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The Ubyssey Jan 18, 1968

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 About to fly into a rage,
science vice- president
John Taylor feels somewhat stuck - up as he
grumbles about zipper-
codes. Despite pants of
despair, he finally managed to void getting into
a flap and instead had a
ball, if only for a brief
science stunt commemorating science week.
— kurt hilger photo
Wally
said
something
/ol. XLIX, No   35
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 1968
48
224-3916
Acting president
slates conference
to debate secrecy
SCIENCE STUNT .
— kurt hilger photo
engineers sent to rule elsewhere.
SULLIVAN
tiery box for dummy engineer
highlights science week jollies
The only engineer around the library Wednesday noon was
n a coffin, and he was alite.
It was all part of science week.
An irreverant procession of 100 yelling sciencemen carried
he black coffin to the front of the library.
Inscribed on the coffin was EUS (engineer undergraduate
:ociety) and ASUS (applied science undergraduate society).
A dummy engineer immersed in gasoline and fireworks lay
nside.
Rain put out the first match but the second ignited with an
sxplosion of flames.
Gleeful blue-jackets left after the dummy stopped burning.
Science orgies continue today at noon in Hebb theatre with
pep meet. Admission for the skits, live music and entertainment
s 25 cents.
By FRED CAWSEY
Acting president Walter Gage Wednesday
agreed to call a special meeting between students
and senators to discuss senate secrecy.
But Gage, who confirmed the decision during
a meeting with the Alma Mater Society president
Shaun Sullivan, termed the meeting a "discussion" rather than a special meeting.
UBC's student senators this week urged Gage
to call an emergency senate meeting to discuss
the issue of secrecy and senate responsibility.
Their request came after
600 UBC students voted Jan. 9
to stage a sit-in at the next
senate meeting.
The student senators said a
sit-in can be avoided if a special
meeting is arranged before the
Feb. 14 senate meeting. But
much depends on the success of
the meeting, they said.
Sullivan met Wednesday
with Gage to discuss the format
of the special meeting.
No date has been yet set for the meeting.
Sullivan said he will meet Gage early next
week to arrange its details.
"This is not a special senate meeting as such,
nor is it a special student council meeting,"
Sullivan said.
"The student council will invite senate members to a discussion with student council, and
interested  faculty  and  students."
Student council is trying to create a dialogue
between students and senate, Sullivan said.
Student senator Gabor Mate said Wednesday
Gage's response to the request for a meeting was
a healthy sign.
"The real issue in this whole crisis, however,
is not merely open senate meetings, but the
question of senate's responsibility to its academic
constituents," Mate said.
"The senate was never intended to be democratic by representation," Sullivan said.
Students who want to make curriculum
changes should try to get on deans' curriculum
committees, Sullivan said.
Student senators Ray Larsen and Mate issued
a challenge Wednesday to publicly debate the
issue of senate secrecy with any senator who
wants to defend senate's rejection of student
demands .
Pot story opens
Pandoras  box
WINNIPEG (CUP) — When the University of
Manitoba's newspaper, the Manitoban, ran a story
Jan. 9 claiming four professors had used marijuana, it found it had unwittingly opened Pandora's box.
The result was uproar.
The story made page one in both Winnipeg
dailies and the CBC covered it in their national
news.
University president H. H. Saunderson was
besieged by angry calls from irate parents and
members of the community.
He threatened the Manitoban with a libel
suit for damaging the university image if a retraction was not forthcoming.
Mothers demanded the Manitoban absolve
their own sons of having ever taken the drug
when editor Brian Gory appeared on an open-
line radio show. One woman said the university
should be closed down.
Three of the four professors, unnamed in the
article, came forward, stating they did not use
pot as the paper had reported.
The student council Thursday passed a motion expressing confidence in the integrity of the
Manitoban editor and staff.
In the Friday issue, an apology appeared for
"and and all harm that might have fallen upon
specific people or the general community as the
result of the story."
It went on to say, "In all journalistic honesty
it could not withdraw its original claims."
It did, however, modify the story, saying the
professors "had used pot" rather than "use pot"
as the story had claimed. An editorial claim that
two members of university college used drugs
was withdrawn. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January  18,  196£
NO ANSWERS
Education confab  crap'
Crap.
That was one word Alma Mater Society
first-vice president Don Munton used Wednesday
to describe a meeting this week in Victoria with
Cece Bennett and education minister Les Peterson.
Munton, chairman of the UBC education
action committee, and Sullivan arrived back this
week somewhat disappointed.
Munton said he and Sullivan didn't get answers to specific questions they put to Bennett
and Peterson.
"We gave Peterson a brief about the terrible
regional college situation in B.C.," Munton said.
"He became angry and said the regional colleges are in great slji|pte,..whlch is crap."
Day-care centre
takWs,v£hild$en
At least some UBC married students need no
longer worry about their children while they
attend classes.
A child care centre, designed to give students
a place to leave their children during the day, has
been established in an old storage hut east of
Acadia Park.
The centre, set up at the bginning of January, will have a staff of two student wives and a
teacher,  said  director John Tilley Wednesday.
It will accommodate about 15 children between the ages of three and five at a cost of
$45 a month per child. The children will be cared
for from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
A similar care centre was planned at St.
Anselm Anglican church early in November, but
the idea was vetoed by the church vestry, or
executive.
Dissenters said the establishment of a nursery
in the church would interfere with events such
as arrangements for weddings and funerals.
Tilley said the demand for such a centre
has been so great that the new nursery cannot
accept any more children at this time.
Some line-ups out
Science students will be able to pre-register
this summer.
R. F. Scagel, assistant science dean, said
Wednesday the faculty will continue its policy
of pre-registration.
UBC registrar J. E. Parnall said Tuesday
there would be no pre-registration for most
students in September.
"We also asked whether UBC would get more
capital funds next year.
"Peterson said he had nothing to do with the
budget and took us to see Bennett.
"He told us education, health and welfare
were the government's top priorities. But that's
the case with any provincial government.
"Students can't hope to change Peterson's
or Bennett's minds," Munton said. "We have to
convince the public and the average MLA that
education needs more money."
Sullivan said he considered the meeting a
disappointment.
"He bragged about his government being
deficit-free and at the same time he told us
that money was so tight he couldn't make any
long-term  commitments," Sullivan said.
Simon Fraser University president Art Weeks,
University of Victoria president Dave MacLean,
and B.C. Assembly of Students president Rhys
Phillips were also at the meeting.
Munton said about half of B.C. MLA's have
answered letters from the AMS containing information about UBC's financial difficulties.
"Some NDP and Liberal members promised
they would make education an issue in the next
session of the legislature," he said.
These included Ray Parkinson and Tom Berger (both NDP) and Ray Perrault and Pat Mc-
Geer (both Liberal).
"The Social Credit members just said 'thanks
for writing,' Munton said.
Arts contests
attracts sixteen
A confused day of electioneering ended
Wednesday with 11 students vying for four
,   arts council positions.
Here is the slate after nominations
closed following a series of candidacy withdrawals and additions:
Pressing for president are John Church-
land, arts 1, and Cameron MacDonald, arts
1.
Vice-presidential candidates are Dennis
Hutton, Ralph Stanton, Vern Hunchak, all
arts 3, and Denis Newman, arts 2.
Mark Warrior, arts 3, Berton Clarke,
and Richard Stead, arts 1, are bidding for
treasurer, while Gyda Chud, arts 3 and
Ruedi Sonne, arts 1, are scrambing for the
position of secretary.
FURTHER REDUCTIONS
ON
3500 QUALITY SHIRTS
ALL U.S.A. MFG.   -  a
ADVERTISED IN LIFE
ALL
ALL
$8.95 & $7.95
$6.95 & $5.95
Range
Range
377
2-97
MOSTLY '68 SPRING STYLES
Checks - Plaids - Stripes - Paisleys - Etc., Etc
OPEN DAILY 9-5 12336£73c?8or9ia
FILM SOC. PRESENTS
MICHAEL CRAWFORD ZERO MOSTEL
in
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
Today    Jan.     18     Aud.     50c
12:30,3:30,6:00, 8:30
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
A.M.S.  Elections
First Slate
Wednesday,   Feb.   7,   1968
Second   Slate
Wednesday, Feb.  14,  1968
President
External   Affairs   Officer
Internal   Affairs   Officer
Secretary
Vice-President
Treasurer
Co-ordinator of Activities
Ombudsman
Nominations for first slate will open on January 24, 1968
and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968;
for second slate, nominations will open on January 31,
1968 and close at 12 noon on February 8, 1968. Nominations forms, certificates of eligibility and copies of the
election rules and procedures are available from the
A.M.S.  Office.
A.I.E.S.E.C:
Application forms for the Summer Exchange Program
for Commerce and Economics students should be submitted to A.M.S. box 5 before 3 p.m., Friday, January
19, 1968. Further information concerning the program
or additional application forms can be obtained at the
AIESEC office, Brock Extension 361.
Attention
1968
GRADUATES
Metropolitan Life
1       INSURANCE COMPANY
will be at the
PLACEMENT OFFICE
THURSDAY, JANUARY 25
TO RECRUIT ARTS AND COMMERCE
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN CAREERS
IN
ACTUARIAL SCIENCE
ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT
SALES AND SALES MANAGEMENT Thursday, January  18,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
FIRINGS CAUSE UNREST
Classes boycotted
— lawrence woodd photo
Protestors await interviewees.
Boeing officio
interviews  go
Anti-war demonstrators forced a
Boeing official to leave his campus
>ffice Tuesday when they jammed
nto his interviewing cubicle.
The 20 students held a sit-in at
he office to protest job recruiting by
wo Boeing officials.
One official, Chuck Jackson, and
n interviewee were moved to another
(uilding but were followed and en-
amped again.
/ forced out;
despite   sit-in
University officals said the students
left after handing the representatives
notes protesting the supply of armaments to U.S. forces in Vietnam.
Services director A. F. Shirran
said the demonstration did not prevent the representatives from holding
their 12 scheduled interviews.
There were no demonstrations
when interviewing resumed Wednesday.
WATERLOO, Ont. (CUP) — About
one quarter of the students at Waterloo Lutheran University boycotted
classes Thursday to attend a rally
called to investigate the firing of two
professors.
The foyer of the arts building was
jammed by 400 to 600 students who
heard statements from students, faculty, and administration.
Dr. George Haggar, a political
science professor, and Gary Taylor, a
psychology lecturer, were dismissed
during the Christmas vacation.
Both have been the chief agitators
at WLU for academic and social
change, and have been outspoken in
Bennett
30 years
behind'
Premier Cece Bennett's ideas
on higher education are 30 years
out of date, NDP-MLA Dr. Ray
Parkinson said Wednesday.
Parkinson told 40 students in
Bu. 106 he thinks tuition fees
are wrong in principle.
"Students should work to
abolish them," he said, "although
that probably won't happen in
our lifetime.
"Bennett still thinks a student's parents should pay for his
education."
Parkinson said the commission which gives grants to higher education should foe independent of the government.
"The present commission has
.   no planning staff," he said.
"It should determine what is
essential in the needs of education and make its opinion public." ;
Social Credit MLA Ernie Le-   ;'
Cours said Tuesday that a need
i   for  realism  exists  in financing   >
~   education.
He told 50 students a possible
solution to financial difficulties
would be to limit enrolment.
In reply to questioning, Le-
Cours said he would ask that increased money be allotted to
education in the next provincial
budget.
LeCours said education was
not a self-liquidating asset and
doesn't pay back money invested
in it.
"Power projects are a good
business venture, so the taxpayers' money is safer there," he
said.
Both LeCours and Parkinson   ;
were   speaking   as   part   of  the
education action program sponsored all  over B.C.  by student
councils.
their criticism of the administration
and the faculty.
Taylor was fired because he wasn't
living up to the accepted standards of
the profession, WLU acting president
Henry Endress said.
Haggar's contract has not been renewed because, Endress said, "George
Haggar has made it every evident he
is unhappy. He is unsympathetic to
the purposes and operations of this
institution."
Haggar stated his case saying, "Integrity is what is needed at this institution.
"I accuse my colleagues of manifest moral cowardice."
Taylor then made a plea for freedom to act outside the university.
"I as a citizen of this state have
civil rights," he said. "If I violate the
laws of this country who is going to
punish me — Dean Peters (dean of
academic studies) or the state?"
Jim Griffiths, student council president, repeated the council decision
to wait for the result of the CAUT investigation, expected by the end of
January.
Bible in hand, he declared that he
would not reveal what had happened
during the closed council meeting
Monday at which the council withdrew its support of Haggar and Taylor.
The hundreds of students were
generally quiet, with only occasional
heckling. They seemed to support not
necessarily Haggar and Taylor, but
rather more information about the dismissals of the two.
UBC Tory gets
hate literature
It was all black and white to Conservative club president Andrew
Gates.
Gates, former president of the
right-wing Blue Guard organization
at UBC, received a letter from someone called John Duncan, who identified himself as a member of the Ku
Klux Klan.
The Guard was formed last year
as official student opposition to new
left organizations. It folded at year's
end.
"I can furnish much information
of the right wing struggle & history of
it," the letter said.
"The nowledge to be learned on
this is imence (sic).
"We have a national meeting on
the Saturday of labor day at Stone
Mountain, Georgia."
Two enclosed cards read "Don't
give aid and comfort to the enemy."
"I have no intention of replying
to the Klan letter," Gates said.
It wasn't the first time Gates received right-wing mail.
He said he has had letters from
the John Adams Society for public
safety and the British Salisbury
League, a pro-Ian Smith organization. MWSSEr
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
^c^fes:
JANUARY  18, 1968
> t * ■•CS^V'*
Lines again
For years, September was the month students
played ring-around-the-registrar at UBC.
Registration lineups used to form before sunrise.
The lineups were still there late in the afternoon as
students were let into Buchanan in groups of 10 to get
their schedules initialled by faculty  advisers.
As the lines inched forward, students, many of
whom had to quit summer jobs a week early, seethed.
A few fainted.
It wasn't any fun. In fact, it was an ugly way to
start the university year. This was why every September the cry went up for a sane registration system.
Finally, two years ago, a program of summer registration was introduced. Many students were thus able
to register during August, and the September lines were
shorter. Registration still wasn't one big laugh but at
least it was no longer painful.
But now, in a fit of longing, for the bad old days,
registrar J. A. Parnall has announced that, except for
senior science students, pre-registration will be no more.
Parnall blissfully plans to put "4,000. students a day
for five days" through the IBM-card mill.	
There was one thing wrong with pre-registration:
it was a slight inconvenience for some administration
staff and faculty members. It was only convenient for
students — but that doesn't count.
What is worst is that Parnall's decision was taken
unilaterally. Students were not consulted, although it
is students who are chiefly affected by the decision.
The university administration, its apologists claim,
exists as a servant to the university community. Its job,
says UBC president Kenneth Hare, is to make things
go. We suggest that abandoning pre-registration is not
a good way of making things go. In this instance,
thousands of members of the university community will
not be pleased with the decision of their servant.
The decision should be reconsidered immediately.
Prairie grass
In the middle of the prairie winter, Winnipegers have
found a new way to beat the cold — getting hot under
the collar about, of all things, pot.
Excited mothers and radio stations are demanding
the University of Manitoba's paper, the Manitoban, retract its unthinkable claims that some U of M faculty
and students smoke marijuana. Equally outraged is the
university's president, one Hugh H. Saunderson. Saun-
derson not only demanded a retraction but threatened
any student or faculty member convicted of a drug
offense with expulsion from the university.
We find it difficult to understand what there is
about the innocent marijuana weed that gets otherwise
rational people so excited. After all, there has existed
for years definitive scientific evidence that marijuana is
harmless and non-addictive. There is a growing belief, in
medical and legal circles, that the marijuana law is a
bad one and should be changed.
Moreover, use of the weed is spreading Irapidly into
straight society. It's gotten to the point where some of
the best coffee tables in the country boast elegant roach-
holders.
There has been silliness on three sides in the Manitoba pot case: First, by the Winnipeg mothers and radio
stations who are in a panic over nothing.
Second, by President Saunderson whose threat of
expulsion would unjustly impose a double punishment
on those convicted of breaking an unnecessary law.
Third, and perhaps worst of all, by the Manitoban
whose marijuana "expose" was a childish exercise in
yellow journalism. Many university papers, including
The Ubyssey, could easily, if they so chose, produce a
well-documented marijuana story to liven up a. slow
news day. Happily, most of these papers choose not to
titillate ignorant citizens, and excite iclownish university
presidents, at the expense of some of their university's
best students and professors.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo    Kurt Hilger
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire       Norman   Gidney
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni  Lee
Ignoring the whole fracas were Fred
Cawsey, who likes telephones, Paul
Knox, who doesn't, and Alexandra
Volkoff,   who   sends  telegrams.
Mike Finlay and Steve Jackson
and Jim Maddin and John Twigg
ended up with butterflies in their
stomachs. Fran McGrath turned
cartwheels in a nun's habit, while
Ghenghis Khan raped 187 maidens,
as is a hun's habit. Irene Wasilewski,
ailing in the corner, was (sic). Dave
Salmon scaled a volcano, despite being warmed. Laurie Dunbar plunged
into a vat of puce color and dyed,
while Jim Tallman drew up short
when he was attacked by Ann Arky.
Charlotte Haire  was there,  too.
Peace in our time.
Student demands scare
pious AMS councillors
By GABOR MATE
Not since the fee march of
two years ago has the Uncle
Tom role of student council
been so clearly revealed as
during the current crisis concerning senate's refusal to act
in  a democratic and responsible manner.
In the first place, the actions
and pronouncements of our
student government serve the
purpose of obfuscating the
real issue. For the crux of the
problem is not, as student
council tries to pretend, whether or not senate will have open
or dlosed meetings. It is
whether or not the academic
rulers of this university accept
their duty to become responsible to their academic constituents.
The question of open senate
meetings is merely the spotlight which has presently illuminated the real question of
university democracy. It is
merely the pit into which senate has fallen on its path of
autocratic university government. And yet student council
has tried to pretend that this
larger issue does not exist. It
has tried to pretend that its
duty to the students was
served when it passed some
pious motions about open senate   meetings.
INEFFECTUAL
It is as if Sullivan and Co.'s
dim flame of understanding
was completely consumed by
the exertion of passing this
quiet and completely ineffectual motion two weeks before.
Yet on an another level the
role of student council has
been even more pernicious.
They have simply adopted the
role of the policeman whose
job it is to make sure the
naughty students of this university do not forcibly let some
fresh air into the stale atmosphere of the senate chambers.
The prospect of the students
actually   doing   something   to
assert their rights positively
frightens our worthy student
government.
Our councillors —> who had
been perfectly content to do
nothing in support of their
students' justified demand —
these councillors literally dirtied their collective pants
when the 600 students in Brock
last week decided to engage
in some direct action. All of
a sudden they were struck with
urgency of the situation. All
of a sudden they decided that
pious motions were perhaps,
after all, not enough. So they
took the drastic step of deciding to attend ia senate meeting.
IRRELEVANCE
Just as three years ago the
students of this campus had to
forcibly drag their councillors
from the council chambers and
out into the street to protest
the rising cost of higher education, so now the students
have had to threaten direct
action before their government
even realized that anything
was happening.
Fortunately for the students,
their government simply does
not possess the power to stand
in their way forever. Every
new action by student council
merely reasserts the painful
fact of its own irrelevance.
To put it into words that
even student councillors can
understand: THAT COUNCIL
SIMPLY DOES NOT MATTER. You and your friends,
Shaun, are completely beside
the point. You, who never
lead but only follow, can never
hope to deal with any concrete
situation. You can prove your
relevance only by relating to
what the students want.
COMIC PURSUITS
And clearly, my dear Keystone Kops of the council
chambers, the students — or
at least many of them —■ demand a bit of democracy in
this university. They demand
that senate take a small step
towards responsibility by opening its doors to its constituents.
And those doors will be open
soon, dear Keystone Kops, despite any comic pursuits you
may engage in.
- & ■
Justice
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Arnie Myers, UBC information officer, admits that Boeing makes products which are
used to kill people in Vietnam.
But, Arnie Myers asserts, any
company has the right to recruit students on campus.
At the Boeing protest on
Tuesday, we asked Arnie if we
would be permitted to use the
placement offices to recruit
students for an organization
dedicated to the assassination
of LBJ. He replied that we
would not. Why? "Because
you'll be breaking the law,"
he said.
>•„ >; >
Arnie   Myers   has   a   rather
convenient sense of justice.
SHAMELESS NIGHTINGALE
arts 1
Tom's  song
Editor, The Ubyssey:
You quote Tom Berger (The
Ubyssey, Jan. 16), as having
said "too much money is spent
on health services", by the
present provincial government.
This is not what Berger said.
What Berger did say, however,
was that the present provincial
government is not spending
enough money on essential
programs such as education
and health service.
PAUL SABATINO
President, UBC NDP  Club Thursday,  January  18,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LIVE MATCH
CHALLENGED
Divinsky on  chess
Dr. Nathan Divinsky was suspended from The
Ubyssey staff after he made some horrendous errors
in a chess column which appeared in The Ubyssey
Jan. 5. What follows is his attempt to get back at
The Ubyssey.
Editor. The Ubyssey:
PREAMBLE — It is nice to think that The
Ubyssey tries to please its audience and especially its mathematical readers. You did an absolutely delightful, brilliant, charming and witty
chess column in your Jan. 5 issue. However,
your Jan. 12 issue may have gone a bit too far.
On page 3 you had a rectangle regarding a
chess goof, and upawn my word, it was through-
the-looking- glassish. There was not one word
of truth in it. Alice in Wonderland, written by
the well known mathematician Lewis Carroll, did
contain the philosophy that words are the servants and not the masters, that they should mean
what we want them to mean. But your rectangle
left me speechless and if I remain that way I
shall starve to death (it will take some time perhaps but in -the limit as x goes to zero . . .).
DEFINITIONS — S2F2=Stoffman's Stuffy
Prizewinning Paper.
St.=Stinker.
THEOREM 1 — St. Stoffman doesn't know
his pawn from a hole in the ground.
THEOREM 2 — The central point of the right
hand problem in S^'s delightful, brilliant,
charming and witty chess column of Jan. 5th,
was the-existence of nine white pawns. Of course
one must be removed and whichever one is removed, a mate is then available. Nine different
mates in one problem. A veritable harem.
THEOREM 3 — The delightful, brilliant,
charming and witty column was strictly a one
shot affair. It reported an international chess
event that occurs only once every three years,
and in which Canada was represented by a UBC
student. The author had no intention of making
it either a regular or a weekly column. In fact,
he wanted it to be irregular and strongly.
THEOREM 4 — The author's three gorgeous
daughters: Judi, Mimi and Pammy, have pledged
themselves never to go out with a Ubyssey
staffer.
THEOREM 5 — The author's name, in Mos-
com, Minsk and Novosibirsk, will be mud as
soon as his friends there, read the Russian edition
of S2P2.
PROPOSITION — The author challenges St.
Stoffman to a public chess match with live pieces,
at the Cairn, on Thursday March 14, at 12:30
p.m. As is usual in such matters, the person so
challenged must bring 32 beautiful coeds, with
appropriate armbands to distinguish them as
chess pieces, also wearing miniskirts to insure
that all can clearly see that they move properly;
16 blondes and 16 brunettes will do nicely. Since
the staff of S2P2 paint weird pictures of campus
events,   let them be  charged  with   painting  a
Oh my gawd
chessboard on the grass. The author further suggests that St. Stoffman use the Homecoming
Queen whereas the author will use the Science
Queen (after all, why were they chosen?). The
disposition of captured pieces to be negotiated at
a mammoth victory celebration after the match.
COROLLARY—Euclid refused this challenge,
but that, St. Stoffman, will only make you a
double St.
Upsidownishly yours,
N. DIVINSKY.
P.S. The point of the left hand problem was
the fact that the black bishop could not have
moved from its original position since the black
king pawn and the black king knight pawn have
never moved. Therefore the black bishop must
be a black pawn that queened. The only square
on which it could have queened is white's king
knight one, and to get there the black pawn must
have passed through the square at white's king
bishop two. This would have put the white king
in check. Therefore, the white king has moved
and it is illegal for white to castle. The penalty
for castling when it is illegal is for the white
king to move. Thus white must move his king,
and the only place is one square to his left.
This allows the black queen to come down and
give mate.
St. Stoffman has about as much chance of
understanding this as the general theory of
relativity, but those that can do and those that
cannot, edit.
LOVE, N.D.
HONORABLE   ROBERT   L.
STAAiFIELD
SPEAKS
TOMORROW
AUDITORIUM       -       NOON
FREE - ALL WELCOME
The Canadian
Red Cross Society
Wafer Safety Service
SUMMER SESSION
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
AREA WATER SAFETY SUPERVISORS
Applications are invited for several supervisory
positions lor the period May through August, 1968.
Candidates should have completed at least second
j?£.ac..academic, studies. Senior and graduate students
preferred. Salary is'competitive' and commensurate-
with  experience.
QUALIFICATIONS   REQUIRED:
Applicants should possess current Red Cross and
R.L.S.S. teaching certificates plus teaching experience in these fields. Examiner appointment preferred
but not required. In addition, applicants must have
a demonstrated ability to:
— Work without  close supervision.
— Work effectively with both lay and professional
groups.
— Express oneself effectively in public speaking
and in writing.
— Adapt to a variety of situations.
Applicants must be free to travel, hold a current
driver's licence and be available for this work for
two consecutive summers.
RESPONSIBILITY:
Includes organizing and conducting instructor
schools, rendering teachnical and examination services to community swimming programs and promoting Water Safety throughout an assigned region.
TO APPLY:
Apply in writing stating qualification and experience, to the Director of Water Safety Services, Canadian Red Cross Society, 1235 W. Pender St., Vancouver 1, B.C.
Applications must be postmarked not later than
January 28, 1968, and envelopes marked "Area
Supervisor."
Are YOU interested in a
SUMMER STOCK COMPANY
FREDERIC W
• !•]»
THEATRE
JUNE 17 - AUGUST 10
If so, further information on Theatre Bulletin Boards or in
The Green Room (Basement, F.W.T.)
You re Needed and Welcome! Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January  18,  1968
— george hollo photo
THIS IS THE NORTH EAST corner of the third floor of the new student union building where
bodies will be putting out The Ubyssey come September. Construction is proceeding on schedule (so contractors say) for the $4.2 million golden palace.
'TWEEN CLASSES
Kennedy killing retold
SPECIAL EVENTS
William Turner from Ramparts Magazine speaks on the
Kennedy Assassination today,
noon,' Brock lounge.
AMS
MLA's speak on education,
noon, Bu. 106. Today: Liberal
Ray Perrault; Friday: NDP
Dave Stupich.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Candlelight Mixer Friday, 9
p.m. to 1 a.m., St. Mark's College lounge. Non-members 75
cents, members 50 cents.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
A female volunteer group to
visit Oakalla prison drug hut
will be formed if enough people
are interested. Leave name and
phone number in Bu. Ext. 361
before Jan. 26.
EL CIRCULO
Sun and Dust, a film on Mexico, today, noon, IH 402.
ARCHEOLOGY
10,000 years of cultural occupation from the Fraser Canyon
and other sites on display every
Thursday, 12:30 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. archeology lab, basement
of the math building.
VCF
Dr. John ROss discusses God
—the image of man, Friday,
noon, Ang. 110.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Meeting   today,   noon,   club-
room,   to  discuss   steelheading
trip.
AMS
Constitutional revisions committee meets Friday, noon, first
vice-president's office. Open to
all who have ideas or suggestions.
SCIENCE US
Friday last day to get your
tickets to the Crystal Ball. Tickets in math annex.
SCIENCE US
Science pep meet today,
noon, Hebb theatre. Bands,
skits, movies: Admission 25
cents.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Bruno Freschi of the school
of architecture conducts a tour
of the present exhibit — Architecture Without Architects —
today, noon, gallery.
GERMAN DEPARTMENT
Film—Wallensteins Tod—in
German, today, noon, Bu. 102.
ZOOLOGY COMPUTER CLUB
Dr. James Kennedy of the
computer science department
speaks today, noon, HB-6 seminar room.
VISITING LECTURER
Prof. E. J. Greene, University of Alberta, speaks on a
structural approach to Mari-
vaux's theatre, Friday, noon,
Bu. 2238.
SCM
Prof. C.  Anderson conducts
a study group on charismatic
gifts and the new testament,
today, noon, Bu. 2269.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Rallyette Thursday, noon,
starting at H-lot. All welcome.
COMMERCE US
Coffee party today, 1 p.m.,
IH.
TEACHER'S COMMITTEE
ON VIET NAM
Prof. David Aberle speaks on
social science and social responsibility, today, noon, Bu.
104.
AISEC
Meeting to discuss trainee-
ships, Friday, noon, Ang. 213.
CLASSICS CLUB
G. Magnuson discusses the
Polykleitos of Argos, Friday, 8
p.m., 4609 West Eleventh.
NEWMAN CENTER
General meeting, 12:40 p.m.,
today, Bu. 203.
CUSO
CUSO workshop Saturday,
IH. Panel, film, speakers, question period.
COLLEGE  LIFE
Jon Braun continues his
series on sex, love and marriage, today, noon, Ang. 104; tonight, 8 p.m., Brock lounge.
VCF
General meeting today, noon,
Ang. 110. Membership cards
available.
BRAUN
Does  It  Again
Noon and 8 p.m.
ARMOURIES
MOTHER TUCKER'S
YELLOW DUCK
TUES.-SUNDAY   —   JAN    16-21
By Popular Demand
Reduced Rate For Students
VILLAGE BISTRO
2081   West 4th Ave.
more on
SEX
where ?
Noon and 8 p.m.
ARMOURIES
CSDc\f«fcal
f
\
#|o.ll
y%p
°      ulxvncr  & dance
-^opcrv   bo   ct\\~
^Blc^tBiti * 15.00/
CLASSIFIED
Ratm: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances 11
NEED A COSTUME FOR MARDI
Gras? Call or drop in at Deluxe
Rentals, 1292 Kingsway, 874-6116.
Costumes and  service  to  please.
DANCE AT TOTEM PARK. Shockers
and Epics. $1.25 person after 8:30
p.m. Only 75c 8-8:30. Dancing till
2:00   a.m.   this   Sat.   January   20.
Lost & Found
13
LOST—COLLAPSABLE BLACK UM-
brella Thurs. in Engineering 201.
Please phone 936-3116 after 6 p.m.
LOST BEFORE XMAS IN CHEM. 324.
Opal ring.  Reward offered.  736-7063.
FOUND A SUM OF MONEY IN EMA
Phone   Bev at  224-6896.
LOST MEN'S BLACK GLASSES ON
Campus without case. Phone 738-
7496,   ask   for  Bryan.	
LOST   ENGRAVED   ELGIN   WATCH.
Phone John Burns, 224-9910. Reward
ONE MEN'S UMBRELLA FOUND IN
E.M.A. 116 Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1968.
See   Publications   Office.
LOST MONDAY MAYBE IN HENN.
202 one pair of Ladies' glasses.
Please phone 327-3974. Heather.
FOUND IN MAIN FLOOR H. A.
Men's Washroom, pair of Men's
gloves.   Cal   land   describe.   278-5951.
FOUND: BROWN VINYL GLOVES.
Pair of Men's Glasses. See Pub.
Office.
LOST: NAVY BLUE DUFFLE COAT
at Farmers Frolic, Jan. 13. Please
return!    261-0796.   Reward   offered.
FOUND   —   BLUE   FOUNTAIN   PEN
near  B  lot.   Publication  Office.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDER WANTED FROM PATULLO
Bridge. Travel via Marine Drive
for  8:30s,   526-4903.
WANTED RIDERS FOR CAR POOL,
west of Granville phone Ian after
6   al   733-4031.
RIDERS WANTED FOR CARPOOL
vie. of Nanaimo and Kingsway, ph.
TR.   4-1798—Pete.
RIDE WANTED OR JOIN CAR POOL
from   Mallardville,   Ph.   936-8941.
TWO GIRLS DESPERATELY IN
need of carpool. Can provide car
twice a week. Vicinity of 49th and
Arbutus.   Phone  261-4405.
URGENT RIDE NEEDED FROM
the vicinity of Simpson-Sears Bur-
naby immediately. Please phone
435-3206  after  6:30  (Sue).
Special Notices
IS
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
WANTED: FEMALE MODELS FOR
photographer, object photography.
For further information ring Alan,
434-8228  after   6.
SEE AND HEAR THE HONOUR-
able Robert Stanfield in auditorium,
Friday, noon. ^	
Scandals (Conl.)
37
"A FUNNY THING HAPPENS TO-
day in Aud. 12:30, 3:30; 6:00; 8:30
50c   color,   fun,    music.
UBC BUAUTY SALON. EXPERT
Styling and cutting*. Reasonable
rates. 5736 University Blvd. tel.
228-8942.
EVE: IN THE CANDLE LIGHT AT
St. Marks Lounge, Friday night —
the 19th — Adam.
CANADA'S     NEXT    PRIME     MIN-
ister?  Friday   noon.  Auditorium.
Typing
40
ESSAYS     AND     TERM     PAPERS
neatly  typed,   736-0538.	
EXPERT TYPING BY PART-TIME
writer — revisions and corrections.
Theses. 738-5615.
EXPERIENCED THESIS AND ES-
say typist. Work collected and delivered if necessary. Phone: 921-9449
after 6 p.m.
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call 738-
6829. Mondays to Thursday and
Sundays after 10:00 a.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
GIRLS  INTERESTED  IN  CREATIVE
photographic modelling, ph. 224-0711.
Male or Female
S3
Work Wanted
54
BABY SITTING DAYS IN MY HOME,
Acadia Park. 224-1201.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
 84
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
tutoring given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Individual, $2.95 hr. Phone
736-6923.	
EXP. ENGLISH TUTOR. EXCEL-
lent references and results. Phone
AM   6-9740.	
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Still a few left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Sale at: Publications Office
Proek  Hall  or  UBC  Bookstore
HEAD MASTER SKIS 210CM. NEV-
ada bindings, $70 or reasonable offer.
Phono 224-6279.
STUDENT DESK AND CHAIR. CALL
224-1201.
VERY WELL MADE OLD DESK IN
excellent condition. Phone 738-4618
after 6:30 p.m.
1960 M. OXF. STN. WAG. GOOD
cond. $415, offers. Fridge $40, elec.
stove $30, dresser $12 or offers.
Leaving Canada.  224-9459.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
UBC BARBER SHOP OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m. Sat. until 5:30
p.m.   5736   University  Boulevard.
ZERO MOSTEL, PHIL SILVERS,
Michael Crawford in Forum Today,
Aud.    50c.    12:30,    3:30,    6:00,    8:30.
VOTE VERN HUNCHAK FOR ARTS
Vice-president. H3e guarantees a
good  job
Rooms
81
LARGE ROOM ON GROUND FLOOR
in a quiet new home, vacant. Call
224-047T.	
SINGLE ROOM AND BREAKFAST,
UBC   student,   266-9280.
MARSCHA: MEET ME AT TOTEM
this Sat. night 8:00 p.m. Then we
can get into the dance for 75c. The
Epics and Shockers are playing
till   2:00   a.m.    Love   John.	
ROOM ON CAMPUS (MALE). CLOSE
to meal services. 2250 Wesbrook
Cresc.   $40.00  monthly.  224-9662.
OPEN DOOR DROP-IN CENTRE.
(Coffee house in Church cellar.)
Every Friday night, 9-12 midnight,
corner of 11th and Fir.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 AUSTIN 850, $325 OR BEST
offer. Rockie Palmer, Hut 6. Rm 3G
Fort  Camp.   Ph.   224-9880.
62  V.W.   DELUXE  $600.   224-9758  AF-
ter 6:00 Ask for Elwood.
1961 BUICK LESABRE, EXCELLENT
condition, p.s., p.b., low milage,
$1200 or nearest offer. Mr. Bejar
224-5373.
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 10% discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O     Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous                               32
Scandals
37
"A FUNNY THING" HAPPENS TO-
day in Aud. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30.
50c. Color, fun, music.
EASY GOING GIRL WANTED TO
share apt. with same. Own bedroom,
kits.   Pref.   under  21.   224-7266.
ROOM AVAILABLE NOW, 9th AND
Blanca. Possible room and board.
Girls only. 224-7574.
Room & Board
•a
BE A BOARDER AT PHI GAMMA
Delta. First-class food and friends.
$85  mo.   Call  Jake or L.B.,  224-9769.
IGNORE CLAIMS OF BRAND X —
check with Dekes first, phone Len,
224-5916,  after  6.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, January  18,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 7
Yankee justice frowns on
draft dodger counsellors
By WALTER GRANT
Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON (CUP-CPS) — College professors and other adults who are helping the
anti-draft movement in the United States may
be taking a greater risk than young people who
actually resist the draft.
The Johnson administration apparently has
initiated a full-fledged effort to stop the ringleaders of the growing nation-wide anti-draft
campaign. By fighting the resistance movement
from the top down, the administration hopes to
effectively decrease the number of young people
who engage in destructive anti-draft protests
and literally refuse to be inducted into the armed
services.
Department of justice and selective service
officials have not admitted that this strategy is
indeed being followed. However, observers argue
that this strategy has been indirectly acknowledged by statements and actions of members of
the administration.
SPECIAL DEPARTMENT
The justice department, for example, announced two weeks ago that a federal grand
jury in Boston has returned indictments against
five men who have encouraged young people to
violate draft laws. The prosecutions are being
handled by a newly created unit in the justice
department designed specifically to prosecute
demonstrators. Despite the large number of
young people who have been involved in destructive anti-draft demonstrations, the first indictments since the new unit was created involve
adult leaders.
A justice department spokesman said more
indictments may be returned against leaders of
the anti-draft movement. "If we find a clear
violation of the law, we will prosecute. But we
are not predicting if there will be two or 200
additional indictments."
"BUST RINGLEADERS"
Selective service director Lewis B. Hershey
has said he believes many adult leaders who are
too old for the draft are behind many anti-draft
demonstrations. He favors busting the ringleaders
first because most of them "are older and should
know better."
Book co-op anyone?
A meeting to organize a campus co-op bookstore will be held at noon today.
The meetingi in Brock ext. 260, will discuss
a massive propaganda campaign designed to help
bookstore management recognize its obligation
to the students.
Organizers urge all interested students to
attend.
One selective service official said pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock, a veteran leader of
the anti-draft movement, "is encouraging young
people to disobey the law and thus saying to hell
with congress." The official said Spock and
other adult leaders don't have any obligation to
the selective service but they're out there advising the young people to beat the rap.
Spock, 64, and four others who were indicted
two weeks ago (Dec. 27) are accused of violating
a section of the Universal Military Training and
Service Act which says any person is guilty of
violating the law if he "knowingly counsels.
aids, abets another to refute or evade registration
or service in the armed forces" or knowingly
hinders or interferes "toy force or violence or
otherwise" with the selective service system.
Indicted along with Spock were Yale University chaplain William Sloane Coffin, 43; Marcus Raskin, 33 a former White House aide and
co-director of the Institute for Policy Studies;
author Mitchell Goodman, 44, and Michael Fer-
ber, a 23-year-old Harvard graduate student.
FIRST CONFRONTATION
The trial of the five men — scheduled to
take place in March in Boston — will represent
the first confrontation at law between the administration and the anti-draft movement.
It the men are found guilty, the case will
no doubt end up before the supreme court.
Several of those indicted and a number of civil
libertarians have charged that the law under
which the indictments were returned represents
an infringement on free speech.
The last supreme court decision on the law
was handed down in 1919. The supreme court
ruled in Schenck vs. the United States that the
freedom of speech guarantee of the First Amendment does not protect a person from conviction
for counseling others to evade the draft. However, there has been some speculation that today's supreme court would overturn this decision, given the chance.
ACTIONS NOT WORDS
The justice department is attempting to avoid
a new supreme court ruling by staying away
from the free speech aspect in the cases now
set for prosecution. Officials have said the justice
department plans to base the prosecutions on
actions rather than words. For example, government attorneys presumably will present evidence
of what roles the five men have played in anti-
draft demonstrations.
But the official said young people who are
prosecuted will have a second chance. "If a
young person is found guilty, he will be given
the opportunity to change his mind and enter
the armed services rather than go to prison. All
he has to do is say, 'I'm sorry; I'll be a good boy
and go ahead and serve my time like everybody
else'."
FILM SOC. PRESENTS
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
Today    Jan.     18    Aud.     50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
IT'S   GOOD  CLEAN   FUN,
WELL, IT'S FUN ANYWAY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews with student teachers who have completed their
professional year of training and who will be eligible for an
E.A. certificate or better by September, 1968 will be held
regularly at the School Board Office in Surrey, 14225—56th
Avenue, Cloverdale, each Friday.
Interviews during other days of the week may be arranged
by phoning 594-0411.
E. Marriott,
District  Superintendent
of Schools.
Bookstore   challenged
TORONTO (CUP) — The student council at the University of Toronto will go into competition with the campus
bookstore unless student demands are met by Feb. 15.
A resolution to be presented to the press committee
of the board of governors calls for:
• a 10 per cent across-the-board discount on all books
sold in the bookstore;
• the creation of a committee made up of students staff
and administration to determine the bookstore's policy;
• separation of the financial operation of the store from
those of the U of T press.
// you didn't hear
JON BRAUN
yesterday,  you   heard
about him afterwards
hear him twice
TODAY
Parts 2  and 3 of
"Sex,  Love and Marriage"
Noon  and  8  p.m. — Armouries
College   Life   Series   Sponsored   by   Campus   Crusade   for   Christ   of   Canada
our lapinary compatriot
reacts unpredictably
\o prqciress, -we*ve
fbnlnd?
ldka, how she uses
ner new True
tappinessisfioWto    Checking Account,
past-fiasteio a   ^ .,
post-Sox to mail      'ste Senas out cheques
Money to a frieri.    fbr one ceivfc ^o her
■friends.
so, naturally, all her
friends nave to write
her bade \o Ih&rik her
c£br her unexpected
^enerosiVy.
and ffien9 o£ course,
we send back, all her-
cancelled cliecjues.
9o-
•£or every letter that
l&pmetfce sends out-,
She receives two tack,.
dt seems to be a very
down-Jcey way to
attract a-ttention.
it is also a darned <fcod
tvay c£ .keeping -tradlc
ct your disappearing
dough. °
So maybe you. would,
&2preeiafe gpWng your
cheques iactfc, too»»«
post-Happiness is
receiving two qF
Mere Are alternative
nejtiqfs of keeping
track cft/wr money
w/tic/i it-is only„.
tyorlinj io mention..
o\'ra6
your veryoum
custom aulojmrfel
cAetjues /vrjyou
_,^^ 6eepf
C*ee*ee)
Mnk, ofmontreal
CampusBanK
oampusbaiik. branch
in llie administration building
<J.f .peirson, manager
Open 9-'3o - 5 Monday lo Thursday - 93o - 6 Friday Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January  18,   1968
By MIKE JESSE*
Ubyswy Sport* Editor
JESSEN
Those of you who dislike the large amount of money being
spent on athletics will cheer the following announcement and
those of you who want winning teams will lament it.
What I'm talking about is the decision to pull the 1968-69
editions of the UBC basketball and football Thunderbirds out
of the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
This leaves ice hockey as the only sport in which UBC competes with western universities on a league rather than tournament basis.
Belonging to the WCIAA means flying to Winnipeg and
Saskatoon  which  can't  be  done  for  peanuts.
Thus the large amounts of money allotted in
?f? the hockey, basketball and football budgets.
Now high-cost travel has been eliminated
in two of these sports but what have we gained
other than money?
From now on there'll be more gruelling
(don't think that 14 hours to Oregon on a bus
isn't tough) trips by Greyhound south of the
border.
And those Washington and Oregon teams
have never been a push-over in either football
or basketball.
Whereas we've usually managed winning records in the
WCIAA (football had an off-season this year to put it mildly)
and we've even won a championship or two or three, prospects
aren't rosy considering competition with the classy American
scholarship colleges.
The man who engineered the withdrawal of the teams is
UBC's athletic director Bus Phillips. He's to be credited for doing the almost impossible as it was no mean feat considering how
heavily the WCIAA counts on UBC's participation.
The policy-makers of the western conference at the recent
Winnipeg meeting were persuaded to let UBC go wandering
again. For this is not the first time UBC has pulled out of the
WCIAA.
After joining in 1959-60, UBC spent five years in the union
before divorcing Jtself for two years and then returning for
two years on a partial basis.
But other plans discussed at the Winnipeg meeting will
eventually draw UBC back into the fold again without raising
travel costs to their present high state.
By admitting three 'western universities — Victoria Notre
Dame and Lethbridge — to associate status, WCIAA membership
was raised to 11 and this makes possible a split of the conference
into two divisions.
A committee under Dr. Van Fleet of the University of Manitoba is due to make a report in March on the feasibility of such
a split.
Such an action could see UBC, Victoria, Notre Dame, Edmonton, Calgary and Lethbridge in one division and the universities
of Saskatoon, Regina, Manitoba, Winnipeg and Brandon in the
other.
Victoria is ready to enter into basketball competition now
while Notre Dame is almost ready to drop its affiliation with
the Nelson Maple Leafs, which the university stocks with players,
and move into intercollegiate hockey.
Getting Victoria and Notre Dame to enter into football
league play might take time but it could perhaps be worked out
by 1970.
When UBC gets back into Canadian intercollegiate league
play in all -three sports, things could be quite interesting but till
then don't KJtok for any spectacular achievements on the basketball floor or the football field.
A preview of things to come could be in the offing Tuesday
when the basketball Birds host Portland State at 8:30 p.m. in
War Memorial Gym. Let's go and see for ourselves.
ON RUGBY SCENE
Vikings from Victoria
ready to  raid  stadium
CROMPTON
By JOHN TWIGG
There's going to be a really big shoe in Thunderbird Stadium this Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
The shoe, or rather the boot, will be on the
talented toe of Don Crompton, who is the kicker
and top scorer for the UBC rugby Thunderbirds.
The show, which promises to be much better
than any Ed Sullivan "shoe",
will feature a real, live rugby
game  between  UBC  and  the
University of Victoria Vikings,
and   as   an   added   attraction,
there'll be a prelim game between UBC's and UVic's second
teams.
Consider that all this entertainment is free with your AMS
card and that rugby is just
about the only sport active at
home this weekend, then you'll realize that you
can't afford to miss this big show.
Saturday's game will be the opener for UBC
in the Northwest Intercollegiate League) as last
week's game against University of Oregon was
rained out.
Rugby is the big sport at UVic since there is
no football team, and UBC being the local team
to beat, Victoria is going to try just that.
Naturally, the Viking team will be up for
UBC and the Birds will have to be up as well,
but consider the past histories of the two clubs.
Last year, the Vikings ran wild in the loss
column. Their overall record was a pitiful three
wins, two ties and 10 losses.
But first year coach Howard Gruring brought
the team along and they won half of their late-
season games. This year, Gruring's team has
vastly improved, as their seven win, three tie
and no loss record indicates.
One of UVic's 10 losses was to UBC, by the
one-sided score of 13-0. And now UVic has another reason for wanting to thrash UBC.
Though UBC compiled only a three win, one
tie and four loss record in the Vancouver first
division, their league is much tougher than the
island league which UVic plays in. From re
cords, the teams are about equal.
Consider also that the four losses that the
Birds have incurred were the first four games of
the season. They too, are vastly improved.
The week layoff for the
Birds is sure to hurt the team.
Coach Donn Spence was forced
to hold practices indoors, while
UVic cavorted in their balmy
climate.
"The layoff hurt because we
couldn't do any hitting. We're
forced to practise contact only
two days before the game,
which is bad," said Spence.
SPENCE But  UVic's  undefeated  re
cord could be a hindrance to them. Spence stated
that we'll be aiming to give them their first loss,
just to make them mad.
The game itself should be quite exciting as
FRAINE
UBC   and UVic  are  remarkably  similar,  even
wearing the same colors.
Both teams are of average size, leaning more
to an open, fast style of rugby, the best kind to
watch.*'
And now, the stars of our show.
For UBC, there is of course
Crompton, as well as Chuck
Plester and captain Tom Fraine.
UVic features scrum-half Dave
Slater, the blonde wonder, as
well as Bobby Panton and Al
Foster.
UBC will be without the
services of scrummer Bob Jackson who will be replaced by
former Brave Ian Donald. Back
Dave Murphy is also up from
the Braves.
My spies from UVic, three of last year's
players, hav? informed me that the campus is
going all-out for this game. At least three busloads of fans (150) will be coming to the game
from Victoria, so they will have a large cheering section.
If they can come, so can you.
UBC water babies
win in Washington
The UBC Thunderbird swim team got its
first dunking of the season Friday and Saturday
and emerged from the water a winner.
In their first meet, the Birds defeated Western Washington State College by a score of 74-39.
Paced by a strong freshman showing, the
team won ten out of twelve events (they did not
capture any of the diving events).
Ken Campbell got two wins while Phil
Dockerill and Ted Dorchester picked up one each
in their first university swim meets.
Jim Maddin picked up another two victories
as did Rick Mansell and Phil Winch, all returnees
from last year's team.
The next day, Saturday, was not as successful, as the team went down to defeat, 73-40, to
the swimmers of Central Washington State College, which has one of the best small college
swim teams in the U.S.
Dockerill; with two victories, was glorious in
defeat as were the other two individual winners,
frosh Campbell and veteran Maddin.
The Birds also showed well in the medley
relay which they won with relative ease.
The Birds have a tough time ahead of them
as they spend this weekend swimming three
times in the Seattle-Tacoma area.
First they take on Pacific Lutheran University on Friday, then Saturday the University of
Puget Sound in a meet which will be televised
on Channel 7. They will spend Sunday swimming
in the University of Washington's Pacific Northwestern Championships.
You  heard  about   him—
now  hear  him  yourself.
Noon and 8 p.m.
ARMOURIES
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED  AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON.
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
Card.
336 West Pender St.
681-2004
WILLIAM  TURNER
pane tiampahtA WkucpyunsL
SPEAKS ABOUT
' THE KEIEDYASSASSINATION
JkuM.  7lo0/L   —  $an.  18  —   (BadcIl JjounqsL
Free Admission—Special Events

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