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The Ubyssey Mar 28, 1963

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Array THE UBYSSEY
were
too
dirty
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 1963
No. 73
—Genial   Hume  photo
PIPE DREAM becomes a reality next month when new Winter
Sports Arena opens for business. Workmen are now welding
pipes which will hold the coolant under curling sheets. Fats
Scott says the arena will be nice.
Lay your egg in the library
it's open Easter weekend
The library will stay open during the Easter holiday
weekend on a limited schedule.
Easter Friday the library is closed.
Saturday, April 13: reading rooms, stacks and college
library open 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Sunday: college library open 1:30 p.m. to 5:30.
Monday: reading rooms, stacks and college library open
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Circulation service will be provided only in the college
library and at the upper year reserve, desk. Upper year students may use books in the main book stacks.
Ungrammatically grinned he
HOUSING HEAD WARNS
Off-campus rooms
will raise rates
It's no match
for university
University students should
finish high school in their
spare time ,Brock Hall matches say.
It is all a mistake, said
W. S. MacCallum, manager
of the cigaret vending servicing outfit.
He said he was not incompetent.
Listless
AMS
inspector
ks
By PAT HORROBIN <S>
Dorm fee increases could mean off-campus landlords will
increase their rents as well, housing director John Haar has
admitted.
"There's no getting around the fact  dishonest landlords
are>bound to use TJBC's fee hike as an excuse to wring more
money from the students," he said.
■    (Housing   Authority    has   no '
control over rents fixed by off-
campus landlords).
"This is entirely ignoring the .
central issue that forced  us to
raise  fees.  We must  have   this ',
money   in  order   to   finish   the I
new residences."
TRIES  FOR  AID
Haar said he had been trying to get the administration
to pay off some of the housing
authority's  bills.
"But  when the budgst  can't
even meet   academic   expenses,
how   can   they   hope   to   carry!
services like these?" he said in !
justification of the $87 fee hike, j
Students    rents    and    grants
from "angels" like the AMS development fund,  Canada Council and private individuals have
been the only way of financing
student  accomodations  to  date,
he said.
HOSPITAL
But a new $15 million hospital is claiming any private
money UBC gets.
"We've had all the Canada
Council gifts we'll get - for
years, and the AMS can't afford anything more—that leaves
the student the only money
source," Haar said.
"We've got buildings half
finished, right now, in our
badly needed expansion pro1
gram."
"The money will chiefly gc
'o meeting the price of skilled
^bor and building materials."
GLOOMY
Haar said he sees just one
"loomy alternative to the dorm
increase:
"We'd have to abandon the
new residences the way they
ire   now—half   finished."
By TIM PADMORE
Ubyssey council  reporter
Get to know Vancouver from
-he inside—be an AMS housing
inspector.
The AMS is offering a guar-
ar.teed $1,400 for the summer
to a student willing to inspect
and catalogue up to 2,000 Point
Grey homes and apartments offered students for rent.
The inspection program is
the result of charges last
September of over-priced and
substandard off-campus housing. -
A student Housing commit-
ee was set' up.
It decided that landlords
-mould be charged ..2 each for
a listing with the University.
The  proceeds  would pay  for
i house-to-house inspection pro-
>
gram.
The lists, with the results of
the   inspection for   each   home,
will   be   made   available   to   all
students.
Any citizens, they will get one
Psssst.
Wanna copy of the secret information the University will
never reveal?
Write the UBC's bursar for
your free financial statement
of the University, Premier
Bennett said two weeks ago
on his all-star radio show.
Only it didn't work that
way.
Last week, B.C.'s smiling
premier came back to his radio show With a different
story.
"Well," he began, "you remember I asked the citizens to
write to the University bursar
for copies of the financial
statement?
"So they could tell whether
the government is treating the
University fairly regarding
finances?
•
There followed a pause.
"I'm really disappointed
that the people have found it
necessary to advise me that
the    bursar    advised    them
they haven't copies of this
financial statement available,"
he said.
Bursar William White confirmed this report.
He said he had not been instructed to pass out the report
and didn't know where the
premier had got such an idea.
"What the government does
is no business of mine," he
grumbled.
-With an embarrassed laugh,
the premier said: "This doesn't
carry   out   the   spirit   of   the
legislature act (making the
financial statement of all public   bodies  public)."
So now Premier Bennett
says everyone can write him
for a copy of the statement.
•
"As  premier,"   he  bombast-
ed ungrammatically on the
bowmanized show, "I will see
that any citizens who want
to know about the finances of
the University,   they  will   get
WELL-ROUNDED SCOTT
.  .  .  hurly  burly
Action not
through yet,
says Scott
By  RON RITER
UBC students twill go into
action again if the provincial
government ignores petitions
expressing public support for
higher  education.
AMS president Malcolm Scott
said Monday plans are.-" underway to solicit active public support if the money requested for
higher education is not forthcoming.
SYMPATHY
'The campaign will be designed to bring overt political
pressure on the government on
behalf of higher education," he
said.
"It will be aimed at sympathy
groups in the Interior;" Scott
said, "Such as labor, PTA,
teachers, and the B.C. government  employees association."
Scott and former student
president Doug Stewart usurped
the action committee of the
Back Mac campaign after an
ad hoc student committee had
done most of the work.
END  OF APRIL
Chubby Scott said the B.C.
GEA is fully behind the University.
"We even have a letter of support from them written on Department of Hishways stationery," he belly-laughed.
He declined to name the
specific sub-department, adding
he didn't want to get any government  employees   in trouble.
Scott  said  the  end   of  April
Continued  on  page  3
SEE: ACTION
SIR OUVRY'S
SINS
Page 7
. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 28, 1963
Japanese here next week
mw^^^'^-'-r^'. - "PfS^v-
Rugby Birds meet match
By GLENN  SCHULTZ
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds
will get a taste of their own
brand of rugby next Thursday
wb.sn they meet the Japanese
International All-Stars in UBC
stadium.
Birds, who like to play a
wide-open running game, will
have their hands full with the
Japanese  squad.
They average only 150
pounds in weight and five-foot
nine in height. To compensate
for this they have to depend on
their speed.
This will be the opening
: game of the five-game B.C.
tour for the Japanese. They
play other games, against Vancouver Heps, Victoria Reps,
B. C. Reps and the final game
against a team made up of
players under 23:
The sport of rugby is not a
new game in Japan. It was first
introduced there around the
turn of the century, The first
Japanese rugby team was sent
abroad   in  1930   to   B.C.,  spon-
| sored by the B.C. Rugby Union.
The first visit to Jar.m was by
the Canadian learn in 1932.
| The last Japanese team to
| visit here was the Yawata team
j in 1960 which is considered
I Japan's best.
The Birds are no strangers
to the Japanese. They beat the
1960 Yawata team 18-11 here.
Eight players from' the Yawata
team will be back to haunt
B.C. teams.
And Sir Ouvry
strikes again
The long, pecuniary arm of
Sir Ouvry's traffic brigade
has wound around yet another parking area.
The mud-h o 1 e d gravel
patch across the Main Mall
from Buchanan now is a
supervised (i.e. pay) parking
lot.
A Checkpoint Charlie "information" booth has been
set up to guard the entrance.
Rugby is the national game
in Japan. It is the number one
winter sport while baseball
takes the spotlight in the summer.
The team consists of 21 players and they play about par
with  B.C.  teams.
This will probably be the last
UBC game for such players as
Paddy SJoan, Bruce Wallace,
P$ay Wickland, and Doug Sturi
rock. Jim Beck will also graduate. Some of the players , may
be back for grad studies, or
they will play for the Birds
when they travel to the U.K.
this Christmas.
*
Negotiations are presently
under way with Japanese of fit
cials for the possibility of havr
iug a B.C. team tour Japan.
They want preferably a university team, probably the Birds.
Aside from the Japanese
match next week, the Birds
open the second round of the
World Cup matches today in
the  stadium  at   12:45.   .
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I
J
LIBERAL WEEK
^   MONDAY
8 P.M.
THE FORUM
Mike Pearson
^WEDNESDAY
12:00
BROCK LOUNGE
MEET THE
Liberal
Candidates
No Speeches
^  FRIDAY
Free Coffee
12:30
T.V. and RECORDING STAR
Rich Little
At The Inquisition
'Til April 1.
^  MONDAY
APRIL 8
VOTE LIBERAL
UBC LIBERAL CLUB Tuesday, March 26, 1963
WORDS
By MIKE GRENBY
ALL SET FOR EXAMS, EH?
+  **■ VVS Sti11 ** three essays
to hand  in,  and the  last on
™>n't be finished unU1 the ^
before lectures end.
.     well, no. not exactly. The -e'
?.   C°Uple    of   *exl.    which    T
haven't   re.ad    ^    ^
tourth time yet
^tter thi:skts0adw0ay; Ive got
rZ^I '.he' circui»stances, 1
really don't think that'* a fai:
question. air
-'^ince^st0^   °ne   to   write
---2 usi "^ «**
ous, coS     6m more 9*™-
«=•»  cognac or rye?
Since my finals d    >t
What exams?
Apparently   the   papers   arp
^•liS^rof the -ni-
»«•»'.  .responsible  for
-    °ur Pr°f thought he'd tea**
us and held im t se
final «„ T     . P a copy of the
dfdn't   V °f the Class" He
didnt  know that  the  fellow
-th the photographic ^y
is also long-sighted.
J  still  haven't  managed   to
STcnee2hnerVet31--
yeLW^/Ckul0tdUrin9^
rentrma6nda  bunch  <*  P-ple
a»i SOmehow   lost   them
a«d„ow ,t looks as if I may
not be around at exam time Y
Each of my. profs has tolri
-   "f^IeasfSOpercentofthe
class will fail. What,g ^ ^
Since I didn't go to classes
well skip exams,  too.
-    rm t°ld you must mako reservations at Wesbrook if you
"intend to have a breakdown
Isn't there some kind of rule   I
against   having   six   exams   in
Itlree  consecutive   days?
There's oniy one 'sub
Im worned about, but the
lecturer in that class has a
daughter. She's not really that
homely, and it's only for an.
ether month.
My   mommy  told  me   there
would be times like this.
I managed to jump ahead
a bit and finished all my courses last month. Actuallv, t thinv
most people are quite well
prepared.
I've foun' the perfec' sholu-
lion! Here, have another drink!
I'm seriously considering
having a deep, personal tragedy at home.
What, me worry?
Page 3
unfair sex
ti        .     , BY TIM PADMORE
nad such a rough Sr^Uo^Zu      & AMetiC Ass°-ation
Barb Bengough, president ofl
WAA,  came to student council!
',500 for women's
to ask for
'athletics.
NOT A  CENT
Before she even got there she
was persuaded to cut the figure
to $4,500. S
She left without a cent.
tt.„„   . . —menial  .
stone  ,s what you  get  fro
—Genial  Hume photo
m William
KISSES AS COLD a*
Koochin's artsy aiH   Ar"6   '*  What ^
and is on di.p^ t La™"! °* *"?' ^ Welded '^
li^es. (Her legs a^ S^X] "^ W'th °the' ^male
^Sl!^ONfrNuES
P39e one>       ence   with   Pni»+   ^	
Sneo/_y Tprfes
fcrew trouMe
Stubby beer bottles will hurt
the  Liberal Party in  the: next-
federal   election,   says   a   UBC
political science professor
The girls, who get an annual LT^., m°ment   these   bottles
AMS grant of $10,000, need the !a?ri J' /r0f- °aVid Stewart
money for travel expenses, she f'1 ^ "peoPle wi" make
said. v ' sne  a connection between the Amer-
f   The projected budget for air  rem charges 0°/^ ?* ^ CUr"
travel alone is almost $6,000.       I ^XrLTjltTSS >"
|tr Someone suggested they take | QJhefederal electL is lprn 8.
"Trains   take too   long"   shp
I said. s' e
Law   president   Paul   Fraser
charged that an expense of $100
for 'taxis' was "padding".
"How are we supposed to get
from our  hotel   to  the   game'
Miss Bengough asked.
FAST FIGURES
■ Bob MacKay, commerce presi
dent asked, "Why do girls in
extramural sports get $111 a
head, while the men get only
$50 each?"
 "->.™u 1B __Pru a.
Stubby  bottles   will   appear in
B.C. April 3.
"Of course I cannot say that
this is subtle Tory campaigning," Prof. Stewart said
_ Miss Bengough didn't know.
Point   Grey Socred ! neth^^ f Activities Ken-
Bate   has   so   far Lv,    ,„ /   Leitch   said   the SMs
in   should try to boost gate receipts
ln-'    She   said   that   was   against
(Continue,, :Mm page one)     (^   ^
money is forthcoming ^ ^^^ in-1    She   said- ^
If there ls no indication of  tary support for UBC L ^ I WAA'S P^osophy.
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS
EVERY SUNDAY AT
St-. Timothy
Lutheran Church
11:00 Worship
10:00 Bible Study
he said, "The campaign wuT'go
into high gear."
Scott  often   says  things  just
to be quoted in the newspaper.
I he   campaign   will   include
speaking   tours   by   University
students.
Scott said the  tone  of such
;peeches    will   be    "You,    th*
public,   have  supported   higher-
education  by  signing  the petition circulated in March.
"And   now   the   government
has chosen to ignore you."
But will the  government ignore the  232,000 signatures on
I the   petitions   lying   on   education    minister    Les   Peterson's
desk?
"I-don't see how they possibly
can,"   Scott   chortled,   "There's
a good chance we'll get a good
part of what we've asked."
I     Scott  said  he  thinks smiling
I Les Peterson is sympathetic to
the  University's  cause.
"But he can say nothing un
til the premier takes a stand,'
Scott added.
Scott    said   his    correspond
. is   not   liked   by
many ol his constituents.
er™ ?e  Socred  backbench-
$4,500 had been cut to $2 000
But the tight-fisted councillors
still weren't through.
«9^nnn m°ti0n t0  giVe WAA the
*AO00 was tabled till April 1
Miss Bengough said the girls
would be going to the students
at a fall general meeting for
more money whether the April
f9nnnDay °0Uncil gives he^ the
$.<s,000 or not,
SUMMER
JOBS
INCLUDES  5000 PERMANENT JOBS and FREE
TRIPS   TO   EUROPE.
Over  E5,0O0   summer   jobs   (also
permanent)   open  rl^ht  HOW  lj
u.S.   and  Overseas.    Hot   just  a
-j&i^T. ^TS? op*01"* i°l» aata, [
salaries, addresses, etc. Hurry'
Jobs are filled early. Regular
price, $4. Special rush $3 now!
Resume manual $1 or free with
order. SUHKEB JOB IXTSTI-
?,U^4-163 *■ 9t* St.7BrooMyk
tv r\E; (Afla 25c ^S. mail, 75c
First Class).
Would any indivdual who has
photographs
personal reminiscences
etc-
etc.
etc
w / -30-" on this Drift
Words will be a final one I
got a kick out of writing the
column these last two years-
I hope you enjoyed reading it'.
All the best on your exams
and in the future.
■ - Cheers!-.
Robinson's
Jewellers Ltd.
1045 Robson
MU 1-4616
•
Watch Repairs
Watches can be
mailed in if you
can't bring them in.
Enclose your phone
number.
Free  Estimates
25% DISCOUNT ON ALL
SALES TO STUDENTS!
H
Actio* Week l%$
Pita*, mtei m_ j. JudleJL ^
ths.  alumni OigiaL im nuMahlu.
*
THE aTIvT^ "* GEEATLY APPKEaATED BY
THE ALMA KATEB SOCIETY AND THE ALUMNI OFFICE
AS THE STUDENT ACTION WEEK WILL BE WlTT^S
IN THE SUMMER EDITION OF
"JhjL   ChtonidiL"
ALL PHOTOGRAPHS WILL BE RETURNED. Page  4
THE      UBYSSEY
EDITORIALS
The strife is o'er--the victory won
So long.
The., one cliche that can be used
without conjuring up fake tears.
If we were to use the next that
comes to mind — "It's been good to
know you" — that would of necessity
only apply to a very few who have
learned to get along with the Editor.
To say we "have had a wonderful
year" would be hypocritical. It could
have been a lot better.
Cliches find their way into most
farewell adresses. and we find that
no matter what we try to say, we fall
into the same trap.
But thanks to the University and
the student body. The Ubyssey has
been an active and informative cinm-
pus newspaper this year through the
efforts of the students who made the
news.
That is what we have to be thankful for. We also must consider that
without the enemies we have amassed
during the year there would be little
or no controversy.
Council were far from ideal this
year, our best teams (which incidentally cost us $65,500) lost the championships, the Georgia was closed and the
parking situation became more complicated.
We got a "truckwithfirstaidequipment," we had no council fights, and
we nearly gave Mr. Pearson a vote on
Brock management.
In the dying moments for the academic year we managed to pull off
another great Trek.
But not tq pl&% with sour grapes,
all the things brought out news stories
and the people who participated have
all helped to make our year great.
Thursday, March 28, 1963
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Published three times Weekly througnout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of the Editor-in-Chief of The Ubvssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3242.
Locals:  Editor—25;   News—23;   Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief:  Keith  Bradbury
Managing Editor Denis Stanley
Associate  Editor      Fred Fletcher
News Editor Mike Hunter
City Editor Mike Valpy
Picture  Editor       Don  Hume
Sports Editor Ron Kydd
Editorial Assistant Joyce Holding
CUP Editor   Maureen Covell
Critics Editor     William Littler
REPORTERS AND DESK: Lorraine O'Shore, Ann O'Burge,
Timothy Paddymorohan, Heather Fitzvirtue, Ronny
O'Riter, Gerard Hivonohan, Graeme O'Matheson,
Glenn Schultz (him again), Bob Fitzdonald, Ian
O'Cameron, David Fitzablett (hm-m-m?).
TECHNICAL: Gail Andersonohan, Gail O'Fitzkendallohan,
Michael O'Atchison (yeeps).
Letters to the editor
This is "30" for this year
With prorogation of the legislature Wednesday afternoon, the battle of higher education was over.
Premier Bennett had won.
He stood, with $1.6 million at his fingertips and thumbed his nose at a vanquished
UBC.
It was sort of poetic justice.
It was Goliath stoning the hell out of
David, or the New York Yankees drubbing
someone else in the World Series.
UBC had fought and lost.
Now UBC will sit and wait.
It must wait until the premier takes the
notion to give any more of the money needed.
It's up to him now.
Nice try, UBC.
"A/ew Denver" wasn't so bad
By GRAEME MATHESON
Ubyssey  Staff  Writer
UBC student Bob Halowski
paints a rosy picture of life at
New Denver, the B.C. govern-
-ment's school for recalcitrant
Freedomite children.
"Some of the parents compared it to Buchenwald," scoffs
Ha.lowski, an ex-teacher at
New Denver. "It was far from
another   Buchenwald.
"The children had movies
every Saturday, and sometimes
Sunday. If there was a movie
in town they particularly
wanted to see, they could go."
He said the older New Denver students were anxious to
learn to dance, but the Freedomite parents for soma reason  objected.
"But they were very keen
to go to the local high school
dances," recalls Halowski. "so
we taught them.
"They played on the town
hockey team and baseball
teams too — in fact, the teams
would have been impoverished
without them."
To top off the day, the New
Denver staff would take turns
telling the children bedtime
stories, he says.
*     *     *
Halowski explains that the
children, ranging in age from
seven to fifteen, lived at the
dorm but went to school with
the town children.
"The first day they had to
be individually packed onto
the bus, he says, "but once they
realized they would enjoy it
they were glad to go to school.
"And they were ideal pupils.
They had lots of spunk and
Imagination. They were slaves
for work. You couldn't have
asked for more conscientious
students once they had learned
English."
The Freedomites think going
to school will encourage their
children to adopt ways of ours
they think are wrong, he says.
So most of the parents re-
fused to sign report cards,
which would have been tacit
approval of schooling for their
children.
Especially since they generally made very good marks, the
Doukhabour children felt the
lack of parental approval keenly, Halowski claimed.
"The Freedomites are probably so radical because they
lack education," theorizes Halowski, "they haven't been able
to take the better of both cultures and enrich themselves
that way."
And,  he  says,   ope   pathetic
twelve-year-old  asked:  "Am  I
to give up everything I've believed all my life?"
*     *     *
"When the children were
first brought ot the dorm they
used to strip," Halowski reports. "They don't have our
puritanical attitude toward the
body.
"And they don't necessarily
strip in protest. One teacher
they told they had received a
message from God to strip so
she told them she had received
a message. for them to dress
again, and they did.'
And there were times, .he
says, when they would just sit:
"No amount of talking could
get them going — you'd just
have to be ingenious."
On several occasions New
Denver children tried to escape,
says Halowski.
"Sometimes they would tell
me in confidence what it was
like at home — but they don't
like the others to see," he says.
"Sometimes on Sundays they
would go on picnics with their
parents and not bother to come
back. And other times they
would make their bed like
someone was in it and leave."
But they had a tough time to
escape because, he explains,
New Denver can be reached
only through a narrow pass
seventeen miles from the dormitory.
"But several girls did get
passed into the valley. When
the police came they jumped
into a garden and pretended
to be weeding.":
*     *     *
Halowski says the Freedomite children wanted desperately to be like "Canadian" kids.
"One fifteen year old girl about
to go home we asked what she
wanted most. She said she
wanted to buy gloves and a hat
— things 'Canadian' girls
wear." i
He says some of the parents
took their children out of New
Denver and, breaking away
from Krestova, sent them to
school. The dorm finally closed
down because all promised to
send their children t6 school.
"I don't suggest it was an
ideal life,' he says, "children
are better with parental guidance.
"But lots of them cried when
they had to go back home."
Wait
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
It is indeed a pleasure to
find The Ubyssey quoting an
authoritive source to the effect
that I am a "hell of a nice
guy."
Of course, I would have
preferred to find the news that
I am a nice guy on the first
page, and the news that I was
"misinformed" on the third,
but that is perhaps too much
to hope for.
With respect to "plans to
sink the SUB," these are the
facts:
On March 21, I submitted to
Malcolm Scott a petition,
signed by approximately 600
students, that called for a general meeting to discuss the suggestion that monies presently
designated for the SUB be
transferred to the capital or
operating grants of the University. I suggested to Mr.
Scott that in order to avoid
jeopardizing the negotiations
then in progress between the
Government and the University (the negotiations were for
additional funds; would it be
wise to publicise the plan to
spend five millions on a new
SUB?) the meeting should be
held in the fall.
Recent releases in The Ubyssey suggest that the fall meeting would have been held anyway. This is of course, not
true, unless Mr. Dean Feltham
intended to introduce, at that
meeting, a motion calling for
the transferance of funds from
the SUB to the operating or
capital grants.
If that is the case, then I
was  indeed misinformed.
As to The Ubyssey's opinion that the "movement has
fizzled," I assure everyone
concerned that the movement
wil be very much -in evidence
next fall.
Yours truly,
C. E.  PERRY,
Arts I.
It's expensive
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
As one involved in the sale
of tickets for the rugby games
against Japan, it has come to
my attention that some students are complaining about
the price. The cheapest tickets
are $1.00. Also, "A" Cards may
not be used.
The cost of bringing a team
all the way from Japan is,
of course, very high. This cost
is borne entirely by the Rugby
Union—it does not cost UBC
a cent. The game is under the
sponsorship of the R.U. (therefore "A" Cards are not valid).
To make up the tremendous
cost of bringing the team over
here the R.U. is forced to
charge higher prices than
UBC students usually pay to
see their team play.
It concerns me, nevertheless, that students, who think
nothing of paying $1 to see a
movie or buy a round of beer
(not to mention $1.75 for a
Lions game) should complain
about paying a little more than
usual to see a top-notch International team play.
Virtually    all    the    regular
league   games  were   FREE.
Where were you then? .
Yours truly,
BARRY      WHAITES,
Manager, Braves
Rugby  Team.
On war
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I feel that many of the basic
issues of the nuclear arms for
Canada controversy are being
ignored.
In th.e past six thousand
years of recorded history men
have waged war in all but 292.
We have fought 14,531 wars
and have butchered three billion people for the cherished
"realism" of statesmen and
peacemakers like Lester B.
Pearson.
The justification by "realism" is also gone. With the advent of the ABC weapons
(atomic, bacteriological, and
chemical) the choice is between abolishing the age of
war and abandoning the age
of man.
Moreover our enemy is not
so much the Soviet Union as
war itself for if by some miracle the Communists were suddenly to disappear some new
economic enemy just as absurdly inquitous and diabolical to our minds would soon
arise on which we would inflict our quixotic holy crusades. And we would release
ourselves anew to the same
old atavistic vulgarity of war.
One must hope that after
two thousand years of artistic,
economic, and social development man's epitaph wil not be:
"They still solved their problems by slaughtering their
sons."
Surely   man  was  made for
better  things than this.
Yours truly,
DENNIS   FORKIN,
Arts I. Thursday, March 28, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
imi
At this time I wish to do
something that should have
been done long ago—that is,
to define the difference between entertaining films and
the so-called arty films. An
example is Lawrence of Arabia. It is a film in which both
setting and story give all the
potential of an entertaining
film. Since it is entertaining
and able to keep your interest
for four hours, does it necessarily follow that it is a good
film?
•
It is extremely easy to determine whether or not a film
is entertaining but deciding
whether or not it is a "good"
film is the part of the task of
film reviewing which is most
difficult. To do this, one must
consider many factors: montage (film editing, in the peasant's language), content (includes picture composition and
photographic technique, sound
editing, music score, content
structure  and  screenplay.
These are only the main
categories and there are many
others that creep in with the
individual film. Some examples are: use of a successful
expressionistic film technique
in Welles' Macbeth and Citizen
Kane; use of innovatory techniques other than filming such
as the use of internal dialogue
in Divorzio All 'Ilaliana; use
of uniaue cinematic symbolism
in Antonioni's La Notte. This
system must, at times, be completely disregarded , as in the
case of Venom and Eternity, a
film in which the images are
used to accent the sound
track. Another factor which I
forgot to mention is acting.
Acting is a mere drop, in the
bucket for successful films—
it merely has to be competent.
The point has come, in this
essay, where the rhetjqrieal
question that was set above,
can be answered in quantitative as well as aualiiative
terms. The numerical system
shall be as follows—a mark
of 1 to 10' will be given for
each category as it arrives
above; films receiving a mark
of   less   than   50%,   all   told,
shall be considered failures.
The mark that the film receives shall be, according to
my lordly judgement, deemed
final and binding.
Lawrence of Arabia—Entertainment value—9, marks for
the categories: 6, 8, 6, 6, 4, 3,
3. Additional category—acting
—9. The total mark is 54 out
of a possible 90. Result, the
film is indistinguished but entertaining. Now, Mr. Riter, can
you decide whether or not to
see Lawrence?
This is ridiculous! It is like
trying to evaluate, quantita-
tively, any art form. If a film
reviewer judged as Mr. Riter
would. like then, for that reviewer, I would say "may God
have mercy on your soul."
Whether or not you like it depends upon you, Mr. Riter,
not upon me. As you well
know, the cinema is a'personal art and you can only judge
a film for yourself. The film
reviewer can only give his
opinion, not his judgement. If
he does judge a film quantitatively, as I have done, then he
is being dishonest to himself
as well as to his readers.
c-c-c--caJi¥ m
with hullish results
FEMALE AND FELINE give campus the fish eye while gathering pertinent information for another Hull of a  production.
david milne — watercok>urs
I would suggest, to all of those visiting
the library basement Fine Arts gallery this
week, that they turn left into the "Little
Gallery" before induging in the Figure
exhibition straight ahead. The unique color
economy of David Milne's watercolors requires fresh eyes in order to be fully appreciated.
To one acquainted with, and expecting,
only the horrific realism of iria'riy war artists, Milne's paintings are at first a letdown. The seemingly superficial lightness
and freshness of his style, and his choice
of subject matter tend 'to circumvent the
"actuality" of battle; ruined churches, quiet
provincial towns fronted by airniy barracks, gaping bomb craters describe fee
before and after rather than ^he specific
action of war. Yet the expressly moralist
motivation behind each painting comes
across with surprising directness though il
is often touched w::h sentimentality. The
ruined Church at7Jffi.ain^fn^Na»ii.e, the
refuse heapedpabbut the Entrance to Ceflsx
Shelter in MonchV-Le-Preux wistfully comment upon, and contrast with the horror
that has preceded their calm. The agitated,
pointillist color laid upon a strong linear
frame suggests the inner revulsion of even
inanimate objects.
Milne's structural, beautiful color and
extraordinary clarity of organization are
used to maximum effect, with remarkable
variety, in Lievin, The Twins Crater, Vimy
Rietge, and The Cloth Hall, Ypres. In these
paintings, particularly, the artist's innate
and obvious feeling for beauty triumphs
over the most unlikely of subjects.
—dave nordstrom
' For the past three weeks an
unidentified girl has been paid
to prowl the campus disguised
as a student. Vancouver playwright Raymond "Hull announced tills week that the results of her report from tne
basis of a new piay of his,
"Sack Mac."
"She left no cover unlooked
under and turned up some
pretty scandalous information," Hull said. He contended
that students do not know the
real truth behind the "Back
Mac" campaign.
"The Maedonald Report
deals only with daytime student activities. My play will
be a satire on all sides of student life."
concerted
effort
The UBC Concert Band presents its annual Spring Workshop, Friday at noon and
8:30, under the direction of
S. E. Davis. They will present
a free program of compositions designed specifically for
Concert Band.
Works will include traditional compositions by Wagner
and Brahms; a trumpet concerto by ::ummel; Introduction and Scherzo by Maurice-
Weed;. the Chester Overture
by William Scnuman; and the
Symphony in B flat for concert band by , the contemporary composer HinSemith.
The orchestration of
iBrahm's Symphony No. 4 is
done by Ted Lazenby a music
student at UBC. Mr. Lazenby
also did the orchestration for
Bye fiye Birdie and is lead
trombonist in the Vancouver
Symphony.
The trumrvet concerto, will
feature George Laverock. First
chair positions will be filled by
Lynne Serey,. iiute, John .Capon, trombone; Elaine Smith,
oboe; Sari Hobson. saxaphone-
Psi Mallow, Clarinet: Dennis
Miller, tuba; Stan Perry, percussion; Bruce Dunn. French
horn; and Percy Pave/, baritone horn.
can do it i can
UBC's orchestra has come a long way
since Christmas. T-hey are a better unit
than they were at that time.
However, last Friday's program, under the direction of Hans-Karl Piltz,
though showing the orchestra workirig
more as a group, was not a display of
their maximum potential. Jhe string section is still weak and the whole orchestra
could use a lot more rehearsal time to
overcome technical difficulties and get
into the music.
Opening the program 7was fh^, first
movement of Beethoven's "Eroi'ca" Symphony, tfo. 3; Opus 55. The pace was siow.
However, there was not the ponderous
heaviness expected of a slow* rendition;
rather, there was a weakness of sound as
complete sections held back so strihg work
could be heard.
limited range
BEARDED BOY bard, david
dawson has been appointed
Grad Class Poet for the class
of 62-63.
Result of the dynamic range was
limited. The French horns, usually so
excellent, had technical difficulties. However, the development work of the orchestra, as a unit, was cleanly executed.
Manfredini's Concerto for Two Trumpets, Strings and Continuo featured Don
Clark arid George Laverock as trumpeters.
Clark and Laverock, though encountering
technical difficulties, got into their music
sufficiently that their performance showed the excitement lacking in the rest of
the program. Not virtuosic performances
by any means, the musicianship expressed,
overcame note errors to set their work
above that of the others. A lyrically lugu-
StevieW  of  the  UBC  Department  of
7 Music,   Orchestra   Workshop.    Noon
"hour concert, Friday, March 22.
brious Largo demonstrated the talent of
first violinist John Gomez.
Wagner's Overture to "Die Meister-
siriger von Nurnberg" with its heavy orchestration became bogged down in its
own weight. The performance felt stiff,
however. Some of this can be attributed to
the work itself. Strings and woodwinds
were at several times buried under cascades of brass.
Here, however, the orchestra achieved its first sense of climax, and music over
arid above the technicalities. But even
here, they had not suiiiciently overcome
their qualms to present a moving performance.
The evening program included, as
well, movements from Hindemuth's Spiel-
musik. Op. 43, No. 1 and Tschaikowsky's
Symphony No. 5 in E Minor, Op. 64; also
Nuages, from "Nocturnes" by Debussy.
The criticism here appears negative.
It is because the standard of performance
demonstrated at this concert was not that
expected from an orcrestra comprised of
musicians of this calibre.
Their foremost fault was an inability
to extend beyond the physical performance to give a musical performance of
depth and feeling. This is not a result of
poor musicians, but the result of a group
of students of very high individual ability,
very hard-pressed for group practice time.
proud parents
A secondary fault is the attitude of
some performers that the noon-hour concert is merely "the last rehearsal before
the evening concert." It is, however, at
this time that the audience is composed
of students. It is at this concert that they
demonstrate the Music School to the rest
of the campus, rather than at the evening
concert, which is direct to an audience of
mostly proud parents.
—gerry koer Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, Marcr
Tears; [eers, beet
The Georgia went dry
Welcome Students to
Cafe Dan's„
Come to the Club and meet
your friends. Good music and
entertainment.
Admission $1.50
With AMS card _•__'_ $1.25
Every   Friday   and   Saturday.
Telephone MU 4-4034
Home   255-6115
HELP !
If  you   fcmnd   an   essay  on   "The
Truth,''   please,  phone   987-8342.
WANTED
A ccng-enial girl to share a comfortable basement sute, approx.
one mile from gates. Fiivate bed
& sitting: room, adjoining' batb-
loom, private entrance. Share kitchen-. Half of rent $2 7.50.
Phone Marilyn,   CA  4-5834
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs — Inspections
BA Service Station
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
CA 4-7644
West Point Grey
United Church
"Just Outside the Gates"
4595   West   Eighth   Ave.
Minister: Rev. Wilfred Fearn
Services: 11 a.m. & 7:30 R.m.
Young Peoples Union to
which all students are invited meets Sundays at 8:45 p.m.
Choir practice Thursdays
at 8:Q0 p.m.
'S
T
4544 West Tenth Avenue
CA 4-6919
"For An Experience in Fine Dining"
Coffee Shop and Restaurant Facilities
Equipped to Cater for
Special Luncheons, Dinners
.   and Small Banquets
By DAVE ABLETT
Anonymous, Ubyssey  Reporter
One day followed another in
1962-83, - "
It was to be expected.
But there #e?re times ...
It didn't -.rain that first week
of lectures in September. A
good sign.
But little clouds hung over
the students' lot in those first
days.
Buster's was gone.
The grand high potentate of
car impounders was gone from
campus, driven back to the
jungle of downtown Vancouver.
*
There was no one to make
students toe the line; no one
to throw rocks at. An ominous
omen.
But students found plenty to
throw rocks at:
Byron Hender spent an airy
afternoon at the library. Byron
made  the   mistake   of  talking
" about 'the- engineers   in   non-
" technical terms.,
The   Liquor   Control   Board
closed   the   Georgia.   A   black
- day.   Students   shed  heart-felt
tears for ol' Cece, the bartender.
Another Cece took verbal
lumps but managed to protect
the Socred billfold.
The Board of Governors had
popularity problems. Even
their best friends told them.
John Haar took his lumps
from the resident fellows when
he had to do the governors'
dirty work—announcing dorm
fee increases.
There were plenty of targets
for rocks. There were a lot of
laughs, frustrations, a few tears
— the Georgia.
Housing administrator Haar
saw some good times in those
first days.
He wanted to clean up housing on Point Grey.
It was a popular plan.
"We should be able to find
out in what kind of places students have to live," said Haar.
The Ubyssey found that
homeowners had built a Little
Rock right outside the gates.
It was sobering.
The rooms were cold and
dirty. It was damned annoying.
At the same time, students
found a new man who wanted
them to toe the line — Sir
Ouvry, the czar of the parking
lots.
The most hated man on campus, he was called.
Who, me? Asked Sir Ouvry,
blandly.
The Ubyssey was kind to
him.
He wanted to do away with
all that there bureaucratic fuddle the parking system can
spare — the predictions that
never came true department.
The parking lot later sank.
Sir Ouvry got blamed.
The students dug out their
cars and threw rocks at Sir
Ouvry.
The faculty didn't.
•
Of course, they had nothing
to complain about. Their parking lot didn't sink.
On  September  27,  the  first
Back Mac, Hender?
signs appeared tl
Socreds weren't
popular with stu*i
Provincial regi
Kenneth Morton
weren't eligible
Grey by-election.
Campus Liber
Democrat clubs
Attorney-Genera!
The same day.
committee chairr
ley announced 1
would be held to
anniversary of tl
of 1922.
There were tv
1962-63. One wa
would call an an:
bration.
•
October  was
Kaneung Wata<na
The  Colombo
dent   was  a jses
Camp.
Doctors thim
smallpox.
He didn't, jus
disease.
More   than 70
Fort  got jabbed
night. Thousands
needle   during
days.
Kaneung folio'
from an isolatior
Shaughnessy Hos
Three days s
scare broke, «v
mentous events vi
The  DUs  —
fraternity  — w
"wild and recklt
their Kerrisdale
That's what
said.
"I was young i
to be tolerant," s
owner, "now, jtou
Jack Rennie, r
frat house, claii
weren't responsii
But the partie
after that.
•
On October 1
for the first tim<
to Hurricane Fre
Freida roarec
night, leaving sti
•lights for the wi
ing trees fro
Boulevard and
Ouvry of all blai
merging of C-lot.
On October 7
went dry.
It was Black 7
Closed until f
said the sign.
That night, 3
the Georgia bi
Control Board <
McGugan in effij
Then they bui
row in other pul
The real Cole
remained to strife
*
The sorrow ovi
overshadowed th
which broke the
Len Norris did
day showing t
bombers and sav
parading their si
War was on e\
People drank
without sugar:
United Nations
observed Wedne.
Sir Ouvry got 1
knowing what :
going to do wh
dropped.
In November,
about Cuba and 28,1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
s an
d
t maybe the
scr all-fired
V& after ail.
^F of voters
jad Students
Bj-tlie Point-
s and New
jrotested to
Bonner.
Homecoming
xi Paul Marat' a parade
ark the 40th
Great Trek
■ parades in
!i what you
versary cele-
e month of
laL
.change stu-
§n_, of  Fort
8'if'-: "-' ;■..-
rip-rere^skin-•
SC- ■„:• ,   7
f&u^enfs7.at-
hat Monday
nore got the
e   following
;d the scare
bed ward at
:tal.
er the pox.
l -*more more unfolding,
elta Upsilon
r e holding
i" partise at
ouse.
W- neighbors
ice and I try
id one home-
tU*w#h..ii,''-
Wager of the
it'®*e  DUs
&"..'■■■
Hrere quieter
.- C-lot sank
as a prelude
leu.
.down that
ients without
ikend, uplift-
7 University
^solving Sir
i in the sub-
the Georgia
Wednesday.
Ehter  notice,
} friends of
jried Liquor
aiirman  Col.
id their sor-
bl McGugan
again.
r the Georgia
r Cuba crisis
iext Monday,
.cartoon that
e ban - the -
the-Georgias
ns.v
try tongue,
their   coffee
Jay went un-
*¥•■'    ■-
luiied for not
adents: were
(a the i bomb
■tfetey forgot
he battle be
gan in earnest for more money
for UBC.
Dr. Patrick McGeer, an assistant '. professor of medicine,
called for a third Great Trek.
He was speaking in the heat of
the Point Grey by-election cam-
The other Cece
paign ,— in which students
could vote.
He was elected.
Phyllis Webb told The
Ubyssey that maybe they didn't
like the statues on the Buchanan concourse, but she'd seen a
little kid kissing them.
The Ubyssey discovered that
the kissing kid was posing for
his mother's camera.
*
The UBC fours salvaged a
bronze medal in a blistering
rowing race'at Perth, Australia.
At the * end of TNtfvember,
President Macdonald turned
down a request from the senate
that they receive a copy of his
report when it was ready.
Mrs. Eve Burns-Miller told
an audience of "children" in
Brock Hall to "hush".
She was hissed and booed.
She wasn't elected in Point
Grey.
In January, The Ubyssey
crowed.
It was our month.
The Ubyssey won an unprecedented triple crown in college journalism — for general
excellence, photography and
editorial writing.
Sir Ouvry decided his troopers would look nice in khaki
uniforms. He ordered them.
The RCMP began their sneak
attack on student .speeders.
They used ghost cars, ghost
pickup trucks and they hid behind trees.
They denied they were at
the same time investigating
student political activity on
campus. The Ubyssey thought
they were. So did everybody
else.
So did Commissioner Harvison.
*
On January 28, President
Macdonald released his long-
awaited report on higher education.
It was a blockbuster,'a $100
million -blockbuster.
The Socreds snapped to attention in Victoria. But to students' alarm, they forgot about
giving    UBC    the    money    it
needed.
Three days later Dr. Macdonald announced that UBC
was to get an ambulance.
It was to be controlled by
Sir Ouvry.
A week later, Byron Hender
was hoisted to the roof of the
library. He was there for two
hours.
*
On    February   19,   Premier
Bennett  shafted  UBC.  He  cut
the operating grant request by
$1.8 million.
The Ubyssey spelled h i s
name wrong.
Three days later, model
parliament fell.
Prime Minister Ross Munro
was swept from office into the
Brock broom closet.
"We want our seat back," he\
said as engineers pounded at
the door.
By the end of February, action   was  brewing 'among stu/
dents over Bennett's budgetary
knife.
It ended in Action-Week and
230,000  B.C.  residents signing
petitions   asking   him-  to   sew	
UBC back up again. Like, send
money.
*
Last week, John Haar became the sacrificial lamb of the
board of govrenors when he
announced they were planning
to increase dorm fees by up to
$87.
It wasn't a popular idea.
The grad class said it will
donate an ambulance as its
parting gift to UBC.
Sir Ouvry said he really,
didn't think it was such a good
idea.
"*.■+*. 1nl   «,    -   «w*Jt
Who's Macdonald?
Hark, a subversive!
Got a flat, constable?
The khaki kops
The high potentate was gor" Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 28, 1963
Grizzled
is a bt
pinKo
Education should have the
money nuclear arms now gets,
the: editor ot the communist
1 Pacific Tribune  said Tuesday.
And" that's the only constructive thing blue-shirted Tom Mc-
Ewen did say in his noon-hour
talk here.
The   rest   of   the   time   the
grizzled old communist spent
blasting other political parties
—except the NDP.
"Fi»*eign control of the
economy is the main reason
Canada's education system is in
such, bad  shape,"  Tom said.
"The communist solution to
this problem is to divert money
Ask ffte a few questions,
and I may tell you some lies
Students will have an opportunity to question Socred
brass Friday.
Attorney General Robert Bonner and Point Grey MLA
Thomas Bate will speak at an election meeting for two Socred
candidates.
Invitations were sent to several students in the Point
Grey area.
It invited them to "hear direct irom your representative
the latest news on the contentious issues at present before
the legislature."
It said questions would be welcome and where possible
fully answered.
Statements such as this are usually -made simply to get
people to attend the meeting.
The meeting is at the Masonic Hall, 4426 West Tenth,
Friday at 8 p.m.
from this criminal arms spending to education."
He said students should pressure the federal government to
bring this about.
McEwen also admitted to students he doesn't own a white
shirt.
"I had one 15 years ago but
i it finally wore out."
He wears the blue shirt, he
said, to identify himself with
the masses.
There was considerable
heckling from the three people
attending the meeting.
Shrjuting and waving his
arms, McEwen declared U.S.
intervention and Liberal treason had brought -about the fall
of the Conservative government.
"I doubt if you know this,"
he said, "but Lester Pearson is
an agent for the Pentagon. I
know this to be a fact."
When asked if he would prefer Soviet domination to
American domination he became angry and refused to
answer.
Alumni searching
for trek nostalgia
The alumni office is still
looking for Back Mae campaign anecdotes and pictures.
The alums want them for
the University's   archives.
All pictures, negatives and
stories on the campaign are
to be turned in either at the
Alumni ofice, Room 252 in
the Brock Extension or to
Malcolm Scott in the AMS office.
Flowers
10% discount g-lveii Students on
■—•a<r»s. Order now lor your
next formal.
VOGUE   PLOWEB- SHOP
BE   3-6323 — RE '3-3031
2180 W.  Broadway-
Double Breasted Suite
Converted to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
ATTENTION EDUCATION STUDENTS
The District Superintendent, Principals and Secre-
, tary-Treasurers of Hope, Princeton and Keremeos School
Districts will be available for interview at the Personnel
Offices from  10:00  a.m.  to  4:00 p.m.  on Thursday and
Friday, April 4th and 5th. .
All inquiries will be welcomed.
*^l^^^^i_f
m
■ V:   '     ' X ,«*!»
THANKS!
Tire advertising department of TneiJbyssey would like to thank the following advertisers for their
patronage during the past year. These advertisers have seen fit to display their products and services to
you in The Ubyssey and "we hope that ydu have seen fit to give these firms your patronage during the
past university year and will continue to <to so in the  future.
ADVANCE   BUSINESS   COLLEGE
ADREM WAKE-UPS
JWRNStANCE ;    .....;
ALEXANDER AND ^AXiLS^'^r^^C^^llt).
Aluminum company of canaIda LiMiTED
|r|.B^ SKI HUT
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
4^Sf|Ei^., \.i^r:v   ....   .„
AtOMlCiENiRGY of^n^^ umtted
|^s jHtpito.'.&,' powIr authority
(llAINE BOOSTER
(LANK OF MONTREAL
MEL BAUENSBY
B.C. LIBERALS-,...„..,
B.C. MEDICAL SERVICES
l#A-C^S&»«£* .-,,• -.„,....,,
BEU TELEPHONE COMPANY OF CANADA
CAF* ©AN v ■i-t-,   :  -iMe-_^--v
CALIFORNIA STANDARD COMPANY
CAMPBELL.. STUDIOS
CAMPUS SHOE STORE
CANADA PACKERS LIMITED
CANADA^A-WCO..
CANADIAN CHEMICAL CO, LTD.
CANADIAN GENERAL t|ji£TR*C
CANADIAN  IMPERIAL  BANK  OF  COMMERCE
CANADIAN INDUSTRIECl^-'    ^-7
CANADIAN PRATT & WH+TNE^.AIRCRAFT
CANADIAN TAMPEX CORPORATION LTD.
CANADIAN; WESTINGHOUSE  LIMITED
CAVALIER. SHOPPE
CAVE  CABARET
CELESTA SHOP
THE CELLAR
CHARTpiBD ACCOUNTANTS
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
CLINTON'S MEN'S WEAR
COCA-COLA. LIMTED       ,,
COLUMBIA  CELLULOSE   LIMITED
CYANAMID OF CANADA LTD.
DEANS RESTAURANT
DEPT. OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
DO-NUT DINER
duMAURIER CIGARETTES
DUPONT  OF CANADA
DttTHffi BOC#7|I.tD.
T. EATON COMPANY LTD.
JACK ELSON MEN'S WEAR
FINNS CLOTHING   ,r
^lenAyr knp tiMrfia^ „ ,
fRANVlLLfc OPTICA*.  LIMITED
REAT WEST UFI ASSURANCE
GREYHOUND LINES OF CANADA
HARRISON HOTEL •   .,.;'
GEORGE HAYES MEN'S WEAR
HUDSONS BAY COMPANY LIMITED
IMPERIAL OIL ebMPANYlTD.
IMPERIAL TOBACCO COMPANY OF CANADA
BRAHADI'S TOBACCO
PLAYERS CIGARETTES
PLAYERS FILTER
INQUlSlTJOH "&§f$£fi $0O$E
INSTITUTE Of CHARTERED ACCCOUNTANTS
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
IRON ORE OF. CANADA LTD.
WRIGHTS TRAVEL SERVICE
E. A. LEE FORMAL WEAR
MACDONALD TOBACCO  LIMITED
EXPORT CIGARETTES
MATTEL TOYS: IIMITED
MATZ AMD  WOZNY CUSTOM TAILORS
MOBIL OIL OF CANADA LTD.
MODERN TRAVEL LIMITED
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
NEW YORI^CpSfUMI«L_dN
N.jF-C.U.S* TRAVEL AGENCY
NORTH-RITE LIMITED
NORTHERN ELECTRIC COMPANY LTD.
ODEON THEATRES
PHILLIPS APPLIANCES  LIMITED
pitman optical limited
pl1mley fourth avenue
Prescription optical company ltd.
PROCTOR AND GAMBLE LIMITED
>plNT GR£Y LIBERAL ASSdClATIbN
sPOINT PREY SOCIAL CREfolT
R.C.A. VICTOR
READERS  DIGEST ASSOCIATION
RICHARDS AND FARISH LIMITED
RIDGE THEATRE
TftOYAL BANK OF CANADA
' ROYAL TRUST COMPANY
RUSHANT   CAMERAS   LIMITED
STUDIO THEATRE -
SARGENT SALES AND SERVICE
SCHOOL  DISTRICT NO.   1,   FERNIE
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2, CRANBROOK
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 28,  QUESNEL
...SCHOOL  DISTRICT  NO.  80,   KITIMAT
SHELL OIL COMPANY OF  CANADA  LTD.
STUDENT   PERIODICAL   AGENCY
SUN LIFE ASSSURANCE CO. OF CANADA
TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE
JfOTEM SHOES
tftANE  OF  CANADA  LIMITED
TRANS  CANADA   AIR  LINES
fUCKETT  LIMITED
BUCKINGHAM  CIGARETTES
UNITED AIR LINES
UNITED TAILORS
7LJPJOHN COMPANY .
VANCOUVER OPERA ASSOCIATION
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY SOCIETY
PETER VAN DYKE
VARSITY THEATRE
VOGUE FLORISTS
R» J.  WEST AGENCIES  LTD.
WESTERN SPORTING  GOODS
WINRAM   INSURANCE  LIMITED
j^TER^TIpNAi,JjgkiLJ&l0iW9F CANADA LTj>.
CpNjoMPATEp M^NGjA^lSMELTUNG COMPANY LTD.
KENMC^LMSTERlJINE ART PHOTpGRAPHY
^^VAoiuil^N J*PEDJEiT& f*Owi* RIVER LTD.
^VTU^L^iEE ASSURANCE CaOE CANADA
PAN  AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION
4S4ukn FRtsjiv
Director of Advertising,
The Alma Mater Society
PARKERS SPORTSWEAR COMPANY LIMITED
PROGRESSIVE- CONSERVATIVE PARTY OF CANADA
SCHOOL  DISTRICT  NO.  32,  FRASER CANYON
SCHOOL- DISTRICT   NO.   43,   COQUITLAM
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.„ 57, PRINCE GEORGE
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 60, PEACE RIVER NORTH
WOODWARDS  DEPARTMENT   STORES   LIMITED
Vancouve. Sales Mgr.,.
The Ubyssey
BERT MacKINNON
Vancouver Sales Rep.,
The Ubyssey Thursday, March 28, 1963
THE       UBYSSEY
Page
9
More academic interest
«MMMWI^-_-_MH^B_i__i_HHHH_-_^_^_HM
New group wants
help for frosh
The intellectual side of UBC has stirred the interest of
the executive element.
Jim   Ward,   AMS   first   vice
president, is chairman of the
newly-formed education committee.
The committee wants to promote a more informal relationship between freshmen and their
professors and upper class students.
"Some of the first year profs
aren't very good," Ward said,
"and their notes are in accordance."
He said department heads
should provide concise notes for
freshmen.
Ward said these moves would
help lower the first year failure
rate.
"We need more symposiums
and conferences in liaison with
the clubs on campus. The present
Academic Symposium isn't
enough.
"The aim of the committee is
to promote a higher level of
interest in academic life," he
said.
He suggested evaluation of
courses, lab facilities, textbooks
and faculties.
The committee would send
students from UBC to other
campuses in Canada. It would
promote an increase in student
aids and loans, Ward said.
Their translations
were real classics
Classical studies students Newton Seale and Richard Toporow-
ski have won top awards from
the Canadian Classical Association.
Newt and Richard picked up
first and second prizes respectively in the western division for
their translations of classical
Latin.
Publications Office
63-64
~">      f The Co-Ordinator of Publications is now  receiving
applications for two assistants to the Co-Ordinator- Applicants should have experience in some field of student
publications — Yearbooks, Newspapers, etc.
Please address all applications to:
THE COORDINATOR OF PUBLICATIONS,
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE,
ROOM 201, BROCK HALL.
State Name, Faculty, Year, Phone Number, and Related
Experience.
Applications close April 3rd.
JktereJtetf Jfa Helping
Mtyket Cducatich ?
Qvsh.   tfUL   MLftWWL   ihsL   (UnuL
TFlaieA.   $oasfy.  wilL  dsl
jconiuwinq.  ii&.  mmpmqn,  io,
bhinq.  infoJtmaiion,  on JuqheA.
sdu£aixon,  io.  Mul  jottigMW  of.
&.Q.     Qf.  uoju.  Uvjl  out of,
iosvn,  and  aM.  wi&&Ai&d.  in,
Jvdpinq,  oui dwdnq.  inn.  AtwunsA.,
ptlsaM jconiact   .   .   .
THE RECEPTIONIST
A.M.S. OFFICE
College
9C9
FACULTY PINS  $ 1.25
FACULTY SWEATERS      14.50
UBC JACKETS  14.50
LARGE MUGS   3.25
SMALL MUGS   1.65
LIGHTERS .           -. .98
BLAZER CRESTS   6.25
SWEATER CRESTS    1.50
Everything Marked Down!!
Brock Extension       11:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m.
. . . AND
CANADA
STRONG!
Canada's whole future as an independent world power depends on YOUR
vote ... we must be free to make our own decisions on nuclear policy ... we must
continue our economic growth ... we must have a strong, effective government
with a clear mandate to guide Canada through the most momentous years in her
history.
Under your Conservative government, even hampered by Opposition
parties wiliully "playing politics", Canada has continued to grow ... and grow
stror-ssr. In 1962 our export trade shot up 7% . . . our gross national product
lose 8% . . . our personal income increased 6%. We have, thanks to firm Conservative policies, the fastest growing, healthiest economy in the Western world.
THINK CANADIAN and YOUU vot« CONSERVATIVE
IN VANCOUVER QUADRA RE-ELECT
GREEN,  Howard
IX
Published by the Progressive Conservative Campaign Committee Page 10
T HE-    U-BYS-SEY
Thursday, March 28, 1963
■—Don Hume photo
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE scholars for 196 3 are (top) Holger Herwig, Harry Oussoren,
Brian Davidson, Bill Horswill and (bottom) Norma Blackstock and Brent Barr. They will
spend next year studying in Germany, Japan, Chile, Spain and Russia, while one student
from each of those countries cpmes to UBC for a year.
Radsot'i
ga
says Sol
Radsoc's program level has
been aimed at the moron and
not the intellectual, the society's
new .president said Wednesday.
"Never in the history of the
society," said M. Solomon Wodinsky, "has there been so much
garbage aired as there has" been
this year.
"No one with any intelligence,
can   stomach Radsoc."   -..-■; »"*; *
Wodinsky, a political science-
student, succeeds Daryl Dickinson as head of the organization.
He said Dickinson had concentrated the whole year on
amusing the morons on campus.
"I may know nothing about
producing a radio show," he
said, "but I can do a better job
than this."
Wodinsky said next year's
Radsoc would be completely devoted to classical music and
learned articles from all campus faculties.
"This is the kind of material
UBC students are really interested  in,"  he  said.
. n,;*Qi7
Typing - Shorthand
8:15 a.m. - 1.-15 p.m., May 1
Advance Business College
AL 5-3727 or CY 8-3822
Chem Students
Learn the elements of the Periodic Table in their proper order
(and remember them) this fast,
simple, way. Send $1.00 to
MURRAY, P.O. BOX 234, OUT-
REMONT,   P.   QUEBEC.
Teacher,   wife   and   three   children, six, four, and baby, requires
a well-appointed house oh'qr very
near campus "for July and August.
1 Details   to   Drew,   Tahsis,   B.C.
f "' "■ ■" --"■• --(   • i"~7~        i ■
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We  specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
Residence council
waxes philosophical
The Philosophy club doesn't exist, God doesn't exist, and
now the Inter-Residence Council is trying to get into the act
too:    .'•■
They don't want to exist
either.
IRC is hoping to be reincarnated into the University Residences   Association.
IRC president Bill Rogers
says: "It's more than just
changing our name. As the URA
Harvard law dean
talks here Monday
The dean of the famed
Harvard Law School will
speak at UBC Monday.
Erwin N. Griswold will address students at 11:45 a.m.
in the main reading room of
the Law Building.
we'll  be  constituted  under - the;
i
Alma Mater Society." I
Rogers is looking for execu-!
tive members for the new asso- [
ciation. j
They    are:    president,    vice-1
president,   secretary,   treasurer, j
athletic  and cultural chairman, \
social chairman, public relations
chairman,   AMS   representative
and    co-ordinator    of    women's
activities.
There will also be one representative from each of the university residences and the
theological colleges.
The first set will be appointed before the end of this term.
Students should apply to the
IRC box in the AMS office.
There is no charae for our services
modern travel limited
4345 Dunbar Street Vancouver 8, B.C.
Telephone 224-3110
APPLICATIONS    FOR:...
DISCIPLINE   COMMITTEE
PROSECUTOR (LAW STUDENT)
ASSISTANT PROSECUTOR (LAW STUDENT)
4 MEMBERS
STUDENT   COUfeT
5  Judges  and  2  Alternate Judges
High   School   Conference   Chairman
PLEASE SUBMIT APPLICATIONS TO:
SECRETARY, AMS OFFICE, BY MONDAY, APRIL 1.
(ELIGIBILITY FORMS REQUIRED)
Jess E. James,
CLASS OF '67?
Applications...
are being received for the position of Housing Inspections
- Co-ord}nator. This is a full summer's work with a salary
of $1,400. Apply at the Personnel Office.
A life-long student of transportation sys-j
terns, James will be best remembered fori
his provocative major thesis "Iron Hosses
I Have Broke In." Working towards his I
doctorate, he formed a research team,
with his brother and toured the West,!
'aking copious quantities of notes as
hey went. Soon the whole country was
talking about the James boys and they
were in great demand as guests of honour
at civic parties (neckties to be worn).
Despite a reputation which grew by leaps
and bounds (mainly on to passing trains)
Jess E. James remained an elusive, retiring
person who spurned formal gatherings no
matter how pressing the invitation. A:
superb horseman, Mr. James had a way
with colts. His untimely end came when
he was engaged in breaking in a new
one — a 45, to be exact.
Keep your sights on success H
by forming a good banking j
connection — a "must" for   mYmwMommijii
success in any profession or   |i|H||l
business. ■■tUJJJ
Bank of Montreal
Whatever became of:
?NE BANK WHERE STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS ARE WARMLY WELCOMED
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KJOR-BYy,Manager   . ■     ...,-. .   ... Thursday, March 28, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Campus roundup
Page 11
Write a review
for Open House
Open House  commttee  wants  a musical  review  depicting
student and university life.
PRESIDENT John Macdonald
concludes Vancouver Institute
lecture series Saturday at 8:15
in auditorium. His topic is
higher education: the way
ahead.
Two Africans
to speak here
Campus United Nations and
CUSO clubs will present two
speakers on Africa next month.
Dr. I-indsay H. White, an American Negro and associate director of Operation Crossroads Africa, will speak on the Challenge
of Africa, April 15.
Dr. White recently completed
a three-month tour of 20 African
countries lining up summer work
projects for African and North
American students.
On April 16, Edwin K. Towns-
end Coles, head of the Institute
of Adult Education at University
College, Southern Rhodesia, will
discuss Central Africa — Problems and Prospects.
Coles is now on tour of North
American University Extension
departments.
Both lectures will be held at
12:30 noon in Bu. 100.
A prize of $50 of student
money will be given to the winning entry. Deadline is October
15.
Further information can be
obtained by contacting the
Open House committee in the
AMS office.
Committee chairman Ed Lavalle, a Beta man, said he didn't
expect anything usable would be
submitted.
*     *     *
Russian exchange student
Yuri Rigin has been named top
foreign student of the year at
UBC.
The award is given to the student who contributed most ot
international goodwill in the
university  year.
It is sponsored by International  House  Club.
Rigin has participated in academic conferences and seminars
and joined the, Back Mac petitioners when they went into the
Interior.
He has also spoken to organizations on and off campus while
at the same time maintaining a
high academic record.
American   students    were
WANTED
MICROSCOPE    WANTED    —•
In-
stniment   n6t   required   until
end
of  term,  rhone  CA  4-5493.
BRIGHT
SPRING
FASHIONS
by
Glenayr
Sprightly new for Spring is
this Arnel/Cotton Swiss
Jacquard Cardigan ... in
many beautiful patterns and
colour combinations, with
narrow facing, to match
Arnel/Cotton fully-lined
double-knit skirt—in exciting
new colours for Spring
Cardigan 34-42, $10.98, skirt
8-20, $13.98. At better shops
everywhere.
Without this label #£&_J§S  it is not a genuine KITTEN!
barred from the contest this year j
because no one likes them.
* *     *
A team of Hungarian all-star
table tennis players will meet
three UBC students in an exhibition match at 8 p.m. today in
Internationa] House.
UBC students are Chandra
Mathosingh, Mitsu Kutsekake,
and Ernie Cockyne.
* *     *
Nominations    are    being    accepted     for    the    International
House Association student of the
year award.
The student who has contributed most to the International
House motto—that brotherhood
may  prevail—will   be   selected.
Nominations are to be submitted to the International House
office. There is no deadline.
Campus Canada
to loose again
Student council has given
Campus Canada approval to
publish a second issue this fall.
The magazine didn't actually
need council's approval but
public relations is important
and councillors like to feel they
are, too.
Council also announced that
the magazine, published by
NFCUS and produced at UBC,
actually had a profit of $200.
Losses up to $500 had been expected.
Deadline for submission of
material for the next edition is
July 15.
FOB SALE
Speed Graphic 314x414. leather
Csute, Accessories, perfect condition.
PUcne CA 4-4249 for appointment .
to see.
For
Careful Consideration
of your automotive
requirements call
Bill McLeod
at r»IU 1-2311
or WA2-1770
Factory deliveries
Proper financing
Substantial savings
GM Deealer
Group Right to EUROPE
Definitely Going - May7 - Aug. 23
Group travels via N.Y. Stopovers permitted before and
after above dates in NY., Toronto, Winnipeg and Edmonton—at individual's convenience. Only travel as a group
from N.Y. to London but enjoy the group discount over
the entire route. For information phone Barry Patmore,
AM 1-5770. Applications must be made before April 4.
SpAinq  jcomad.  in.  like,  a,   Jtion.  hoahinq.  wiih.  now,,
diff&Ji&nt  and.  sxaiinq.  pbaiisAnA.   that  bhiqPdtstn,
ihsL  fa&hion.  aouhl
illli    *%
5aqqI.   SjpJunq.  iviih.  jconfidnrvcc.  in.  a.  n&w.  ivakdhobs.
jchoMn.  wiih, dwJuminaiion,  at  ihsL
\\
LION'S   DEN
The store for the man who's going places.
u
771 GRANVILLE ST.
MU 1-2934 Page 12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 28, 1963
'tween dasses
Election wagon
roils to campus
Dorothy Steeves, NDP candidate for Pt. Grey, speaks at
noon today in Bu. 104 on federal election issues •
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY management professor Dr. Seymour Melman speaks- Friday
trt 8 p.m. in ft-mce df Wales
school auditorium on alternatives to military systems of
power.
/H debates
Congo crisis
Should the United Nations use
military force to carry out its
decisions?
In the Congo difficulties were
resolved when the UN forced a
settlement on Katanga, but
was this the'proper way?
The problem will be aired at
noon today in Internationa?
House when law professor L. G.
Jahnke and John Grant of the
extension department sfceak on
The UN.and Katanga. Dr. John
Conway, who was also to talk,
has the mumps.
Everyone is invited to the discussion, sponsored by the UN
Club.
IMS
Dr. Seymour Melman; author
of "The Peace Race", speaks on
"Productivity and the Peace
Race'" noon today, Bu. 106.
* *     *
PLAYERS CLUB
General elections meeting,
12:30 Friday, Green Room.
* *     *
WUSC
Meeting,   12:30  Friday, board
room, IH. All prospective members welcome.
| *     *     *
DEBATING UNION
!    Annual general meeting and
[elections, 12:3© Friday, Bu. 224.
* *     *
VCF
Rev. Brook of Alliance Tabernacle, speaks and shows slides on
"World Mission Today", 12:30
Friday, Bu. 106. Prof. Nichols of
Religious Studies Dept., speaks
on "The Deity of Christ," 12:30
Friday, April 6, Bu. 106.
* *     *
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
University Concert Band
Workshdp, Friday, Brock. The
band, under the direction of S.
£. Davis, will make two appearances 12:30 and 8 p.m. Free admission.
* *     *
FENCING CLUB
All members please return
their equipment, 12:30 Friday
n the Armory, or 7 p.m. Wednesday.
* *     *
SAST ASIA SOC
Three films from Communist
China, noon today, Bu. 106. Non-
members 15 cents.
GETTING ENGAGED?
, 40% Discount pins 3 years Insurance
on fine Quality Diamond ring's.
Also- 25% Discount on Famous Brand
team.  Watches. .
Phone   Mel   Battensby,  Sc.  4
PA 7-2589
A PRIZE
WINNER
S'ienna dinnerwar.e
in only one of
.several patterns
on display which
have won awards
for excellent design and quality.
Brides, visit and
pick your favorite.
DESIGN
FORUM
923
ROBSON
FINE ARTS
Peter Aspell, artist, teacher,
and participant in current exhibition in the Fine Arts Gallery,
will discuss his opinions on the
human figure in painting, noon
today, Library Fine Arts
Gallery.
* *     *
MUSSOC
General meeting to discuss
new slate of officers and suggestions for next show, noon today,
Bu. 205.
* *     *
HAM SOC
General meeting, elections,
noon today, Bu. 227. ;
'.''.-*    * " *■ '■''■'''
PRE LIBRART SOC
Miss TLore Brewer speaks on
cataloguing, noon today, Library
Rm. 838.
■■*' *    *    * .•- •
CAMPUS CANADA
Deadline _or contributions for
fall edition of NFCUS national
magazine is July 15. Submit to
Campus Canada, AMS. For further information contact Peter
Penz, RE. 1-7335.
Bay Day Fficfey Bay Dq^,
Friday Bay Day
Bay Day Fm_|§y Bay Day
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BAY DAY Friday Bay Day
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Bay Day 1
zriday Bay Day FRIDAY Bay Day
Bay Day
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Friday. Bay Day
Bay Day
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Friday Bay Day
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Friday Bay Day
The Ideal  Place To
Meet   Your   Friends
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak with  Coffee
$1.35 - Ifs Really Good
Full Course Meals
within your income.
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
See how pleasant
banking can be at the "Royal"
ROYAL BANK
The Cambridge Natural Shoulder Suit
is on sale in the Bay's Career and
Campus Shop, second floor. Hand-finished in pure wool . . . from our finest
maker. Blue, grey, brown, black,
olive; 36-44. Regularly $95.
Friday 69.88
T^Hnftlfrag (tWjmng
INCORPORATED   2*?    MAY    1670.

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