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Array FEBRUARY 10,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXIX
TITTIES INYO FACE SINCE 1918
STUDENT COURT
Yet more mediation ahead:
AMS brings back Student
Court.
THE HATCH
The Art Gallery has
undergone a name change of
another avian variety.
LAST WORDS
Ubyssey editors talk about all the
different bird puns the AMS can
make.
P4 P6 P8
UPCOMING T-BIRDS GAMES And an explanation of why you should watch them.    P9
An island paradise is a ferry ride away, but what
do you do when you get there? // Page 2
HUES
IMMMI
THURSDAY ' 12
ODYSSEY TO THE SACRED HEADWATERS
12:00-2:00 P.M. @ UBC'S OLD AUDITORIUM
Anthropology prof Wade Davis describes the natural beauty ofthe Sacred
Headwaters in Northern B.C. and discusses the threats it faces from industry
and the response from First Nations and other communities. Free
THURSDAY '12
Feb 6 to 14
Event listings
prideubc.com
BEYOND BINARIES ▼
1:00 P.M. @ DODSON ROOM, 1KB LEARNING CENTRE
As part of Outweek, Pride UBC is hosting an interactive discussion of gender
diversity and trans issues. Share and listen to personal experiences and
watch topical films. Free
THURSDAY ' 12
AN EVENING WITH ELIZABETH MAY
7:00 - 9:00 P.M. @ 6030 CHANCELLOR BOULEVARD
Federal Green Party leader and Member of Parliament Elizabeth May will be
giving a lecture at this Vancouver School of Theology event. Learn about and
discuss her platform and environmental issues at this free talk.
ON
THE
COVER
This was the last photo this camera ever took. It had nothing to do
with the fact that it's a brewery...
- Photo Mackenzie Walker
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*>-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                 FEBRUARY 10, 2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXXIX
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
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Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
3en Cook. Bill Situ
Twitter: ©ubyssey
JovanaVranic +
Veronika Bondarenko
LEGAL
news@ubyssey.cs
The Ubyssey is the officia
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tions Society
ters received after this point
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to edit submissions for length
the Impact of the ad.
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONEONONE1
John Zollars is a drummer in the UBC Marching Band.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
John Zollars marches to the beat of his own drum
Olivia Law
Senior staffwriter
The UBC marching band is an
element of life on campus that is
familiar to most students. Playing
at least one game each week, and
practicing twice weekly, John
Zollars is an integral part of this
tradition. Beginning two years
ago as the bass drummer ofthe
band, Zollars is now the snare
drum player and is critical in
keeping the players and marchers
on track.
A fourth-year anthropology
major, Zollars had zero marching
band practice prior to UBC, even
though he hails from the States,
the marching band centre ofthe
world. "You kind of develop a
fondness over time," said Zollars
on the 'Hail UBC anthem and
rhythmic drum cadences. "It's a
finely oiled machine when you
get to that point."
When there's no other
instruments playing,
it's just us, and we
have to keep playing
in order to keep
everyone in rhythm;
as a drummer you
constantly have to be
alert."
John Zollars
Fourth-year anthropology major
and marching band drummer
Evidently a drummer to the
heart and soul, Zollars taps
out rhythms at different points
throughout conversation —
whether conversing about the
music or otherwise. As part ofthe
percussion section, keeping to the
beat is his key role in the band.
"It's more difficult — not to
belittle any other instruments —
if you're percussion because, for
one, our equipment is just heavier," said Zollars. "Also, you've
probably heard it: when there's
no other instruments playing,
it's just us, and we have to keep
playing in order to keep everyone
in rhythm; as a drummer you
constantly have to be alert."
Usually on the way
back when we're
walking we'll all goof
around — I came up
with a thing where if
everyone is dragging,
I'll stop, and we'll yell
Hammer Time' and
everyone just plays
'Can't Touch This,'
which is really fun."
At least five times each semester, the marching band make
their way down to the Thunderbird Arena, playing 'Hail UBC
and other crowd-revving themes
before varsity games.
"It's fun," promised Zollars.
"Usually on the way back when
we're walking we'll all goof
around — I came up with a thing
where if everyone is dragging,
I'll stop, and we'll yell 'Hammer
Time' and everyone just plays
'Can't Touch This,' which is
really fun."
With up to around 30 people
at each practice and game,
there's a great camaraderie
amongst the group, which is
one ofthe reasons Zollars keeps
returning year after year. With
games like the recent Winter
Classic, the band are encouraged by the huge turnouts.
"We love that kind of atmosphere, it really motivates us to
play. There's definitely an energy
we feed off and we've been
thanked a couple times from
coaches," said Zollars on the
comradeship between UBC Athletics and the band. "Everyone's
benefitting."
We're still fairly new,
so I think we all kind
of recognize that we've
rejuvenated what
used to be there, and
athletics is definitely
hoping we can keep it
going."
When asked about the rehearsal procedures for such a prominent band (in stature and volume)
Zollars recounts many occasions
where he has been asked to play
quieter or move rooms. "One time
we were scheduled in a room in
the SUB, and unbeknownst to
us, we were right next to a yoga
class," remembered Zollars. "We
had to drum on chairs and things
that wouldn't reverberate a lot of
sound."
Another time during finals,
members ofthe band were
practicing outside the SUB, and
received noise complaints from
studiers in 1KB. "It's one of those
things where you don't know how
loud you're being until everyone
else tells you."
Marching band isn't something
Zollars saw himself partaking
in when he joined UBC as a first
year. But being involved with the
band is infectious, and Zollars is
keen to keep building the profile
year on year.
"We're still fairly new, so I
think we all kind of recognize
that we've rejuvenated what
used to be there, and athletics is
definitely hoping we can keep it
going." Xi
Know
somebody
interesting?
Do you have a brilliant prof or a fascinating friend at UBC? Send an email to
aerhardt@ubyssey.ca with some contact info and reasons why you think they
would be a good candidate to be profiled in The Ubyssey. // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
UARY 10, 20
AMS»
Student court for conflict mediation to be reinstated
The AMS student court was first started in the mid 1970s.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The AMS plans to bring back
their student court in the
upcoming weeks.
The student court, which has
been around since the mid-1970s
but has not been filled since
2009, aims to bring together
a diverse group of students to
mediate disputes and resolve
interpersonal issues between
students, clubs and AMS mem
bers and make suggestions on
the position that the AMS should
take in specific instances.
This was also before the
AMS instated an official om-
budsperson position for conflict
management and resolution.
The AMS is still in the process
of figuring out how the two will
work alongside each other.
In June, the AMS Council
decided to bring back the original
student court structure to work
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
alongside the current ombud-
sperson but did not act upon it until
recently when they announced that
they would be posting the positions
for the court at the February 4
council meeting.
AMS President Tanner Bokor
said that since the student court
was never officially dissolved,
council felt that it was necessary
to continue filling it each year.
"Student Court is to be a
standing body in the AMS By
laws, and should have been called
sooner. We're now just following the necessary processes to
comply with our bylaws as set by
students, and that process took
time," said Bokor.
The AMS will hire several students to serve as judges at the court
and be called in on a per-case basis
when mediation is requested. The
rest ofthe court will be selected
among current UBC students.
Accordingto Bokor, the idea
behind student court was to have
a representative group of students
who can critically and objectively
examine situations that may come
up among students and will require
a response from the AMS.
"[The court] can objectively take
a look at a circumstance and report
to Council on how they would recommend following that, so that's
really where their function lies
now," said Bokor.
At the same time, Bokor stressed
that while the student court will
serve as advisors to the society,
they will not have the power
to mandate specific actions or
decisions. AMS Council would
still need to vote whether to act
upon the recommendations ofthe
student court.
"If decisions would break our
code or by-laws or anything there
or even the law, then it would be
the responsibility ofthe directors
to say 'Nope, we can't go for this,'"
said Bokor. "But it depends on the
circumstance because we really do
view student court as that neutral
third party." Xi
ACADEMICS»
Policy that restricts syllabi changes a priority for VP Academic
Mateo Ospina
Senior StaffWriter
The first lecture of every class
usually starts with the introduction
of a syllabus, but there is no official
policy that requires professors to
stick with it for the rest ofthe term.
While professors tend to follow
the syllabi they hand out at the
beginning ofthe course more often
than not, the lack of official university regulation on the subject is an
issue that AMS VP Academic Anne
Kessler hopes to tackle.
Currently, the group in charge of
academic regulations, the UBC Senate, requires professors to include
information detailing a description
ofthe course structure, operation of
the course, prerequisites, statement of learning objectives, a mark
breakdown, a course schedule and a
description ofthe grading system in
their curriculum guide. Professors
are only recommended to include
information on academic integrity.
Kessler's desire for a syllabi
policy comes from a combination of
her personal experience observing
friends who saw professors make
larger curriculum changes in the
middle ofthe term, and her communication with peers from other
universities that already have syllabi
policies in place.
"A syllabus should be a contract
between a professor and a student
about what the class is going to look
like," said Kessler.
Commerce student Lauren
Telford described an incident when
her oral communication professor
assigned weekly journal entries
that would be due at the end ofthe
term for 15 per cent ofthe grade.
One week before the due date, the
assignment was changed to a reflective essay on the journal entries.
Although this incident was
eventually resolved, Telford believes
occurrences like it are a sign ofthe
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UBC currently has no policy governing syllabi procedures.
weaknesses of UBC not having an
official syllabus policy.
"Just like a budget lays out our
money, a syllabus lays out our time
— and once approved shouldn't be
changed," said Telford. "I don't
want to do more work so a paid
professor can suddenly decide that
they want to do less."
Other students feel that
pre-structured syllabi restrict professors from adapting to the needs
of their class. First-year Sauder
student Amy Wu had a professor
change the pace of a class dramatically in order to keep up with the
schedule ofthe syllabus.
"The speed-up caused a lot of
people to drop behind," said Wu.
Kessler believes that uncertainty in the management of a
course negatively affects student
success. She is currently holding
discussions with other university officials about timelines and
agreements for a new syllabi policy
she hopes to put in place in the
next few months.
Some of these plans include a
requirement for professors to put up
syllabi two weeks prior to the beginning of a class. This would allow students to have a better understanding
ofthe expectations and work level
of a class before actually showing up
on the first day.
The syllabus for each course
would also be posted alongside
the short blurbs that are currently
listed as information about classes
on the SSC.
"We joke about the 140 characters that are on the student service
centre," said Kessler.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Kessler also hopes to include
mental health resources on syllabi,
including resources that will help
students who are struggling to keep
up with class work or are overburdened by stress. Reinforcing information about academic misconduct
and plagiarism will be another one
of her focus points.
Kessler is aware of how these
extra requirements will affect
professors and hopes that the
discussions she is hosting over the
next few months will allow her
to make a policy that reflects the
needs ofthe students while being
mindful ofthe work professors
will need to put into it.
"We definitely require a lot
more from professors," said
Kessler. "We don't want to add an
extra burden." Xi
SOCIOLOGY »
UBC-O to offer
course on
soccer superstar
Cristiano Ronaldo
=HOTOJANSOLO/FLICKR
UBC-O will be offering its course on Cristiano
Ronaldo under the department of sociology.
Kelley Lin
Senior StaffWriter
UBC Okanagan is offering a
whole course on Portuguese soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo.
Luis Aguiar, associate professor of sociology at UBC Okanagan's Irving K. Barber School
of Arts and Sciences, has created
a fourth-year course focusing
on the sociology ofthe famous
soccer player.
"I'm Portuguese so I was curious
about Ronaldo and Ronaldo's sort
of representation in Portugal itself,"
said Aguiar. "Ronaldo has the
most visibility of any ofthe soccer
players and probably any other
athlete in the globe, so that makes it
interesting to investigate why [and]
what he means for Portuguese
communities, not only in Portugal,
but [also] outside Portugal."
Like many other courses, this
one currently consists of lectures,
student discussions and required
readings, but Aguiar also hopes to
be able to bring in guest speakers
to expand the course in the future.
Accordingto Aguiar, the
purpose of the course is not to
talk about Ronaldo's soccer goals,
magazine features or clothing
line, but to discuss the social,
cultural and psychological subjects that his fame can provoke in
the classroom.
"It's not really about the skills
and abilities of Ronaldo on the soccer field," said Aguiar. "In general,
we talk about Ronaldo, but we also
talk about issues [such as] race
and the early commodification
of children into the professional
ranks of athletes, so students get
pretty riled up about that kind of
discussion and information."
In fact, students currently
enrolled in the course this term
were not even aware that the
sociology course was focused on
Ronaldo when they registered
because of technical issues with
the course registration website.
Accordingto Aguiar, he hasn't
yet decided exactly how the
course will develop in the future,
but he hopes to teach it again.
Potential plans include the possibility of implementing studying
abroad into the course, as well
as trying to reach those who are
close to Ronaldo, or even Ronaldo himself to be potential guest
speakers in the classroom.
"This was one of those 'what
if kind of moments of inspiration," said Aguiar. "My focus
beyond him is to explore a bit
about how he's positioned with
Portugal and touch upon Portuguese contemporary society and
culture, so this was a good thing
for me to do." Xi NEWS    I   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2015
HEALTH »
Eating disorders: dietician talks triggers, signs and resources
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
According to UBC dietician Kara Vogt, stress can be a significantfactor in developing an eating disorder.
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
Though there aren't many known
causes of eating disorders, it is
certain that stress can be a significant factor for developing one.
Accordingto clinical instructor and head of UBC's dietetics
program, Kara Vogt, students
with tendencies towards unhealthy eating habits can be at
risk for developing an eating
disorder during their studies.
"Student life is really busy and
stressful, and it's a big period of
transition in life, so it can leave
people vulnerable to struggling
with their eating," she said.
It can be difficult to identify
an eating disorder as a student,
according to Vogt. But despite
not having an official diagnosis,
it is crucial to keep an eye out for
"unhealthy relationship^] with
food."
For students who notice obsessions with their food intake, such
as compulsive calorie counting, restrictive dieting, regular
binge eating or just a general
need to have constant control
over their eating, Vogt suggests
there may be a form of eating
disorder present.
The diagnoses of eating
disorders are categorized into
three broad categories: anorexia
nervosa, bulimia nervosa and the
catch-all category of eating disorders not otherwise specified.
Despite this classification, however, individuals can experience
features of multiple categories of
the illness.
"I think that's something that
not everyone realizes — those
stigmas around diagnoses,"
said Vogt. "People can still be
suffering with a spectrum of
disordered eating, even if they
don't have those official labels
diagnosed by a physician."
Another thing to look out for
as a sign of risk for disordered
eating is changes in mood, such
as irritability, anxiousness and
social withdrawal. Accordingto
Vogt, the way we deal with our
emotions can greatly affect our
relationships with food.
"Eating disorders are not always
about food — I know that sounds a
bit funny," she said. "Some warning signs for someone who might
be struggling is if they're having a
difficult time coping with stress or
emotions ... controlling their food
intake might be one way of managing [this]."
Of course, many of these
emotional changes can come as a
response to triggers in everyday
life. Vogt pointed out academics, social pressures, self-realization and media influences
as some ofthe major triggers
affecting students.
If students are noticing signs
of disordered eating, Vogt recommended drop-ins to the UBC
Student Health or Counselling
Services, where they can receive
referrals to treatment programs.
"They're a great first stop,"
she said.
However, if students are looking for more immediate information on disordered eating and its
treatment, Vogt suggests visiting
the Kelty Mental Health or Looking Glass Foundation websites.
Kelty Mental Health offers
many online resources, and information on how to get referred
for any ofthe eating disorders
programs in B.C. The non-profit
Looking Glass Foundation provides support groups and further
information online.
Sending links to online resources like these can also be helpful
in communicating concerns
students may have about their
friends' eating habits. Gentle
approaches to talking about
disordered eating — like using "I"
statements — work much better
than accusatory or confrontational tactics, said Vogt.
According to Vogt, the most
important step in identifying and
tackling disordered eating is the
process of self-reflection.
"When you notice you may be
gravitating towards unhealthy
behaviours, whether it's eating or
something else, just sort of step
back and check in with yourself
about what's going on," said Vogt. Xi
Eating disorder
resources
UBC Student Health
Services
students.ubc.ca/livewell/
services/student-health-
UBC Counselling
Services
students.ubc.ca/livewell/
services/counselling-services
keltymentalhealth.ca
The Looking Glass
Foundation
lookingglassbc.com
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES
OR19BLUE
WHALES
You can make a difference
Use recycling stations
to sort your food scraps
and recyclables into
the proper bins.
<3d
UBYSSEY
BOARD OF
DIRECTORS
Nominations close February 13, 2015 and voting runs Mar 9-13,
2015. Nomination forms are available at SUB 23. This is not an
editorial position. Members of The Ubyssey Publications Society
Board of Directors are responsible for overseeing the finances
and administrative operations ofthe newspaper. Responsibilities
include attending board meetings, tending to business as it ar^ss PUB
and overseeing personal projects.
UBC SUS
For further details please email fpereira@ubyssey.ca
Sort it Out. Have any
ACADEMIC,
HOUSING,
or other
UNIVERSITY-RELATED
ISSUES ?
Visit www.studentlegal.org/apply
O    PRESENTED BY YOUR STUDENT LEGAL FUND SOCIETY    O
ETCH
Student Legal
Fund Society JENICA MONTGOMERY
II Culture
CHARITY »
Clubs go head-to-head to raise funds for Grace Rwanda
DAY, FEBRUARY 10, 201!
COURTESY AA
AAI members Joy Richu, Kome Eto, Elizabeth Johnson, Amarachi Chukwu and Amartei Amar (left to right).
Andrea Gonzalez
Contributor
The old SFU versus UBC rivalry
is back in full force this month
as UBC's own African Awareness
Initiative (AAI) competes with
SFU's African Students Association (ASA) in a drive to raise
funds for Grace Rwanda.
A non-profit organization
based in Canada, Grace Rwanda
aims to provide educational support for the youth of Rwanda by
providing literacy materials and
raising awareness about Rwanda
in North America.
"Grace Rwanda stands for
improving literacy and education
to broaden the opportunities
for the children in Rwanda. As
Africans doing just that here at
UBC, it's really a mirror of our
lives, so it's something we can
relate to," said UBC AAI's VP
Finance Kome Eto, who aided in
coordinating with Grace Rwanda
to come up with an innovative
way to raise funds to accomplish
the organization's mission. He
also stressed that this was an
opportunity to show the Rwanda
of today rather than the country's infamous recent history.
With SFU and UBC, AAI
saw an opportunity to channel
students' energy towards a good
cause, so they reached out to
SFU's ASA to partner with them
in their fundraising efforts.
The AAI already had a good
relationship with SFU's ASA,
"they were more than glad to join
hands with us on this project
and hopefully we can do a good
thing for the children of Rwanda.
Hopefully AAI can donate more
than ASA so that we can have the
bragging rights," said Eto.
Throughout the month of
February, students will have the
opportunity to donate to their
favorite team online or directly
to AAI or ASA.
People can donate online,
through the Grace Rwanda
website which is linked on the
Facebook page, or in person.
There will be booths at the SUB
and collections at the member's
meeting at the end ofthe month.
This is for everyone at UBC not
just for Africans, said Eto.
All the funds raised during
the competition will go directly
to support literacy programs run
by Grace Rwanda, including the
purchase of books and e-readers
for the organization's youth center community library.
Accordingto Eto, any donations to support Grace Rwanda's
mission can help to effect significant change in the educational
hopes of Rwanda's youth. "The
Giving Competition is important
so that students know that they
can give back, even without a full
time-job. Having graduated, you
know that you can still make a
difference," said Eto.
In addition to generating
greater awareness about Rwanda,
the Giving Competition offers
the platform for all students at
UBC and SFU to donate funds to
help create these communities,
by targeting the most crucial
area for the people of Rwanda to
prosper socially and economically: education.
"Our club actually came about
because there isn't enough talk
about Africa at UBC. We believe
that if the campus can see that
there are students here who have
close ties with Africa. They will
see that people in Africa are
trying to make a difference for
themselves," said Eto. Xi
NETFLIX »
Bottom ofthe Queue: Grabbers
Sam Fruitman
StaffWriter
This is a severely misleading
film. Deceived by the weird —
mind you, very entertaining
— sounding plot synopsis and
low-budget-looking poster, we
thought Grabbers would be a
logical choice for this week's
review. How pleasantly surprised
we were. This film isn't terrible
in any sense ofthe word! Dare we
say it was actually a good film.
Shot in beautiful Belfast,
Northern Ireland — the same
location where Game of Thrones
was filmed — the film is about
a Garda (an Irish police officer)
who arrives in a quaint, seaside
town to fill in for a colleague
on holiday. Queue the arrival of
nasty-looking, tentacled aliens
with a thirst for human blood,
and things start getting real. The
only thing stopping these aliens?
Belligerent drunkenness. The
townsfolk must fight the beasts
GRAPHIC MING WONGfTHE UBYSSEY
while simultaneously fighting to
stay upright.
As we said before, outside ofthe
poster and plot synopsis, this film
doesn't really exhibit any characteristics of a bad movie. The acting
isn't cringe-worthy, but pleasing
to watch. Director Jon Wright
actually took the two lead actors out
drinking and filmed them plastered,
to help their performances. And it
shows! The rest ofthe cast is entertaining to watch as well. It's also
hard not to love an Irish accent.
With a film like this, it would be
easy to overuse CGI — as most bad
films do — but this film rarely shows
the aliens, waiting till the halfway
mark to really show anything, a
technique which effectively build
suspense. It was also nice to see
some quality CGI for the times they
did show the monsters.
The Bottom Line: With satisfying
effects, acting and story, this film
should be closer to the top of your
Netflix queue, rather than the
bottom. Xi
Like movies? We do too.
Join the force.
culture@ubyssey.ca
OPERA»
Traditional opera still lives up to its fame with The Marriage of Figaro
The Opera Ensemble showed UBC why theatre isn't a dead art.
Gabriel Germaix
Senior StaffWriter
Many aspects of The Marriage of
Figaro could easily be adapted to
fit the 21st century, but UBC Opera
Ensemble's cast took more than
three hours to demonstrate why
they shouldn't be. If daring takes on
major works of art appear to refresh
the sterner operas, the Mozart opera
certainly doesn't need more than
a solid interpretation to appeal to
the viewer.
The solidity ofthe cast and
musicians ofthe ensemble is what
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
audiences will remember ofthe
opening performance ofthe newest
UBC Opera production.
It started with Director Nancy
Hermiston dedicating the opera to
Irving Guttman, who passed away
in early December. The founding
father ofthe Vancouver Opera
was a benefactor to UBC School of
Music. Hermiston celebrated the
new generation of singers who will
perpetuate Guttman's passion and
dedication to opera and awarded
the Guttman-Dales scholarship to
Laura Widget, the Countess in the
night's cast, and Tamar Simon, who
played Susanna. A new collaborative
agreement between the school of
music and the Vancouver Opera was
also announced.
"It is not always that we have
such a close relationship between
the professional and the academic
side of opera," said Hermiston.
Then dark came, and with it
the first notes ofthe opera. On the
scene, a traditional set ornamented
with light baroque paintings hinted
that the cast was not to break any
standards of opera. It sought to
make the audience feel at ease, as if
it were already part ofthe house of
servants and masters that were to
storm in. "Cinque... Dieci... Venti
...," Figaro's voice resonated, and all
distance was abolished.
The power of Mozart's opera,
despite its beauty, relies in its ability
to engage its audience in a circle of
characters who, despite their antagonisms, always feel like a big family,
and UBC's opera cast managed to
pull it of with panache. The round
and full voices ofthe talented cast
had the audience convinced that despite the Count's claim on Susanna,
Figaro's soon-to-be wife, all would
be alright in the end.
In the game of simplicity and
affection-winning, Guttman-Dales
scholarship recipient and lead singer
Tamar Simon managed better than
anyone else. Her round soprano
voice enchanted the audience as her
character, Susanna, tried to escape
the Count and helped the Countess
play her unfaithful husband.
In addition, the comic role of
Cherubino was not overplayed as
it is occasionally, and overall, the
cast kept a sobriety that makes
the humour ofthe play that much
more appreciated.
Unsurprisingly, the technical
heights ofthe score didn't seem
to prove a problem for the cast.
Though some notes ofthe male cast
lacked depth at times, the quality of
the singing was more than enough
to content the audience. The famous
arias, Cherubino's "Voi Che Sapete"
and the duet "Sull'aria" were duly
applauded as they echoed in the
memories ofthe audience.
A good part of the audience
laughed hard at the plot twists
making it seem like they knew
the opera by heart, once again
proving that it does not take a jury
of 70-year-old Mozart experts to
enjoy a balanced staging of The
Marriage of Figaro. Of course, it
lacks the frenzy of modern cinema
but it still engages the viewer in
a way that sometimes makes us
forget that the artists are singing
all the while.
The story lives, the melody remains, and there is little reason for
changing what has worked for more
than 200 years. All it takes is a solid
cast and talented musicians. Xi TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2015    |    CULTURE
ART»
Council votes to change AMS Art Gallery name to the Hatch
ALTERNATIVE
DISPUTE I
RESOLUTION1
POSTGRADUATE
CERTIFICATE
The AMS Art Gallery will be called the Hatch, when it opens in the Nest.
Jenica Montgomery
Culture Editor
With a majority vote from the
AMS Council, the AMS Art Gallery is getting a new name with
its move into the new SUB in the
coming months.
When the Nest opens in April, the
AMS Art Gallery will be renamed
the Hatch, fitting with the bird
theme the AMS has established.
"It was sort of an afterthought,
but we realized afterwards it works
quite well," said Josh Bokor, SAC
art gallery commissioner.
"Hatch is like a term... like
hatching an egg, bringing life to.
We want to start helping out more
with artistic endeavours on campus.
Also think of us like a doorway,
Hatch into a new area, a new artistic
sphere."
The original idea for the name
was the "Arts Incubator."
"[It's] sort of a new up and coming term in various places. Sort of
fostering artistic expression and
growth ... but we thought that
incubator was going to be a bit
too sterile, so we actually came
up with 'well what about hatch?'
It has the same connotations, and
it also, surprisingly, goes very
well with the new building — the
Nest," said Bokor.
The AMS Art Gallery is currently located on the main floor
ofthe SUB and focuses on student artworks and UBC-centric
exhibits, the upcoming changes
to the art gallery, including the
name, will serve only to enhance
this focus.
The reason for the change
is to solidify the the gallery's
identity, attract a larger audience
and foster a stronger art gallery
on campus.
=HOTOCHERIHANHASSUN^HE UBYSSEY
"The art gallery, in one sense
has never had an official name,
and in another sense had way
too many names ... it gets a little
confusing for people, especially
when we're working with external
bodies ... so we want to have an
identity of our own that people can
actually latch onto and know us as
something," said Bokor.
The name change won't be the
only difference from the old SUB's
art gallery: the Hatch will be an
improved space with moveable
walls, better AV fixtures and a
sliding glass front door. According
to Bokor, the art gallery also wants
to look into different programming and exhibit versatility.
The first exhibit in the new
building will be on the different
Student Union buildings throughout the university's life — including the Nest. Xi
PERFORMANCE »
Small Stage point 5
unites cultures
Olivia Law
Senior StaffWriter
Pair five musicians with five
dancers, none of whom know each
other, all of whom have completely
different backgrounds in the arts
world, and what do you get? Small
Stage point 5, explosive collaborations set to stun audiences on a
visual, emotional and artistic level.
Each pairing of dancer and
musician has five to seven minutes to create a work of creative
talent on the small, eight by eight
foot stage of The Emerald theatre.
Between each performance,
audiences will be entertained
by emcee Billy Marchenski, a
"comically inappropriate Cupid," sure to invite controversy
and laughs.
Small Stage point 5 is co-cur-
ated by UBC creative writing
professor Tariq Hussain. Also as
one ofthe performers, Tariq has
been essential in the collaborations ofthe musicians.
"It's mostly people who are
from my own musical network,"
said Hussain on where he found
such a variety of performers. A
Juno nominated songwriter and
Brasstronaut band member, Hussain is evidently well connected
in the music of Vancouver.
Bringing in pop-rock singer-songwriter Louise Burns, lead
singer of The Belle Game Andrea Lo,
Euro-sounding band Woodpigeon
member Mark Hamilton and Tarun
Tspoon, Delhi 2 Dublin DJ, Small
Stage point 5 is set to be an evening
of firsts.
The final outcome of these
diverse pairings and genres is
unknown as of yet, even for those
involved.
"Who knows what those guys
are all working on," said Hussain.
"They could come up with anything eclectic and wild."
The dance styles are also from
a wide range of origins. Burns
is paired with burlesque dancer
Burgundy Brixx, Hamilton is
paired with "waaking" dancer
Clarence Tang and Hussain
himself is matched with a dancer with a traditional Chinese
dance background.
"It'll be interesting because
obviously I don't play this style of
music," said Hussain. "The music
I'm going to do is going to have
my more folky, sentimental style
to it, mixed with what he's doing."
Not only are the collaborations
highlighting different music and
dance genres, they are fusing different cultures together. Hussain
highlighted the importance of
Small Stage point 5 will bring different performers together to create unigue performances.
discussion and communication
through the rehearsal process,
learning the background history
of your partner and infusing different visual elements.
"We talked about lanterns, Chinese lanterns, as there's not a lot
of lighting options in the theatre,"
said Hussain. "You can certainly
create a difference between light
and absence of light, which is cool
to play with. You're thinking about
the visual stuff, you're thinking
about what people can see from
where they're sitting, there's a lot
of different things to consider."
The creativity required to perform with a stranger of an extremely different background is an exciting and innovative concept. The
limitations of technical modernisms in the theatre, the small stage
and time constraints are stimulating to the performers, forcing them
to think outside ofthe box to create
pieces of artistic movement.
=HOTOCOURTESFWAYNE HOECHERL
Doubtless, MovEnt's Small
Stage point 5 is going to be an
exciting piece of theatre. It will
expose and highlight different
themes, ideas and genres in the
world of performance, and is sure
to keep the audience on their toes.
MovEnt's Small Stage point S will
be taking place from February 12-15
at 8 p.m. at The Emerald. Tickets
are available online and at the door,
cash only. Xi // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
LETTER »
Do we still need black history month?
LAST WORDS//
THE AMS IS BECOMING
AN AVIARY
The AMS has been the early bird
when it comes to rebranding student
society institutions, and the Hatch
— the new name for the AMS Art
Gallery — is just another chicken in
their hen house.
We get it, you love birds. So do
we, but eventually you're going to
have to put a cap on that eagle and
stop with the bird puns. First the
Coop, then the Nest, the Perch and
now the Hatch, when will the AMS
just let it fly south for the winter?
We know the AMS is just trying
to spread its wings with the opening
ofthe Nest, but there's only so many
bird references this university
can take.
We've run out of bird puns, but
you get it. Continuing with the
aviary theme is simply a bird-
brained move. Seriously guys, it's
getting hawkward.
SNOBBY SALESPEOPLE
SUPERCEDE SUCKUPS
Have you ever walked into a store
selling expensive wares and immediately felt judged by the sales
people? Well apparently those rude
people sell more than the nice ones,
which completely contradicts most
people's experiences.
In some senses sure, having
snobby workers could boost the aesthetic appeal ofthe luxury items the
customer is purchasing, that doesn't
mean people enjoy rude staff.
That said, nobody likes an overly
enthusiastic and peppy worker
either. Being constantly asked "do
you need any help?" can become
a nuisance.
A general rule of thumb when
it comes to being a sales associate,
leave the customer alone unless they
look desperate for help, and when
they do, be kind.
THE AMS IS COURTING
ITSELF WITH THE
STUDENTCOURT
The AMS' decision to bring back
their student court in the hopes
of having an disinterested group
of students resolve disputes and
controversial issues is an especially confusing one, especially
considering the fact that the role
of their ombudspersonis to do
exactly that.
Ask Natalie: On staying motivated
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie,
I can feel myself losing momentum from the beginning ofthe
term; how do I force myself to
stay on top of school even when
I want to sleep all the time?"
Keeping your steam going after a
month of school is hard, especially
in the second term. I have some
(hopefully useful) ideas that can
help you push through the term.
Set weekly goals for yourself.
Include not just school related goals (do all your readings,
start essay, go to a study group
meeting,) but also personal and
fitness goals (pick up groceries,
research new printers, go for
a run). Check them off as you
finish them and if you think
you've finished a good amount
— whatever that is to you — treat
yourself to something nice.
You can also try different
studying methods from the one
you're currently using, until you
find a new one that works for
you.
Taking frequent study breaks
while tackling new material is
one method that works for a lot
of people. Half-hour or hour-long
breaks for every two hours of
studying or for each chapter can
break up a large batch of readings, though this only works if
you actually follow this pattern.
There are also apps that can
block certain websites from your
computer during certain times
if you find that you are spending
too much time on Facebook or
another website.
If getting started is your
problem, you could try easing
into studying when you know
you have a lot ahead of you
by reviewing your textbook's
vocabulary or glossary section.
Make sure you know and understand the basics of what you're
learning before you jump into
the more advanced concepts.
Reviewing something you're not
100 per cent on yet can also get
you through the first hump of
studying.
You can also do things like
making flashcards, playing
studying games and studying in
groups to help revive your studying gusto. It is important to stay
on top of school since it can be a
slippery slope that will bite you
in the butt when exams roll up. .
Need advice? Write to Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@
ubyssey.ca and have your questions answered in an upcoming
issue of'The Ubyssey. Xi
LLUSTRATIONJULIANYUffHE UBYSSEY
It sounds like the AMS still
hasn't quite figured out how the
two of them will work together,
but it looks like this student court
idea is shaping out to be yet another
rung in the convoluted ladder of
bureaucracy that anyone who deals
with the organization has to climb
on the daily. As the AMS openly
admits that the student court will
not have any real power (Council
will still have to vote to approve
anything they suggest), this naturally begs the question of what they
are even there for.
If it's simply to play court and
provide suggestions through a student voice, there are already ample
other opportunities for this to happen through other mediums — in
fact, that's what Council is supposed to be in the first place. If they do
set up the court in such a way that
it both has some real influence and
actually provides something that
existing services don't, then we can
revisit its value. tJ
BOLUWAJI OGUNYEMI
Letter
Every year with the celebration of
Black History Month in February
comes the argument of whether we
still need to recognize black history
month. This is especially true for
those who consider North America
to be a "post-racial" society. It is
asserted that black history should be
taught along with the rest of North
American history and that relegating 28 (or 29) days for the history of
those ofthe African diaspora does
not reflect a position of empowerment and, in fact, makes it acceptable to ignore black history for the
remaining 11 months ofthe year. I
argue that Canadians and Americans alike still stand to benefit from
the official recognition of Black
History Month.
In its 15th year as an organization, the UBC Caribbean African
Association (CAA) held its second
annual Afrofest Gala on February 7.
The group's flagship event included
music, dancing, Ethiopian food,
a small live auction, spoken word
poetry performances and a fashion
show.
Black History Month is still
needed because, as a society, we can
learn from both the teachings and
the historical struggles of black Canadians and black Americans to fully
understand the relations between
history and the present situation of
people ofthe African diaspora.
Though much of Afrofest
Gala and other events centred on
Afro-Carribeantopics are focused
around the celebration of culture
and contributions by those ofthe
African diaspora, the event served
as an avenue to creatively discuss
some ongoing issues.
Black History Month is needed
to recognize contributions and
struggles such as those ofthe late
Vivien Thomas, cardiac surgery
pioneer at Johns Hopkins University. He was denied training in
medicine not for the content of his
character but because ofthe color of
his skin. Confronting and discussing the history and experience of
the African diaspora is occuring on
the UBC Campus. Both CAA and
Color Connected Against Racism,
another student-run organization,
regularly host film screenings and
discussions.
When the majority of history that
is taught in North American schools
is written from the perspective of
European males and those of European descent, we should acknowledge that the stories of those of
Asian, African and other backgrounds are systematically silenced.
We need to be reminded to seek
our history. In a similar vein, CAA
President Denise Preira stated that
"Afrofest seeks to change the negative metanarrative ofthe African
continent as dark and corrupt" and
to emphasize its "beauty, diversity
and vivacity."
I do believe that a reframing of
Black History Month would prove
useful. I think that a token recital
of a number of prominent historical
black figures does not do justice to
the historical experiences of black
peoples and how this relates to the
present.
Unlike our neighbours below the
49th parallel, most black individuals in Canada are immigrants or
children of immigrants. African
history and Canadian Black history
is unique and worth learning.
In this multicultural nation, the
achievements and struggles of many
different minority groups should be
highlighted regularly. I think we can
consider Black History Month as a
reminder to try to be more inclusive
and broad-minded ofthe history
about which we seek to learn.
Boluwaji Ogunyemi is a dermatology resident physician at UBC. Xi
Notice of Public Open House Cancellation - DP 15001
Public Open House
Wesbrook Plac^Lpts 27 & 29 Faculty & Staff
You are invited to at
proposed faculty
Wesbrook Plaq,
total gross f
ntal Housing
comment on the
29 in
ngs, with a
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
flsfl =l a* H^°hT
campus+community planning // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
VARSITY »
Upcoming T-Bird home games
— and why you should go
Men's Basketball
Feb 13/14
8/7 p.m.
UBC (10-6)
U Manitoba (9-9)
The UBC men's basketball team is among the hottest in the CIS right now.
After an abysmal start to their season, they've won eight out ofthe past 10
games, including a split weekend against the Calgary Dinos last weekend.
This is the only matchup between the Bisons and the T-Birds this season,
and both teams are fighting for the final three playoff spots in the Pioneers
Division.
Women's Basketball
Feb 13/14
6/5 p.m.
U Manitoba (1-17)
UBC (13-3)
The women's squad has been absolutely dominant this season. They're
currently riding an eight game winning streak, and are perched first overall
in the Pioneers Division. Manitoba, however, is on an eight-game streak of
their own — just in the opposite direction. It'll be a fairly lopsided matchup
and should be a ton of fun to watch. Unless you're a Bisons fan.
Men's Hockey
Feb 20-22
Times TBA
Women's Hockey
9
Feb 27-Mar 1
Times TBA
UBC (13-10-5)
U Manitoba (15-13-0)
This series is a big deal — the men's T-Bird squad took a step forward and
secured a home playoff date for the first time since 1971. They'll be facing off
in abest-of-three series against the fifth-place University of Manitoba, who
they've had some trouble with — the 'Birds are 1-3 against the Bisons in four
games this season. In the three losses the teams combined for 11 goals, and
the one win came in an 8-6 bonanza. UBC might have to blow these games
open to survive.
TBA (bye to semifinals)
UBC (17-5-4)
With two wins over the Bisons this weekend, the women's squad is currently
second in the conference with no way to fall. The top two teams get a bye to the
semifinals, and home ice advantage. They're three points back of #1 seed Alberta
with two games to go, and the only thing up for grabs at this point is bragging
rights heading into the playoffs. When the semis begin, get ready for a show as the
Thunderbirds will face off against a lower-seeded team hot off a playoff win and
hungry for more. 10    I   SPORTS   I    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10,2015
B
Words by Benjamin Osbbbrne
Photos by Mackenzie Walker
it costs too much, I have a term
paper due" — all common excuses
to avoid the long trek to beautiful
Tofino on Vancouver Island. The
funny thing is, the journey is half
the reward. After 45 minutes of
being crammed in a car, driving
through touch-and-go city traffic
and turning around when you are
halfway there to get the sleeping bag that your buddy forgot,
you will have already made it
to beautiful Howe Sound where
your B.C. Ferries chariot awaits.
From here on out, words will be
substituted for the jaw dropping
scenery ofthe B.C. coast including glaciated peaks, beautiful
ocean inlets, never ending beaches, maybe even some whales, def
initely a few seals and hopefully
no sharks.
proximately one and a half hours)
and the drive on the Pacific Rim
Highway (approximately three
hours, depending on how many
•logging trucks you get stuck behind), there is plenty of sightseeing to keep you occupied. Beautiful old growth forests, lakes and
steep, eroded cliffs take the place
ofthe skyscrapers, city parks and
busy streets we have grown used
to being trapped by. Between the
beautiful ferry ride and the drive,
you will already have completed the most difficult, but also
possibly the most enjoyable part
of your journey (as long as you
aren't driving.)
Once you get to Tofino, there
gre plenty of options, accommodation-wise. Camping is the
your time — unless there's 20 mm
of rain in the forecast. Weather
pending, Bella Pacifica camp-
areas directly on the beach, as
well as in the woods for a reasonable price.
There are also many other
options for campsites in Tofino
and Ucluelet alike, with slightly
cheaper prices available in the
latter tpwn, such as Ucluelet
Campground.
Ucluelet is about 15 minutes
looking to pinch pennies, it's a
perfectly sound alternative.
z*&
take the place of the skyscrapers, city parks and busy streets
we have grown used to being trapped by." TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10,2015    |    SPORTS    |   11
So you've made the trek
westward, you've found a place
to stay, and now one of pristine,
biologically diverse, and intensely
beautiful coastlines is yours to
play on — what do you do? Besides
its beautiful scenery, Tofino is
most well known for its surf. The
water's cold, so grab a wetsuit at
Relic Surf Shop in town — plenty
of options for boards as well,
and plenty of nice guys and gals
who will hook you up. Tofino
has three main beaches — Long
Beach, Chestermans and Cox
Bay. Chestermans is the place to
be for beginners. With plenty of
other people your skill level in
the water you'll feel comfortable
looking like complete idiot and
having a damn good time (like
everyone who learns to surf).
If you're a more advanced surfer, or the waves aren't working
at Chestermans, you're in luck.
Because of Tofinos' complex
coastline, the town offers beaches
which face slightly different
directions, catching swell from
multiple angles. Head over to
Long Beach or Cox to find the
waves best suited for your level of
riding and you'll also catch plenty
of beautiful scenery.
Tofino is a small town, but
there is plenty of quality food to
reward yourself with. Tacofino,
the local taco bus, is a favourite.
Serving up burritos, tacos and
plenty of other Mexican treats,
these are a perfect post-surf
snack — for the sake of your
bowels (and paddling ability), it's
advisable to stay away from them
pre-surf — especially when you
combine them with coffee. Speaking of coffee, hit up the Tofitian
for tasty, (slightly expensive, but
good) coffee and baked goods.
They can have some leeway on
their price though because a)
they have such a damn cool logo
b) you're in Tofino, and last,
but not least, c) you can't deny
the quality.
Along with surfing, there are
plenty of beaches to explore,
fishing adventures and mountains to climb in the area. When
your parents come to town, make
sure they get a room at Cox Bay
Beach Resort, 100 metres from
the waves.
If you have some extra money
to spend — or you're lucky enough
to be staying at Cox Bay with
mommy and daddy, there are
some great whale watching tours
to go on, as well as charter fishing
boats to catch your own dinner.
Don't bother looking at the
forecast. Whether you are camping, staying at a hostel (check out
the Surfs' Inn Hostel) or living
it up at Cox Bay, you're sure to
have a good time. You can be
fooled by forecasts of sunshine
all weekend and be greeted with
40 millimetres of rain over two
days; conversely you can also see
the typical 50 per cent chance of
rain for three days straight turn
into three days of sunshine. This
is the Pacific Northwest. Either
way, you get to experience the
beauty of Tofino and get in on a
secret not a lot of people in the
world know about. Don't expect
California weather; there's a
reason they call it "Tough City."
It might rain on you for 48 hours
straight, but that will only leave
you wanting to come back for
more. If you get more than 24
hours of sun, consider yourself
blessed. Either way, you have the
unique opportunity as residents
of B.C. to be surrounded by
stunning scenery and amazing,
relatively untouched paradises.
Worst-case scenario, you are
definitely going to appreciate
your cozy, dry home in Vancouver
more than you did two days prior.
Not a lot of people know ofthe
surf potential, beautiful scenery,
delicious food and generally laid
back vibe that Tofino offers. Take
a weekend to check it out — you
won't regret it. tJ 12    I    GAMES    I    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10,2015
A park bench on campus receiving
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6- For (cheap)
11-Make lace
14- Pave over
15- Norwegian name of Norway
16-Pay stub?
17- Desert bloomers
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Blemish
Minn, neighbor
22-Pitchers
24-Small loudspeaker
Japanese dish of raw fish
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COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
32-Humorous
33- Dodges
37- Hot time in Paris
38-Attorney follower
39-Mai	
40-Will
43- Indian term of respect
45-Glisten
46- Religious dissent
47- Underwater missile
50- Used in a rite of purification
51-Mrs. Gorbachev
52-Ages and ages
53- Off-road wheels, for short
54-Grimy
57- English architect Jones
62-Friend of Fide
63-       can of worms
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65-Cornerstone abbr.
66- point: where it all becomes clear
67-Boisterous
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5-Controversial
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9- Vietnam's Dinh Diem
10-First book ofthe Bible
11- Marisa of "My Cousin Vinny"
12- What you put on snooze
13- Foot bones
21-Narc's employer
23-Come again?
24-Be silent, musically
25-Penned
26-Chair designer Charles
27- New Haven collegian
28- Begin's co-Nobelist
29- Not many
31- Pooh's creator
33- Dictation taker
34- Early anesthetic
35- Monetary unit of India
36-Fortune-teller
38-Surrounded by
41- Cookbook amts.
42- Leading
43-Official sitting
44-Singer Garfunkel
46-Attila, e.g.
47-Hint
48-Vows
49-Metal pin
50-Faithful
52- Sicilian volcano
55-Wall St. debut
56-VCR button
58-Cpl.,forone
59-Henri's here
60- Astronaut Grissom
61-Kid of jazz

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