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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1966

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 28
VANCOUVER,  B.C., TUESDAY,   NOVEMBER  22,   1966
224-3916
WISE AND POELVOORDE
—Williams Lake Tribune photo
prepare weapons
Riders hit Cariboo
with educated word
The three horsemen of aca-
demia descended on Williams
Lake this weekend to spread
the gospel of higher education.
And they hit high schools,
radio and television stations
and the streets in the effort to
make it a decisive issue in the
Nov. 28 Cariboo by-election.
The three, UBC students Don
Council blab cut,
last loop purled
Three councillors apparently mean three hours to
students' council.
Monday's meeting was the
shortest on record this year
— one hour, against the usual
three to four hours.
Absent were first vice-
president Charlie Boylan,
scienceman Frank Flynn, and
artsman Don Wise.
Also absent was the clacking of nurse Allison Rice's
knitting needles. Rice wore
the sweater she's been knitting during council meetings
since early September.
Wise, Dave Zirnhelt and Doug
Poelvoorde, moved on to
Quesnel Monday to attend an
all-candidates meeting there.
The iby-election was called to
find former Attorney-General
Robert Bonner a seat in the
legislature after he was defeated in Vancouver-Point Grey in
the Sept. 12 provincial election.
"We completely covered the
town," Wise said in a telephone
interview Sunday.
"The Socreds seem to be worried, but the Liberals and the
NDP are backing us."
He said the three students
have appeared on a local television show and on a radio
open-line program.
High school authorities gave
the students permission to distribute literature about the
cause of higher education in
the schools.
The three are presenting a
completely non-partisan stand
in their trip through the riding
by car and horse.
Wise said The Williams Lake
Tribune will run a story on the
trio's stand when it is puiblish-
ed Wednesday.
Reject AMS brief
planner tells city
Vancouver planning directoT Bill Graham has advised
city council to reject a UBC student council request to
relax Point Grey zoning regulations.
The recommendation comes in a report to be considered
by council today.
Graham's report also states:
"There is no serious student
housing shortage per se; rooms
with and without meals are
available both on the campus
and in the city."
"The current housing problem appears to be largely one
of quality and type of accommodation rather than shortage."
There is a shortage of suites
and housekeeping units.
"The provision of low-cost
housing for university students
from outside the city is not
the responsibility of either the
city of Vancouver or of its
single-family homeowners: it is
the responsibility of the university and the provincial government."
Housing plans inadequate
"The university's four-year
student housing program does
not at present include suites
or accommodation with private housekeeping' facilities
currently sought by some
single students."
"In order to meet the student demand for suites, it will
be necessary for the university
to either provide low-cost
suites on the campus, or to
take steps to have ordinary
apartment buildings with
suites provided privately off
the campus in the endowment
lands."
The AMS brief claimed 1,400
students who applied for on-
campus  housing  were  turned
away, and in addition, 1,500
suites had been eliminated in
the area west of Granville and
north of Thirty-third Avenue.
Graham counters that "within a week or two of the commencement of the 1966 fall
term, it was evident that all
students had been accommodated and housing still had a
number of on-campus vacancies for single persons."
Also: "from 1960 to 1965,
only 2,650 suites have been
eliminated from all (RS-1) districts throughout the city,
whereas about 16,750 new
suites have been erected, mostly on the west side of the
city."
BILL GRAHAM
. . thumbs down
Five percent petitioned
The report contends the AMS
made no representation to the
manager of the endowment
lands and the signatures on
the petition supporting the
brief represented only about
five per cent of the properties
in the subject area.
"Student demand for accommodation with housekeeping
facilities is unlikely to be relieved in three years," the report continues.
The university does not provide this type of accommodation on-campus at present and
"university officials appear to
be somewhat sensitive to the
idea mainly because it is closely related to the university's
policy of accepting responsibility for student behavior on
the campus."
Briefs opposing the relaxation of zoning regulations were
submitted to the director of
planning by homeowners associations in West Point Grey,
North-West Point Grey, and
Dunbar.
The briefs claimed housing
for students is a matter for the
provincial government, and
said it appeared students simply desired housing less restrictive on their behavior, which
would be undesirable.
Cram period starts now;
exams begin in two weeks
There are 14 days of classes left before UBC's eight-
day exam period begins.
The Christmas testing dates begin December 10, and
continue to December 20, Andrew Wilson of the registrar's  office  announced  Monday.
"We will have the schedule of exams posted Monday for sure, but will try to have it out before then,"
Wilson said.
Three exam times will be held each day — 8:30 a.m.,,
12 p.m., and 3 p.m.
Last year's timetable was also eight days, but
began two days earlier.
Lectures in most faculties resume Jan. 4.
Students
hit parking
regulations
Grad students are petitioning  for  a better parking deal
from the UBC traffic office.
Under the new parking
rules, grad students are paying more and getting less,
complains grad student chairman Gordon Robinson.
Until now grad students
have paid $5 a year and could
park in any lot. This year they
must pay ten dollars and are
restricted to specific areas.
Robinson said the association is quite happy to pay the
additional $5 like everyone
else but they object to the new
restrictions put on them.
Traffic czar Sir Ouvry Roberts has told the association
he will consider their complaints if sufficient dissatisfaction is expressed by grad students.
About 210 persons have
signed the petition. There are
1,500 grad students registered
at UBC.
Dick Holt, the grad student,
in charge of the petition, says
the association hopes to get
half of A-lot restricted exclusively to grad students and
lower mall residents.
He says there are no problems with any other lots.
Holt added he felt grad students are entitled to privileges
with regard to parking because they have been "through
the rigors of the undergraduate program".
SECOND
PRESIDENT OUT
(See Page 2) Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1966
—kurt hilger photo
"THREE WEEKS TO LEARN ALL THAT?" gasps furry coed
Heather Cameron, arts 1, as she takes advantage of
Engineer's exam sale in Angus lounge this week to pick
up an English  100 paper.
Selkirk College
loses its head
CASTLBGAE, B.C. (UNS)
president  quit Friday.
William Campbell, head of
the West Kootenay's new Selkirk College, will resign effective May 31, 1966.
(UBC's president John Macdonald resigned Oct. 26.)
Selkirk College, housed in
an old construction camp since
its opening in September,
1965, moves into a new $3.5
million complex at Christmas.
Campbell has been president
since the college opened.
His reason for resigning is
poor health and curtailed family life.
He also said: "I resigned because I think I have done my
job of creating a first-class
college and faculty, and I'm
weary after three years without vacation or rest."
John Welton, chairman of
the Selkirk College Council,
announced    the    resignation.
A second B.C. university
Both the council and Campbell
denied Campbell's resignation
was due to disagreements
about the educational concept
of Selkirk or about the 1967
budget.
"There's no mystery about
the resignation and there's no
skeleton in the cupboard,"
said Campbell.
FOR MARRIEDS
Housing bidding bared
Five contractors have submitted bids on the 275-unit
married students' residence to
be built at UBC.
Acadia Park, a high-rise
apartment and row housing
unit, will be built on 25 acres
of wooded land south of Acadia
Camp.
Bids were opened Thursday
by UBC bursar William White.
Contractors could make ibids
on the total project, or on the
separate sections of site clearance, apartment, and row housing.
Bids were also based on two
possible completion dates, Aug.
18, 1967, or June 1, 1967.
Four   companies   submitted
bids for the total project.
For completion date Aug.  18,
1967:
Laing Construction & Equipment Ltd., $4,533,081;
Imperial  Construction Ltd.,
$4,588,926;
Chess chaps
match moves
with master
UBC students will be given
a chance Wednesday to match
wits across the chess board
with an international master of
the game.
Dr. E. Macskasy, math professor, has agreed to play simultaneous matches during the regular Wednesday meeting of
the bridge and chess club.
Dr. Macskasy, who has represented Canada in international competition against some
of the world's best players, will
play any numlber of students
during the session, which will
start at 7:30 p.m. sharp in
Brock TV lounge.
Students are asked to bring
their own chess sets and boards
in case there are not enough
sets on hand to supply the
demand.
Bridge will also be played,
and any new players are welcome.
Red  horde  sells
Christmas  cheer
Copies of first and second
year exams will be available
all this week from engineers.
The last two Christmas
exams in each of En. 100, Ec.
200, Math 120 and 202, Physics 110, and Chem. 101 will
be sold in the main hall of
the Buchanan building, and
in the Hebb building each
noon.
Price is 15 cents each or
two for 25, with all the proceeds going to the Sun's Cup
of Milk fund.
H u&son'g fag ©il an* (Sag
(Sompang |tumte&
CALGARY
Offers Career Opportunities to Graduates in
the Fields of:
- PROCESS AND PRODUCTION ENGlNEERING-B.Sc, M.Sc.
- PIPE LINE ENGINEERING-B.Sc.
— GEOLOGY—Honours,  Majors,
B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D.
Geological,  Engineering
— GEOPHYSICS—Geophysics, Geophysical Engineering,
Geological Engineering, B.Sc.
UNDERGRADUATES
Summer training opportunities will be available to undergraduates as follows:
- PRODUCTION AND PIPEUNE-Engineering 3rd and 2nd
year
— GEOLOGY—3rd year and 2nd year
- GEOPHYSICS-3rd year
Please see the Placement Office for details
and appointments.
Campus Interviews, Nov. 28 & 29 (Geological 28th only)
For completion date June 1,
1967:
Dawson & Hall Ltd.,
$4,868,569;
Northern   Construction   and
J. W. Stewart Ltd., $4,815,-
300;
Separate bids were:
Site only, completion Aug.
18, 1967: Laing, $985,736.
High-rise only, completion
Aug. 18, 1967: Laing, $1,475,-
337; Imperial, $1,512,948;
Greenwood Construction, $1,-
519,000.
High-rise only, completion
June 1, 1968: Greenwood, $1,-
547,000.
Row housing only, comple-
ion Aug. 18, 1967: Laing, $2,-
200,082; Imperial, $2,300,678.
Site and row housing combined, completion Aug. 18, 1967:
Imperial, $3,133,978.
UBC's board of governors
will meet today to decide which
bids to accept.
SHOW UP IN EUROPE THIS SUMMER
But See Our Show First
NOV. 24, THURS., 12:30 P.M., B.U. 100
Slide Show Camping Through Europe
The Steel Company of Canada
Limited
Canada's Leading Steel Producer
OFFERS
INTERESTING CAREER POSITIONS
Interviews November 28, 29, 30, Decmber 1
for Graduates in
ARTS & COMMERCE
(with interest in data processing, accounting or
production supervision)
and ENGINEERING
Apply: Placement Office
SPECIAL
EVENTS
Presents
SHARON McKINLEY, cellist
LLOYD POWELL, piano
Featuring works from Brahms, Beethoven, Vivaldi, Mendelssohn and others.
This is the second concert in the Jeunesses Musical series
Today — 12:30 — Auditorium — 35c
Thursday - THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
in the Armouries Tuesday, November 22,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
JOINT DECISION
—powell hargrave photo
"YOU BETTER BELIEVE I'M A WOLFHOUND," sweet-talks long-time campus hustler Thunder as he gives the sad eye to shaggy coed Carole Smith, education 2. Thunder, the
fastest lips on campus  in   lunch-bag  grabbing, can look sadder than any hungry male.
CHARGED PLATES
MSU books nab crooks
By VAL THOM
Bells clang and turnstyles
lock when students try to pinch
(books from the Michigan State
University library.
An electronic sensing system
is installed in the library books.
A charged electric plate is
inserted in each book. If the
book has been properly checked out the charge is erased.
Otherwise, the charge activates a six-foot high sensor column which sets off the alarm
system.
University officials at Michigan State say the system will
save money by preventing
losses.
Will this device be installed
at UBC?
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
AMS reprimands
truant councillors
Four council members are
shirking their responsibilities.
Alma Mater Society council
Monday night approved a motion that certain members be
instructed to fulfill the responsibilities of their positions and
start attending meetings regularly.
The reprimanded members
are Frank Flynn, science president; Gordon Robinson, grad
students president; George
Poulos, social work president;
and Dave Hurt, the president of
the library students.
All were absent.
Treasurer Lorne Hudson
made the motion after the introduction of Graham Nelson,
non-voting representative of the
science undergrad society on
council.
Nelson replaces Flynn, who
quit his AMS duties last week.
"Flynn resigned as science
president," explained Nelson,
"but the SUS council refused
to accept his resignation.
'^He agreed to stay on if the
SUS council would take over
all his AMS duties."
Flynn no longer sits on AMS
committees, and science has no
vote on council. Bad grades,
parental pressure and pressure
from other duties were named
as the causes of Flynn's at-
temped resignation.
Stubbs doesn't think so.
"This is a commercial product now available and most
librarians feel it isn't very satisfactory," he said Monday.
It is difficult and expensive
to install. We have over 800,-
000 bound volumes and thousands of pamphlets and period-
cals.
"It would ibe expensive and
time-consuming to install the
system in our collection,"
Stuart-Stubbs said.
"The system probably isn't
designed to deal with theft in
a large library."
Michigan State University
has 150,000 volumes.
Profs help pick
Mac's successor
The president of the UBC faculty association said
Monday the faculty hopes to work closely with the Board
of Governors in selecting a successor for president John
Macdonald.
Dr. Robert Stewart, professor of oceanography, said in
an interview a four-man committee will be appointed Wednesday to advise the Board's
four-man committee. The B of
G committee will be named at
a meeting tonight.
"According to the universities act, the board has the
responsibility of selecting the
new president, but we believe
the faculty association should
have a de facto influence — if
not a de jure influence — on
the decision," he said.
"We had planned to work
as a joint faculty committee,
but the board was not prepared
to accept this."
The faculty association has
no formal status within the
universities act.
Stewart said the association
did not want to get into a conflict with the board.
"All we can do is make a
fuss, and we don't want to do
that. The situation is very
tender now and we don't want
to muddy the water."
Nathan T. Nemetz, chairman
of the Bof G, said he expects
the faculty association to act in
an advisory capacity as it did
in the selection of Macdonald.
SUS lacks
new chief,
Flynn back
Science ex-patriate Frank
Flynn has returned to the
science undergraduate society.
Flynn told The Ubyssey
Monday the SUS council rescinded a motion to accept his
resignation as president of the
organization  on Friday.
He agreed to remain because the council could not
find a replacement.
Flynn, newly appointed
chairman of the B.C. Assembly of Students, said he would
attend the AMS council meetings "only when an important
issue is at hand".
"A member of the SUS
council will be present at future AMS meetings," he said.
"The AMS committees on
which I served used 60 per
cent of my time.
"I feel I will now have
enough time to do more work
with both SUS and BCAS,"
Flynn said.
Library survey polls
English 100 classes
UBC's library survey isn't over yet.
Questionnaires like those
students filled in at polling
places around the campus Friday will be handed to English
100 classes within a week or
so,  Alma Mater Society presi
dent Peter Braund told an
AMS council meeting Monday.
"The Friday campaign netted 4,272 completed questionnaires. Surveying all the English 100 classes may give another 3,000," Braund said.
In other council business,
charter flight director presented councillors with posters advertising this summer's
flight to Europe.
Personalized slogans are
directed toward members of
each faculty, such as "Rub
shoulders with Europe" for
rehab medicine.
Council also discussed the
problem of exam schedules
which often inconvenience
out-of-town students. Final ex-
Social worker probes
Canadian woman s role
UBC Education faculty and International House
presents Women in Canada with Mary Selman, 8 p.m.
Wednesday at IH.
The first program in the "Canada in Transition"
series examines women's role in the family, in education,
in employment, and in voluntary services.
Mrs. Selman is a mother of three with a master's
degree in social work.
A three-woman panel discussion will follow the
speaker.-
aminations extend into May,
causing problems of accommodation and travel.
"Why doesn't the administration do away with the midterm break?" suggested EUS
president Eric Newell.
"The four-day break is the
reason exams extend till May
4th," said Hudson.
Council asked Braund to investigate  the  situation.
"I will try to find out how
these schedules are arrived
at, whether the exam times
can be made public earlier,
and whether they can still be
changed," Braun said.
"The timetables this year
were made up last spring."
Council approved a grad
class executive minute suggesting investigation of alternatives to the annual booze
cruise.
The grad executive felt
some other social function
might interest and accommodate more graduates.
AMS passed a University
Clubs Committee executive
minute fining 31 clubs for non-
attendance at a general meeting, but denied permission to
fine the Quadra Institute.
The constitution of the
Quadra Club, devoted to serving the interests of those arrested for possession and
smoking marijuana, has not
been approved by council.
"UCC has no jurisdiction
over this group," said Braund. WE UBYSSEY
Published Tuosdoys, Thursday* and Fridays throughout tho university yoor
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions ant
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press, founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorijed
second doss mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Pago
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
Here are some ot the unpleasant'st words
that ever blotted paper.
—William Shakespeare
NOVEMBER 22,  1966
r~ - •""'fc.-.M
,v ^<.~& &-1
Letters from
the editor
William Graham, city planner:
We're pleased to see you rule there is no housing
crisis in Point Grey, and happy to hear you plan to
advise city council not to relax zoning by-laws to permit
illegal suites for students.
We're so gleeful because we don't think the crisis
was really as bad as it looked eithet — only a few
people are now paying ridiculously exhorbitant rents,
and not many are living in really awful slums.
We applaud your perspicacity; you said Vancouver
shouldn't worry about UBC because it's a provincial
responsibility.
That irnplies the city and the university have nothing
to do with each other.
Well, our advertising manager estimates students
and staff at UBC spend upwards of $37,000,000 every
year, in Vancouver, on all the things people need to live.
The university itself spent $38,000,000 last year,
again, most of it in Vancouver.
But then, $75 million a year stuffed into a city's
economy isn't really very much, we guess, and certainly
doesn't obligate the city to consider the people who
spend it.
Because, hell, they'd have to spend it in Vancouver
whether the university existed or not, eh, Mr. Graham ?
Yrs etc.
Ralph Daly,
UBC director of information services:
Your letter (over there on page 5) is blatant issue
fogging.
The universities act also contains section 55,
immediately after it outlines the powers and duties of
the senate.
In essence, 55 empowers the board to veto the
establishment or discontinuance of any course, faculty,
department or award; to veto any change in university
rules and regulations; to veto university affiliation or
disaffiliation with any other educational institute.
Also the board is not bound by the president or
by any committee of the faculty to hire anybody — it
has the veto there, too.
In our editorial, we correctly stated how the university operates in law.
We don't know how it operates in practice because
the board and senate meetings are secret — something
not provided for in the act.
You have again attempted to fuddle the issue with
some of the facts instead of all of the facts, a trick most
unbecoming an information office.
We reiterate our main point: put eleven loggers in a
room, and they'll talk about everything in terms of
logging.
Put eleven businessmen on a governing board, and
they'll both talk and think in terms of business.
Universities are more than just business.
At this university, there are both other things to
think about and other ways to think.
Trivially yours,
Dear Easter Bunny;
Holy eggs, Bunny, you better get moving or the
elfin mafia will clean you out of all the graft.
We mean, here it is November already, and
Christmas decorations have been up for months, and
you haven't even started pushing those big chocolate
eggs.
You'll never make Easter a festive, gift-giving
occasion if you let that bastard Santa stay ahead of you
like this.
Yours in a basket,
DID YOU SAV " HIGHER
EDUCATION BEATS
HORSE SENSE*
. r-HH      Ml
m
N
x-~
GARBAGE
FROM GABOR MATE
Rent-a-radical now
• •
Some worthless items I
stumibled over while doing
the pre-Christmas clearing
out of my mental garbage
dump:
Item one. Two B.C. medical experts, the Sun reported last week, have called
Vancouver "the VD capital of
Canada". It seems to me city
council should seize this opportunity to drum up some
business for the tourist trade.
Maybe something could be
worked out to coincide with
B.C.'s centennial celebrations.
"Vancouver," the ad could
say, "a century of disease".
Our happy little symbol, Century Sam, could be joined by
Sue Phyliss and Gomer Rhea.
It might also help the winter works '(program. The
downtown prostitutes could
carry signs: "Why Wait For
Spring, Do It Now."
Item two. Letter in The
Vancouver Province. "Lester
Pearson has sold out to them
French Canadians. I want the
old Red Ensign back. I fought
and died under that flag,
along with many others.
Signed, Veteran."
Item three. There will be
a ten-foot statue of Joe Kapp
in Saturday's Grey Cup parade. This comment from the
Peking Review: "In an attempt to consolidate their
shaky hold on the people, the
Canadian regime is going to
ludicrous lengths to foster
the cult of the personality.
The monster statute of a losing football player was dragged through the streets of
Vancouver today, to the
cheers of obviously brainwashed throngs.
"Later that night young
revolutionaries battled with
brutal capitalist police, and
were dispersed only after
prolonged fighting." Ridiculous?  You  haven't  read the
Vancouver papers on China
lately  ...
Item four. Has Dalton made
Diefenbaker camp?
Item last. A friend of mine,
last year's editor of Consensus, has gone into business
for himself. He has asked me
to submit the following advertisement:
"Are your parties a drag?
Are they too staid and boring? If you are tired of old-
line parties, phone Rent-a-
Radical Service. We have
radicals of all shapes and
sizes, and all shades of red
or pink. What do you prefer? A dupe  of  the Russian
Communists? A dupe of the
Chinese Communists? An independent dupe?
"For a moderate fee a radical will come to preach world
revolution right on your living room rug. Watch him spit
on all that our society holds
sacred! Watch him defecate
on your most cherished beliefs! Watch him smoke pot
and butt the ashes on your
mother's butt! Watch him
feed LSD to your Aunt
Martha's pet canary! Be the
first on your block to turn
your next party into a riot:
phone Rent-a-Radical Service
now."
f^WUft'
. V f ^—kww(w   ;
Kennedy: politics
are highest ideal
By MIKE COLEMAN
The U.S. presidential election of I960 was a political
watershed both in and beyond
America. The "fire-in-ice" image of John F. Kennedy combined a cool, reasoned attitude and an inspiring sense
of idealism. His articulate intelligence, his urbane glamor,
and his sparkling wit once
more elevated politics in the
public mind to its rightful
position as the most noble of
all professions.
Three years ago today, John
F. Kennedy was murdered.
Lyndon Johnson succeeded
to the presidency. Despite a
remarkable record of legislation, and a massive electoral
victory in 1964, Johnson is
regarded in many quarters as
a usurper. His administration
has signified a return to the
pork-barrel politics of an
earlier generation. His image
is a mixture of folksiness and
foxiness, of corn and cunning.
There is no sense of the
measured vitality that was
generated by Kennedy. Johnson's administration is increasingly being viewed as an
interregnum, to continue only
until Bo,bby Kennedy 'comes
of age' and takes the presidency.
Many people take this to be
a natural and inevitable progression. The liberal ethics
and ideals, the impatience
with cant, the social concern
manifested by Kennedy are
emphatically the desires of
the new, post-war generation
which he came to represent.
I count myself proudly
among those who yearn for a
return to the political scene
of the promise embodied by
Kennedy, that public service
through politics is the highest ideal, burning as brightly
and as vigilantly as the eternal flame at Arlington. Tuesday, November 22,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Page 5
Maple leaves
vwi
'Pay two rents
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Is there any substantial
reason why final exams cannot end within the boundary
of a calendar month rather
than, as this year, on the
fourth of May? I am speaking
- for the many out-of-town students who, during the winter
session, live in apartments
and suites requiring monthly
payments in advance and pay-
* able at the first of the month.
For us, it means either paying May rent both in Vancouver and in our hometown
or wherever we have a sum-
„mer job, or wasting studying
time by moving for three or
four days. Worse than the
inconvenience at that time of
the year is the cost of a motel
or hotel.
The same problem arises at
the beginning of the winter
session. Although classes do
not begin until the third week
in September, it is necessary
, to pay for those first three
weeks rent in Vancouver
while living, working, and
often paying rent elsewhere.
* Again,   we   are   paying   two
rents for one month.
You might ask what is
wrong with living in a motel
for a few weeks — tout with
anything more than one car-
_ load of belongings, or without a car, it is impossible.
Problems would be reduced
at both ends of the session if
classes could start at least
one week earlier so that final
exams could end a week
earlier. If classes started two
weeks earlier than usual, it
would perhaps also benefit
faculties who usually have
exams slightly later than
others.
If The Ubyssey could  in-
.   vestigate  this  vital  problem
and do something about remedying it,  it would  benefit  a
great many students.
BRIAN PERCEVAULT
phys. ed. 4
'pro-Chinese
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In reply to yesterday's letter from Edward Lunny and
Bernard Aherne, I'd point out
the two separatists from Quebec did not represent a communist party viewpoint. As
they point out, they are pro-
, Chinese and anti-revisionist.
Which means in plain language, they  oppose  the  pro-
wmmmmmmmimm?- ^^s- -wswrnni-
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing          ... Richard Blair
Mews   _             -   Carol Wilson
City    .  Danny Stoffman
Photo        Powell Hargrave
'    Page Friday --         Claudia Gwinn
Focus      --           Rosemary Hyman
Sports  Sue Gransby
Ass't News    Pot Hrushowy
Ass't Cily Tom Morris
"•    CUP      Bert Hill
Kathy Hyde stalked out to find
people talking about prostitutes
and came back wet. Boni Lee
couldn't find her fire chief. Dave
Cursons couldn't find his ferry.
Bo Hansen found the tenth floor.
Murray McMillan, Rod Wilczak,
Norman Gidney, Kathi Harkness,
Val Thorn, Pat Lidkea, Kris Em-
mot-, Val Zuker, EJIert Lovborg,
Jill  Green, and  Smith  wrote.
Rick Shaw, Red Maxwell and
Larry Burns eyed the sports scene.
Fotomen were Derrek Webb, Al
Harvey,  and   Dennis  Gans.
gram of the Parti Commun-
iste du Quebec.
The communist proposal
for Confederation is that Canadians should re-write their
constitution recognizing the
national status of Quebec, including, for both English and
French Canada, the right to
secede from confederation.
The main difference between these two points of
view is the communist party
projects the possibility of
radical social change in Canada without a revolutionary
civil war. Relatively peaceful
transition to socialism within
the framework of a multiparty parliament cannot be
achieved in Canada, however, until English Canada is
prepared to accept the
French-Canadian nation in
Quebec as an equal partner.
Unless this is done, then indeed the separatist viewpoint
will be accepted by the majority of Quebecois. And in
this revolutionary age, who
can deny the right of a nation  to self-determination?
Misunderstanding and ill-
will between French and
English Canada is not created
by a few young revolutionaries.
It is created by the domination of Quebec by English
Canadians and U.S. corporate
power. When both nations in
Canada are free from that
power, then peace and harmony between us will become a reality.
CHARLIE BOYLAN
Grad Studies III
'Rules absurd'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We are a group of nursing
students writing to complain
about conditions existing in
the school of nursing at UBC.
The restrictions we must
submit to, while applicable in
the hospital situation, are absurd when applied to the
campus.
To quote a few examples:
attendance is taken in most
nursing classes as was done
through elementary school.
Does the faculty feel we aren't
responsible enough to make
our own decisions? Tuum est.
Also, it has ibeen suggested
(with implications of coercion)
that we not wear slacks to
classes on campus. All other
students have the privilege of
choosing their apparel. Does
our situation sound like university to you?
For reasons which you have
perhaps gathered by now —
fear of repercussions — we
wish to remain anonymous.
Indecent exposure
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re your story on the incident of indecent exposure in
the library: this story contains
quite a bit of erroneous information.
You say that the incidents
all took place on level two of
the stacks. Not so. I was approached twice by this man,
both on stack level four.
You also say that the student was described "as med
ium in height, with short dark
hair, and wearing a standard
UBC leather-arm jacket."
Phooey. I dont know what the
other three girls said, but I do
know that I described the man
as being a little taller than
average, with short blond hair,
and wearing a dark brown
sweater and matching slacks.
Maybe there were two men,
one dark and one blond?
The story reads "four coeds
Wednesday reported a man indecently exposing himself
..." I think that what you
mean is "by Wednesday, four
coeds had reported ..."
As far as I know, I was the
first to see the man, and I
reported the incident on Saturday afternoon. One would
gather from your story that all
the incidents occurred on the
same day, which obviously is
not the case.
Either the person responsible for the story is in need
of a course iii accurate reporting, or Mr. Stuart-Stuibbs has
got all the facts wrong (in
which case I don't hold out
much hope for his investigation).
ELIZABETH PAUKERT
'Senile distortions'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I thought no one listened
to Bertrand Russell anymore,
so the advertisement containing his senile distortions, and
the unbelievable fact that
someone paid for that advertisement came as quite a
shock.
It is, unfortunately, just an
extreme example of the general Canadian feeling: that
somehow the Americans caus-
9*umi«ed
IfOXr what?
r<*-i--V<$y»r,
ed the Viet Nam war and
even if they didn't, they ought
to get out.
This attitude is puzzling.
After all, where is the fighting going on? Not in the
north, but in South Viet Nam.
When did regular North Vietnamese troops invade South
Viet Nam? Before regular
units of the American army
landed.
Who refuses to negotiate?
North Viet Nam, not the U.S.
or Saigon.
These are incontrovertible
facts. In their light, how can
any reasonable person blame
recent U.S. policy for the conflict?
John Stuart Mill described
the situation: "The doctrine
of non-intervention, to be a
legitimate principle of morality, must be accepted by all
governments. The despots
must consent and be bound
by it as well as the free states.
Unless they do, the profession
of it by free countries comes
but to this miserable issue,
that the wrong side may help
the wrong, but the right must
not help the right."
PETER G. WILSON,
North Surrey
'Tropical  climes
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
When dissent is focused on
North American society, the
objectors are often requested
to leave for China. These objectors quite rightly object to
being thought of as yellow
—and besides, they might no
longer be free to object.
This is then a question of
ethics. If your society is pursuing wrong courses, it is better to stay than to flee to
safe tropical climes.
I therefore propose that
such objectors and their
mates travel to the unpolluted reaches of our Far North.
There they could lay the
foundations of Utopia, undisturbed by the Red hordes. If
they left swiftly on this modest proposal, they might be
eligible for a centennial project grant for their long
march.
In these northern regions,
still undespoiled by the dewy-
eyed Americans and such
bourgeois luxuries as garba-
matic disposers, their hot air
would be most useful.
GRAHAM   NELSON
Academics judge competence
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Your Nov. 24 editorial comment: "We doubt their (i.e.
the board of governors) competence to select and appoint
professors and to make ruling affecting university faculties and teachers" is a complete misrepresentation o f
how the UBC system of government works in practice
and by law.
The academic competence
of faculty members is judged
entirely by other academics
in the appropriate fields. Junior faculty members are selected by faculty of the department they are to join.
The department head recommends them to the dean and
the dean recommends them
to the president. The president is responsible for recommending the candidates for
appointment by the board of
governors. Senior appointments, in addition, are reviewed by a university-wide
academic committee.
Section 46 (d) of the university act, which gives the
board final power of appointments, promotions and dismissal of all university employees, also contains this restriction: "No person shall be appointed a member of the
teaching staff of the university or of any faculty mem
ber thereof unless he is first
nominated for the position to
which it is proposed to appoint him by the president
of the university, and no member of the teaching staff of
the university or any faculty
thereof shall toe promoted or
removed except upon the
recommendation of the president of the university."
The "rules affecting university faculties and their teachings" are entirely within the
province of the senate, of
which a majority of members
are academics. The very wide
powers of the senate, covering all academic matters and
standards, occupy more than
a page of section 54 of the
university act.
The duties and power enumerated include "the government, management and carrying of curriculum, instruction,
and education offered by the
university . . . all questions
relating to academic and
other qualifications of all applicants for admission as students or faculty ... to consider and revise courses of
study, instruction and education in all faculties ... to
approve the establishment or
discontinuance by the board
of any faculty, department,
course of instruction, chair-
fellowship, scholarship, exhibi
tion, bursary or prize."
The senate also is responsible for the library, student
discipline, university rules
and regulations, and faculty
matters generally.
While the board has finai
duty and power to approve
the allocation of university
money (80% of it provided
by the public), the university
operating budget originates
from the requests of each department. These are brought
together by each dean and
recommended to the president
in a faculty budget. The president scrutinizes every faculty
budget in detail with the dean,
and makes the final decisions
about what is included in the
budget which the president
recommends to the board of
governors.
Capital funds are allocated
in a similar manner. Requests
for buildings, and facilities
originate in the departments,
and are put forward by the
deans. The president with the
help of a committee chooses
the priorities and recommends
a building program to the
board. Academic areas which
will use the buildings are
represented in their design on
clients committees.
RALPH DALY
Director of
information services Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1966
SFA study van probes
movement of knowledge
A $30,000 grant will enable
Simon Fraser Academy's faculty of education to explore
the "information movement"
between B.C. schools and universities.
The Donner Canadian Foundation grant will equip a mobile study van with the latest
audio-visual aids.
It will  work  principally  in
Foot-loose grads
get King-ly grants
Applications for the Mackenzie King travelling scholarships for 1967-68 are being
invited.
Four or five scholarships of
not less than $2,000 will be
available for study in the fall
of 1967.
William Lyon Mackenzie
King, former prime minister
of Canada, made provision in
his will for the .annual awarding of a number of scholarships.
Scholarships are open to
graduates of any Canadian
university who propose to
engage in the U.S. or the
United Kingdom in post-graduate studies in international
or industrial relations including the international or industrial aspects of law, history,
politics or economics.
Awards will be determined
on the basis of academic
achievement, personal qualities, and demonstrated aptitudes. Consideration will also
be given to the applicant's
proposed programs of postgraduate study.
exhilarating
elegance
for MEN
JADE
EAST
COLOGNE
4oz.
$4.75
AFTER
SHAVE
4oz.
$3.75
Discerning men find luxurious
pleasure in the subtle masculine scent of Jade East...worlds
apart from the ordinary.
Applications are reviewed
by a board of trustees including Dr. Claude Bissell of Toronto, Dr. Cyril James of Montreal, and Dr. Norman MacKenzie of Vancouver.
Applications should be sent
to dean of student affairs,
Walter Gage, at UBC before
March 1,  1967.
northern areas and  the interior of B.C.
The van will carry information resources from SFA to the
schools and collect research
data which can be fed back to
the university.
Dr. A. R. MacKinnon, SFA
dean of education, said the
project is concerned primarily
with reducing the time lag in
information movement.
"This problem has been felt
increasingly within the last
few years because of the accelerated speed with which new
knowledge is being developed," said MacKinnon.
The study van carrying
audio and video recorders,
film projectors and other
equipment for use in schools
will go into operation in the
spring semester.
B.C. HYDRO & POWER AUTHORITY
requires
ENGINEERS
for its expanding activities
There are excellent opportunities for graduates to obtain
a variety of training and experience in many locations
throughout the Province, leading to promotions and increased salaries commensurate with responsibility.
Please consult your bulletin board and our brochure
"Engineering the Future" for background information
and description of B.C. Hydro's diverse activities and
engineering career opportunities.
Campus Interviews:
November 28, 29, 30
December 2
We are looking forward to discussing your career plans
with you and in exploring how your interests and talents
could ibe best utilized in this rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an appointment time through the
Student Service Office.
Why Marat! Why DeSade!
ARE YOU CRAZY?
The University as an institution is the abode of Life and Letters,
Law and Lean-tag at its highest human expression.
The lowest form of human indulgence is to sit in comfort, watching distorted, distracted, disturbed minds, and the sufferings
inflicted on other human beings, wantonly, for no purpose whatsoever.
Just make-believe,  you say.  Only play acting.
Let us not delude ourselves.  Darwin  wrote:   "Whatever action  is
made familiar  to the mind  renders  its  performance the  easier."
William  James:   "A  suggestion   in   the  mind  tends   to  carry  itself
out   in   practice."
A student or faculty member is hardly likely to go cuckoo, watching the play. It is when this gets into the blood stream of a nation's entertainment and culture that you may expect trouble, real
trouble.
A current example amid thousands: The Trap. Man turned Beast
(La Bete) and women turned a beaten slave and dumb. Great,
unlifting, inspiring entertainment for the masses. Herr Weiss is
for the classes.
This widespread softening up of the public mind for worse to
come, first occurred in recent history during the Weimar Social
Democratic Republic, the heyday of the Brecht, the Weills, the
Grosses and the Piscalors. They did a fine job, (wittingly or unwittingly,) in preparing the mood of the German people to accept
Supreme Lunatic Adolph  Hitler as  their Fuehrer,  the  Leader.
And now Herr Weiss obliges us with a play infinitely worse than
anything shown  before  the advent  of Hitler.  Nice  Herr Weiss.
Learn more about this carry-over from Weimar of the 1930's to
the Americas of the 1960s. Read TERMITES IN THE SHAPE OF
MEN sub-titled Commonsense Versus Pierre Burton (E.W.&.M.M.
Robson)   $2.50   at  your  University   Book   store.
Or   write   North   Star   Books   P.O.    Box   2421,   Vancouver   3,   B.C.
If we are in time to arrest this trend, this decline and fall towards
the decrepit and the degrading pompously pretending to be cult-
ture, you will consider TERMINITES IN THE SHAPE OF MEN
a bargain  indeed.
SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS INVITED
• CHALLENGES
• OPPORTUNITIES
See The
MERCANTILE  BANK
OF CANADA
CAMPUS INTERVIEWING
NOV. 28
Make Appointment at the Student Placement Building
MERJNATIONAL HOUSE
PRESENTS
CANADA IN
TRANSITION
Nov. 23: Wed. Mrs. Mary Selman, member of I.H. Board
of Directors, will head a discussion on "The
Place of Women in Canada".
Nov. 30: Wed. Mr. R. E. Fairbairn, Gen. Sec. of the Vancouver YMCA, will discuss "The Place of Youth
in Canada".
COMING NEXT YEAR
Feb.    8: "The place of art in Canada".
Feb. 22: "The place of individualists in Canada".
All at 8 p.m., I.H. Upper Lounge
CONTROVERSIAL!
The critics disagree: Art or Pornography?
PRO: CON:
"Effectively   deals "Sensationalism dis-
with the overwhelm- guised as honest
ing   sex   drive   of drama."
M  —THE   PRESS,   CLEVELAND
young men... Hon-
est mli*             *
*c*K, cDAKirum tvAuiMPP riis camera is a
—SAN   FRANCISCO   EXAMINER
...        .  .        .,   Peeping Tom.
As convincing as it       r *montrEa
is erotic."
—MANCHESTER   GUARDIAN
"Admirably
wrought."
— NEW   YORK   TIMFS
—MONTREAL   GAZETTE
'A vulgar movie."
— NEW   YORK   HERALD  TRIBUNE
"One of the best films of what it is really
like to be 18."
-LOS   ANGELES   TIMES
formerly Sweet Substitute
KENT'S
ni   ivr_i^i a a
aressed
Filmed   in   Vancouver
1965   Film   Festival  Award;  Winner
Starts Wednesday — Lyric Theatre FOCUS
Turmoil hits student papers
MONTREAL (CUP) — A
mass meeting of McGill University students has forced their
student council to reconsider
its dismissal of McGill Daily
editor Sandy Gage.
A huge crowd of unruly students packed a university
auditorium last week, responding to a call for student
action against the council.
When it finally got underway, shortly after 2 p.m.,
there were 600 students left.
Then came a series of emotional speeches and procedural
wrangling which resulted in
almost unanimous approval of
a subamendment calling for
Gage's immediate reinstatement as Daily editor.
But the meeting was adjourned before an amendment
calling for review by council's
judicial committee and the
original motion calling for the
paper's new managing board
to be selected by the old one
could be voted on.
Council president Jim McCoubrey called the meeting a
"zoo" and said the subamendment won't be binding on
council.'
But he said apparent student dissatisfaction with the
council decision will result in
Nine to study
U of T discipline
TORONTO (CUP)—A nine-
member committee, to be appointed by University of
Toronto's president Claude
Bissell, will make a thorough
study of UofT student discipline.
The committee will be composed of three board of governor members, three members of Caput (the UofTs
disciplinary body) and three
students.
The committee will "examine the whole Caput procedure and make recommenda-
tions on alternatives," a
spokesman for the president
'said.
The study was also prompted by "the general idea of increased student participation
in various levels of university
government," he said.
-_-_-________-__-___---__________-____--________■■
No prescriptions,
just descriptions
MONTREAL (CUP) — Sir
George Williams University's
health centre will not prescribe the *pill' but it will
give out information on the
oral contraceptive, a health
centre doctor said.
"We will talk to any girl
about how the pill functions.
However, we are in no position to prescribe it," he said.
The pill can be prescribed
only by a competent gynecologist after a thorough examination and the health centre
employs no gynecologists, the
doctor explained.
Tuesday, November 22,  1966
the whole Daily issue coming
up again before council.
Friday's meeting was called
by a group of students opposed to council's decision.
The engineers who left before
it got under way supported the
firing, and their absence
prompted accusations that the
gathering was "undemocratic."
Plans by the Sir George
Williams University newspaper to publish and distribute
a rebel newspaper were abandoned when McCoubrey told
printers to print the four-page
Thursday issue of the Daily.
When the Thursday edition
failed to appear, The Georgian
offered to publish 10,000
copies for distribution to McGill students.
Ex-editor Gage turned over
his last set of repro proofs to
Georgian editor Mike Taylor,
and Taylor agreed to have his
name appear in the pirate
paper as its editor-in-chief.
But the special issue, carrying The Georgian's banner,
was cancelled when McCoubrey ordered printers to resume work on the original
paper.
Said McCoubrey: "As publisher of the paper the students' council could no longer
Coates stays out
TORONTO (CUP) — The
former editor of Ryerson
Polytechnical Institute's student newspaper says he will
stay resigned.
Len Coates, who resigned
a s editor - in - chief of T h e
Daily Ryersonian after leading a walkout of 18 Ryersonian editors two weeks ago,
says he will put in his one
evening a week on the paper
—just like any other journalism student.
Coates and his 18 editors
walked out in protest of the
administration's move to give
the paper's professional managing editor final say "in
matters of taste".
The third-year journalism
student said although his resignation achieved "something
that should have been done
years ago, it would clear the
air if I stayed resigned".
Newly appointed editor
John Hewer said the question
of editorial control has been
entirely resolved.
The final say over any
material is "mine and strict
ly mine," he said. "If I think
something should be published, it gets published, but I
have to appear before the
newly - established publishing board later to justify it
if  it draws  criticism."
Hewer will also select a
new masthead to replace the
editors who resigned in sympathy with Coates.
Coates says he will assist
the new editors and work on
the paper one night a week
as required toy Ryerson's
journalism department.
Meanwhile, Ryerson president Dr. F. C. Jorgenson has
received at least one letter
criticizing the board of governors' decision to assume
full editorial control of the
paper.
University of Manitoba's
students' union president
Dave Sanders told Dr. Jorgenson in a letter he is "most
dismayed" to hear of the Ryerson incident. Sanders went
on to suggest steps the administration should take to remedy the situation.
Students poisoned
WINDSOR  (CUP)  — More than 150 University of
Windsor residence students suffered food poisoning after
eating in the university cafeteria last week.
This is the first time Wind
sor has ever had a food poisoning incident, the university
food services manager said.
Tests are being conducted
to determine the exact cause
of the illness.
Meanwhile, cafeteria operations were almost back to
normal for lunch Thursday.
However, only superheated
foods are being served until
further tests are completed.
Solitary study method
mooted for Mt. Royal
CALGARY (CUP) — A
new independent study meth-
ties, may be implemented at
Mount Royal Junior College,
an MRJC administration official said.
The new concept would allow students to study at their
own pace in the library, rather than at the average pace
set  in  the  classroom.
Haven't we met
before, my dear?
TORONTO (CUP) — The
University of Toronto's sex-
oriented computer dating program matched a male student
with his sister, a programmer
reported  Tuesday  (Nov.   15).
Programmer John Pullman,
said the brother-sister match
is the only "honest objection"
he has received to the Engineering Undergraduate S o -
ciety's computer campaign to
share funds for SHARE.
Pullman,  who is  planning
a thesis on computerized dating said reports of requests
for homosexual dates were
unfounded. Only one such request was received and it
proved to have been falsified.
THE     UBYSSEY
assume responsibility for
printing The McGill Daily
which was prepared by the
former staff.
"The paper which was to
appear Thursday could have
been printed if the repros . . .
had been returned."
The council president said
it would have been printed
earlier had legal authorities
been able to check it for de
famation.
"Under no circumstances
was The Daily to appear on
campus until it had been
checked," he said.
"We did this for our own
protection." McCoubrey also
contended that Gage had
"absolutely no authority" to
take The Daily's repro proofs
from the printers to The
Georgian office.
McMaster expands
HAMILTON (CUP) — The
first six buildings of a $35
million expansion program at
McMaster University were
opened here Saturday.
The program, under way
since 1958 and now with a
1968 completion date, is designed partly to put the institution on the map as a centre
for studies in nuclear physics.
In ceremonies Saturday,
the university officially opened its general science building, physical education centre and commons building,
and two residences, McKay
Hall and Matthews Hall.
These buildings have been
in various stages of use for
the past several years.
Construction has started on
a new $10 million senior sciences complex, a $3.8 million
arts building, a $1.2 million
shops and maintenance structure and a $345,000 biology
greenhouse.
Workmen are also clearing
the site for a $3.3 million nuclear linear accelerator, which
will enable McMaster scientists to investigate nuclear
particles at velocities approaching the speed of light.
The new piece of equipment is an addition to the
university's nuclear physics
program, which started in
1958 with construction of the
first nuclear reactor on a
Canadian campus.
Co-editor resigns
OTTAWA (CUP) — Frederik Stevenson has resigned
as co-editor of The Carleton, student weekly at Carleton
University.
The 23-year-old English and
psychology student announced
last week he is leaving the
paper for "academic and financial reasons." Two weeks
ago Stevenson was elected
temporary president of the
Ontario Region of Canadian
University Press.
He is expected to continue
in that position, and has also
announced his intention to
run for president of Canadian
University Press in December.
Carol Anderson, a third-
year journalism student, will
now move from the position
of co-editor to editor-in-chief
of The Carleton.
4458 West 10th Ave.
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Page 7 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1966
FEBETRON AND FRIENDS
study radiation effects
Machine studies changes
What happens when potatoes are subjected to high energy radiation?
This is just one of the problems that the newest acquisition of UBC's chemistry department, the febetron, is being used to solve.
The machine, worth $26,-
000, is used to study changes
that take place when matter
is subjected to radiation.
"Our experiments are aimed
at describing the chemical processes which take place between the time radiation
strikes the material and the
end result," said Dr. David
Walker, assistant chemistry
professor in charge of the
machine.
"Once these processes have
been described and become
predictable,    industry    should
be able to eliminate the trial
and error basis on which they
now operate, and the results
of irradiating any particular
substance may become predictable."
Water is presently being subjected to the bombardment of
electron pulses emitted by the
febetron.
"This is not as strange as it
might seem, since apart from
its purely academic interest,
water is the chief constituent
of many of the materials
which are presently being irradiated commercially — including potatoes."
PRESENT THIS COUPON
and receive from
PETERS
ICE CREAM PARLOR
3204 W. Broadway and Park Royal
ONE SUNDAE OF YOUR CHOICE
at half price
GOOD UNTIL DECEMBER 3. 1966
■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
November 28 - 29, 1966
Special interest in these fields:
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
COMMERCE AND  BUSINESS  ADMINISTRATION
GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS
For appointments, contact
The  University Placement  Service Office
HUSKY OIL CANADA LTD.
HUSKY
DIAMOND -  WEDDING RINGS
MILLERS is pleased to be an
Advertiser in The Ubyssey' and
welcomes all students to visit
any of our three stores and
see our exclusive Diamonds,
Fine Jewellery, Watches, China
and Giftware.
Courtesy Discount extended to
all U.B.C. Students and Personnel.
THt STOHf WITH THt OH>tta*B MTTSO I
lllillcis
655 Granville Street.
47 West Hastings Street.
Vancouver, B.C.
622 Columbia Street
New Westminster, B.C.
Extended  Term.  Available
WE NEED ENGINEERS EAGER AND
ABLE TO ADVANCE THE 'STATE
OF THE ART IN THE BROADENING
FIELD OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS
CONSIDER A CAREER IN THE BELL,
W YOU ARE GRADUATING IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The Bell's technical progress is vital, ever growing. New electronic devices ... more advanced
switching systems for local and long distance
services ... advanced carrier systems and a host
of related developments offer highly interesting
challenges to engineers.
DISCUSS YOUR CAREER
IN
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ON NOVEMBER 28, 29, 30
WHEN THE BELL
EMPLOYMENT REP
WILL BE ON CAMPUS.
He'll be back at a later date to interview graduates
in Science Business Administration, Commerce
and Arts.
Informative Career Booklets are available from
your Placement Officer.
Bell Canada Tuesday, November 22,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
INDIAN HOME
CUS co-op given grant
Six Indian girls and one
university student living at the
Kitsilano co-operative home
for girls have received a $2,500
Koerner foundation grant.
The home operated by the
CUS committee of the AMS.
Plans are to make the home
a semi-permanent residence for
eight to ten girls to help them
adjust to city life.
A second grant of $1,000
was made to the Vancouver
Indian    centre,   a    voluntary
agency set up in 1964 to aid
young Indians. The foundation
grant will aid in renovation of
new premises.
The largest single grant —
$3,000 — made by the foundation is to UBC's grants-in-aid
fund administered by Dean
Gage to help individual students in the arts.
Other UBC grants were:
Vancouver Poetry Centre —
$300 to  support poetry read-
Designers discuss
education effects
The effects of educational change on school design will
be discussed at a two-day conference in Vancouver during
    December.
CUS raids
CUP coffer
for payment
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students
board meeting has told the
Canadian University Press to
pay back a $2,000 debt by April
15, 1967.
The motion cited CUS budgetary problems and "a desire to
terminate all financial obligations to the union by outside
organizations" as reasons behind the move.
The board also mandated
CUS national president Doug
Ward to "take appropriate
action" if CUP doesn't meet
its obligations to the union.
CUP president Don Sellar
later said his organization will
attempt to meet the deadline
by conducting a fund raising
campaign.
Students  soaked
by  diving  course
Do you aspire to become
a fish, temporarily at least?
Then register now for the
Acqua Soc's new diving
course after Christmas.
The course will take approximately ten weeks and
the lessons will be given
both in private pools and in
the ocean.
Guaranteed   to
genuine fish.
turn   out
Phone and enquire of our low rates
4384 W. 10th       Ph. 224-6434
Principals, teachers, school
board officials, and architects
will take part in the conference Dec. 9 and 10 at the
Georgia Hotel.
Topics for discussion will
include learning environment
demands of changing curriculum, requirements of the community, setting architectural
requirements, and strategies
in planning.
Speakers include:
Herman Ruhnau, president
of Ruhnau, Evans and Stein-
ham;
James MacConnell, director
of School Planning Laboratory
at Stanford University;
Jonathan King, secretary of
Educational Facilities Laboratories in New York;
And John Fritz, professor of
education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.
ings on the UBC campus and
in the city by poets visiting
the Vancouver area;
UBC dept. of music—$500 to
aid transportation of a concert
tour of Okanagan high schools;
UBC zoology dept. — $1,500
to assist with teaching-research
films on the comparative behaviour of wild sheep;
And UBC dept. of community and regional planning —
$1,000 for study into relations
of social and physical planning.
lL\mUU
*illftA*
FORD MOTOR COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED
invites YOU to meet its
representative on campus
November 29 and 30, 1966
GRADUATING SENIORS
in
ARTS, COMMERCE
ENGINEERING
Learn what FORD can
offer YOU
ARRANGEMENTS FOR INTERVIEWS CAN  BE MADE AND
FURTHER INFORMATION OBTAINED AT
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
ATTENTION -
GRADS and
POST GRADS
B.A. Sc. B.Sc. (Mathematics,   Statistics)
B.A. (Economics)  B.Com. (Accounting Option)
AND
B.A. Sc.
B.Sc.
B.A. (Economics)
B.Com. (Accounting)
with   POSTGRAD  STUDIES   in
Business Administration,
Commerce, Economics, and
Accounting
FO R
CITY of VANCOUVER
Engineering Dept.
Engineering Research
—Operations research, statistics, work study
—Engineering methods, systems, materials with
emphasis on  operations   research   and  computer
application
Engineering Budgeting
—Annual budgets, budget reviews, programming,
projections
Traffic  Engineering
—Traffic operations, signal systems, accident
analysis, data collection and processing
Urban  Renewal
—Co-ordination of engineering aspects; design and
estimation of cost of services, streets and utility
relocation
Civil  Engineering
—Streets & Structures—streets, lanes ,bridge
approaches, freeways design, construction,
maintenance
—Water Works—longterm  planning, design,
estimating, specification writing
Salary (1967) — $609 - $834 per month
(depending on qualifications)
INTERVIEWS:
December 1
1966
Appointments and additional information through Mr. J.
C. Craik, U.B.C. Placement Office. Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1966
—dermis gans photo
IT'S UP FOR GRABS - and a UBC Thunderbird grabs it.
The Friday night game was the season opener and both
rookies   and   veterans   were   on   the   ball   as   the   Birds
flew victorious over the White Spots.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON PDRUGS
f
Limi ted
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
677 Oiuturim
Opp. THE BAY
ttl-4174
DOWNTOWN
47$
Opp* Afmy m
1A 1-0751
Rookie Phil
spilled Spots
It was a promising way to open a new season.
The UBC Basketball Thunderbirds defeated the Inter-
City Senior "A" White Spots
63-59 Friday at the War Memorial Gym.
Rookie guard Phil Langley
certainly proved himself. Langley, a junior varsity star last
year, scored 16 points including the last winning basket.
Veterans Neil Murray and
Ian Dixon followed with 14
and 13 points respectively. It
was a good game for Murray
who caught 15 rebounds.
Coach Peter Mullins said:
"The first half was good with
a half-time score of 38-27. The
Birds also led down the second
half, playing well. The team
did very well generally for the
first game but there are some
things we have to fix."
Mullins is pleased with the
new players. He named Langley, Dave Rice, and Bob Molinski.
Veteran Jack Turpin also
played well.
"I was a little upset at the
defence in the second half,"
said Mullins, "it wasn't as
good as it can be."
The Birds will play next at
the Totem Tournament, Nov.
25-26, in the War Memorial
Gym.
SF Varsity
break JV's
win streak
All good things must come
to an end, and the Junior Varsity's string of victories is no
exception.
Thursday night the Jayvees
lost 87-65 to the Simon Fraser
Academy Varsity team.
It was the first loss for the
club since Jan. 29. It had piled
up 14 consecutive wins prior
to this game.
The Jayvees were handicapped without Keith Marget-
son and the loss of Derek
Sankey because of a cut head.
High scorers for UBC were
Rick Inrig with 15 points,
Sam Vandermeulen with 14,
and Dave Marshall with 10.
Simon Fraser's high scorer
was Dave Murphy who collected 23 points.
The Jayvees picked up again
Friday when they met the Victoria College Varsity and won
68-47.
The team record for the
season now stands as six wins
and one loss.
Inrig scored 21 points in
the last game. His average for
the past four games is 22
points. Vandermeulen shot for
20 points.
Victoria's high scorer Ken
Jackson was held to two points
by Bill Ruby.
The big game is Nov. 23
at Magee Gym. The Jayvees
battle Kerrisdale in the league
final.
PHIL LANGLEY
. . . top rookie
RUGBY BIRDS
OPT OUT
Although the UBC Thunderbirds have qualified for the
league title, they are withdrawing from the playoffs.
The Birds defeated ex-Brits
Saturday to take the "B" section title. The score 'was 8-0.
They were to meet the "A"
division winner for the finals.
But a tie in the last "A" section
game has put the playoffs a
week ahead.
This means the game would
cut into the Birds' exam schedule. The Rugby Association
offered to delay the finals until
January ibut was refused.
"After the long lay off, they
would not be prepared,' said
UBC athletic business manager,
Buzz Moore.
The Rowing Club, which
holds second place, will likely
replace the Birds in the finals.
Sports  writers,
where  are  you?
Right now the sports department consists of the
editor—and that, sports fans,
is it.
If you're interested in
sports but can't write, we'll
show you how. And if you
can write but don't know
much about sports, we'll stuff
you with all kinds of knowledge and get you interested.
And if you can write and
do know about sports, why
the hell aren't you down here
already?
That's the Ubyssey office,
North Brock basement, every
Monday, Wednesday, and
Thursday. Help.
Five wrestlers
land on top
in first bout
Wrestling coach Paul Nemeth
is pleased with the results of
the UBC Invitational Tournament, held Saturday.
Five of UBC's wrestling team
team won their bouts. Dirk
Heiss, Bob Scott, and Ken Ker-
luke won third places, reaching
the finals. John Hula and Ron
Turner fought to fourth place
standings.
This was the opener of the
wrestling season for the UBC
club.
UBC took fifth place at the
close of the tourney.
The winner was Central
Washington State College. University of Washington came in
second and Western Washington State College took third
place.
The UBC team will be participating in the Winter Games
Trials. The winners go to Quebec for the first Canadian
Winter Games. Seven or eight
UBC members are eligible. The
games will be held Feb. 17-18.
It's now or never
Tuesday noon will be the
last chance for UBC Thunderbird football players to turn in
strip at Wolfson Field.
Rowing crews win
season's first race
The UBC Varsity and Junior Varsity rowing crews won
their  first  race  of  the  season   Saturday  at   the   Seattle
University Regatta on Green Lake.
In  a hard-fought race over
the 1500 metre course, the
Varsity eight defeated the
Lake Washington Rowing
Club by less than half a boat
length.
The Junior Varsity eight
beat Seattle University and
Oregon State, winning by two
lengths of open water.
The winning times were 4:22
and 4:21.
The UBC four with coxwain
also defeated the Washington
Club in a time of 4:57 but lost
to them in the four without
coxwain race.
The UBC Freshmen eight
came second in their event,
losing to a Victoria College
crew. Oregon came third.
Rugger men
easy winners
Saturday was a successful
day for UBC's rugger men.
The Braves played to a clear
9-0 victory over the Blue
Bombers.
The Tomahawks defeated
B.C.I.T. with an 8-0 score.
The Totems reached a 3-3
tie against Vancouver City
College.
Only losers were the Teepees.
They fell 25-5 before the Blue
Bombers second side. Tuesday, November 22, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
£pwU*£
Waterloo-Lutheran
learns its lesson
TORONTO — (CUP) — St.
Francis Xaxier gave Waterloo-
Lutheran a lesson in football
basics here Saturday, and
rolled to an easy 40-14 victory in the second annual College Bowl game.
Operating behind a punishing offensive line and an extremely well-balanced attack,
the X-men from Antigonish,
N.S. piled up 510 offensive
yards before more than 12,000
fans at Varsity Stadium.
The Golden Hawkes showed
little of the form that propelled them to an undefeated season in the Ontario Intercollegiate Football Conference
and third place in national
ratings. They were restricted
to   only   occasional   offensive
thrusts.
St. Francis Xavier outweighed Waterloo - Lutheran
along the line by an average
of about 15-lbs. per player.
Substitute quarterback Terry Dolan directed the winning
attack. Playing his first college game, Dolan completed
12 of 19 pass attempts for 282
yards and four touchdowns.
Three of his passes went to
Terry Gorman, named the
game's   outstanding  player.
Dejected Golden Hawkes'
coach Dave Knight said:
"They were bigger, faster and
stronger than I thought they
would be." Before the game
Knight had said he thought
his club could beat any college
team in Canada.
^ _
—derrek webb photo
OOPS — I MISSED ANOTHER one says Victoria College goal-keeper as a UBC Thunderbird, assisted by veteran Mickey McDowell, scores again. The Birds soared to a 6-4
victory over the visiting Vikings Saturday at the Winter Sports Centre. It was the third
win of the season for the team, coached by  Bob  Hindmarch.
Vikings vie for victory,
vanquished by the Birds
The UBC Ice Hockey Birds
recorded their third win in as
many games Saturday.
Glen Richards led the scorers to a 6-4 victory over Victoria College Vikings.
In the first period of play,
Glen Harper of the Vikings
scored the first goal. The
Bird's Jack Moores followed
with a goal, and Richards and
Kevin   McGladery brought
the score up to 3-1.
Richards scored again in the
second period. And McGladery came in for another goal
in the fourth period. Bobby
Apps completed the line of
scorers.
One of last year's top scorers, Mickey McDowell, played
a good game, giving assists.
Moores also played well. So
did Richards who worked real
ly hard for his two goals.
The Birds' captain Al Mc-
Clean had a bad time, hitting
the goal post three times.
UBC marked up 36 shots
over Vikings' 15.
Coach Bob Hindmarch said:
"It was a good game to watch.
It was clean with only six
penalties, and fast, as hockey
should be."
Five hundred people turned
out to watch the Birds win.
—derek webb photo
TRYING TO MOVE IN for the kill, this unidentified Viking meets a determined UBC
Thunderbird. The move is intercepted and the action swings back to the Birds who
chalked up over twice as many shots as the opposing team.
UBC cross country runs
competition into ground
UBC's cross country teams came back from Victoria
Saturday sporting the Admiral Nelles Trophy, the reward
for an overwhelming win.
16 teams were entered in
the Royal Roads Invitational
Meet. UBC took first place.
And UBC took second place.
In the 4.3 mile race UBC's
"A" team crossed the finish
line — one, two, three, four
and five. But the team was
robbed of a perfect ending by
one of its own members.
Pat Laver, coming in second
place, is a member of the
"B" team also. A perfect finish requires the first four winners to be of the same team.
The winner, Don Scott, finished in a time of 19:39, only
two seconds outside Don Valiant's record.
UBC track and field coach
Lionel Pugh said that Scott
could have beaten the record
had he known how close he
was.
Bob Tapping took third
place. These runners won the
trophy with an almost minimum 13 points.
UBC's "B" team won second
place witli 47 points. The runner-up had  99 points.
Pugh summed up the victory: "It was the best of the
year".
OCTENNIAL   '66!
Four score years ago an enterprising individual
opened shop on Cordova. His name was Walter
H. Grassie. He sold the finest jewellery. And
made good. His business has moved about a bit
since then. Grown up some too. But Walt
Grassie's legacy survives.
Today—more so than ever—we at Grassies unite
traditional quality with contemporary design.
We glean world markets, trace new sources, anticipate fresh trends. Gaging the spirit of the
times.
Then we act—fast! Faster than change. That's
why our merchandise reigns supreme. For four
score years. Because we're an active part of the
scene—tuned in and turned on to the supercharged  sixties!
Come  downtown — walk   into Grassies  on  Seymour.   Snoop around, gawk or just gaze.   See
what it feels like to be eighty in 1966!
566 SEYMOUR .. . 685-2271 'Page  12'
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Grits run into newsmen
LIBERAL. CLUB
Liberals Alan Gould and
Mike Coleman debate with
Ubyssey men Gabor Mate and
John Kelsey, resolved that
Political parties are an effective vehicle to social change.
Today at noon in Bu. 102.
SQUASH CLUB
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
212.
FINE ARTS
David Spearing of the school
of architecture conducts a tour
of the present exhibit Roots of
Japanese architecture today at
noon in the gallery.
PHYSOC
A talk on Meteor observation, and the Riche-Cassegrain
telescope tonight at 8 in Henn.
201.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Cellist Sharon McKinley and
pianist Lloyd Powell perform
in a Jeuness Musicales concert
featuring works of Brahms,
Beethoven, Mendelsohn and
Vivaldi, today at noon in the
auditorium. Admission 35 cents.
MATH CLUB
Meeting today at noon in
-Ma. 202 to discuss the exhibit
and proposed journal.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Bu. 225.
BRIDGE AND CHESS
Meeting Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in Brock TV lounge.
IH
Mrs. Mary Selman discusses
the women's place in Canada,
Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the IH
upper lounge.
DESERET CLUB
Bruce   Preece   speaks   Wednesday at noon in Bu. 216.
PRE LAW OPTION
E. B. B. Carrothers discusses
the   Diary   of   a   Corporation
Lawyer, today at noon in Bu.
100.
NEWMAN CENTRE
James Russell, archaeology,
dicusses do we know what we
do when we dig and delve, tonight at 7:30 in the St. Mark's
music room.
LSM
Karl Schutt speaks  on  Re
ligion  in  Art,  Wednesday  at
noon in Ang. 204 .
COMMUNITY PLANNING
The film River With a Problem (pollution in the Ottawa
River) will be shown Wednesday at noon in Las. 102.
VCF
Informal discussion Wednesday  at 5:30  p.m.   in  Mildred
Brock.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
The Moody Science film, Red
River of Life will toe shown
Wednesday at noon in Bu. 104.
MUSSOC
Musicians interested in playing in the orchestra for How
To Succeed . . . please call the
musical director at 228-8659.
PRE DENTAL CLUB
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Bu. 204.
NDP
Christmas meeting Wednesday at noon in Bu. 202.
ARTS US
Nominations for vice-president and treasurer open until
4 p.m. Friday. Application
forms available in the AMS
office.
DEATH OF GOD
Discussion group with Rev.
Jack Shaver, every Tuesday at
noon in Bu. 2201.
ROD AND GUN
Dean Cowan discusses Big
Horn Sheep Disaster in the
East Kootenays, today at noon
in Bio-Sc. 2000.
PRE MED
Dr. Wada discusses Neurology at UBC, Wednesday at
noon in Wes. 201.
ONTOLOGY
Fay McKay and Ron Polack
speak on Emotions Rule the
World, Wednesday at noon in
Bu. 223.
WUSC
Free film, today at noon in
Bu. 106.
CHORAL SOC
Members are requested to
attend last two practices.
WEDNESDAY CONCERTS
Esther Glazier and Robert
Rogers   play  Stravinsky's   Di-
WHY BE GRAY ?
HAIRCOLORING TREATMENTS
-  HAIRSTYLING -
UPPER TENTH BARBER
4574 W. 10th Ave. __ by the Gates
4333 W. 10th Ave.
224-1711
BIRD CALLS
The handiest book on campus
going fast
Get Yours Today
AVAILABLE AT THE BOOKSTORE
AND PUBLICATIONS OFFICE,
BROCK HALL
ONLY 75 CENTS
vertimento Wednesday at noon
in Bu. 106.
UN CLUB
Dr. Solecki speaks on Sino-
Soviet relations Wednesday at
noon in Bu. 219.
UN CLUB
Films  on   Poland   and   the
Suez will be shown today  at
noon in Bu. 100.
ACE
General meeting Wednesday
at noon in Ed. 204. Admission
one bar of soap.
UBCSCC
School for rallyists Thursday
at noon in Chem. 250.
WUS
Drs. F. Langdon and L. Zol-
brod and WUS exchange
scholars discuss Japanese attitudes today, Wednesday at noon
in IH upper lounge.
Oxford debaters defeated
in clash with classicals
MONTREAL (CUP) — Marianopolis College, a tiny
all-girl classical college, defeated the Oxford debating
team on the resolution women should be kept barefoot, pregnant and in the kitchen.
The Oxford team of Ian Forrester and Lord James
Douglas-Hamilton, British law students, were defeated
resoundingly by a vote of 300 to 3.
And two of three who voted for Oxford were male.
PSYCHEDELIC
WORSHIP
A Trip In the Church With
(Rev.) Jim McKibbon, Tommy Chong and The Vancouvers
at
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED CHURCH
Friday:   Nov.  25,  7:30  P.M.
Sunday:  Nov.  27,  8:00  P.M.
See "SUNDAY" CBC—Nov. 27
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
HITCH-HIKER LEFT PARCEL IN
red Volkswagen on October 16th.
Please return contents to Jim,
CR 8-0268 or Box 193, Totem
Park.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF
blue bag containing skates,
gloves. M. Kerr, etc. Phone Peter
224-7809.
WOULD THE GIRL WHO TOOK
my navy duffle coat from Bio.
Sc. 2341 please mall Marianna at
874-2429.  I  have yours.
Greetings
12
Coming Dances
12A
AFTERTHOUGHT HAPPENING
presents the brave new world and
Tom Northcott Trio Friday, November 25,  9 to 1.
Special Notices
13
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
WHITE SLAVE MARKET ! '54
Consul named Fred — needs hospitalization, best offer — 988-7300.
MECHANIC'S BARGAIN ! — '54
Consul needs slight repair — best
offer,   988-7300.       	
SPECIAL ANTIQUE SALE — OLD
mugs. Selling at real low prices.
See  Miscellaneous For  Sale.
Transportation
14
URGENT — THREE GIRLS NEED-
ing ride from New Westminster.
Call Marg., LA 6-8108, 8:30's Mon.-
Fri.
RIDE WANTED TO CALGARY
leaving after Dec. 16. Share gas,
driving, Bill,  224-5373.	
RIDE WANTED FROM 70TH AND
Montcalm. 9:30-5:30 lectures, phone
Dave,   AM   6-2732   or  FA  5-5860.
RIDERS WANTED FROM VICIN-
ity of 4 and Williams (Richmond).
Stay out nights and Saturday.
Phone   277-7488   evenings.
Wanted
15
WANTED: USED FENDER DUAL-
Showman or Bassman amp. or
English Vox Bass amp. Call
Wayne  736-4045 or  AM 1-2495.
USED SKIES, ANY TYPE. WILL
consider price $30-$50. Phone Allan
at gSS-S^  after 5  p.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
GOING TO EUROPE? SEE OUR
slide show on camping in Europe.
Bu.100 Thurs. 12:30 noon. A.M.S.
Charter flight.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 VW. VERY GOOD CONDI-
tion. Contact Ron KO, Rm. 3370,
Biological Science or phone 731-
4468  after  6  p.m. 	
1954 CHEVROLET IN GOOD RUN-
ning order. Good battery, tires
and radio. Car is on the Campus.
Phone Ed, 224-9667.
TR3   WELL   MAINTAINED,    CITY
tested. RE 8-5537.
Automobiles   (Cont'd.)
DO YOU NEED INEXPENSIVE,
reliable transportation? '58 Austin
4-dr. Excellent rubber, $375. AM
1-2503 after  6 p.m.	
'59 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE. GOOD
running condition. $225. Phone 224-
7331. 	
1958 VAUXHALL IN GOOD CON-
dition. Am asking $175. Will accept reasonable offer. Phone
Heather 327-4396.
1958 PONTIAC 6-CYL., AUTO.,
accessories. Mike: 731-6295 after
six.
22
Accessories & Repairs
Automobiles Wanted
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
Scandals
39A
DEAR C.B.: HAPPY 21st! SAVE A
pub for me Wed. Watch out for
underage boys with bubble gum!
F. Pay.	
CUT IT SHORTER AND KEEP IT
longer—why not try it! Campus
Barber Shop,  Brock ext.	
ALL WE WANT FOR CHRISTMAS
is our two back wheels. You fink.
Luv and retreads, the Pink—CP"s.
SURF SVISDAHL PASSED OUT
while the SUNDAY BAND shook
loose.
LAST CHANCE FOR SASKATOON
Christmas trip. Call Doug 224-9055
or Nels 228-8708 before  Sat.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED
70th   & Granville  Street        263-4530
TYPING     —     ESSAYS,      THESIS,
Stencils,  etc.  Close to University,
224-0244.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, reports, etc.
Low rates — phone 733-0734 any
time.
PROFESSORS
Fully   exp.   in   the   typing   of   your
theses.  Reas.  rates.  Ref. Inger  872-
7380.
STUDENTS!
Am once  again  free to accept your
typing   requirements.   Elec.   Typewriter.   Inger   872-7380.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
CON-ARTIST? STRAIGHT COM-
mission. Approx. 35% part-time.
Ph.  872-2275.	
WANTED: YOUNG MAN TO TAKE
group of boys from private school
skiing on Mount Seymour on
Saturdays next January and February.  Phone CA 4-1304 daytime.
Music
63
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. 736-6923. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish,
German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 75 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,   or  the  Bookstore.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
FOR SALE: NIKKOREX 35SLR
$50. Roger Howard, Hennings 305.
Call 228-2856  or  224-5395.	
SPECIAL SALE OF "OLD MUGS"
in old Totem Grad Books. 1966
issues now $2.00, 1965's only $1.00
(No 1964's), 1963's, $1.00. Publications  Office,   Brock  Hall.
ONE MATCHED PAIR OF KNEIS-
sel Black Star skis, 200 cm. Never
used.  Phone  Murray,  224-9662.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
NEED A ROOM CLOSE TO CAM-
pus, only $35 Monthly. Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity House, 4435
W. 12th. Phone 224-9654 after 6
p.m.
ROOM WITH BREAKFAST. MALE
student sharing. 2427 West 3rd
Ave.   Phone:   731-6062.
SHARE FURNISHED SUITE WITH
female student. Private bathroom,
entrance. Near University Gates.
$40.00 monthly each. Phone 228-8826
or 228-8003.
PLEASANT BEDROOM - STUDY.
Just outside gates. Suitable for
one male student. Phone 224-0636
after 6:00 p.m.	
GIRLS
FURNISHED    ROOM   FOR   RENT,
3461 West 3rd. Phone 738-6980.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD. LAUNDRY
included. Male students only. RE
1-1865.	
ROOM AND BOARD CHEAP. CALL
Andy Sandilands, Zeta Psi Fraternity 2250 Wesbrook Cres. 224-
9662.	
SHORT OF FUNDS? ENJOY COOK-
ing? Music? Room and board close
to Gates in return for cooking family evening meal five days a week.
Optional additional light domestic
work  paid   by   the  hour.   224-7574.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
LUXURIOUS APARTMENT FOR
senior man adjacent to campus.
Phone 228-2265 or 228-8645. Joel
Brenner.
NEEDED MALE ROOM MATE FOR
luxurious but inexpensive West
End apt. Call 684-6742.
Real Estate
86
CLASSIFIED
BUY  -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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