few days old. I'm still very young.
I'm a little bee, and you're an old
bee that can't fly anymore."
The circles which the boy danced
around the wicker-chair became
ever larger.
"Don't get too close to the
bees!"
"I'm not afraid! I'm the young
bee, you're the old bee!"
"The bees can sting you. Come
to me!"
"Yes, now the* young bee flies
back to the old bee." When the little one was by his grandfather
again, he stood for a short while
and listened.
"Do you hear how the linden
sings?"
"That is not the linden, those are
the bees."
"Do the bees sting the linden?"
"Oh no, they're only getting the
honey out of the flowers."
"Why do they sting people
then?"
"The bees only sting people
when they're afraid."
"Are they afraid of me?"
"Yes, they don't know you yet."
"Do they know you?"
"Of course they know me."
"But at one time they didn't
know you either. Did they sting you
then?"
"Oh yes, at first they stung me
often."
"And   they   never   stung   the
Written by Peter Daniel Wolf-
kind, Mondnacht Erzahlungen,
Europa Verlag Wien, 1972.
Translated by Monika Schmidtke.
linden? Not even at first?"
"No, bees sting neither flowers
nor trees."
"How old is the linden? Is it
eighty-four years old too?"
"The linden is older."
"How old?"
"Many hundreds of years."
"Will you also be as old as the
linden?"
"No. A human being never
becomes as old as a linden."
"Then I won't become as old as
the linden either?"
"Of course not."
"How old will I become?"
"No one knows how old he will
become."
The boy looked towards the sky
where a heavy, dark cloud passed
by.
"Do you see the big cloud
there?"
"Yes."
"When must this cloud die?"
"When it falls to the earth."
"But clouds don't fall to the
earth?"
"Yes, when it rains, when it hails
and when it snows."
"Then there are many dead
clouds in every brook and every
river. Then every puddle is a dead
cloud. Then we drink dead clouds."
"Yes. We eat dead leaves, dead
animals, and we drink dead
clouds."
"Do we also eat dead bees?"
"Oh no, we don't eat the bees,
but their honey."
The grandchild left the grandfather alone again and played.
"Get away from those bees!"
The warnings and gestures of the
old bee-keeper were uncertain.
"Does it hurt when a bee
stings?"
"It hurts very much."
"Can a bee sting often?"
"No, a bee can sting only once.
When a bee has stung, it must die."
"Must I also die if a bee stings
me?"
"No, not you."
The boy went to the rosebed that
bordered the meadow.
"Why are so many blossoms
missing from the roses? Who's torn
them off?"
The little one tore a rose off.
"Let the rose live!"
"Its thorn pricked me. If it pricks,
it must die like a bee."
He brought the torn-off rose to
his grandfather.
"How old was the rose?"
"Only a few hours perhaps."
"Then it was younger than I am."
"Maybe."
It became dark in the broad
valley. Thunder could be heard in
the distance.
"Why is it becoming so gloomy
now?"
"A thunder-storm is coming."
"Will the clouds die again?"
"Yes."
"How old will the clouds
become?"
"I don't know."
"Will we grow older than the
clouds?"
"Yes, they'll die very soon.
"If Mama and Papa don't come
soon, the dead clouds will fall on
us, and we'll be completely wet.
Will we be dead then too?"
"No."
"Will the bees also get wet?"
"No, they don't get wet. They fly
into their house beforehand."
"Even the old bees?"
"All bees."
"Are there bees that can't fly
anymore?"
"No, if a bee can't fly anymore, it
must die."
"But you can't fly into your
house anymore."
"No."
"Can I fly into my house?"
"You can fly faster than the
bees."
"But I'll stay with you."
"No, no you must go into the
house."
"The bees aren't in their house
yet either."
"The bees know exactly when
they must go into their house."
The first drops fell. The bees still
hummed in the linden.
"Don't you hear that the bees are
still in the linden! And it is already
raining."
"They'll go into the house at the
right time. You go into the house
now too. I'll wait here."
"I'd like to wait with you."
"You'll catch a cold."
"You could catch a cold too."
"I am already old."
"I'm old too. If I were a bee, I'd
have to die already."
In his hands the old bee-keeper
held the large, yellow rose which
the boy had torn off. The boy stood
next to his grandfather. He looked
towards the sky. "Now many will
die. Those, those, those, those."
With his small hand he pointed to
the dark clouds. "Even the bees will
die if they don't stay in their
house."
"Don't worry about it!"
"But you can see that the/re still
flying towards the linden. Tell them
that they should stay in their
house."
"They don't understand our
language."
"Bees, go into your house! Bees,
stay in your house! The clouds will
die! Stay in your house, bees! If you
don't stay in your house, you'll
have to die too!"
The little one ran to the bee-
house.
"Stay here!"
He didn't hear his grandfather.
He'd already stopped a flight-hole
of the bee-house with his little hand
and called: "Stay in your house or
you'll have to die!"
"Get away! Get away! They'll
sting you!"
The grandfather tried to rise. The
large yellow rose fell into the grass.
Loudly buzzing a dark cloud of
bees descended on the boy.
"Leave me, you'll have to die if
you sting me!"
Then he fell to the ground.
It began to rain. After a time it
grew quiet in the linden. The rain
washed the bees out of the little
one's face and off of his hands.
Through his hair flowed many small
rivulets. Later the old bee-keeper
saw a great rainbow that arched
over the valley.
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
Free sex
advice.
That's right. When you
visit FT. Burger & Sons
we'll advise you of your
sex. Free of charge! Add this
free advice to our 15 classic
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and you've got one heck
of a crazy little restaurant, sir
or madam. 2966 W 4th Ave.
by Bays water.
Open daily from 11:30a.m.
4,-^Tj^r **    »•
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Our brewmaster's finest achievement
Friday, November 16, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 New Orchestra jazzes
up instrumental tunes
From PF 2
Plimley's vibraphone playing, which
sounds and even looks like a
highway in an earthquake, made
sure there were no complacent corners to curl up in. Simpson
responded and tore up his corner of
the stage.
Stravinsky's Rite of Spring came
to mind as the quintet opened up
the second set with a dark, African
journey that drove deep into the
heart of animal anguish. The audience was too stunned to applaud
and could only answer with dead
silence and knowing smiles.
True to the spirit of the moment a
telephone call in the background
was imitated and integrated into the
music. Lansall-Smith provided a
visually dramatic moment as his
bass countered an attack by Eppel,
Cram and Plimley on french horn,
saxophone and bass clarinet. One
could almost smell ozone in the air
after Cram's scorching sax solo.
Several    shorter    pieces   were
among the highlights of the evening, featuring bass and drums playing a game of hide and seek. When
violinist Karen Oliver sat in on the
session she engaged in a hop, skip
and jump joust with Simpson's percussion that ended in an exclamation so abrupt that both audience
and musicians were taken by complete surprise.
The quintet demonstrated its versatility by moving easily from a light
cavalry charge to an exploration of
resonance by tapping the sides of
their instruments as though to draw
out the spirits living within. When
Plimley rubbed the surfaces of his
piano one got the eerie feeling that
he was erasing sound rather than
creating it.
The NOW quintet has come a
long way from their first performance here on campus in the Music
Building recital hall back in March
1978. Their concert Friday night in
their workshop space was an astounding suggestion of how much
farther they intend to go.
New found landers
coddle audience
From PF 6
Codco members Cathy Jones,
Tommy Sexton, Mary Walsh and
Andy Jones skim through the skits
like the Enterprise in hyper-drive.
And they take their audience on
an intergalactic excursion in a modified cultural centre.
Tuesday's opening night audience laughed their guts out. They
made  silly  balloon   noises   (you'll
have to see the performance to understand the significance of the balloons) and guzzled beer after beer.
Go to Newfoundland and see the
herring chokers as they really are.
But if you can't afford the trip,
see Codco and see hew Newfoundland surreally is.
Performances are at 8:30 p.m.
(that's 9 p.m. in Newfoundland).
Cod, they're funny.
A Rose by any
other name sweet
From PF 4
music of the sixties or counterculture. The only reference to the
turbulent decade is a radio
newscast about the Vietnam war.
The concert scenes are very well
executed. It's a shame that the rest
of the film is not up to the same
technical level. Director Matk
Rydell does his best although he
has to deal with a hollow script by
Bill Kerby and Bo Goldman.
Because The Rose is solely intended to showcase Bette Midler's
obvious talents, the rest of the cast
does not have a chance to display
their skills. Alan Bates stands guilty
of overacting. Frederic Forrest is
appealing but his role is so limited
that he surfaces only periodically.
The stage is left to Midler and she
makes the most of it. She is truly a
fantastic performer. In The Rose
she makes her acting debut and is
very good as the title character.
She is even better than Barbara
Streisand was in the pretentious
and morbid A Star is Born.
If you like Bette Midler, you'll
love The Rose. Watching her belt
out "When a Man Loves a
Woman" is such a joy that this
reviewer sat through twenty
minutes of the next showing of the
film just to catch Midler deliver the
number in her own unique, off-key
and off-beat manner.
Other feasts include "Midnight in
Memphis" and "Stay With Me
Baby."
Worth seeing.
DENISON MINES
LIMITED
Summer Employment Opportunities
exist in 1980 for
GEOLOGY STUDENTS
Interested in Coal Exploration in
B.C. and Alberta.
See your Geology Office for details.
Deadline for applications is
NOVEMBER 23
* (lust another empty space)
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Tonight's late movie: last Tango in
Pango-Pango, (comedy-musical,
1979). Absent-minded pathology
professor loses wife on overseas
trip, and wacky police inspector
makes startling discovery. Orson
Bean, Patty Duke, TV series
pilot.**
SALE
eacner
records^ltd
New Location — 1040 Davie St.
Group
grope.
After the game, after the
. exam, after anything...
the group gropes better
at I?J. Burger & Sons. Home
of 15 classic burgers. And
other great stuff. 2966 W 4th
Ave. by Bayswater. Open
daily from 11:30a.m.
Void where prohibited by law.
CBS	
DREAM POLICE-Cheap
Trick $3.99
LIVE AT BUDOKAN-Cheap
Trick $3.99
CHICAGO 13 $3.99
BORN TO BE ALIVE-Patrick
Hernandez $3.99
HYDRA-Toto $4.99
OFF THE WALL-Michael
Jackson $4.99
FLASH & THE PAN $4.99
rWARNER/ELECTRA/ATLANTIC
TUSK-Fleetwood Mac $8.99
CARS-Cars $3.99
HERE COMES THAT SOUND
AGAIN-Love Deluxe $4.99
RICKI LEE JONES $3.99
FEAR OF MUSIC-Talking
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REPEAT WHEN NECESSARY
— Dave Edmunds $4.99
PRIORITY —Pointer Sisters
   $4.99 J
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CORNERSTONE-Styx
BREAKFAST IN
AMERICA —Supertramp
OUTLANDOS D'AMOUR
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REGATTA DE BLANC- Police
STEPPIN' OUT-Joan
Armatrading
PART OF THE GAME-Pablo
Cruise
$4.99
per disc
i-CAPITOL-
FIRST UNDER THE
WIRE —Little River Band
ESCAPE FROM DOMINATION—Moon Martin
STREET MACHINE-Sammy
Hagar
COME TO ME-France Joli
SQUEEZING OUT
SPARKS-Graham Parker
EVE —Alan Parsons Project
LOW BUDGET-Kinks
IN THE HEAT OF
THE NIGHT-Pat Benatar
$4.99
per disc
-POLYGRAM	
GREATEST HITS, Vol. 1&2
— Donna Summer $8.99
LIVE & SLEAZY-Village
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GREATEST-Bee Gees $8.99
ARE YOU READY (Live)-
Atlanta Rhythm Section
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SUZI & OTHER 4 LETTER
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FINE ART OF
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Boomtown Rats $4.99
COMMUNIQUE-DireStraits
$3.99
Quantities limited on some sale items. Sales ends Sunday at 5 p.m. Sale items
also available at 4553 Kingsway.
Both Peaches Records Locations Open Sunday 1-5
DO YOU EVER WANT TO
RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS?
You think you've got that entrepreneurial flair, the desire to really try something
on your own. Someday you want financial independence. You want to try it out and
see if it's for you or not. But, well, next year will always be a better year. This year
you've got some heavy commitments... right? Besides it's kind of risky isn't it? Well,
sort of — but that's what College Pro is all about:
1) student days are the best time to try something on your own — your
commitments will only get heavier later on in life.
2) running a College Pro outlet is done via a finely tuned System. The System
brings down the risks in many of the variables, e.g. marketing, estimating, legal,
production, accounting, etc. to low levels and leaves only one main determining
variable - YOU!
But it's November, why look now for a summer "job"?
We look now for two reasons:
1) The real go-getters can plan this far ahead when they see an opportunity.
2) It's no easy "job." We start your training in January.
CAN YOU DO IT? YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO FIND OUT.
PRESENTATION:
Speaker: Greig Clark — 1979 "Canadian Entrepreneur of
the Year" (chosen by CEDC and Financial Post)
Film: College Pro Presents — The Manager (a day in
the life of a student entrepreneur)
Place: Room 323, Henry Angus
Date: Monday, Nov. 26
Time: 12:30
Last year it worked very well for 40 different managers across Canada who averaged
$7,000 - $10,000 each. MORE INFORMATION AT YOUR CAMPUS PLACEMENT
CENTRE.
Page Friday 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16,1979 Ian Gomm comes to the SUB
ballroom on Sunday, Nov. 1, 8
p.m. and brings his brand of stylized British pop music with him.
Tickets are $4.99 and can be purchased in the AMS Student Union
office.
Paul Horn and his quintet are at
the Soft Rock Cafe Nov. 16, 17
and 18 at 9:30 and 11:30 p.m. Reservations 734-2822.
The fifth annual Hot Jazz Festival takes place next weekend, Nov.
23 and 24. Six local bands and three
from Seattle will play during the
festival. Three sessions will take
place at three locations: Hot Jazz,
36 E. Broadway, Peretz Hall, 41st
and Cambie and Biltmore Hotel,
J2th and Kingsway. Tickets available in advance at $5 per session or
$10 for all. Phone 734-8311.
GOMM
with the wind
The Vancouver Society for
Early Music presents Janet See on
baroque flute, Nan Mackie on viola
da gamba and Doreen Oke on harpsichord at the Surrey Arts Centre
on Nov. 18 at 3 p.m. The three west
coast musicians will play music
written before 1800 from the
rococo, baroque, renaissance and
medieval periods on reproductions
of original 18th century instruments.
The Grinning Theatre Dragon
Co. returns to Vancouver after a
two-year absence to stage Bloodthirsty Love, a new wave "musi-
kal" with music by Vancouver's
own, the Undead. Opening Saturday, Nov. 17 at the Actors Workshop, 280 E. Cordova, it runs until
Dec. 1. Tickets $3 at Quintessence
Records.
Xmasp-p
p-parties.
Unfortunately the bozo
who wrote the headline
had a terrible stutter. But
never-the-less, his info was
correct. For a great and
inexpensive Xmas ba^-h head
to l'lM'HJ. Burger.    , ns.
15 classic burgers. Anc* other
great stufffff. 2966 \V. 4th Ave.
bv Bavsvvater. Open dailv
from 11:30 a.m. Call 734-8616.
This week at the
Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd.:
Sunday, Nov. 18:
9:00 a.m.    Worship
10:00 a.m.     Bible Study
11:00 a.m.    Worship
7:30 p.m.    Evening Prayer,
Ralph Donnally.V.S.T. guest
preacher
Tuesday. Nov. 20:
6:00 p.m.    Lutheran Student
Movement supper
9:00 p.m.    Vespers
Thursday, Nov. 22:
12:30 p.m.    "Faith, Science and the
Future,' with Hugh Dempster, Dept.
of Computer Science
S#»»^    J&ySSte.
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Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
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gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
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Open 5 P.M. Every Day
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A variety of great dishes including    Moussaka,    Kalamari
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Mon- Thurs 4 pm-2:30 am
Fri & Sat 4 pm-3:30 am A
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PARKING AT REAR $«-5491
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.Friday, November1(5,. 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16,1979
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headphones, has perfected the electret principal. Sound
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all exceed competively headphones costing much more
than the SR-44.
PLAY IT
$199
^ ^X ^   5000
IMPULSE NOISE REDUCTION
SYSTEM
Ever since the invention of the recorded disc, annoying chrks and
pops' caused by scratches, static, and other imperfections have
consistently disturbed the listening pleasure of music lovers Now SAE
introduces the unique model 5000, an Impulse Noise Reauction System
which eliminates those unwanted sounds with no adverse effect on the
quality of the recorded material
PLAY IT
FOR
229
95
36087 LABOUR OF LUST
— Nick Lowe
RECORDS
TAPES $4.99      -p
36101 FOOL AROUND -
Rachel Sweet
RACHEL SWEET
FOOL AROUND
including:
I Go To Piecea/8-A-B-Y/Sad Song
Stranger In The House/Who Does Lisa i
lt   TAPES $4.99
LENE LOVICH
STATELESS
including:
Home/Lucky Number/Say When
Writing On The Wall/I Think We're Alone Now
36102    STATELESS    -
Lene Lovich
RECORDS   *V
$4.49 }
TAPES $4.99     J*
36104 DO  IT YOURSELF
— Ian Dury
IAN DURY
& the BLOCKHEADS
DO IT YOURSELF
including:
Inbetweenies/Oon't Ask Me/Waiting For Yo
Uneasy Sunny Day Hotsy Totsy/Mis

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