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The Ubyssey Jan 11, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIX, No. 32
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1968
224-3916
SENATE
Senators
denounce
sit-in plan
Acting UBC president
Walter Gage, Wednesday, called a proposed student senate
sit-in irresponsible.
His reaction was one wave
on a flood of senator opposition to the Feb. 14 sit-in in a
Ubyssey poll Wednesday.
"It's an irresponsible action," he said. "It is not in
the interests of the university
or the student body."
Gage, who is chairman of
the senate, said he hoped the
students would reconsider
their decision, which he
thought was made in the heat
of the moment.
He also said he would be
amazed if the student council
condones the sit-in proposal.
Dr. V. J. Okulitch, dean of
science, said the students' decision to stage a sit-in is an
example of mob rule.
"It's an essentially childish
move," Okulitch said. "Senators must speak for themselves. They are not responsible to their electorate."
"Intimidating the senate will
just defeat their purpose,"
said Dean Neville Scarfe of
education. "Were the students
who attended the meeting just
a few of the vocal minority
who think violence and force
is better than democratic process?"
"It's rather startling news
to me," said Dean of Arts,
Dennis Healy. "If there is going to be fireworks, the students would be very wise to
see what support they have."
Secretary to the senate J. E.
Parnall said he didn't know
how the students would get
into the senate chamber.
"There's no room," he said.
"The administration building
is closed to the public when
the meetings are held."
Dean of commerce Philip
White, who vigorously supported the open gallery in senate
discussions, said he would not
support the sit-in.
"This would be an unfortunate action for the students to
take," he said. "How can they
subscribe to the democratic
ideal and revolt against democratic government?"
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said the
sit-in would polarize the feeling of the senate towards an
open gallery.
, "It's ludricous," he said. "If
a poll were taken of the entire campus the vote would be
reversed."
"I think the decision made
at the meeting: was based on
emotions and not reasoning."
— bob brown photo
'TIS ROSES and 'tis still winter but the plum preserve smell
still   comes   through   with   a   clarity  that   rivals   the   skunk.
Board of Governors
shaft UofC president
CALGARY (CUP) — The president of the University of
Calgary has resigned over conflicts with the board of governors.
Dr. H. S. Armstrong has taken up the post of dean of graduate studies at the university of Guelph.
The resignation statement said: "... The best interests of
the university will be served by freeing the board of governors
to seek and appoint someone to whom their unanimous support
can be assured."
Exactly four years earlier Dr. Malcolm Taylor resigned as
Uof C president to become president of the University of Victoria.
In a special edition editorial of U of C Gauntlet, the student
newspaper said: the similarities between the resignation of Armstrong and Taylor four years ago extend far beyond the fact that
both men submitted their resignations on Dec. 18th.
"Both men were more than capable at their jobs — and both
met with opposition from the board of governors which was supposed to be fully behind them."
U of C student president Bob Eustace said Armstrong had
tried to make the university a total educational community, but
that he did not get support.
Eustace said Armstrong's resignation was a tragedy. Armstrong cited two examples of non-support by the board: he had
not been provided with an on-campus house, as he had been
promised and which he felt was necessary, and he had not been
consulted by the legislature when the board of governors was
appointed two years ago, after the Calgary campus split from
the University of Alberta.
He takes up his Guelph post July 1. His resignation date has
not been announced, nor has a successor been appointed.
Valentine's Day
By MIKE FINLAY
More than 600 UBC students voted Tuesday to break senate
secrecy by staging a sit-in at the next meeting of senate.
The sit-in was first proposed by arts president Stan Persky
at an open meeting called in Brock by two student senators to
discuss their threatened resignation.
At the meeting senators Ray Larsen and Gabor Mate said
they would not resign because it was evident the students present
wanted them to stay on.
Persky said it was ridiculous to discuss senate secrecy.
"Just send in some students to sit-in and senate secrecy will
be ended," he said.
Charlie Boylan, grad studies, moved that students endorse a
sit-in at the next meeting of senate Feb. 14. The motion was almost unanimously supported.
During the meeting, Mate and Larsen explained why they
were prepared to resign.
Mate said he was elected on a platform of ending senate
secrecy and responsibility to the students.
In rejecting the idea of open gallery, he said, the senate
proved itself illegitimate and not responsible to its constituents,
the students.
"How can I serve on a body that is illegitimate, undemocratic
and not responsible?" Mate said.
He added that the Canadian Union of Students has said
students shouldn't serve on closed governing bodies.
Larsen said the senate was still closed despite an agenda
and a summary of proceedings being published for each meeting.
"Minutes of the meetings are a fraud. They just give the
air of communicating," he said.
If senate doesn't change, the student senators will have little
effect, Larsen said.
Senator Kirsten Emmott, who has left university and cannot
continue in the senate, said she no longer thought the senators
should resign.
"It might still be valuable to sit on senate and expose the
inefficiency and fraudulent proceedure," she said.
Grad student senator Mark Waldman, last of the four senators, said he never had any intention of resigning, but was dissatisfied with the present closed senate.
"The present situation is unacceptable, but we should keep
working and maybe after a few meetings the vote will be in our
favor," he said.
Quitting would do nothing but hinder the progress of student
power at UBC, Waldman said.
The senators answered questions from the floor, all of which
criticized their proposed resignation.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said the senate
was no longer completely closed and the senators should work
harder to get a public gallery.
"If you're not willing to work, then you should resign," he
said to applause.
Persky said Sullivan should direct his criticism at himself
because the AMS council was accomplishing nothing.
"You should offer your resignation," he told Sullivan. "Then
you'd get some real action."
A motion urging the student senators remain on senate, that
they start a concerted program of action on issues affecting students, and that they campaign against the provincial government
for short-funding UBC was unanimously approved.
Alumni, students dine
Tickets for the UBC student-alumni banquet in Brock
Feb. 27 are up for grabs.
About 150 of the tickets, provided by the sponsoring
UBC Alumni Association, are available free to students on
a first come, first served basis.
Ma Murray, esteemed editor of the Bridge River Lil-
looet-Times, will be guest speaker at the banquet. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 11, 1965
IN CLASSROOMS:
What happens is news
By STAN PERSKY
In attempting to tell the story of what goes
on at the university, I think it requires only a
slight shift in perspective to see that much of
what happens in classrooms is news.
Just within my own knowledge this year I
see such things in lectures as: Roy Turner and
Matthew Speir presenting immediate field research on conversational analysis in the relatively
new area of ethnomethodology; David Aberle,
the Navajo expert, offering free discussion extra
sessions on just about anything; and Bob Rowan's
political philosophy class going in depth into the
vital political issues of the day.
Rowan's seminar style, which gets a lot of its
electricity out of heated student interchange, has
more of the atmosphere of an important news
conference than a staid lecture.
Wilson Duff's course on B.C. Indians provides
an extended example of What I mean. Duff does
an anthropological-historical survey of the province's 45,000 Indians, and has recently shifted
more focus to contemporary
conditions and problems.
As Duff opened a recent lecture, a student behind me commented, "Hey, another anthropological happening." He was
referring to Duff's variety of
methods for presenting his
material.
He opened the lecture with a
prelude: a letter had just arrived from President Peter
■""imams of Kitwancool village in Tsimshian
country. Williams' letter discussed the response
of his council to the recent land claims that had
been brought to B.C. courts by his Nishka neighbors, and asked for Duff's aid in representing the
Kitwancool side. (Duff has written a monograph
DUFF
on the history, territory and laws of the Kitwancool.)
Williams' letter not only gave us a sense of
an active up-to-the-minute situation, but led Duff
into a brief description of "the movement afoot
to settle the whole Indian land question". Bulletins on the progress of the issue are regularly
reported. The land question is a particularly
relevant and contemporary problem for Indians
and in Duff's classroom you hear the latest news
from direct sources.
The lecture itself dealt with the Carrier Atha-
paskans, and the explanation came in the form
of words, color photographic slides, tapes, music
and stories.
His point was to show us how the closer the
Athapaskans were located to coastal groups, the
more direct was their cultural borrowing of
coastal forms. Duff demonstrated this by a set
of color slides, depicting the route east along
highway 16 towards Prince George and showing
us a series of totem poles.
At Burns Lake we saw the anomaly of the
rather well off Babine band living in a settle-
ment of freshly painted modern homes. It certainly didn't fulfill a white man's romantic
notion of Indians in lodges, purely pursuing some
particular way of life, but it did offer a contrast
to frequent sights of contemporary squalor.
Slides of Ft. Fraser were shown, and Mr. and
Mrs. Maxine George, whom Duff has interviewed. Duff, at this point, added the dimension
of sound, and we listened to George recounting
some original stories and singing hymns translated into his own language.
The point is not that Duff's presentation is
merely a multi-media show but that it's a good
way to make the material graphic.
That the material is local sets up the idea for
any adventurous student that he, too, could go
out and see for himself.
AMS Experimental College Meeting
Thurs., Jan. 11 - 12.30-2.30- Bu. 226
of Mr. Stockholder's Course on Literature and Imperialism
READINGS:
Camus—The Outsider
Franz Fanon-The Wretched of the Earth (Grove Press)
Barrington Moore-Social Origins  of Dictatorship
and Democracy—chapt. on Fanon
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
It
THE PHYSICISTS"
(An Intellectual Thriller)
by Friedrich Durrenmatt
with
Tom Wheatley
Barney O'Sullivan
Dorothy Davies
Joseph Golland
wX
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
JANUARY 12 - 20, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available  for  all  performances)
-    SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES    -
Monday, January  15th-7:30  p.m.
Thursday, January 18th ~ 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 — or 228-2678
One of the few contemporary German plays to win international acclaim
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
DATA-DATE
The computer-dating
service with fun  in   mind
4¥
Please look in the Sun
on January 13, Saturday
for details.
DON'T MISS OUT
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Committee Appointments
'Vive  le   Quebec  Libre!'  (?)
Interested in going to Montreal for a seminar on
Quebec Affairs, January 17-20? Or would you rather
travel to Winnipeg for a conference on International
Affairs, January 23-27? Interviews will be held for all
interested applicants for both conferences Thursday,
12:30, Board Room, Brock Hall.
our lapinary compatriot
^reacts unpredictably
to prqefres-S , -we've
found?
like, how she uses
lier new Tlrue
AwfneJTt&k,    Chec^m^ Account.
pasl-haste io a   ^ ..
posi-fax ft, wall       && Sends out cheques
Money iro a frtent.     fair one ceivfc -to her
•friends.
so, naturally, all her
■£riends .have to write
her bade \o thank her
-£ov her unexpected
sieuerosiVy.
and tfon9 o£ course,
we send back, all hef
cancelled cheques.
9o-
■£or every letter ^at
lapinette sends out,
she receives -two lack/.
it seems to be a very
down-key way to
attract attention.
it is also a darned <£pod
Ivay c£ keeping ira.dk,
o£ your disappearincr
dough. °
So maybe you would-
appreciate gelling j/our
cheques iacic, too...
posl-happiness is
receiving two qF
Sometfiina for one
■ttwiy/r trie post.
JRtre Are alternative
ineWicds of keeping
tract cftfeicr moxey
w/tic/i it ts only,.
tyorliny to Mention.•
ol'n>6
your very own
custom autoaraphei
cKeoues /w- yott
^ fiennt
C*ec*ee)
tank of montreal
CampusBanK
caiupusbonk branch
in the administration bujldincj
cj.f .peirSon, manager
Open 9-'3o - 5 Monday to Thursday - 93o -6 Friday Thursday, January 11,1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 3
A ROOM with a view from
the top of Acadia Park Tower.
The campus spreads out below in a panoramic view with
the waters of Burrard Inlet
and the coast mountains
fading into the background.
Tenants of UBC's newest residence will be moving in this
weekend.
—george   hollo   photo
Alumni report urges
government control
The alumni report on university government says the
provincial government should be assured of fiscal control
of universities.
To assure this, the report recommends the establishment of a government-appointed advisory board to allocate
provincial funds to universities and colleges in B.C.
The report also recommends four faculty members be
added to the board of governors but added the majority of
B.C. government appointees on the board should be retained.
The report prepared by a committee chaired by Vancouver lawyer Sholto Hebenton said that students should
not be allowed to sit on the board of governors.
"Student representation is not necessary. Students'
views can be correctly inferred because of continuous student comment," the report said.
It added: "The younger generation does not appear to
have the same respect for confidentiality that the older
generation does".
The role of the senate makes it an appropriate forum
for student participation, the report said.
It also recommends the senate should be reduced in
size from 73 persons to 55 by removing faculty and alumni
representatives.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan said
Wednesday that although council is in favor of student
representation on the board of governors, he personally is
not.
"However, I think students must have access to the
board and be able to present their views," he said.
"I think the alumni report, maintains an invalid premise — that government appointees must be in a majority
in university government.
"The advisory board is a good idea but it should have
a majority of representatives from the university, community, and industry."
Hebenton could  not  be  reached  for  comment
NOT CENTRAL ENOUGH'
Faculty fights  building
By FRED CAWSEY
Faculty dissatisfaction with the planned new
administration building continues after its contract has been awarded.
The location, the northwest corner of University Boulevard and Wesbrook Crescent, has
been criticized by senators as not being central
enough.
First murmurs of dissent came Nov. 15 at a
special senator meeting with an official of a San
Francisco architectural firm contracted to design
a master campus plan.
The next day the UBC administration called
for tenders for the building.
At the next regular meeting of the senate,
UBC prof. Dr. S. H. Zbarsky asked why the
tenders had been called for despite the criticism.
At that meeting, a committee was appointed
to investigate the situation. Prof. S. M. Friedman,
a member of that committee was still working
on his report to the senate Wednesday, and knew
nothing of the awarded contract.
"If the contract is out for tenders, what can
be done about the dissatisfaction?" Zbarsky said
Wednesday.
Zbarsky didn't know that the contract had
been awarded Tuesday.
"If Zbarsky hadn't raised the question the
senate might never have been told that tenders
had been called for," student senator Gabor
Mate said Wednesday.
"There seems to be problem of communication," Zbarsky said.
Arnie Myers, UBC director of information
services, said Wednesday the board of governors
had undertaken a comprehensive review of the
building site and its criticism.
"They reviewed their decisions about the
location, shape, function and traffic flow of the
building, and decided that their first decisions
were correct," he said.
"This contract is just for the first stage of
the construction, the second stage will be across
University Boulevard."
The contract calls for $1,491,209 to be paid
to Laing Construction and Equipment Ltd. for
the construction of a new general services administration building.
The building will house the registrar's office,
department of finance, data processing centre,
post office, housing administration, office of the
dean of graduate studiesi and a campus branch
of the Bank of Montreal.
Dean Walter H. Gage, acting UBC president,
said none of the money used for the new building
would otherwise be available for academic
purposes.
"Construction of this new and badly needed
administration facility will not infringe in any
way on our program of construction of academic
buildings," he said.
Spring spouts blood
They're out for your blood.
Red Cross spring blood drive officials, that is.
Target total this year is 4,000 pints, up 1,200
over last year's.
W. B. Johnson, B.C. director of blood transfusion clinics, said Wednesday the Red Cross
depends on UBC to maintain its blood reserves
at this time of year.
"The UBC clinic is the only major one at that
time of year," he said. "UBC donations have to
supply B.C. hospitals for two weeks."
Chris Anderson, forestry 3; said he hopes to
initiate a per capita competition between faculty
and students.
<?TN.
THINGS ARE F/AEAS THEV ARE.' WE
WJ OUf&BMES'.COnE AMD BE
~~   '      I THRESHED.^
***   CWq. '.*«* *SSO«
'S"i*V
TWf vs nsa
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pag.
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
JANUARY 11, 1968
Open senate
The senate is open.
It was opened Tuesday by those most seriously
affected by senate decisions — the students.
Students, sickened by senate's crass refusal to provide an open gallery at its meetings, unanimously passed
a motion at Tuesday's open meeting in Brock to attend
the next senate gathering as interested observers.
There is nothing radical or irresponsible or intemperate about this student decision.
It is, plainly and simply, right.
It is right that people should have access to decisionmaking which affects them. Senate decisions, both in
the long-run and the short-run, affect all students.
Senate and administration officials will act unwisely
and unjustly on Feb. 14 if they try to keep the students
out. What, students will ask, have they got to hide ?
Irresponsibility
Only one student acted irresponsibly at Tuesday's
open meeting: Alma Mater president Shaun Sullivan.
It was unfortunate that Sullivan left it to Charlie
Boylan (a graduate student in UBC's English department) to make the motion to open up senate. This
action was obviously Sullivan's responsibility.
Sullivan says he agrees that senate meetings must
be open and that the present senate situation is un-
accpetable to the people he is supposed to lead — 18,000
students. And Sullivan must also be aware that the
way of negotiation has failed — the vested academic and
business interests which dominate senate have refused
to listen to reasoned argument. Of a rather vulgar turn
of mind, they understand only crude power.
For the moment we will refuse to take seriously
Sullivan's inane claim that the 600 people who attended
Tuesday's open meeting were misled by their emotions.
This can only be the hasty rationalization of a confused and backward mind.
A unanimous decision by a large group of students
at an open meeting is not something to be casually
ignored. Sullivan can resume his responsibility by joining the student senators Feb. 14 and leading interested
students into the senate's hiding place.
Chuckles
Someone has done something to the staid old alumni
association. Suddenly, the association is making a brave
attempt to have a bit of fun with its old alma mommy.
First sign of the new spirit was the recent rejuvenation of the old Alumni Chronicle, a journal which once
prided itself on its lack of content. The latest Chronicle
has expanded its scope and repays reading.
But that was only the beginning. This week, barely
repressing giggles, the association released a publication called Report of the Alumni Committee on University Government. The report is easily the sharpest
piece of satire we've come across all year.
The alumni "report" makes mockery of a recent,
and highly dispensable, literary form — the study of
what to do about university government in this Berkeley-
inspired era. of student-faculty unrest. Wittily, the association punctures the smugness of all the Duffs and
the button-down blindness of all the Berdahls. Keynote
of the satire is the contention throughout the report
that, despite unrest, the university structure is just
beautiful the way it is. Too, there is a clever put-down
of the Duff-Berdahl technique of recommending tiny,
meaningless changes in the present system. Among the
alumni's   "recommendations,"   for. example,   are   these:
"The Board of Governors should be increased in
size from 11   to  15 members."
"The Senate should be reduced in size from 73
persons to 55."
As an added touch, the alumni wits sprinkled
the "report" with gems like this: "The,younger generation does not appear to see the same need nor have the
same respect for confidentiality that the older generation does."
Our only criticism is that the satire sometimes gets
a bit heavy-handed. But it must be remembered that
the "report" is a first try and a radical break with a
long tradition of high seriousness. Thank you, alumni.
'Heard any good myths lately?'
Yank and Latin universities
are like ships in the night
By RONALD HILTON in the U.S. for the tripartite required   to   state   their   plat-
Reprinted from The Nation system used in Latin America, forms.   Meanwhile,   the  Amer-
Hilton  is  executive  director but they may come later- icanized  universities   in   Latin
of  the   California Institute   of In  Latln  America   th^   Cor- America   are   moving   toward
International Studies at  Stan- doba    university    reforms    of the   traditional   U.S.   system;
ford. He spent a year in Latin 1917   br0uSht   back   the   med" the trustees appoint the rector,
America ieval   democratic   system    by who in turn appoints the deans.
which   university   authorities, The    circus    of    elections    is
Where are American univer- especially     the     rector    (i.e., abolished,
sities headed? They are being president)  and  the   deans   are CAMPUS SACROSANCT
Latin    Americanized.     Where elected by the faculty and stu- American    university    cam-
are    Latin   American    univer- dents.   Faculty   members   pre- puses have had no special legal
sities headed? They are being sent themselves as candidates, status.    In    Spanish - speaking
Americanized. make     speeches     expounding countries, university buildings
The two systems are, there- their   programs,   and   the  vie- have   for   centuries   been   as
fore, like ships passing in the torious  candidate  takes  office sacrosanct    as    the    churches,
night. Perhaps a little ship-to- for   a   stipulated   term.   Some- where    anyone    fleeing    from
ship conversation would be a times the elections are as color- the law could seek asylum. In
good thing, since the seas are ful as a U.S. political conven- front of some old Spanish uni-
uncharted. tion.  By contrast,  our univer- versity    buildings    are    stone
SOP OFFERED sity presidents have tradition- pillars   connected by  a  chain,
Faculty and students in the ally been appointed for an un- beyond which the police could
United States are no longer limited term by the boards of not pass. The tradition of
willing to be controlled, trustees, which can dismiss barring police from a univer-
through the boards of trustees, them at will. There are now sity has allowed students in
by the power elite. They want demands that the faculty be Latin America to barricade
a say in the conduct of the guaranteed at least some say in themselves inside university
university's affairs on the the selection of a president, buildings and allegedly to con-
highest level. Most Latin Moreover, academic elections vert them into revolutionary
American universities have in the United States have been barracks. The Americanization
achieved this, usually with a pretty much a formality. They of Latin American universities
tripartite governing body are elections for committees, has been accompanied by a
drawn from the faculty, the not for executive posts; candi- flouting of this tradition. When
alumni and the students. This dates do not present them- Venezuelan President Leoni
system is blamed, rather un- selves, and those elected do recently sent troops into the
fairly, for the inefficiency of not have to state their pro- Central University of Caracas,
Latin American university ad- gram. It is now proposed that it did not occur to him that
ministration. The American- the elections acquire some he was acting like the mili-
ized universities employ U.S.- reality, that there be effective To Page 5
style boards of trustees on candidates, and that they be See: U.S. SCHOOLS
which the faculty and students
have little, if any, representa-   '■■mmii*smt>m[m*!* «™*<»™<~™™»i<^mmMmMmmmmm^
Knn     TTcnalW   o   enn   ic   nfforpH EDITOR: Danny Stoffman nf Lee  Tse  Hu,  the leeason between
non.   usually a sop is oiierea      c|^ ^^ ^^ the  workers  and  the   ruling  class
in    the    form    Of    a    committee News                                   Susan Gransby Hrush  made  Irene Wasilewski blush,
marlp nn nf administration   far-         Managing   Murray McMillan Fred Cawsey burned a few ears, Paul
made up 01 administration, tae-        phofo    »   K'orf H||ger Knox  went unrecognized  and  Laurie
ulty   and   Students,   which   airs       Senior .Pat Hrushowy Dunbar   had   John   Birchers   on   her
.               .                                              , Snorts                                         Mike Jessen n^ind.    Alexandra    Volkoff    was    the
its     Views     but     has    no     real tfWe   .ZZZZZZ7'No'rman   Gidney ladV in blue-
nnwer    Tt  i<?  doubtful  that  this        Page Friday   Judy Blng BiIIv   Netminder  scored,   and   shot,
power.   H  is  auuoiiui   uidt   uiu>        A£lf   cjfy'  BoJ. Lm with John Twigg, Mike Fitzgerald and
device   Will   much    longer    ap- Nonchalantly   grinding   out   an   al- Jim Maddin all whom sported sports,
pease     the     demands     Of     the most   endless   ream   of   copy,   Mike Lawrence Wood, developing nicely,
...            J4.J+          u               a Finlay  became  senatized  and the icy thank you, saved the news desk along
faculty and Students, wnowant C0ld air (thanks to two ems) became with fotogs Bob Brown, George Hollo,
to    have    their    hands    On    the clear as well. Mark DeCoursey slept, Powell   Hargreaves,   Chris   Blake   and
and  Steve  Jackson  and  Judy Young Bernard  Loiselle,  who   was  not  slow
legal controls Of the university. encountered the rantings and ravings but  antagonistic.
There have not been demands .  ...-^p^ v.s..    . msm     *              > -   •   *•» griculture
rese
•      •      m
Vol.   187,  No.  539
MANURE CITY
THURSDAY, JAN.   11,  1968 Page  2
THE    MOOBYSSEY
Thursday, January 11, 1968
Aggies-ha ha
Look around you, fella. See the 'individualistic',
universal student. Laugh, and go back to your niche.
Pause next time. Think of beer and engineer. The
commerceman and tan. The beards and the weirds.
Wonder why you think you're better than anyone sitting
over there doing what you wouldn't do, and why you
make fun of him and why you're afraid of him.
Try to think about Agriculture, don't just say
"there's an Aggie — HAW, HAW!" We think that we
are unique; we are small, close, friendly; we see you
almost as an outsider would see you. But we can't help
but make that last statement hypocritical when we
see an engineer at  the pub jeering.
He's there because he is celebrating — he just solved
a huge problem — and he can't see that we have anything to celebrate. We resent the potential businessman
who doesn't need to talk to us or befriend us because
we don't happen to be in his way up the ladder of success. We cannot understand the dedicated chemistry student who looks down on us because we don't happen
to be terribly keen about our chemistry courses and
score much below him. We are sometimes bitter about
the non-science follower because he so often ignores
us, saying we are backwards and not with the times.
Are we missing out on that great experience of life?
Are we backwards? Are we blowing our cool and missing the truth of it all?
It will be hard not to get mushy, but listen fella!
Saturday is the end of Aggie Week. Look and count the
things you have seen pertaining to it. Remember that
there are only two hundred and twenty of us, and try
to recall a better show. Did you see us peddling apples
in the cold? Do you remember our whoops and hollers
as we performed our stunts? It's easy to call that immature and unproductive and we're the first to admit it.
But we're not just content doing our thing, we're happy.
Have you ever seen a 'high' guy act as happy? Remember, we were sober.
Agriculture isn't the biggest thing in our primarily
materialistic world. We won't make as much money as
an engineer or a musician. We won't have the pleasure
to discover the real meaning of life because we aren't
so dissatisfied that we have to look for it. We won't be
so absorbed in our work that we forget we only have
limited years. Certainly we will miss the adventure of
precarious jobs — people must, eat, and until somebody
solves that problem, we'll have work. We can't think of
a better life, but obviously most others seem to feel
there is one. If you do, "think about it. Realize that we
know what we are doing. Realize that we are happy
doing what we are doin<*. Try to realize that we try to
know what you are doing, but it is you who make it hard.
And fella, if you still don't figure us — just try us.
Man must eat
A sound economy must rest on a sound agriculture
— and it always will, because man must eat. In our complex, modern society, we are taking agriculture too
much for granted.
During the 19th and 20th centuries, there has been
rapid growth in technical and scientific knowledge, the
Malthusion growth in world population, the increasing
pollution of our environment, and a lack of appreciation of the importance of balanced ecological systems
and man's role in them. Man's survival depends on finding viable solutions to these problems, and agricultural
faculties can play a key role in seeking such solutions.
The necessity for food and freedom from diseases
are the two main factors governing the size of a population. Our present rate of population expansion can be
attributed to modern preventive medicine and revolutionary advances in farm production processes. A farm
worker is producing four to five times as much today
as he was in the early 1940s. This is a considerable
increase but it will have to be doubled again by 1980
to meet ever-increasing world food needs.
It is the purpose of a Faculty of Agriculture to
produce agriculturists and agricultural scientists
capable of increasing production and utilization of food
supplies. How can our Faculty meet these demands? By
producing bachelors graduates who have majored in
specific areas and know enough about the economic
side of agricultural business to serve the industry. By
producing scientists, researchers in a field of science or
social science related to Agriculture.
The basic fields involved are: Soil Science, Plant
Science. Animal Science, Engineering, Economics and
Social Science.
A Faculty of Agriculture should produce scientists
and agriculturalists in these fields — scientists capable
of research into agricultural problems in an effort to
maximize production, and agriculturalists capable of
incorporating this information from research into food
production processes. Produce enough such graduates
from Aggie Faculties and the world food shortage can
be abated, if not alleviated.
"We can cancel that order for RAID now."
The blue-jean boys blew it
We suppose that all of you apathetic nonentities didn't notice, but we have been staging
frivolous but frolicking .stunts and contests all
week. Monday we invited all faculties to send
their best flower children to the Foresters' side
of the McMillan Building (that's our nursery) for
a revealing test of skill and speed. The team to
assemble the best flower in the shortest time
would be the winner.
We were over-confident with the knowledge
that we have the only course on campus dealing
solely with the anatomy of different flowers.
Never fear, we were wiped out! The aesthetic and
aromatic beauty of our effort was nothing to
the artsmen's creation. Our flower was unnotice-
able beside the twenty-foot production of the
Engineers. Our flower was cheap beside the diamond-studded conglomeration crafted by Commerce. We were shot down.
Tuesday was another day. We couldn't miss
on the grass-cutting contest. Arts got so hung-up
on the word that they missed the starting gun.
Engineers got so hung-up on the word that they
missed it too. Science-men were afraid of snakes
in the field, and the meds' didn't want to get
their feet wet. We didn't even have to bring out
our hidden tractor to win.
Aggie Week without a manure spreading
contest would be a shocking blow to the tradition-conscious members of our faculty — so that
was slated for yesterday. Disappointed with the
poor competition of the day before, we carefully
screened the applicants. The only campus group
with an unbroken record of B.S. spreading was
the Ubyssey. I won't even print who they sent
as their contestant, but it was obvious from the
start that he wasn't well aquainted with our materials. We did very nearly loose by default
however — we let him talk for a few moments
and all but one of us fell asleep. After gagging
him (we found that we could by a regulation
decreed many years ago concerning the silencing
THE MOO
BYSSEY
Member of BETTER BARNS ASSOCIATION
Winner of TWONG POUCH AWARD
Published every so ofen upon the simultaneous occurence of a blue moon and AGGIE
WEEK, by and for the aforementioned blue
bloods ,and available to anyone seeking Agrarian solace.
EDITOR: LORNE DUNN
EDITOR'S ASS.:  DAVE PARSONS
ART (Y) WORK: BRUCE MELTON
REPORTERS: MERILEE FAHRNI
ANONYMOUS ARTSMAN
Also special thanks to The Ubyssey for its
assistance, which made the whole thing possible.
of opponents) we were happy to see that he still
had enough in him to shovel the shit all through
the night, 'till we were left far behind.
Two out of three isn't the best average, but
even if we lose stunts staged today and tomorrow, we won't feel bad. We always prove ourselves at the end of this glorious week — at the
Farmer's Frolic. We guarantee that we enjoy
ourselves more than any other student from any
other faculty. Come and prove it to yourselves.
We also guarantee that you will enjoy yourself
more at the Frolic than at any other Faculty's
dance. You see, even if we aren't number one
in all our contests, we can't be bitter. We do
love you all — it just isn't advertised.
Senate sit-in
proves  nothing
By  DAVE  PARSONS
So our great student senators have decided
to hold a sit-in at the next meeting of the senate.
Whoopee — that is going to prove one hell of a
lot! What kind of senators have the students of
this campus elected, anyway?
Agriculture was one of the few faculties to
vote solidly against the three student senators
who were elected.
Our outspoken president, Gene Zabawa, has
questioned not only the actions of our senators,
but also the need for students on the senate at
all. With this last statement I must differ, because I feel that student senators could serve a
very useful function on senate.
But by "offering" to resign, or by holding
a sit-in, our student senators are going to accomplish damn little.
As Agriculture students, we can't help but
wonder what is wrong with people who do all
the complaining about the "beaurocracy" and
the "system" and the "establishment". We wonder if these people are really sincere or if perhaps they get a bang out of complaining.
I'm sure we don't try to understand the
thought processes of our senators any more than
they try to write off our criticisms with the
thought that we don't think.
We do think.
We admit that we don't think in the same
way as our senators think, and we admit that
we don't think that the university is going to
be improved by more of the senators' kind. However, we do accept the fact that they will always
be with us, and we will live with you.
We would like you to act with a bit more
maturity. Stay in the senate, bitch till your lungs
are withered, raise hell if you have to, and make
the rest of them think.
You cannot do that by quitting or by holding a sit-in. But you can do it by bitching about
student needs. A constructive bitch is a good
bitch. Thursday, January 11, 1968
THE    MOOBYSSEY
Page 3
Ghouls make
poultry of
Aggie men
Look at those pictures!
Look at the poor unfortunate
man being covered with chicken feathers over sticky syrup.
Aren't you glad you have never
fallen foe to the muscular and
inventive ghouls that make up
the Agriculture Women's Undergraduate Society? (See them
laugh as they make poultry of
our men.)
The explanation that the victims hadn't bought their Farmer's Frolic tickets was a lie.
It wasn't even a publicity stunt:
we never need those to sell out
our dance.
The men of our faculty can
only surmise that our sweet
and sweaty faculty-mates don't
have our welfare at heart. We
hope that their success does
not inspire them to further
ugly acts — we, as true blue
Aggie men, would have to retaliate.
We do have some Progesterone (you know that horrible
hormone — and what it does to
female constitutions) and we
know where their coffee-sugar
supply is —
If you like it,
you're Aggie
If you think that The Moo-
byssey was written by arts-
men — then you are obviously
an engineer; If you think that
The Moobyssey was written by
an engineer . . . then it would
seem, by the same reasoning,
that you are obviously an arts-
man.
However, if you think that
this paper will not cause a reaction, then I suggest that you
are an uninformed science-
man. If you think that this
paper will not cause a reaction,
then I suggest that you are
an uninformed engineer. If
you think you can do better,
you are probably a commerce-
men. If you enjoy The Moobyssey, you are an Aggie, or
should be.
The ghouls pour on the syrup and feathers.
Fight police brutality, drain
your precious bodily fluids
Our Forestry friends have the honor of running this year's
blood drive.
They want a plug, and we are happy they think enough
about it to ask us. We feel Canada is extremely lucky to have
the Red Cross operate a free-blood-to-needy-beings-from-free-
bleedy-donors system.
It works, as long as everybody realizes that to get, somebody's got to give.
Agriculture students are proud that we have always been
so very liberal with our precious bodily fluids, though opposed
as we have always been to stupid competitions, we shan't dwell
on the fact.
We are a little annoyed, however, that the faculties so often
put down by our university's lovely people must love to give
blood more than those lovely people do.
"We love you" mustn't apply to sick people. To you, sweet
flower blossom of the ephemeral lily' pad, sick people aren't
all wounded cops. After all, with police brutality what it is, you
may need some yourself some day.
Blood drive week will be held from Jan. 22 to Feb. 2,
1968.
Below, one recipient relates his story:
I didn't want their stinking blood, but they forced it on
me! I wanted to die—that was the only way to reach my blue
Aggie heaven.
I protested, hid in the women's John, even blessed them when
the ultimate desecration of my personal liberty occurred.
Toward that huge reservoir of collected blood I was dragged,
my pleas that Buddhist Aggie Monks are exempt, ignored.
So I'm still existing. Hell! Maybe the engineers will take
me. They're not so damn humanistic!
Enter hallowed
Aggiedom halls
Glide softly through huge front doors whose muffled locking
behind offer resounding echoes to the portentous silence.
'Aggie Faculty! ! ! flashes bluely neon in your mind as you
survey rows of forbidding trophies—accolades to past Aggie
achievements.
Advance—classroom vistas unfold—dim romantic glow suffusing patterned wall panels and kaleidoscope samples and
diagrams; equipment silently awaiting life, their kinetic energy
poised around you.
Silence thuds loudly, scutters down the empty aisles of your
vision.
You, poised atop tiers of desks, savor this innately intellectual atmosphere; expand with pride and awe for this moment.
You belong!
An exciting involved four years await, replete with romance,
intellectual activity, and the fulfillment of active course-work.
The wraith of Marion Mounce, first woman agriculture graduate,
militantly advances ahead as you tremble from the room.
Behind, in the romantic gloom, blue neon gradually fades.
And Ih^re was the foitrlh year forester who even after
living with the Aggies for half a year, couldn't quite grasp the
atmosphere.
Forester stamps through the glass door, click of the lock is
gobbled by the resounding echo of tromping feet.
'Aggie Faculty! ! ! drifts vaguely into his skull as he ignores
the rows of trophies.
Tromp, tromp!
Romantic glow is instantly rejected—something wrong with
the lights. Insignificant diagrams and colorful samples adorn the
walls—ignored.
Silence is eery, except for tromp; uncomfortable unconcerned
reaction to unrealistic atmosphere. Head whirls quickly, ashtray
in range for phlernmy tobacco gob. Splat! Pride of contact fills
mind.
He is content with home, he belongs! Aggie walks by with
books and is scorned. Forester passes bouncing rubber ball. Pass,
grab, laughter.
Very content.
Letters  to  Ed
Get together:
dig the shig
Dear Sirs:
Last November our secret
experiment was inadvertently
divulged to the public when
three sheep and two pigs escaped into C-lot and began to
play leapfrog.
Naturally people began to
talk and to speculate about the
nature of the experiment. One
Artsman -who saw it, and
thought that they must be
fighting,  exclaimed:
"Gracious me, why must
they contend with each other
in such a grotesque fashion?"
An Engineer suggested the experiment must have something
to  do  with  heat  mechanics.
It is with great satisfaction
that we can now put their
minds at rest and declare our
work a  complete  success.
Last week a woolly little
cross-breed with a flattened
snout and a curly tail was
born. The name of the new
species is, of course, Shig, and
its  possibilities  are  unlimited.
Take, for example, this excerpt from the November 22nd
issue of The Ubyssey: "Those
wise in animal-lore probably
do not want students observing
jheep-pig activities for fear it
will start a new dance." And
we agree—the world is not
quite ready for the Shig.
But we, the members of the
Agriculture faculty, are willing
to show a sneak preview to a
select few who would like to
come and see the Shig this Saturday night at the Farmers'
Frolic.
Get your ticket now because
the Shig cannot wait.
A. A. AGGIE
Agri XXX.
Dear   Sirs:
It has come to our attention
that a lot of people, especially
sciencemen and engineers, have
misconceptions about us Aggies.
They think we do nothing
but clean out cow barns, when
in actual fact we also muck
out hog pens, horse stalls,
chicken coops and sheep barns.
We think they are grossly
underestimating our ability as
students.
SAM SHOVEL
Moobyssey
aids digestion
By the time you have read
this article and digested the
non-existent facts found herein, you have wasted 30 seconds of your valuable time,
you idiot. Page  4
THE    MOOBYSSEY
Thursday, January 11,1 968
AGRICULTURE:
A versatile education
.i
LOOKING COWED as he tries to milk a peanut, Clinton
Peters fails to refrain from making nutty cracks as Joe
Gardner tries to bring him to heel, his sole feat of the day.
Round object in the background, which drew a round of one
clap when erected, was made after funds had evaporated.
SFA rank with potential
The AUS outranks all other  groups  on  or  off  campus.
Recently a body of highly inspired SFA students pulled a
tremendously witty stunt. Taxed to their utmost, this imaginative
group (in retaliation to the EUS who had apparently kidnapped
their president), released several valued Aggie cows, subsequently
painting  "SFU"  on an  obvious "assinine spot.
It was a rather appropriate parallel of two prominent
images, despite degradation of the Aggie US bovine dignity.
In a didactic, non-retaliatory action, yon campus on the
hill received the donation of a quantity of substance which is
produced in abundance by one of our more complicated machines
hidden safely in the swine barns.
We hope this heaping of honors upon the hillside college
will be graciously received.
We also hope SFA students won't turn up their noses now
that said quad has been adorned with greater potential for
growth and life.
Thanks is due to those twelve members of the AUS who
took part. Because of this organization, the SFA campus now
ranks higher than ever before.
If it were not for the alarming predominance
of blue-clad hicksters contrasted with the sight of
beautiful women stalking the butyric stained
halls, one would hardly be able to differentiate
the agriculture building from its drab contemporaries.
This centrally located structure, for some unknown reason, is seldom traversed by the average campus trotter. Oh, the occasional artsman
lost in his perennial smog stumbles upon this
humble abode and finds himself at the mercy of
the inhabitants.
Apart from the misguided artsmen, few
visitors pay their social respects.
THE  IDLE RICH
As far as most people are concerned, the
aggie building houses rich farmers' sons and
beautiful women looking for ideal, husbands.
Also, it is often implied that the Agriculture
Faculty is primarily a finishing school for
farmers.
These ideas, we must admit, have long been
outdated. This does not mean, however, that
Aggie women aren't beauiful. or that Aggies
make poor husbands. Neither does it mean that
Aggies disrespect farm life.
Most Aggies feel that farming is an. honorable profession and a satisfying life. Their primary concern, however, is to receive an education — a versatile education.
WE  ARE  VERSATILE
You may sneer, but statistics show that agriculture students truly receive a versatile education which equips them mentally and physically
and thus enables them to participate in a wide
ranee of activities.
The UBC Aggie grads fill positions ranging
from that of Chief Rat Catcher of Toronto to
that of party leader in Canadian politics.
AGGIES ALL
Nearly every field of endeavor is justly represented by agriculturists from this university.
This includes the fields of commerce, education.
Thanks a bushel
Thank you all, beautiful pipples, for un-
pocketing your precious coins in aid of our
needy crippled children. Please don't admit that
you bought an apple because your mouth thirsted
for that delicious juice.
You will have greater peace of mind if you
only admit the charitable intentions of your
personality. The money that you popped into
our rattling cans will all go to the Crippled
Children's Hospital fund. Let your heart be
warmed by your generosity. And thank you!
law,  scientific  research,  farming,  and such  oddities as deep sea diving and psychology.
Apart from being general busy-bodies, Aggie
grads fill many positions available only to agriculturists. Since agriculture is primarily concerned with the production of food, Aggies are
faced with a continuous challenge — that of
ensuring a plentiful supply of food for tomorrow
and many tomorrows to come.
EXTENSIVE  EMPLOYMENT
This requires a versatile education — including all the sciences and a generous sprinkle of
the fine arts.
To all Ripley fans, we have a final word. The
art of yanking teats is not necessarily mastered
by every graduate of this faculty.
LEFTOVERS
A turkey weighing 62 pounds, and estimated
to be equal when dead to between 280 and 300
Christmas dinners, won ihe heaviest turkey competition at the Interna;.ona! Poultry Show at
! Jlympia, England.
Prince Cliarle.- u(. i.!,
Smithfield Agricultural
steer, Climsland Jasper.
i s  won a first at the
iow   with   his  Devon
Bay Street's George Hees to a farmer in the
rural riding of Northumberland:
"Mighty  fine  Guernseys  you   got  there.  Just
about: the nicest I ever seen
Farmer in reply  ' He.isi   ■■•,-.  •     and the verb
form is 'saw'.'"
A pair of Aggies are seriously interested in
producing a boar with a "gilt" complex while
:" veral otlv iv. are leokmn ever the new crop
of lambs and arc wondering "weiher" or not . . .
From the Frontier Press: Neepawa, Manitoba,
Jan. 12. 1905. By the destruction of the Opera
House block here and several stocks of merchants, a loss of $75,000 was sustained this morning. It took the firemen three hours to get water.
LONDON (AP) — The Agricultural research
council here says pigs can be taught to control
the temperature in their sty.
Pigs at a research farm here learned to press
a lever controlling an infra-red heater when
they are cold and a second switch to turn on a
fan when they are hot.
Jr\tf .]3fAfA^^woOwEsyA qso^ \
4MWHB-W)
▲fifAfA^AfAf ^«C»UpiBTATA?Af HARD JIMES
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE AMS OFFICE Thursday, January 11, 1968
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 5
U.S. schools go Latin
From Page 4
tary governments of Argentina
and Brazil, which democratic
Venezuela has formally denounced. In the United States
the reverse trend is perceptible.
The presence of the state
police on the Berkeley campus
has become a major issue, and
in a TV interview on Feb. 5
former President Clark Kerr
of the University of California
said that the assignment of
outside police to various campuses had aggravated student
unrest. There are demands
that university police take care
of campus problems, the feeling being that once the campuses are under the thumb of
the regular police, academic
freedom will vanish. It was
precisely this fear that made
Latin American universities
challenge the right of the government police to enter university buildings.
STUDENTS RIOT
In the past, most of our great
universities -were supported by
tuition. Since World War Two
there have been, even in New
England and in New York
State, moves to provide free
higher education on a scale
hitherto unknown in the
world.  Generous  California is
now wondering how it can
afford to maintain its costly
state university and college
systems, but Gov. Reagan's
proposal to introduce tuition
is generally regarded as a step
backward. In Latin America,
free university education has
been the rule, but in fact the
governments have usually
been unable or unwilling to
pay for a modern university
system. Salaries have been
low, and funds for libraries
and equipment insufficient.
The Americanized universities
charge tuition and in many
cases, as at the Universidad de
los Andes in Bogota, offer fair
salaries and provide relatively
good facilities. The move to
introduce tuition would undoubtedly spread were university authorities not afraid of
rioting students who will seize
and burn buses if fares are
raised a cent. Caught in a financial vise, public Latin
American universities stress
"autonomy," i.e., the state
should provide the funds but
otherwise not intervene in the
affairs of the universities. This
cherished autonomy, now being eroded in Latin America,
is essentially what the Berkeley liberals demand.
HEAR
JON BRAUN
ON THE
17th and 18th
Model Required
For HAIRSTYLING
Call 325 - 6898
evenings only
Payment of Fees
Second installment now due.
Payment should be made at the
Accounting Office
on or before
Monday, January 15,  1968
FILMSOC PRESENTS
ALFIE
WITH MICHAEL CAINE
FRL JAN. 12 -AUD. -50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
COMING JAN. 13, 14-8:30 p.m.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
"A show  not to be missed"
"An  orgy of color, action  and  sound"
THE
—Time Magazine
African Ballet!
Tickets: $2.50, $3.00, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 j
Vancouver Ticket Centre 683-3255, 630 Hamilton St.
or through any Eatons store. Town and Country
Electronics  in  Kerrisdale and  Richmond.
50 Dancers, Singers and Musicians from Africa!
Acclaimed in the leading capitals of the world.
Free press squashed
WINDSOR <CUP) — More than 50 students
and a handful of professors marched Wednesday in sub-zero temperatures in favor of a free
student press for the University of Windsor.
They were protesting a senate committee's
action in forcing the resignations of the co-
editors of The Lance. Several professors cancelled lectures to allow students to join in the
protest.
At 11 a.m. a special one-page issue of The
Lance appeared on campus giving a complete
chronology of the affair.
At 1:30 the board of publications called for
a Canadian University Press investigation commission to look into allegations of censorship,
coercion and obscenity.
The board agreed to accept the findings
of the commission, and asked the senate to do
the same.
In Ottawa CUP president Lib Spry said
arrangements will be made to convene the
three-man commission Saturday.
Windsor university president J. F. Leddy
declined an invitation to select a fourth member for the commission. He said after consultation with various interested parties at
the university he decided not to be come involved with what he termed an "ad hoc"
committee.
The controversy began Dec. 4 when Leddy
called a meeting of the senate committee on
student conduct, activities and discipline
(SCAD) to consider what he termed The
Lance's "morbid obession with squalid vulgarity."
SCAD at the time asked for student council
support in cleaning up The Lance, but council
refused, reiterating the right of the paper to
operate freely.
Co-editor John Lalor told CUP Tuesday
Leddy and SCAD objected to several articles
printed during the first term, particularly
the article entitled The Student As Nigger,
an analysis of university education in western
society.
The controversy died down during the
winter break, but Lalor said it became clear
Monday SCAD would move to expel co-editor
Marian Johnstone and himself at a Tuesday
meeting if they did not resign beforehand.
In his letter of resignation, accepted by
SCAD without comment Lalor said he was
not prepared to let any "arbitary committee"
play with his life,
He said he would not allow the committee
to "roll up my future in a little ball and flush
it down the toilet for the sake of expediency."
The Windsor student council termed
SCAD's role in the case "unnecessary interference" which undermined the student body.
Whether you dream of a car-
or a countess, we can help you
To us, a Confederation career is the good life. Rather like buying a Bentley.
Or courting a countess.
And we can give you the good life. If you'll work for it.
We're looking for men who are intelligent, resourceful, ambitious. Men who can
decide their own working hours, set their own goals, be their own decision-makers.
If you're willing to settle for a nice, safe job with a guaranteed income of
$10,000 in five years, forget this message—you're aiming too low.
But if you want the good life, contact:
ronfederation Life
\r J-  ASSOCIATION S
Doug Bennett, C.L.U. Superintendent of Agencies 685-1277
WE WILL BE ON CAMPUS FOR INTERVIEWS JAN. 23, 24, 25 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 11, 1968
Luther figure runs
for UWO rectorship
LONDON, Ont. (CUP) — Martin Luther is alive and running
for rector at the University of Western Ontario.
His real name is Pat Donohue, and he's been riding around
campus on a horse, decked out with a long black wig, a black
hat and a flowing cape.
Donohue admits he looks a bit like Luther. But as a Catholic,
he banks on it bringing in some of the Protestant vote. Since
he's studying for the priesthood, he figures he's got the Catholic
vote tied up.
A rector is a student representative on the board governors.
Donohue is the first announced candidate. The students
council last fall rejected the board of governor's invitation to
seat a non-student rector, but the graduate students council
decided to accept the offer.
A full-page ad in Friday's Gazette, the student newspaper,
placed by the board, stipulated that in accordance with the uni-
versities' act, the rector must be a faculty member or a UWO
graduate of a year or more.
The undergraduate student union placed a full-page ad in
the Gazette opposite the board's own ad, strongly opposing a
non-student rector representing students on the board.
The ad said: "No one can represent the interests of the
student or express the student point of view as effectively as
one who is himself a student. The rector proposal represents
mere lip-service to the principle of meaningful student participation."
The ad suggests three students be elected to the board: one
each by the graduates and the undergraduates, and one elected
at large.
(Revision of the universities' act was hotly contested in the
Ontario legislature last spring. Students wanted a student rector,
but the legislature moved in favor of the board's non-student
rector request, after a committee of the legislature had supported
the student argument.)
BRAUN
SPEAKS OUT ON:
'SEX, LOVE
AND MARRIAGE'
BRAUN SAYS:
WHAT IS THIS
THING CALLED
LOVE?
WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT?
FIND OUT - SEE
WITH:
ALFIE
FRI., JAN. 12 -AUD. -50c
12:30,3:30,6:00,8:30
MICHAEL
CAINE
ATTENTION  ALL STUDENTS!
Your are cordially invited
to the sixth annual
Student-Alumni Banquet
Tuesday, February 27th,  7968
at 6:00 p.m. in Brock Hall
GUEST SPEAKER: Mrs. Margaret (Ma) Murray
Editor,  Bridge  River - Lillooet News
Free tickets may be obtained by phoning, visiting or writing
the Alumni Association Office at Cecil Green Park (next to the
School of Social Work), call 228-3313 BEFORE February 7, 1968.
(Accommodation is limited so reserve NOW!)
®Vu<sfcal
•<r*
^
all
<%*%o
*-"0£»eT\.   to   aVt~
^SicVts va * 15.00/
^Rftlath.. Couple
MEN!!!
ABBOTT'S MENS WEAR
CLEARANCE
SPORTS JACKETS - »> i.w »,
$15.95
Example: A wool tweed muted houndstooth
Reg. $64.50  -   $39.50
Some SOCKS Vk PRICE
SWEATERS from $5.95
Example: Soft, supple suede front cardigan
Reg. 49.50   -   $29.50
Bulky British import pullover
Reg. 22.50   -   $14.95
DRESS PANTS from $6.95
Example: Pure virgin wool "Keithmoor" slacks
Reg. 27 50  -   $18.95
DRESS SHIRTS
GANT  Reg.  $9.00
SALE $6.00
Shop Soiled Shirts
2 for $5.00
TIES
Reg. to $2.00  -   $1
TIE  &  PUFF  SETS
Reg. $4 Reg. $5.50
$2.50     $3.50
D. B. BLAZERS - $29.50
SPORT SHIRTS from $3.95
ABBOTTS
MEN'S
WEAR
4445 W. 10th—just down from Sasamat Thursday, January 11, 1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 7
'TWEEN CLASSES
Marxist on Negro revolt
SPECIAL EVENTS
Dr. Herbert Aptheker, US
director of Institute of Marxist Studies speaks on the
Negro Revolt today, noon,
Brock lounge.
VCF
Movie, Nobody Waved Goodbye,   today,   noon,   Ang.  110.
Admission 10 cents.
AAC
Richard Thompson, leader
of confrontation with Saskatchewan government, hoping to
meet student activists, today,
3 p.m., Bu. lounge.
FILMSOC
Alfie Friday in the auditorium  at  12:30,   3:30,   6:00   and
8:30 p.m., 50 cents.
GIRLS' GOLF TEAM
All  girls  interested  in  golf
lessons call Lauris Innes, 278-
1115.
EDUCATION US
Meeting today, noon, ed. 100,
for    all    students    graduating
this year.
MUSSOC
Rehearsal   for    chorus    and
singing    leads    tonight,    6:30,
auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD
VOLLEYBALL
Practices    for    both    teams
Tuesday   6:30   p.m.,   Thursday
6 p.m., Sunday 1 p.m., gym.
COLLEGE LIFE
No    meeting    tonight.    But
don't miss Braun on Sex next
week.
AIESEC
Applications    for    the     exchange program must be submitted to AMS, box 5.
CLUB  CANADIEN
Business     meeting     Friday,
noon, Bu. 205.
PEUS
Ski   trip   to   Manning   Park
this  Sunday.   Cost  $4,   tickets
in the gym.
DANCE CLUB
General     meeting     Friday,
noon,  clubroom.  Dancing  will
follow.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Special showing of film
Overture, today, noon, IH 402.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Workshop   on  value,   taboo,
culture and . . . Saturday, 10
a.m., IH.
GOSPEL STUDENTS
Ed  Gregory  returns to  talk
on   renewed   Christianity   via
the  Holy Spirit,  today,  noon,
Bu. 202.
COMPUTER CLUB
Courtesy the ACM and UBC
computing centre Prof. Arden
of U of Michigan will speak
in Ang. 314, today, at 3:30
p.m., on Machine Organization
and a Survey of Time-Sharing.
EL CIRCULO
Conversation    group    meets
noon today, IH 402-404.
INDIA STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Meeting   in   IH   400   Friday
noon.
SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Meeting noon today in chem.
250.
AQUA SOC
Meeting Friday noon in Bu.
217. Dives and compressor will
be discussed.
PHRATERES
All-phi meeting today, noon,
Bu. 104. Coffee party for
grand - president,    Mrs.     Chil-
BRAUN SAYS:
LOVE
WITHOUT FEAR -
THAT'S WHAT
EVERYONE WANTS
DANCE CARIBBEAN
Friday 12th
9:00 P.M.
At International House
Caribbean Natives Band
Everyone Welcome — 75 cents
FACULTY OF
GRADUATE STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
All graduating students who hope to enter graduate
study at this University in 1968-69 are urged to file
applications as soon as possible. Places will be limited
and most decisions on admission will be made by
April 1.
The University offers graduate scholarships to outstanding students wishing to pursue studies toward the
Masters oir Doctoral Degree in many fields of graduate
research. Scholarships range in value up to $3500
per annum. In addition many departments have positions available as teaching assistants or research
assistants.
For detailed information consult the head of the Department in which you wish to study.
For application forms and further information please
apply to the Dean of Graduate Studies, Biological
Sciences 2312.
strom,   Monday  morning.   Details in Phrateres room.
EDUCATION US
Student-faculty coffee  party
for secondary students, today,
2:30   to   4:30   p.m.,   education
lounge.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting   Friday,   noon,   Bu.
223.
NISEI VARSITY
General meeting today, noon,
Bu. 205. Coke party follows in
clubhouse.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meeting   Friday,    noon,   IH
music room.
KOERNER LECTURE
Dr. Theodore Rosebury discusses science and social responsibility, Friday, noon, Ang.
104.
BRAUN SAYS:
LOVE WITHOUT
FEAR-THAT'S
WHAT EVERYONE
WANTS
COMPACT
CONTACT
CONTACT IfSS
LEHSINE
Why carry around a whole
chemistry set full of potions
for wetting, cleaning and
soaking contact lenses?
Lensine is here! It's an all-
purpose solution for complete
lens care, made by the
Murine Company.
So what else is new?
Well, the removable
lens carrying case
on the bottom of
every bottle, that's
new, too. And it's
exclusive with
Lensine, the
solution for
all your contact
lens problems.
for contacts
CLASSIFIED
Rales: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75«, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
 11
ALL THOSK GOING TO NORMAN
MacKenzie Dance Friday, please
briny any  <lanee   records  you   ha\e.
DANCE CARIBBEAN — FRIDAY
night al !):00 p.m. with the "Caribbean Native" Band. Open to all,
75c.   International   House.
Lost & Found
13
WALLET LOST, JAN. 4, VICINITY
Hennings. B'inder call 224-1)711 after
7   P.m.   Reward.   RM   130,   Tom.
•OUNI):   MAN'S   RING  IN   "C"   LOT.
Please   phone   685-948S.
ivEWARI) L.'OR RETURN OF OR
inl'ormation about green suede coat
lost new year's eve at Phi Kappa
Sigma   House.   Phone   224-96SI.
HIST. WHITE FUR HAT. IF FOUND
please call AM 1-8600. Reward offered.
FOUND DEC. 3, 1!)<!7 IN EMPTY
lot beside Fort Camp a Honor-
Reward I'in. Please collect Pub
Office    Brock   Hall.
Rides & Car Pools
14
i'ARPOOL WEST RICHMOND, 8:30s,
Blundell and Railway. Needs passengers,   277-7463   after  6   p.m.
DRIVER WITH CAR WOULD LIKE
to join British Properties carpool.
Phono  John,   926-2572.
NEEDED RIDE FROM PORT CO-
(luitlam to UBC to arrive 8 o'clock.
Please phone 942-9156 in the evening.
ride needed from corner of
S.W. Marine and Balaclava in time
for 8:30 M & Th; 9:30 T, W, & F.
Returning anytime after 4:30. Please
phone  Sharon,  266-8246
THREE GIRLS  DESIRE RIDE PROM
Fraserview   area.    327-2674.
WANT TO JOIN CAR POOL FROM
North Shore. Phone George at 987-
6781.
15
Special Notices
FOR RELIEF~FROM THAT YEAR
end hangover—see Peter, The Cam-
pus  Barber Shop,  Brock  Hall.
PHI KAPPA PI, CANADA'S ONLY
National fraternity, invites you to
participate in their annual spring
rush. Sign up at I.F.C. office, Brock
Extension.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30-6 p.m. Saturdays 'till
5:30.	
EXPERIMENT IN CHRISTIAN COM-
munity — a Christian Be-in for
University studenls. Weekend January 12th to 14th. Only 20 boys and
20 girls can be accommodated. For
reservation call the Cenacle, 738-3121
RODEO? ALL PEOPLE INTEREST-
ed in starting a Rodeo Club please
phone Neil at 224-9833 between 6:00
p.m.   and   7:00   p.m
ALL THOSE INTERESTED IN
Paulitics. Your Sharp minds are
needed to elect P.M. The Trudeau,
strong and free demands we get out
of Lamarsh of Winters and Turner
into  victory.
Marchand — Mar-chand
OPEN WORKSHOP ON "CULTURE"
or whatever this Saturday 13th at
10 a.m. at Internal ional House.
Taboo, values, "Overture" at noon,
coffee   even.   Come.
SPECIAL SH^WING'OF THE FILM
"Overture" today at noon, I.H. Rm
402-3.   Come   you-all.    (Free.)
P.E. SKI TRIP THIS SUNDAY, JANT
14 Manning Park. $4.00 Limited
number.   Buy   today.
Travel  Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
ATTENTION FUN~~SEEKERS.'"~AT-
tractivn man with broken right
ankle wishes to meet attractive coed, with same. Object: Mardi Gras
Dance. Transportation supplied
Phone  228-8729.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1951 CONSUL, $65. NEW CLUTCH,
brakes, ignition. See Jim, Hut A3,
Rm.   7,   behind Auditorium.
1960 FORD, ONE OWNER, 6 CYL.
Std. Good condition, $375. Phone
TR   9-3419.
'61 VOLVO WITH 63, B-18 MOTOR.
% race cam, high compression
head, lighted flywheel, new pirelli
tires. Motor requires work. $450. or
offers. Ph. 224-9753. Okanagan
house room 111 ask for Bob Gran-
holm.
1957 JAG SPORTS — MUST SELL.
Reconditioned motor, new clutch
and Top. Reasonable. Phone 733-
4090   after   6   p.m.
TR3 — I960 SEAT BELTS. IMMAC.
Inter, perfect mech condition. $700.
Phone 224-7858. Guy.
Automobile Parts
23
TWO NEW 165-15 SEMPERIT RA-
dial snow tires, with studs, on
Triumph   rims.    431-2131. ■
W1ANTED. TWO SNOWTIRES FOR
Volvo. 15x approx. 6.00. 224-9812.
Room   205.	
TYRE CHAINS, RIM FOR MINiT
Smith tach. Phone AM 6-7938 after
6   p.m.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Miscellaneous
32
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS —
Reservation for Mardi Gras. 5620
Dunbar  Si.   Phone   263-9011.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
HAIR FIECES CLEANED AND
styled. Reasonable rates, U.B.C.
Beauty Salon in the village. 228-
8942.
WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? ASK
Alfie. Jan. 12. Friday, 12:30, 3:30,
6:00,  S:30.  And.,   50c.
ALFIE FRIDAY', JAN. 12, AUD., 50c.
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. What's It All
AbouI.   Baby.	
'STAR TREK" FANS UNITE! TO
save Ibis show. Write to NBC-TV,
I'.urbank, California, BEFORE Jan.
31.
Sewing - Alterations
38
SUPERB PARISIAN FINE TAIL-
oriug al a special discount for male
and female students". Y. Roun-
ditck, 2754 W. 4th Ave., Vancouver,
l!.C.
Typing
40
TVP1N:;   2f.c/PAGE.    CARHON   COP-
ies.   10c/pagc.   685-7876 after  12  p.m.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates   TR.   4-9253
ANY AND ALL TYPING EXPERTLY
done. Reasonable rates. Phone
277-3521.	
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
sparing, legible work — Call 73S-
6S29. Mondays to Thursday and
Sundays afler  10:00  a.m.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. IBM Executive.
Reasonable lerms. Call days, 688-
4745   eves.   263-4023.
EMPLOYMENT
Male or Female
33
HELP WANTED — STUDENT TO
babysit occasional evenings. Will
drive home. Excellent rates. 731-
5946.
Work Wanted
54
DAY CARE FOR PRE-SCHOOLERS
by mother who knows her Spock.
$3.50 a day or 50c an hour. Telephone  224-1052.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
 64
ENGLISH, FRENCH,       HISTORY,
Russian. Individual,    no    contracts,
$3.00  hr. by  B.A.,  M.A.,   B.L.S.  736-
6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lutoiing given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Individual. $2.95 hr. Phone
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Still a  few left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Rale al: Publications Office
Brock   Hall   or   UBC   Bookstore
AQUALUNG,     SINGLE     70 TANK,
with     Seubapak     harness, J-valve.
and    tank    boot.    $50.    Call 224-0250
after  6.
X-TRANS. CAR RADIO, GM CARS.
Now, $80.00, sleal at $40.00. Even-
ings,    526-6884.    Ask    for   Ray   only.
TYROL SIZE 7% SKI BOOTS, LIKE
new, with press $25. Phone 266-5045
after   5   p.m.	
FOR SALE, HANDMADE AUBURN
wig. $40.00 or best offer 731-5946.
WET SUIT FOR 5'7", 150 t7b7~COM-
plele with hood, gloves, bools. Ski
boots,   men's  size 10.  921-7049.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms 81
ROOMS ON CAMPUS—AVAILABLE
Now. 2250 Wesbrook. $40.00. 224-
9662.  Close  to Meal   Services.
ROOMS FOR RENT, MALE ONLY.
Near Arbutus and 16th Ave. Phone
733-5255  after  6  p.m.
SINGLE ROOM — MALE STUDENT
—and   breakfast,   266-9280.	
SLEEPING ROOM. 10 MINUTES
walk from campus. $35.00. Phone
224-0378   evenings   only.	
'•'OR RENT — ROOM PLUS ALL
other facilities. Fourth and Bur-
rard.  Phone 738-0784.. Male only.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
ZPT Fraternity House. $75-month.
224-9660   after   five.
Room & Board
as
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE IM-
med. for one male student. Call 224-
3504.	
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
5745 Agronomy Road, 224-9667,
5-7   p.m.
LARGEST ROOMS ON CAMPUS.
Singles and doubles. Phi Delta
Thela    Fraternity.    Phone    224-9073.
ONE ROOMATE REQUIRED TO
share West End apt. with three
others. Rent $75-mo. Phone Rick
736-9480.
FOR THE BEST FOOD AND Accomodation on campus call Larry
or    Ted    224-7843    or    224-9684.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
for males. Quiet hours, weekly
cleaning service. Free parking, etc.:
Phone  224-9665  after  6  p.m. 	
ROOM AND HOARD FOR YOUNG
lady. Ride available. Phone 731-
3284.   15th   and   Balsam.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT. PRI-
vate entrance. Kitchen, $75' per
month. 4480 West 10th. Phone 939-
1286. Page 8
THE       U BIYSSEY
Thursday, January 11, 1968
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
JESSEN
It's about time referees stopped influencing the outcome of
international ice hockey games. Russian referee Anatoli Seglin
can claim a big part in the Soviet team's 4-2 victory over Canada
in the Canadian international hockey tournament which concluded Saturday in Winnipeg.
The Russians scored three power-play goals in beating the
Canadian nationals and clinching the three-team double round-
robin tourney. And all of the penalties which resulted in these
goals were called by the chubby, bald, scowling Soviet referee.
To say that all the Canadian penalties were undeserved
would not be true, but one; that to Danny
O'Shea early in the third period, was most certainly not.
After pressing the Russians in their own
end since the beginning of the period, the nationals finally connected for their first goal at
the 5:16 mark.
Perhaps Seglin thought the gutsy Canucks
were coming too close to winning this contest
or perhaps he was temporarily blinded. Whatever the reason he decided to call O'Shea for
tripping at 5:27.
What Seglin called tripping was merely another example
of the famous Russian art of taking a dive. Even on television
it was obvious. For years the Soviet players have fallen down
when barely touched by an opponent to get a penalty and a
chance to put their lethal power-play to work.
And work it did. At 6:18 Victor Blinov scored his second
goal of the night with a booming shot from just inside the blue
line.
National's coach Jackie McLeod said the game was Canada's
until that penalty. "It took the starch out of us," he added.
Minutes later the Russian referee gave another example of
his competence when the Canadians broke over the Soviet blue-
line on a three on two break. A Canuck stood with one foot
on the line as the puck-carrier crossed over it.
You guessed it. Our friendly referee called the play offside.
It's hard enough to beat the supremely-conditioned Russian
skaters but when one of the referees is calling plays in favor
of the Soviets then the task becomes virtually impossible.
This is by no means an isolated incident. Last year at the
World Hockey Championship in Vienna, Austria, the Canadian
nationals received a number of bad breaks due to poor calls by
referees.
Going back to 1966, when the championship was held in
Yugoslavia, the Canadians threatened to pull out of world hockey
play because of the poor officiating which was always taking
away vital goals and calling cheap penalties and offsides.
Canadian hockey officials should take a stronger stand to
ensure that we receive fair and equal officiating at home and
abroad.
The coach of the UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds, Bob Hind-
march, said in a recent interview that the Russians are very
arrogant and want a European referee to call games in which
they participate.
Hindmarch, who, along with Father David Bauer of UBC,
developed the idea of a national team to represent Canada, said
the contest last Saturday was one of the finest hockey games he
had ever seen but that the officiating was ridiculous.
I agree on both counts.
If the nationals can stop dallying with the puck and take
more shots on the opposition net, then perhaps they'll return
from Grenoble, France, with the 1968 championship in their
pockets, despite the anti-Canadian attitude of some referees.
It's a women s weekend
Calling all girl watchers, now hear this.
The Thunderette Basketball and Volleyball Tournaments, to
be held this weekend, are the highlight of the women's athletic
schedule.
Women will abound in the Women's Gym on Friday from
4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30
p.m. They will be participating in the basketball tourney.
But that's not all.
The volleyball tournament will be held in War Memorial
Gym on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
FORESTRY GRADUATES
are   invited  to discuss  career  opportunities  with  Canada's
leading Forest Products Company.
Interviews will be held on campus
January 15, 16, 17, 1968
for   graduates   interested   in   Forestry   Operations,   Logging
Operations and  in Wood  Products  Manufacturing.
For   information   and   appointments   please   contact   your
Students Placement Office.
AA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
THE
USYSSEf
S*J5.-V
— fred cawsey photo
BILL MACKIE shows his fine form on the side horse during a recent practice.
IN GYMNASTICS
Coach wishing on a star
By JOHN TWIGG
UBC may be peanuts in some sports, but we
definitely rate highly in North American gymnastics, thanks mainly to two men.
Bill Mackie, the 19-year-old star of coach
Bruno Klaus' gymnastics team, placed third in
his event, free exercise, at the recent seventeenth
annual National Gymnastics Clinic held in
Sarasota, Florida.
He thereby proved his ability beyond a doubt.
Klaus, a top American gymnast and coach
who moved to UBC this September, said of
Mackie, "He's an outstanding Canadian gymnast.
He is exceptionally good in free exercise considering his finish at the National Clinic against
many outstanding and Olympic competitors."
Klaus should know, as he had the honor of
coaching at the clinic.
Mackie went to the prestigious meet to gain
international experience and to see what other
gymnasts are doing. "His main problem at UBC
is finding competition. I wish I had another
gymnast of his calibre," said Klaus.
I'm afraid that Santa Claus is Klaus' only
hopej as athletes of the Vancouver-born Mackie's
calibre are a rarity indeed.
Though Mackie is unassuming, he is a man
of potential—he practises 18 hours a week. "He
has a long way to go to reach his peak, but with
three or four years of hard work, he could pos
sibly be an outstanding gymnast in Olympic
competition," said Klaus.
Mackie will get his chance to shine this year,
as the North American championships will be
held in War Memorial Gym this March.
The meet will have contestants from Mexico,
Cuba, United States and Canada, as well as four
specially invited world champions.
Klaus is optimistically looking for a tenth
place finish from his star in the all around competition, and possibly a medal for Canada in the
free exercise event from Mackie.
But he must stay free of injuries.
Prior to Christmas, Mackie had several small
hurts, which kept him out of serious practising,
but Klaus said that Mackie now realizes that
he must work with minor injuries.
He plans to work harder for the Olympics
this October in Mexico, but Klaus is now trying
to get him in shape for the meet in March.
Just the same, "He has the potential to place
in free exercise, his best event," said the coach.
Klaus was reluctant to say much more about
his star, because he had only known and coached
him since September.
To sum up, Klaus said, "He is a good gymnast and a hard worker, but he needs someone
to compete with, there is no challenge here."
The future looks bright for UBC in gymnastics, what with 1962 All-American Klaus
coaching a potential champion, but come back
in three years.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
DR. HERBERT APTHEKER
American Marxist — Director of the American
Institute of Marxist Studies
Speaking  on
THE NEGRO REVOLT"
TODAY - NOON - BROCK LOUNGE

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