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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1964

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Array THS UBYSSEY
are
hardy boys
Vol. XLVI, No. 45
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1964
" CA 4-3916
3§_  •
k
LINDA CHALKLIN
. Queen for a knight
One pin, two crowns
Harmony
in royal
m ■ m •»#*
reigns
family
King John's fair queen is also King John's girl friend.
Linda    Chalkin,    of    Alpha
Gamma Delta sorority, was
elected Mardi Gras queen Friday.
She wears the pin of John
Black, of Alpha Delta Phi fraternity.
He was elected king.
• •    *
The crowning of the king and
queen was the highlight of the
two-day Mardi Gras festivities
over the weekend.
The affair netted several
thousand dollars for the Muscular Dystrophy Fund. The
final figure has not yet been
added.
Grand prize of a trip for two
to Hawaii was won by Mrs.
Mary Ann Pruner of New Westminster.
• •    •
Belle Koronko won the wrist
watch, and a fur stole was won
by Sanford Budgen, Arts II.
A picture of a nude woman,
hanging over the bar in the
sets for the floor show was
censored.
Critics painted a cat over it
and then realized that was even
worse.
So the set was replaced with
a blanket.
CANADIAN
EXAMPLE
Engineer to try
for presidency
A third candidate has entered the race for AMS president.
Ken Harrison, Engineering
III, posted his nomination
form Monday.
Mike Coleman, Arts president, and Roger McAfee, former Ubyssey editor, declared
their candidacies last week.
Nominations for first slate
elections close Thursday.
Nurses afraid to
protest fee boost
Hardest-hit faculty
silent on $200 hike
Fear of faculty pressure is preventing nurses from protesting a $200 increase in their fees.
Nurses interviewed by The Ubyssey said they were
required to clear all public statements through the faculty.
The nurses preferred to remain unnamed.
Nurses at UBC were hardest
hit by the fee increase announced last week by the Board of
Governors. The increases for
most faculties ranged from $50
to $60.
Until last week, nurses were
required only to pay for arts
end science courses they were
taking. Nursing courses were
free.
The Alma Mater Society is
going to protest for them, President Malcolm Scott said Monday.
The $200 increase brings
nursing fees up to $346.
But nursing students have
only one or two months in
v/hich to work during the summer.
"It was absolutely impossible
for nurses to get through by
themselves even before this increase," said one nursing student.
She said even if employers
would hire nurses for the short
summer holiday, the strain of
the nurses' course makes a rest
essential.
"The faculty discourages us
from getting jobs," she said.
Miss Evelyn Mallory, head
of the school of nursing, refused to comment to The Ubyssey.
"I think the student press
should leave it quite alone,"
she told The Ubyssey.
"This attitude of unconcern
by the head of the school of
pursing is incomprehensible,"
said Scott.
"This new fee is iniquitous.
"The AMi3 will protest  this
action to the board.   The board
(Continued on Page 2)
See:  NURSES
SUB vote
goes again
next month
By MIKE BOLTON
An AMS referendum proposing a $5 student fee increase
will be held in the last week
of February or within the first
two weeks of March.
"It will definitely be held
within two months," Dean
Feltham, chairman of the SUB
Planning Committee said Monday.
AMS regulations require 10
days notice before a referendum, is submitted to the student body.
Feltham said the fee increase
will save $1.5 million in interest.
"Students 30 years from now
will be burdened with our debt
if the increase is not accepted," he said.
The $5 increase may be requisite for SUB.
The Board of Governors will
not allow the thirty year
scheme, according to Feltham.
The increase will reduce the
duration of the debt to fifteen
years.
"The benefits of the increase
are worth more to me than 50
cups of coffee spread over one
year," he said.
The delay will allow the
committee to consider other
sources of revenue.
RECOGNIZE THIS? It's a picture of wet pavement at
night in front of Buchanan.
See more of UBC at night on
Page 5.
They're a Hardy bunch
No moral problem with Bobbseys
(See Page  3)
By LORRAINE SHORE
UBC students will soon be
able to read the Bobbsey
Twins books.
The UBC library has the
books on order.
It's also going to acquire the
Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys
series.
•    •    •
"And I hear that Tarzan is
being published again, so we
may get that too," Miss Sheila
Egoff, assistant professor in
the library school, said Monday.
Recently, an Ontario mother
moved   to   ban   the   Bobbsey
Twin  series  from school  libraries.
She charged that they were
"garbage, badly written and
boring."
•    •    •
Miss Egoff agreed that they
were not good literature, but
defended their moral qualities.
"They're rigid middle class
in setting and values," she
said.
"They have a narrow moral
concept, in that good deeds always receive a reward," Miss
Egoff said.
"You   know — the   Hardy
boys rescue an old man and
immediately get $200," she
explained.
The books are on order for
the children's fiction collection, a recent addition to the
library.
The collection now has
3,500 volumes, but will have
10,000 when the section is
completed.
•    •    •
The books are considered a
teaching collection, and are
supposed to be representative
of all types of children's literature.
It has "good, bad and indif
ferent" books, she said, and is
used mainly to teach future
children's librarians.
The Bobbsey Twins are
mostly in the "bad" category,
pecording to Miss Egoff.
•    •    •
She said that the books
have "tremendous nostalgia,"
and are cheap.
"That's why aunts often
give them as presents," she
explained.
She said that libraries generally try to keep children's
books with better literary
style  and characterization. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28,   1964
Avant-garde art show set
for start of 10-day run
UBC's unique avant-garde
showcase of the arts starts its
10-day run Wednesday.
The arts festival, sponsored
by the fine arts department
and the   Arts  Undergraduate
society  is an annual event at
UBC.
Two .exhibitions open at
10:30 Wednesday in the Fine
Arts  Gallery.
A   show   of American   pop
10,000 signatures sought
to boost Bauer s Babes
A mammoth telegram from UBC students will be sent
to Bauer's boys in Innsbruck Wednesday.
UBC booster club is looking for 10,000 signatures for
the telegram.
The Olympic hockey team, which trained at UBC, is
competing in the winter Olympic Games.
The team beat Yugoslavia 14 to 1 in its first game
Sunday night to qualify for the final round.
Students may sign the telegram any time up until 3.30
in Brock Extension 155, or at noon outside the AMS office.
Mud may delay
dorm completion
Builders are fighting mud and other construction problems in a race to finish the new residence blocks by next
September.
Yes, but it's
sure dandy
By STEVE BROWN
Liquor is not quicker.
Aggie debaters Jim Ward
and Irena Olajnik Friday championed the cause of temperance
to defeat Arts in the inter-
faculty debating play-offs.
The lone defender of the
bottle was Charles Pentland,
Arts IV. His partner Andy
Danyliu, Arts IV, was unable
to get to the debate.
Rumor that the missing debater was on a binge was
quickly quelled.
Ward, AMS vice-president,
said he wanted to Scotch any
arguments of the affirmative.
Here he comes
A late model MG-V williae
leaving Ontario soon for B.C.
It will be examined closely before making the trip.
The five-storey residences
and two-storey common block,
at Agronomy Road and Marine
Drive, are supposed to be ready
for occupancy by Sept. 1, 1964.
An informed source said Monday that unforeseen earth excavation and other problems
have arisen.
R. B. Bennett (no relation) of
Bennett and White Construction Ltd., contractors for the
project, said the construction
schedule was tight from the
start.
"However, we hope to have
it finished by the target date,
Sept. 1," Bennett said.
NURSES
(Continued from Page 1)
will be asked to make special
provision for financial aid to
student nurses, and the provincial government and the B.C.
Hospital Insurance Service will
be warned of the serious consequences of a continuance of the
present lack of financial resources," he said.
TONIGHT!   ON STAGE!
in the Cave
*
PAT
wtt
Paul Smith, Musical Dir.
Showtime* Tonight: 9 8. 11:30
H
CAVE
626 HORNBY ST.
MU 2-3677
Dinners from Seven
STUDENTS
Special passes for this show
may be obtained at the AMS
Office.
art, entitled "Art becomes
reality", and an exhibition by
Vancouver artists, of "The
new ceramic presence" will
start on Wednesday in the
Fine Arts Gallery.
At noon, a concert featuring the music of American
composer, Charles Ives, will
be presented in Bu. 106.
A panel discussion on pop
art, with Abraham Rogatnick.
Mrs. Bagley Wright, Doris
Shadbolt, Marshall McLuhan
and Gerd Stern, will take
place in Arts 100 at 3:30 p.m.
A Festival Club will operate daily from 1:30 to 2:30
and 4:30 to 5:30 in the lobby
of the Frederic Wood Theatre.
The club will allow students to meet the festival artists over coffee.
Other highlights of the festival include a speech by
Marshall McLuhan, author of
"The Gutenberg Galaxy" on
"Changing attitudes on space
in poetry, painting and architecture since television" at
noon Thursday in the auditorium.
At noon Friday, Gern Stern
will give a presentation "Ths
verbal American landscape
take two", involving film,
tape and sildes in the auditorium.
Course planned
in leadership
The Extension Department
and Cedar Cottage Neighbourhood House are sponsoring an
eight-week course devoted lo
leadership and participation in
community organizations.
The programs start Feb. 4 at
8 p.m. in Cedar Cottage Neighbourhood House, 400 Welwyn
Street.
Information can be obtained
from Miss Marjorie Smith, CA
4-1111, local 886.
On campus today and tomorrow to interview graduating
students is Squadron Leader D. R. MacKay, AFC, CD.
S/L MacKay is from the Directorate of Personnel Manning, Air Force Headquarters, Ottawa.
Graduating students who are
interested in details on
career opportunities in the
RCAF should make an
appointment through the
University Placement Office,
local 620.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
C.U.S. STUDENT TRAVEL AIDS
International Student  Identity   Card,   Handbook  on
Student Travel, etc., available in A.M.S. Office.
INTER-REGIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS
An opportunity for you to study at another university.
Free tuition and travel grants. Application forms at Registrar's Office.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
HOUSING CO-ORDINATOR
REQUIREMENTS:
Age 21  years.
Academic Year: In Senior Year or Graduate Student.
Academic Standing: Second class average or better preferred.
Experience: In meeting the public, in public service
activities.
Technical Requirements:
A reasonable knowledge of rates for room and
board, accommodation standards, plumbing, heating,
lighting, ventilation and sanitation.
A reference from a Faculty member and a previous
employer would  be desirable.
Applications should be returned to the Personnel Office
by Friday, January 31,  1964.
SALARY:
$350 per month May - Sept. 1.
CUS National Seminar
Applications now being received for CUS National Seminar. Topic: "A New Concept of Confederation."
Seminar will be held in Quebec City during last week in
August and first week in September.
Application forms are available in AMS Office and must
be submitted by 4-.00 p.m. Wednesday, January 29, 1964.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE
for   chairman   of
Applications   now   being   received
Academic Activities Committee.
Deadline   for  applications;   February   3,   1964
cations to- be returned to:
AMS  Secretary,
Box 55,
Brock Hall
Appli- Tuesday,  January  28,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
IDEAS
at
LARGE
Absentia
"A student is required to attend at least seven-eighths of
the lectures in each course for
which he is enrolled."
That's what the calendar
says.
It also says that absence can
only be excused by the dean
of the faculty concerned and
mentions illness or domestic
affliction as possible reasons.
It fails to mention the real
reason many students are absent.
* •    •
It's not physical afflictions
or domestic afflictions that
keep most people from classes.
It's the affliction of having professors who can't teach
—and that's why the seven-
eighths attendance rule should
be scrapped.
It's just a handy little
crutch for professors who
can't get students to attend
their classes any other way.
A lot of instructors ignore
this regulation; they simply
don't  take attendance.
They're usually the good
profs.
• •    •
prof   takes   atten-
good   prof   doesn't
A bad
dance; a
need to.
Why must students waste
their time sitting in lectures
that teach them nothing?
Contrary to public (and parents') opinion, students don't
always skip classes because
they're sitting in Brock caf or
asleep in the library.
Some students refuse to go
to class because they honestly
feel they can learn more in
an hour in the library.
This shouldn't be the way it
is, and it isn't always.
There are plenty of classes
which students are reluctant
to miss—because the prof and
the  course  are worthwhile.
*    *    •
Sure, there are lots of students who would skip classes
indiscriminately—but they're
the students who shouldn't be
here in the first place.
University students needn't
be treated like . high school
kids, forced to comply with
attendance   regulations.
They should be treated as
the mature people they are
always being told they are.
They should be offered the
choice of refusing to attend
useless lectures by incompetent profs.
Minister favors
free education
QUEBEC CITY (CUP)—
Quebec Youth Minister Paul
Gerin-Lajoie says he is in favor of free university education for all students..
Gerin-Lajoie said Thursday
he considers such a plan a
legitimate goal, even if it
meant the taxpayers would
have to support a minority.
He said the community
would receive better trained
people as a result of it, and
they in turn would be of real
service to the population.
Senator says:
DR. LESLIE WONG
. . . "ethnic co-operation"
Economics
transcend
religion
By CHRISTINE BLYTH
The Federation of Malaysia
is an example of the way ethnic groups can work together.
Dr. Leslie Wong, UBC commerce professor, told the United Nations Club Thursday that
Malaysia is successfully overcoming problems of religion
and literacy among three major
ethnic groups.
He said Malayan, Chinese,
and East Indian groups are
working together for the economic improvement of their
country.
Most Malayans are Moslems
and the Chinese Buddhist or
Christian, he said.
To counteract the differences
the Malaysian government has
had to educate the population,
especially in rural areas so
that new agricultural and industrial techniques may allow
them to keep pace with the
population explosion.
He said the government also
plans to change the official
language from English to Malayan by 1967.
This will be difficult as
there are wide differences in
literacy rates—in Singapore
most teen-agers can read but
in North Borneo there is less
than 10 per cent he said.
The first Malaysian government allocated 22 per cent of
its funds to education.
Malaysia now has the second
highest standard of living in
Southeast Asia—second only
to Japan and, said Dr. Wong,
"Most Malaysians are enthusiastic about its economic possibilities."
Top turkeys
Paul    Lawrence    and    Ken
Morrison were winners of the
1964   Varsity   Rod   and   Gui»
Club Turkey shoot.
'Canada example
to whole world'
By DON HULL
Canada is setting an example in racial co-operation for
the rest of the world to follow, a Canadian delegate to the
United Nations said Monday.
This is the opinion of Sena
tor Paul Yuzyk, a Slavonic
studies professor at the University of Manitoba, who spoke
in Brock Monday on "Canada,
a bicultural or a multi-cultural
nation?"
The Senator, Canadian delegate at the UN for the past
three months, said Canada had
earned great respect among
other nations by the manner
in which she is solving her
problems of multi-culturalism.
Canada is an example of a
world  in miniature,  he said.
Yuzyk said the word bicultural is a misnomer when applied to Canada.
"It has always been multicultural, even the British element was itself composed of
different groups, the Scots,
Irish  and  Welsh,"   he said.
Yuzyk classified the three
groups making up the Canadian
population into the British,
French, and a third element.
LAST GROUP
The last group is made up
of the Germans, Ukrainians,
Italians, Scandinavians, Poles,
Indians and Jews, and others.
Since 1901, said the senator,
the proportion of the British
group has decreased from 57
to 44 per cent, the French has
remained static at about 30
per cent, while the third element has increased from 12 to
26 per cent.
He said French-English differences would never lead to
revolution.
Yuzyk pointed out that the
third element predominates in
three provinces, Saskatchewan,
Alberta and Manitoba.
ECONOMIC  PLACE
Yuzyk said the Ukrainians
have assumed a major place in
Canada's agricultural economy
and has contributed greatly to
public life and administration,
and learning.
The British group has contributed the groundwork of
the Parliamentary system and
democracy and the principles
of liberty, fair play and justice.
CULTURE   PRESERVED
The French contribution has
been the preservation of the
culture of a people, and
through their religion, an
awareness of the depth of life,
he said.
"A free play of cultures is
necessary for the emergence
of a Canadian culture," he
said, 'and this will be achieved
oy the concept of unity by continuing  diversity.
Draft board chief opens
door on escape secrets
Students going to the United States after graduation
can learn how to escape the draft Wednesday.
Capt. Chester Chastek, head of the Washington State
Selective Service Commission (draft board) will speak to
students about the implications of American draft regulation for Canadians working in the U.S.
He will speak in Engineering 201 at noon Wednesday.
He is sponsored by the Engineering Undergraduate Society.
Professors
clean up
in the east
Teaching staff at Western
Canadian universities make
less than teachers in Quebec
and Ontario.
But they average more than
31,000 a year more than teachers from the Maritimes.
In a report issued last week,
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics said the average salary
in 1963-64 was $9,451 for Central Canada, $9,050 for the
west, and $7,919 for the Maritimes.
Average for all Canadian
teachers was $9,013, a 2.3 per
cent rise from the previous
year.
Deans in the west averaged
$16,225, compared to $17,625
for the Central provinces, and
$13,125 for the Maritimes.
For full professors, the average was $11,150 in the Maritimes, $13,077 in Central Canada and $13,373 for the west.
Associate professors made
$8,828, $10,223 and $10,224.
Assistant professors got
$7,254, $8,150, and $7,985. Instructors and lecturers made,
$6,069,   $6,534,  $6,400.
Seminar deadline
moved to Friday
Deadline for applications
for the Canadian Union of
Students National Seminar,
to be held in Quebec City in
August and September, has
been extended until noon
Friday.
Those selected for the
seminar will take part in a
study group to prepare for
the topic, "A New Concept
of Confederation."
Recognize
Red China,
MP urges
Prime Minister Lester Pearson should get the Americans
mad at him.
He should follow France's
lead and recognize Red China,
New Democratic Party MP
Colin Cameron told students
Friday.
"I hope Prime Minister Pearson will for the first time in
his long and distinguished career, do something the Americans don't like," he said.
He was answering a question on the repercussions of
the French decision to recognize China.
He said the government may
be forced to follow de Gaulle's
decision to placate French-
Canadian feelings.
"You must remember that
TCA stirred up quite a commotion in Quebec, and perhaps
the government will be forced
to alleviate this by following
de Gaulle."
WANTED
ADVERTISING SALESMEN
FOR ....
AMS PUBLICATIONS
• UBYSSEY
• TOTEM
• BIRD CALLS
• TUUM EST
* Students who will be returning to campus next year and are interested in
earning extra money over the summer
are asked to apply for a sales position
with AMS Publications.
* Some selling experience is necessary.
* Commissions vary from 13-15% on
net sales.
* Apply in writing or in person to PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, North Brock- THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinion*
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242,   Loc.   26.   Member   Canadian   University   Press.
Authorized     as     second-class    mail    by     Post     Office    Department,
Ottawa,   and for  payment of postage  in  cash.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1964
Letters from
the editor
Mr. W. A. C. Bennett,
President, The Bank of B.C. (1964) Ltd.,
Victoria.
Dear Mr. Bennett:
It is with great delight that we at the University of
B.C. (the one in Vancouver) acknowledge the .news that
you plan to establish our province's very own bank.
We always suspected that you had lots of money
over there in Victoria. Now we know what you've been
doing with it—you've done just what every other citizen
does when he hoards cash, you've put it in the bank.
Only it's your bank. That way, we guess, you can
loan yourself money and charge huge amounts of interest, and it will all be a contingent liability, or something.
Anyway, Mr. Bennett, that's all fine with us. We
know that B.C. is just booming right along, which is all
that really matters.
It's just that your Board of Governors here at UBC
has decided to raise our fees by $50. They say they had
to do this because they're just starving for money to-
operate the place, and that this fee raise would bring
them nearly $900,000 extra next year.
Well, we're all in favor, just like you are, of seeing
our University (the one in Vancouver) boom right along
with the rest of the province. It's just that some of us
students can't really afford to pay more and more for
tuition fees.
It would be something else again if there were lots
more bursaries and scholarships, but you can only get
those if you're really down and out and smart.
Sometimes, you can get loans like that from a bank.
Yours, etc.
Mr. Eric Nicol,
Ex-Ubyssey columnist,
C/o. The Province.
Dear Eric:
It's nice to see grads thinking about their good ol'
ivy-covered alma mater once in a while. We're referring, of course, to your column on Monday, in which
you stuck up for the idea of students toting trays and
patching potholes in the summer to pay for their winter
enlightenment.
Well, we're all in favor of logging camps, the Fuller
brushes, and new super encyclopaedias and race tracks
—it's just that it's a bit of a pinch to make $1,500 in
these door-to-door or tree-to-tree pursuits.
We're not arguing in favor of free tuition. Students
who seriously argue that having to work for four months
each summer detracts from their intellectual endeavor
are either (1) lazy or (2) smart enough to rake in a
bare minimum in scholarships to make it through the
next term.
We suspect that most students, the "intellectuals"
included, are jumping glad to get out of here each April,
even if it is only to sell brushes, or tote trays, or patch
potholes.
Mind you, this enthusiasm only lasts for a couple of
months—and then we're all wishing we could get back
to the ivy again.
There, Mr. Nicol, is the rub, or rather, the rut.
None of us students want to get tied down to anything
—be it brushes or books. We shift back and forth between money and misery, on a nice predictable schedule.
The result of all this indecision is that some of us
stay around here for 10 years before we leave, much like
a rather famous chap who used to write columns for The
Ubyssey. Yours patriotically,
THBT    THEK£S...) e(jeKJ.;/
—from  the   Loyola  News
Let the  millionaires
pay  UBC's  fee  raise
EDITOR: Mike Hunter
Associate ..... Keith Bradbury
News Dave Ablett
Managing ..... George Railton
City       Mike  Horsey
Photo   Don Hume
Critics      Ron Riter
Sports    _. Denis Stanley
Asst. City _.   Richard Simeon
Asst. News  Tim Padmore
Senior    Maureen Covell
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It probably is the sincere
intention not only of Dr. Macdonald and UBC's Board of
Governors but also of each
single student to transform
UBC into a first-class institution for higher learning—even
those outside these circles will
most likely agree.
However the problem arises
whether a fee-raise, any fee-
raise, will actually shorten
this process or rather prolong
and abrogate it! To my mind
it's the latter; because the fact
that those who can easily afford 'any' fees seem to be favored, whereas those who
must struggle are seemingly
forced to withdraw—comes
into being.
It is paramount that everyone should realize that the basic initiative in furthering
spiritual and academic growth
at UBC must come from the
latter class, for it is this sociological part of our 'particular' society within B.C.—
that composes the greatest
part of UBC's students.
Higher Education?—yes!
Selective Education?—yes,
as long as the selection reflects academic standards; no,
if it is measured by bulging
pockets!
Thus, a fee-raise is nothing
but a draw-back, a resignation
that tends towards medieval
times when the Church tried
so hard to keep the mass uninformed. Consequently — no
fee-raise; better still: no fees
at all. Let B.C.'s millionaires
or her forest and oil industries provide—'(mustn't it all
flow back to them . . . with
interest?)
To those who might still
wonder what $60 do mean,
this is what they have been
doing for me: pay one month's
rent—which, fortunately, is
very low; pay one month's
food bill—which, unfortunately, is lower still; and must pay
my transportation between
home and campus.
Fortunately (?) I have been
working over the weekends
and have thus been well provided (but then there is always the Student Fund
Loan . . . )
In   short:   the   forthcoming
fee-raise is  a  disgrace and  a
show   of    cowardice   for   all
positively connected with it.
KLAUS BREUER
Arts II
LETTERS
TO THE
EDITOR
Debate debate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I noted with interest Mr.
Peter Hyndman's challenge to
debate with me our political
parties' platforms on Thursday. Had Mr. Hyndman
checked the bookings in the
AMS office, he would have
found that the UBC Liberal
Club has been planning for
some time to have Mr. Alan
Macfarlane, Liberal MLA for
Oak Bay, speak on the recent
provincial throne speech, in
Bu. 100 that day.
For this reason, it is impossible for me to debate with
the Conservative Club at that
time. If any member of the
Conservative Club wishes to
challenge me to a debate in
the future, I would advise him
to have the good sense to
check with me beforehand to
see if the day which he has
chosen is acceptable to me.
MURRAY BOWMAN,
Liberal Club
•    •    •
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Mr. Bowman of the UBC
Liberal Club displays an understandable reluctance to
debate his Club's Model Parliament campaign platform.
May I suggest that his club
is large enough to provide an
alternate debater for the
Brock, or an audience for Mr.
Macfarlane.
Interested as we are in a
successful and lively Model
Parliament, the Conservative
Club looks forward to meeting in Brock Thursday noon
a UBC Liberal with an interest in Model Parliament and
a pride in his platform.
PETER HYNDMAN,
Conservative Club.
Chuck it, Smith
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Mr. Doug Smith has missed
something somewhere along
his 20 years of being related
to the public; he obviously
joined the anti-intellectual
philanthropists long ago; and
his ideas, all 10,000 of them,
are about as welcome in a
university as gratuities in a
law court.
Would you agree with me
in favoring the old-fashioned
notion that without at least
the equivalent of the conventional university education a
man's ideas are likely to be
only half-baked and his powers of communication deficient? The PR boys should not
be allowed to propagate their
false gospel that a classical
education or anything resembling one tends to isolate and
mute its recipients without
protest.
Surely the intellectual
doesn't have to learn to apologize to 'labor' or anyone else
for being well-furnished and
articulate. I'll grant that the
PR consultant is articulate—
I suppose he's qualified in
inter-popular engineering or
something—, but as to what
he says, well, let us just say,
chuck it, Smith!
JOHN STICK.NEY,
Educ. V m
:    I
_>!
i most students UBC
ceases to exist when they
leave one of Sir Ouvry's questionable parking lots in a
cloud of exhaust fumes at
5:30 p.m.
To others UBC lasts a little
longer.
Serious students study until the final buzzer rings in
the library, editors slave past
midnight until the campus
rag is put to bed, eager club-
sters swab out their smoke-
encrusted club rooms — and
some even manage to live in
the cramped administration-
provided  cubby-holes.
<#•
Mr
UM&_!l
I-ft..
i» t
*" - ,fc _.■<
-   :*,-v*A<
•ii      ■>
The most striking feature about UBC
a? iverht is the seeming  quiet.
Sut open the door of the Field House
and you'll probably get beaned by a
tcr-nls  ball.
O" try the Brock Lounge. Countless
c riT.iT.itions hold memorial dinners,
course? on Swiss embroidery — and
method's of hog calling.
And since it hardly ever stops rain-
ir.r r.-. Vancouver, especially at night,
couples just don't wander through campus gnrdsns holding hands.
The"  per'; on  Spanish   banks.
Ant* make little jokes about watching submarine races. And all the car
windows steam up
Ii the Buchanan building night school
classes g ind on.
fie Suc'inr)-. n louige janitor bends
down to pick up a banana peel for the
ninety-ninth time and kicks aside a pile
o' t-ed Ubysseys.
£:KinH Brcck the dingy club rooms
'-•re *:■•; active as ever.
The Jazz c!ub fills the alley way be-
l'.ve:-i  the shac'-.s with far-out jazz.
The Varsity Outdoor Club fills the air
wir:- CFUN, shouts, and the sound c*
'."ic s o'> they do some mid-winter spring
cleaning.
And card players, su prisingly
enough, play ccirds in other non-descript
rooms.
No, MT'hn, the ccrpool hasn't quite
evaporated  UBC in a  cloud of exhaust
''Al
M
#*•.
PHOTOS   BY   UON   HUAAE
-TEXT   BY  MIKE   HORSEY Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28,   1964
FIGHTING FOR BALL during line-out are members of UBC Braves and University of
Washington Huskies rugby teams. UBC downed U. of W. Varsity 11-6 at Varsity
Stadium. Braves were led by Keith Watson with two penalty goals and a convert. Dave
Gayton scored a try.
Braves pull switcheroo
but Birds aren't blue
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
The UBC rugby Braves won
a game for the Thunderbirds
and sent them into first place
Saturday.
Braves defeated, U. of Washington Huskies 11-6 while ths
Birds were tying Western
Washington Vikings 3-3 in Bellingham.
Brayden leads Braves
to weekend hoop split
By BOB BANNO
UBC Braves emerged from a weekend double-header
with Inter-City Junior Men's League teams with a split.
Kerrisdale
Merchants surprised Braves with a 1-3-1
one Sunday at Kerrisdale and
won 75-66.
Braves were led in the losing cause by high school ell-
star Alec Brayden with 18
points and 6'3" Bill Humphries
with 17 points. Mark Church-
land managed 13 points for
UBC.
Friday night at War Memorial Gym, Braves faced YMCA
and a more conventional man-
to-man defence and won 60-
52.
Humphries and B r a y d e r.
again led UBC, scoring 18 and
14 points respectively.
"It Was the first zone we've
faced all year," said coach
Norm Watt .of the Kerrisdale
game. "We just couldn't adjust
enough."
UBC—Vollmer 5; MacDonald 2;
Balf, Hill l; Walker, Humphries 1N; Jones 3; Campbell 6: Brayden 14; Banno 4;
Cliurchland 6—60.
TMCA—Douglas 2; Moore 8; Clar-
idge 2; Myrs, Morgan, Turriff 11; Muter 2; Harrison
2; Carter 6; Drew 11; Brug-
gencate   8—52.
•     •     •
UBC—Vollmer 1; MacDonald 2;
Humphries 17; Brayden 18;
Walker 4; Jones 4; Campbell 4; Banno 1; Cliurchland
13;  Balf   2—(16.
K_RBISDA__—iWitherly 8; Anderson 7; Conley 16; Hoff 18;
Blumenscheit, Hanson 9; Atkinson  6;   Kuehn   13;  Crosato
Coach Albert Laithwaite
correctly anticipating a tougher game from Western W.
who had challenged him to an
exhibition match, decided to
let the Braves take on the
Huskies.
• •    •
In the newly-formed West
coast inter - collegiate Rugby
league any UBC team can play
in the scheduled game. It was
UBC's first league match.
Against the Vikings the
short handed Birds who had
left seven key plavers at home
trying out for the All-B.C.
teams managed to control the
territorial play but had trouble
scoring.
• •    •
In the first half Bot> McGavin scored the Bird's single
try on a 55-yard broken field
run that was the highlight of
the game.
Thunderette hoopsters
win battle but lose war
UBC Thunderettes managed to win only one game
in their own Thunderette Invitation Basketball Tournament held last weekend at UBC.
UBC beat Nanaimo 73-38, but lost to the Senior A
Orphans 50-49 and Mount Pleasant Legion 71-52 in the
two-day tournament.
Richmond Merchants won the competition after
beating the Orphans 75-37 in the deciding game.
Portland and the Kelowna Teddy Bears qualified for
the consolation round, with Portland finally winning
43-31.
Birds slay
Dinosaurs
By DAVE CARLSON
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds opened their home
conference schedule with a pair of victories over the weekend. The victims Were the University of Alberta-Calgary
Dinosaurs.
Friday night, the Birds romped over the prairie crew 80
43. The game was never cloao.
After eight minutes, UBC led
23-11 and never looked back.
The half score was 43-22.
Captain Dave Way sparked
the well-balanced attack with
15 points. Ron Erickson plunked in 14, and John Cook contributed 12.
TOP SCORER
Top scorer for Calgary was
Tom Sindlinger with 13. Barry
McCullough picked up 10.
Saturday night, victory was
not so easily earned. UBC
opened quickly, holding a 24-
8 lead after six minutes. Then
the Birds slumped into a lapse.
By the 16 minute mark, the
Dinosaurs had sliced the lead
to four points, 29-25.
Peter Mullins suddenly revived his charges, and the
teams left for the dressing
room with the score reading
44-30, UBC.
The Dinosaurs came storming back in the second half.
At one point they trailed by
only two points, but couldn't
keep up the pace. The Thunderbirds won going away 75-
60.
LED  THE  WAY
Again Dave Way led all
scorers, this time with 21
points. And again Ron Erickson was one behind.
Only the first string scored
for UBC. John Cook notched
14 points, Dave Osborne scored
12, and Bill McDonald added
8.
Captain Skip Morgan's 14
points were high for Calgary.
Dave Way also snared 15 rebounds for the winners.
UBC and the Saskatchewan
Huskies remain tied for first
place in the WCIAA with
identical records. The stage is
set for next weekend's showdown between the two league
giants in War Memorial Gym.
Wrestlers
laid low
by Oregon
UBC's Thunderbird Wrestling Team was defeated by
Oregon State University
freshmen in all classes but
the heavyweight in a meet
held January 25 in Corvallis
Oregon.
C a n n Christensen from
UBC decisioned Bruce Christensen from Oregon State
for the heavyweight title.
UBC was hampered by the
absence of 191 lb. Rod Car-
row and 177 lb. Bert Taylor
who were unable to make
the trip.
This Saturday the UBC
Wrestlers host the University of Alberta Golden Bears
and the University of Washington freshman team.
This meet will provide an
indication of UBC's chances
in the Western Conference
Championship on February
22 in Edmonton.
UBC's main competition
in the forthcoming championship is expected to be
the University of Alberta at
Edmonton.
#
ROYAL   CANADIAN  AIR  FORCE
THE RCAF HAS ENGINEERING,
AIRCREW, MEDICAL AND SOCIAL
WELFARE  CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES
FOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATES
... AN   RCAF  PERSONNEL OFFICER
WILL VISIT YOUR CAMPUS TO...
INTERVIEW
All Final Year Undergraduates
Interested in Permanent
Employment in the Air Force
Jan. 28 - 29, Tues., Wed.
APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE THROUGH
YOUR    UNIVERSITY    PLACEMENT    OFFICE
Local 620
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE Tuesday, January  28,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
DUCK BUCK - THAT BALL'S HARD
—don hume photo
DOWNED CENTRE FORWARD Peter Buckland (extreme right) scored two goals in the 4-1 victory over the Cardinals in
first-division field hockey Saturday. Blues tied with North Shore 1-1. Golds tied the Hawks 2-2 and the Pedagogues
suffered their first defeat in five games,  1-0 to the Blackhawks.   Other goals were by Paul Sharp and Tom Groenwald.
Soccer team running
ahead of Royal Oaks
The powerful UBC Thunderbird soccer team recaptured
first place in the lower mainland soccer league's top division
with a 1-0 win over Italo-Canadians Saturday at Mclnnes
field.
UBC is now one point ahead
of the Royal Oaks who were
idle over the weekend and
have two games in hand over
the Oaks.
On Sunday the Birds defeated the visiting Oregon University 6-2 in another game played
on the Mclnnes field mud
slough.
PENALTY KICK
Saturday's    winning    goal
came on a penalty kick by Jim
Jamison.
Up to the penalty kick the
Birds   had  controlled   most of
the play in the Italo-Canadian
end  but   had  been   unable   to
find the net with their shots.
FOUR  GOALS
In Sunday afternoon's exhibition game against Oregon
Harry Lenduoy came through
with a brilliant four goal performance enabling UBC lo
save face against the much
lower rated Oregon club.
In another soccer game Saturday the Braves lost 5-2 to
Croatia after Mel Bond had
opened up with two goals in
the first five minutes of play.
Pep talk helps T-Birds
pepper Manitoba Bisons
Coach Dennis Selder gave his hockey team a
produce-or-else ultimatum and the Birds responded with
their first win of the young Western Intercollegiate
season.
Saturday night they defeated the U. of Manitoba
Bisons 4-2. Before the game Selder had given the Birds
his ultimatum and after a lack-lustre opening period he
made his threat good.
Friday the Birds had lost 6-3 with Al Merlo, Bob
Parker and John McLeod netting goals.
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Co.
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the. university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY  and  GEOPHYSICS
Also interviews for summer employment will be held
with geology and geophysics students in 4th and
post-graduate years.
ON JANUARY 29TH, 30TH AND 31ST
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Co.
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONTARIO
New bowlers
must qualify
Anyone wishing to bowl in
the Intra-mural bowling singles
tournament who does not bowl
in the Intra-mural leagues must
bowl three qualifying games in
the   UBC   alleys   by   Jan.   31.
Contact UBC lanes manager
in order to arrange times for
the games.
Are Cars As Good
As They Used To Be?
Are cars tinnier, more poorly
constructed or less safe than
they used to be? Can you still
be "stuck with a lemon"?
•February Reader's Digest answers these common questions
—in this first-hand report by
a man who spent weeks researching the production of
new cars. Get your copy of
Reader's Digest today...32
articles of lasting interest.
SOUTH GRANVILLE
yu//////r//f/     A//r//j
RAYMOND SALON —
29.12 Granville  (at 14th)
736-5446
RAYMOND SALON —
2814   Graville   (at   12th)
731-4242
20rr   DISCOUNT TO
STUDENTS —
TUES., WED., THURS.
Open 'til 9 p.m. every Fri.
The best-tasting filter cigarette Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  January  28,   1964
'tween classes
Candidates cavort for frosh
Candidates for AMS presidency will speak to Frosh
General Meeting today noon
in Bu. 205. Election is Feb. 5.
• •    •
ARTS US
Dr. C. W. J. Eliot of the classics department, gives his
Last Lecture today noon in
Bu. 106.
• •    *
GAMA DELTA
Pastor H.S. Fox will speak
on Flight from Responsibility,
Study of Jonah, Wednesday
noon in Bu. 3202.
• •    •
PHE-LIBRARIANS
Miss D. Fraser speaks on
The Medical Librarian today
noon in Rm. 861 of the library.
• •    •
CONSERVATIVES
Provincial leader E. Davie
Fulton speaks Friday noon in
Bu. 102 on Conservative Principles and Confederation. Campaign debate.Thursday noon in
Brock.
• •    •
LIBERALS
Ron Basford, Liberal MP for
Vancouver - Burrard, speaks
Wednesday noon in Bu. 202.
• •    •
NEW DEMOCRATS
Gordon Dowding, MLA fo-
Burnaby, speaks on Woodland?
School today noon in Bu. 104
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 203.
Minister
former CUS
president
A former president of the
Canadian Union of Students,
Maurice Sauve, has been named to the Federal cabinet.
Sauve was NFCUS National
President in 1946-47, and was
the President of the World
Assembly of Youth from 1949
until 1952.
The 40-year-old MP for Iles-
de-la Madelaine has been named minister of forestry in the
re-organized Federal cabinet.
C. W. J. ELIOT
. . . Last Lecture
UNDERGRAD WRITERS
Meeting Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in Old Freddy Wood.
• •    •
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
Film, An Experinent in
Towns, will be shown in La.
102 Wednesday noon.
• •    •
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Richard Thompson, MA for
Cambridge, speaks on Sanity
in Science, Wednesday noon in
Bu. 221.
• •    •
CHESS CLUB
Canadian chess master Ecod
Macskasy will play all comers
Wednesday, 8 p.m., in Brock
TV Lounge. Members are asked to bring boards.
• •    •
RIDING CLUB
Film and meeting, Thursday
noon in Bu. 202.
Power failure
raises panty raid
HAMILTON (CUP) — An
impromptu panty raid developed during a power failure at
McMaster University last
week.
"Panties, panties," shouted
the men, but instead only pumpkins, water bombs and rolls of
toilet paper came fluttering
down from, the windows of the
women's residences.
RCAF CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
RCAF BRANCH/LIST
Aircrew:
Pilot
Radio Navigator
Technical
Aeronautical Engineering
Construction Engineering
Armament
Personnel
Social Welfare
Food Services
Legal
Medical
Medical Officer
Nursing
QUALIFYING COURSE
Any Faculty
Any Faculty
Appied Science
Science (Math & Physics)
Applied Science
Architecture
electrical Engineering
Engineering Physics
electrical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Science (Math & Physics)
Social Work
Home Economics
Law
Medicine    (Ask    about    45-
Month    Undrgraduate    Subsidization)
Nursing
Graduating students desiring details on career opportunities in the Royal Canadian Air Force may arrange for
an appointment through the Placement Office (local 620).
Interviews will be in the Armoury, January 28th and 29th.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. H. Robinson will speak
on The Problem of Arthritis.
• •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets for Pat
Boone show are available at
AMS office.
• •    •
BAHAISTUDENTS
Panel discussion on The Direction of Humanity. Wednesday noon in International
House board room. Panelists:
Frank Harris, Unitarian; Zan-
etta Varley, Bahai.
• •    •
CHORAL   SOCIETY
Practices Tuesday in Brock.
Wednesday in Bu. 104 at 6
p.m. for Feb. 14 concert.
• •    •
QUAKER DISCUSSION
GROUP
Meeting in Buchanan penthouse tonight at 8 p.m. to discuss What Worries UBC Students Most.
• •    •
PRE-DENTISTRY
Dr. I Yorsh speaks on Hypnotism in Dental Practice
Wednesday noon in BU 204.
• •    •
SCM
English 100 seminar today
noon in Bu. 3206, led by Dr.
Kimmitt.
UBC  CLASSIFIED
MAFIA SPECIAL: *37 Pontlac, good
condition (no bullet holes), Grad
Studies Sticker. $100. Dick Fraser,   CA   4-9064.
Desirable accommodation offered student couple in return
for housekeeping- duties and
child care in faculty home. Must
be available summers. Salary.
Apply in writing c/o 4348 W.
Sth  Ave.,  Vancouver.
WANTED: One pair mountain
climbing boots, size 7-7%. Phone
CA 8-8595.  Ask for April.
HITOH-MIKEJRS who have been or
are planning to go to Mexico,
U.S.A. or Canada, phone Peter
Harr.ison, CA 4-3648. Purpose,
forming a hitch-hiking club.
Panel to probe
civil liberties
A three member panel will
discuss civil liberties in Canada Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in
Bu.  106.
The panel, composed of Mr.
Justice J. O. Wilson of the
B.C. Supreme Court, Vancouver lawyer Tom Berger and
UBC assistant law professor
Stanley Beck, is being sponsored by the Vancouver Institute.
FOR SALIO: '55 Hillman, good running condition. Also 18' yacht,
"Flattie," Dacron sails. 4302 W.
9th.   CA    4-4671.
ONE more person needed for established car pool (Monday-Friday)
Kerr. & 49th area. Call Mike, 261-
4353 or Jeff, 266-7722 after 6 p.m.
LOST: Brown purse in Aud. cafeteria Thurs., Jan. 23. I desperately need the identification and car
keys. Please phone 985-3404. Reward.
RIDE WANTED: from Kootenay
Loop area 5 or 6 mornings a
week. 8:30 classes. Phone Glenna,
CY   8-1619.
FOR SALE: 1952 Morris Minor.
Good transportation, near new
tires. $225. Call AM 6-6206.
Progressive
Conservative
Campaign Agenda
•
DEBATE: JAN. 30
BROCK —NOON
•
Davie Fulton
Speaks Jan. 31
BU. 102
r
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Lowest prices on raw magnetic tapes, acetate, mylar, in
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Diamond needles — brand names — $3.75.
Empty  reels -  3",  3V2",  5", 7",   plastic,  with   boxes  or
without, at wholesale prices.
Endless or continuous  tape cartridges or  double  coated
tapes for the above.
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Extension speakers in most sizes.
We rent, buy or trade tape recorders, stereo, portable &
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MAIL ORDER ONLY !
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P.O.  Box  2990, Vancouver 3 ,B.C.
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