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The Ubyssey Jan 10, 1986

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;JBC Archives Sonai
JUBYSSEY
*^ Vancouver. B.C. Fridav. January 10. 1986 ~   >- 228-2301
Vol. LXVIII, No. 27
NOT YOUR SKYTRAIN PAPER
UBC's bucket gets another drop
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
UBC is still short $330,000 this
fiscal year, despite a $567,700 grant
from the universities council of
B.C. late last month.
The grant is part of $925,000 remaining from a $14.9 million three
universities adjustment fund.
"We were expecting this
amount," said UBC administration
president David Strangway Thursday, adding "this is not a signal of
better times."
He said UBC is pleased to get the
"very badly needed' funds but the
real issue is budget planning for
future years.
UBC financial vice president
Bruce Gellatly said the shortfall
could be made up out of the $217
million budget base through careful
money management.
"We've  got   a  quarter   of  the
year," he said, ac
still holdingjfc^j<|ft04&tiieti ;6j>tihf
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UCBC cha^GpQrge Morfitt said
the universities ttoiCt know about
their next year's budgets'uhtil'shdrt-
ly before the end of this fiscal year
despite council efforts to get earlier
notice.
"We've recommended to the
government that they provide a
three to five year planning
horizon," he said.
Morfitt said there was no early
information on the direction of
university funding for next year but
he hopes to at least hold it at cur
rent levels.
"We've expressed in no uncertain
terms that a decline in financing
would be very hard to absorb," he
""said-
jtafyn Chase, director of the UBC
office^ of budget, planning and
system! management, said the
budget* process doesn't work well
without early information. He added the university has no cash in the
bank.
"I don't think one could say
we're in good financial health," he
said.
Strangway said he is spending
time in Victoria lobbying for
university funding next fiscal year.
"It's too bad they're giving (the
latest grant allocation) to us in
January when there are just three
months left in the fiscal year," he
said. "However, we're glad to have
it.
Candidates scarce
kel.y smith photo
CHAD BENINGTON A chemistry engineering graduate student tests out a new computer terminal in the new
UBC pulp and paper centre lab.
Centre lets students peruse pulp
Graduate student research will be
a main activity taking place in the
new six million dollar UBC pulp
and paper research centre which
opened this week.
Research will focus on pulp processing, papermaking, electrochemistry, corrosion, environmental control, energy conservation and process control.
The centre funded jointly by the
federal and provincial governments
and the forestry industry is part of a
plan to revitalize the forestry industry.
"Canada's forest industry is facing unprecedented competition in
the world market. Both government
and industry are aware that a major
focus on education and research is
needed if Canada's largest industry
is to keep its competitive edge,"
said UBC president David Strangway
at the centre's opening Tuesday.
The pulp and paper research institute of Canada PAPRICAN will
provide about $1 million annually
Rick robbed
Rick Hansen has been plagued by
two thefts in as many weeks during
this Man In Motion Tour. An
estimated $5,000 worth of specialized clothing and a video camera with
footage of the Middle-Eastern
stretch of the tour were stolen. According to tour spokesperson
Muriel Honey, Rick was
"frustrated, very frustrated."
Hansen apparently felt the loss of
the clothing very strongly after
resuming the tour in a torrential
rainstorm Jan. 4. The clothing was
custom Nike clothing and
organizers of the tour are struggling
to replace it.
Honey said the film taken in the
Middle East is something "You
can't replace," although a new
camera has been bought.
for the centre's operational costs
and $250,000 for graduate student
fellowships when the centre
becomes fully operational.
PAPRICAN is a research and
educational organization funded 85
per cent by the Canadian pulp and
paper industry.
The 3,000 square metre building
located at 2385 East Mall houses a
library of pulp and paper
technology open to all UBC
students, staff and PAPRICAN
staff.
Dr. J. Kerekes, a PAPRICAN
director and honorary UBC
chemical   engineering   department
professor has been appointed director of the new centre.
The new UBC centre's services
will be complimented by a $15
million PAPRICAN Vancouver
laboratory nearing completion in
UBC's Discovery Park.
Both projects represent the
largest single investment by the
federal and provincial governments
and industry into pulp and paper in
50 years.
Some of the centre's labs are still
not complete but students and staf
are already using and familiarizing
themselves with the equipment
available.
By ED MOU
Although student senator elections are next week, students are
only going to vote on three of the
twelve positions available.
Commerce, Forestry and Pharmaceutical Sciences are the only
contested faculties and even
faculties that have traditionally had
a strong showing, such as Science,
are electing senators by acclamation,
said Don Holubitsky Board of
Governors student representative.
The positions that have been filled through acclamation are:
Agricultural Science: Harriet E.
Crown, Applied Science: Rich Fitz-
patrick, Arts: Michele Reid, Dentistry: Les Ennis, Education:
Therese Killam, Graduate Studies:
Ronald A. Yaworsky, Law: Paddi
Arthur, Medicine: Neil Benson, and
Science: Kirk Hancock.
The positions that are being con-
Culture threatened by military
By JAMES YOUNG
Loud military test flights and a
proposed $800 million NATO base
threaten the survival of the in-
diginous Innu culture in Labrador
and Northern Quebec, an activist
from that region said Wednesday.
Peter Armitage of the Native
Peoples' Support Group for Newfoundland and Labrador told 20
people in SUB 205, "The Extremely
loud noise of low-level flight training threatens the survival of (the indigenous) Innu culture."
"People report that pilots will
"hot-dog" over canoes and tents,
flying so low that hats have been
blown off and the tops of trees have
been burned," he said.
"The noise is so terrifying that
people who don't know how to
swim have jumped out of their
canoes and other people have
reported ringing in their ears for
one hour after overflights," he
said.
Armitage said the noise was having negative effects on animal
populations on which the Innu depend and the long-term effects of
overflight are highly unpredictable.
"Caribou are not returning to
calving grounds and mother foxes
and mink have eaten their young,"
he said.
Armitage said planes such as
American Phantom Twos, British
Tornadoes and German Alphas
have made low-level flights over
northern Quebec and Labrador
under bilateral agreements with the
Canadian government for the last
five years.
"West Germany has increased
the number of overflights in Quebec
and Labrador by 1000, because of
opposition to the noise at home,"
he said.
He added low-level testing was
part of a new destabilizing NATO
strategy known as "deep strike",
which favors Labrador as a test site
because of its topographical
similarities to Eastern Europe and
the Soviet Union.
Armitage said the situation will
get worse if NATO decides this spring to construct an $800 million
base at Goose Bay, a former
American base to which Canada
has already committed $93 million.
"If the NATO base goes ahead, it
will render the land uninhabitable,
he said, noting the possible use of
defoliants and potentially harmful
radio frequencies. "Why should the
indigenous people of the world have
to put up with the testing and training activities of the military
powers?" he asked.
tested are: Commerce: Karen Nishi,
Alice Daszowski, Forestry: Carol
Chapman, Garrard Olivotto, Pharmaceutical Sciences: Tracie Green,
Dan Martinusen.
The student Senators at-large
who have been elected through acclamation are: Justin Williamson,
Christina Davidson, Deidre Moore,
Margie Farikh, and Don Mustard.
Board of governors representation Don Holubi sky said "Some
faculties are strongly represented,
but others such as Medicine and
Law tend to go by acclamations
each year.
"It's not unusual for the number
running to fluctuate year to year. I
don't see it as indicative of any major student trend towards apathy,
it's just the yearly changes. The
campus is becoming much more
academically competitive, and people don't want to devote their time
to non-academic pursuits," said
Holubitsky.
AMS director oi adminstration
Simon Seshadri said "Students
don't seem to care. They are a pretty apathetic population."
Candidates for the student board
of governors representative election
include Phil Bennett, Bob Gill,
Claudia Gilmartin and Don
Holubitsky.
Students can vote on January
15-17.
ALRT benefits not felt at UBC
Students say their commuting isn't affected by Vancouver's new
advanced light rapid transit, "Skytrain", system.
"I don't think it affects the way you go to school," said Mike Ly,
Arts 2, waiting in a lineup at the bus loop Thursday. 'I would use it
if it went to UBC but it's not even close."
Others in the lineup had stronger views on Skytrain including "I
think it stinks — it's a lot of money that could be going into education," from one anonymous rider.
None of the 20 students interviewed found the bus system less
crowded since the introduction of the $854 million Skytrain system
fromDowntown Vancouver to New Westminster.
The full impact on bus routes to UBC of the Jan. 3 Skytrain opening has not been calculated, said a Metro Transit Operating Company official Wednesday. Ray Poluk said tests will soon be conducted to measure public use of the UBC routes.
Some people have missed the bus because of schedule changes
since ALRT opened. The 25 Brentwood-Blanca bus now runs five
minutes earlier, for example. Other routes and schedules have been
changed to tie in with the ALRT stations and schedules. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Frids/, January 10, 1986
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Mice and Men share loneliness, love
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
The Vancouver Playhouse's current production of Steinbeck's Of
Mice and Men is a compelling
drama created of harmonies: rich,
interwoven   harmonies   of  words,
sets and lights which together imply
the play's deeply affecting theme of
love.
This is the simple story of a
friendship.
Lennie  is  large  in  stature,  his
Stephen E. Miller as George. . .needs a friend
thoughts simple and childlike. He is
totally dependent on his friend
George. George is much smaller
than   Lennie,   he   is   clever,   opi-
Of Mice and Men
Presented    by    the   Vancouver
Playhouse
Directed by Walter Learning's
nionated, and tough. In the suffocating loneliness of the play,
these two share a wordless, ac-
tionless, intense and highly coveted
love.
George and Lennie are travelling
to find ranch work in California
during the Depression. The story
follows their arrival on the ranch
and their experiences with the
ranch's owners and other ranch-
hands.
Steinback's characters never
speak honestly of their emotions, of
their need for love. Lennie cannot
understand why George remains his
companion, as George complains to
Lennie that life would be much
easier without him. Lennie never
understands, and George never explains himself. But the implied
reason for George's remaining with
Lennie is obvious: he desperately
needs and appreciates his friend.
Dialogue is sparse in this emo
tionally rich script visually
represented by Edward Kotanen's
sets and Donald B. Scarrow's
lighting. The set consists of two
moveable on-stage platforms, one
of the forest, the other of the ranch
buildings. The rest of stage is bare.
Characters walk in from spatial
voids to platform islands of light
and human interaction.
The vibrant colour of the scene is
not from the set, which is brown
and lifeless, but from lights which
shine a multi-coloured, life-giving
sunlight. The fully lit backdrop
behind an always small acting area
gives the audience a sense of the
characters' stifled, unexpressed
emotion, and of their loneliness and
senses of isolation.
Central to the success of this production is the acting. Stephen E.
Miller, as George, is fast-talking,
but not obnoxious, inarticulate, yet
kind and sensitive. There is no
doubt of his love for Lennie. The
smoothness and rapidity with which
George gains the respect of his new
bunkmates works because of the
charm and ingratiating presence of
Miller's characterization.
Jackson Davies' Lennie is also
good. A highly recognized acto best
known for his comedic work,
Davies' being cast is not simply a
Historical production lacks passion
By EVELYN JACOB
If you ask the average person on
the street what they know about
Canadian history they might tell
you that they think Winston Churchill was the best leader we ever
had. If you ask the average Canadian what he knows about his or her
history, he or she might tell you that
it is boring. With no revolutions or
civil wars, our history textbooks
seem more like bedtime stories than
great war epics.
Samuel Lount
Directed by Laurence Keane
To be aired on CBC in spring
As Canadians, then, we are left
with a sequence of occurences
rather than heroic moments, and it
is this which makes up our history.
But this does not suggest that our
past is invaluable; it is still worthwhile writing books and making
films about. After all, world history
is relative: if we view history on a
continuum, Canadian history, on a
scale from one to 10, might hover
around, let's say, four, with Russian history standing at about, say,
nine and a half.
Canadian born director and
writer Laurence Keane and producer Elvira Lount stuck their
patriotic necks out to re-create an
incident in Canadian history, the
William McKenzie Rebellion of
1837.
The story is part of those unique
episodes that make up our past,
lacking neither passion nor heroism
— why, then, did I find myself,
after 40 minutes of the film, squirming in my seat, changing positions
at least 20 times, wondering
desperately when it would end? If
one cannot fault the substance of
history, then one must look critically at how that history is presented,
and this is where Samuel Lount falls
seriously into trouble.
Samuel Lount was a blacksmith
with one foot in the McKenzie
Reform camp, and the other in the
radical offshoot of the Quaker
group, the Children of Peace.
The group's main philosophy was
to reject violence for pacifism.
When a neighbour of Lount's is
badly mistreated by the Crown,
Lount's pacifist philosophy falls into doubt. The entire film hinges on
the choices Lount faces: whether to
turn his back on evil or meet it
squarely in the face; evil, in both
the abstract, and in the bad government. He must choose between
pacifism and activism, between the
philosophies of Mckenzie's Reform
Party and the Children of Peace.
Lount's sense of freedom and
justice wins out in the end when he
refuses to "turn the other cheek."
Canadian born R. H. Thomson
stars as Lount, whose previous appearances have been in The Stratford film festival and in the television production, Escape from Iran.
Thomson's acting is the film's major weakness, which is devoid of
skill and passion.
To make matters worse, the entire film is so incredibly slow, it
makes you want to scream and run
out of the theatre for a good dose of
Hollywood.
A completely enjoyable part of
the film is the cinematography.
Marc Champion's (director of
photography) goal was to accurately reconstruct Upper Canada of
1837 and he succeeded by visiting
museums, and by looking at old
postcards of Canada that director
Keane collected. What he achieves
in Samuel Lount is an atmosphere
of simplicity.
The music too is a saving grace.
In Samuel Lount we hear the
sounds of the sitar, Shakuhachi,
and the Japanese Biwa all helping
to provide the graceful connection
between man and nature.
The question remains as to
whether or not international audiences will respond favourably to a
Canadian incident that is badly re-
enacted, the only positive aspects
being the presence of an English
born actor, and visual qualities and
music which are both the works of
non-Canadians.
Samuel Lount will be aired on the
CBC in the spring of '86.
matter of getting the best man for
the part. He is a name. Physically,
he is not big enough to appear to
possess the physical strength attributed to Lennie in the script.
But Davies skillfully, and surprisingly, addresses this problem of
size, and gives a fine performance.
Davies gives Lennie a sensitivity, a
love of George, and a simple, moving trust of other people.
Addressing the problem of his
physical size, Davies portrays an
awkward, lumbering and, especially
in the scene in which he crushes an
opponent's hand in self-defense, an
inability to control an immense
reservoir of strength.
Davies'   performance is touching and intelligent.
The supporting cast, an ensemble
whose role is to portray a loneliness
and pain not experienced by George
and Lennie, works well. Frank C.
Turner as Slim, the understanding,
sensible, though unimaginative
leader of the ranchers, is nicely em-
pathetic to George's situation and
exhibits a compelling rugged grace.
Lome Kennedy's black-clad
cowboy, the ranch owner's son
Curly, is entertaining: swaggering
with the arrogance of the sexually
impotent "stud" who has to push
around the ranch-hands to assert
his masculinity.
Goldie Semple, as Curley's lonely, sexually frustrated wife carefully
bases her character's seductiveness
on her sense of loneliness. She
desperately seeks attention by the
only means she knows.
Director Walter Learning's
minimalist approach to this production, where unspoken emotion rises
out of the voids of dialogue, set,
and light, is daring and successful.
Instead of compensating for the
superficial barrenness of the script
with elaborate, realistic sets, he has
chosen to mirror the script in his
staging, and so accentuate the
characters' pain.
From this directoral vision,
unspoken emotion rises as the
play's theme, and the love of
George and Lennie fills in all the
spaces.
Hypnotic 54.40's groove finds sound of truth
By JON WALTERS and
LEN MacKAVE
Independent 54-40 is expanding
the boundaries for the
neighbourhood of Vancouver's
non-commercial music. Theirs has
not been a destiny so easily
manifest.
Years of hard work in performing and writing plus an ability to
adapt to circumstance have resulted
in the growing reputation they bring
to the UBC SUB Ballroom tonight.
Moving on from the release and
moderate success of their LP Set the
Fire, the band soon completed an
eight-song demo tape which is currently attracting major label interest. A potentially disruptive personnel change hasn't stopped 54'40
from promoting the unreleased project or from producing even more
recent material. The replacement of
drummer Darryl Neudorf by ex-
French Letters member Matt
Johnson was a trying development
for the group and managers Keith
Porteous and Allen Moy.
"We could all tell that Darryl was
taking a different direction from
the band's," offered Porteous from
the Gangland headquarters in False
Creek.
The live act remains distinctly
54'40: soaring vocal harmonies, the
introspective view of compelling
subject matter and a groove that's
alternatively intense then relaxed,
as one might expect, at the confluence of rock and country/folk
music.
Check the contrast between the
upbeat Me Island and the hypnotic
pulse of Holy Cow. While retaining
the strong, familiar 54-40 presence
the new material illustrates an
assured progression; guitarist Com-
parelli agrees that songs such as
Baby Ran and Alcohol Heart are
more accessible than previous
work. His gradual shift of focus
away from trumpet, synthesizer and
playing basic rhythm licks to upfront lead guitar give 54'40 a still-
melodic  yet   more  straight-ahead
Comparelli and Osborne . . . redefining borders
mackave photo
sound; what Comparelli terms the
search for a sparser overall impression indicates a belief that
sometimes less can be more. With
this objective in mind, he suggests
the most recent songwriting isn't
strictly democratic. "We don't just
write a quarter of a song each," he
said. "It's easier to find the natual
thing that's out there — that is."
Guitarist and lead vocalist
Osborne continues to aim 5440's
creative sights at new horizons. The
band most often works from his
framework of lyrics and chord progressions to fill out the arrangement
and dynamics of a song.
The process is working well. In
spite of almost daily rehearsal of the
soon-to-be-released material, 54-40
plans to premiere :hree new songs in
tonight-'s 75-minute set. The show
is also rumoured to be receiving national coverage by a crew from the
CBC's The Journal. But die-hard
54'40 fans needn t shy away from
the media lights and a virtual barrage of the band's latest work. The
original energy and innovative performance still shine through even
though the only remaining track
from available pressings still performed live is The Sound of Truth.
"It's strange how the song has
changed so many times with us,"
Comparelli mused. "We're still
looking for the sound of truth. It's
never finished."
CITR and Revolutions Records
present 54"40 with special guests
The Thin Men and Fourth Floor.
Doors open 8 p.m. All ages
welcome. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 10, 1986
Participate now
It's easy to complain. It's easy to come around after
the fact and bitch about inadequate student representation in the government of UBC. Higher tuition fees,
athletic fees, book prices, and the ever-popular funding cuts; we all know the tune. But when the time
comes to do something about it, where is everybody?
Why only three of 12 student seats on the UBC
Senate being contested in upcoming elections, while
the other nine seats, as well as the Senate-at-large
positions, are being filled by acclamation?
Does this lack of serious competition signify an unprecedented solidarity among students whithin the uncontested faculties, that they shouldn't even need an
election to express the majority vote?
We should think about how your university government functions, or how well your interests, as a stu
dent, are being represented.
How could they possibly be represented, given the
lack of any meaningful democratic procedure in the
election of student voices in the university.
Reflect on the virtual total apathy of UBC students
towards effective participation in the administration of
an institution that, after all, is here primarily for their
benefit.
Out of more than 25,000 students, a whopping 25
people actually sacrificed themselves to run for the 21
available positions.
The only people who can fill these seats are UBC
students. If we don't care about the democratic
representation of your views.  If we don't take the
time to speak up and take action when the opportunity
comes, nobody else will.
Myths about 'peeping torn parade' exposed
By JACQUELINE LARSON and
JANET PATTERSON
How could the figure of Lady
Godiva be the subject of controversy? She was a revered mythical
figure who intervened when her
aristocratic husband mistreated the
poor. She disrobed, and rode
through the town on a horse. By
displaying her body which was considered her husband's exclusive property, she shamed him before the
village.
Her ride was a courageous act of
solidarity and compassion, and the
townspeople, the myth goes, so
honoured her that they collectively
refused to watch her ride. Only one
man, Tom, defied the town and surreptitiously observed her. The myth
gave birth to the English expression, "Peeping Tom". The myth
also goes that God struck Tom
blind for his defilement.
perspectives
At UBC, every year, during
Engineering week, the engineers
hire a woman to ride naked on a
horse through the campus, paraded
past hundreds of leering engineers
and unsuspecting passers-by.  The
"Lady Godiva ride" has been
transformed into a mockery of the
original. The controversy arises
from the tension between a number
of inaccurate and self-serving myths
and the reality.
MYTH #1. No one but a bunch
of crazy feminists object to the
Ride.
REALITY. Hundreds of letters
from the community are on file at
the Women's Centre: MPPs,
associations within the NDP and
the Social Credit Party, Churches,
individuals, etc. all who strongly
oppose the event. Every year, the
UBC Administration expresses its
disapproval, and every year, a
number of women and men risk
harassment and their personal safety to stop the ride. The ride, is spite
of these protests has continued and
all UBC engineers are associated
with it, although only 400 of the
1800 engineers participate in the
ride.
MYTH #2: The Ride represents
the civil right to freedom of expression.
REALITY. The freedom of expression has always had certain
limitations. For example, no one
has the right to publish racial
hatred. In the early 1970's, the UBC
engineers published anti-Semitic articles which outraged the campus
and were withdrawn. Why is it acceptable for them to slander women
but not racial groups?
And while the engineers wail
about their democratic right to express themselves, they commit
violence against those who voice
contrary views.
• in 1978, the engineers broke
into and vandalized the
Women's Centre
• in 1979/80, the NEUSletter
published the names and
phone numbers of individual
women who spoke out against
them. These women were
then slandered, harassed and
intimidated and their integrity
and sense of personal safety
violated.
• in 1985, peaceful protesters at
the ride were jeered at, shoved, tripped, and pelted with
ice balls and eggs (a fact
which suggests premeditated
assault).
So much for "freedom of expression".
MYTH #3. The Peeping Tom
Parade (as the "Lady Godiva
Ride" has been renamed) is just
fun. (This is also known as "Boys
will be boys.")
REALITY: The event is inherently sexist, and is a male celebration
of their sexual control of women. It
is one part of a practice that
degrades women by making violent
"jokes", mocks their sexuality, and
prevents them from equal participation in the academic community.
For example, engineering labs are
known to display pinups of naked
women, and their "special"
newsletters discuss the dimensions
of female genitals ("beaver",
"twat", and worse to the
engineers), and publish "jokes"
about rape and incest. Their
newsletter of Jan. 8, 1986, which is
paid for and made available to all
engineering students, mentions a
girlfriend who "like Tapioca, could
THE UBYSSEY
January 10, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the Universi
ty of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Sniffle, sniffle. The pitiful cry of the Ubyssey lingered into the printers. Ed Mou and Dave Ferman
rolled out the copy sheets while Oan Andrews and Jeson Levine driwled dejectedly behind. "It's a hurricane out there!" cried Stephen Wissenthal as -ie bounded through the door, upsetting Michael
Groberman's carefully laid plans of mice and men. k&lly Smith looked on in disgust and Debbie Lo and
Donne Flanagan offered buckets of condolences. The wake and the waking continued to the wee
hours, with Camile Dionne and Evelyn Jacobs leading the keening. Morgan Burke trickled by on a raft
near dawn, but only Chris Pearson and wee Stevie W?u were up to see him. 'Tis the banshee herself!'
spouted Romy Kozak, suddenly awake. "Where?" demanded Nancy Campbell. "Out by Glen
Sanford's turnip patch." "t don't believe you at all" said Mary McAllister, and they all went into the
bathhouse for a steam.
be made in a minute." This is not
fun — it is sexual assault.
The ride is also inherently
violent, last year, a number of people were injured during the ride. In
November, last year, students who
presented their concern about
violence   to   the    Engineering
Undergraduate Society (EUS) were
told, three times, that violence
"goes along with the event ... if
you step in front of a moving train,
you will get run down."
MYTH #4. The Peeping Tom
Parade is a traditional symbol for
engineers. (The EUS claims that it
shows they are "more bold and
creative than most people —
qualities they hope to carry into
their professional lives.")
REALITY: The Parade is a symbolic    manifestation    of    the
engineer's anti-woman attitude. Dr.
See page 5: SEXIST
letters
Land claims remain an open issue
I would like to thank the
Students for Increased Forestry
Awareness and panelists Rosalee
Tizya and Perry Redan for holding
an interesting and well-attended
forum on Native land claims
(Thur., Dec. 5). Being from Alaska,
where Native claims were settled 14
years ago, I found several aspects of
the UBC panel discussion of particular interest.
First, almost all questions from
the floor concerned asking the Indian representatives what they
wanted, specifically, and what they
would do after a settlement. Most
people in the audience seemed persistently uncomfortable with the
vagueness of the answers. (For example, at the end I overheard one
gentleman remark, "That was interesting, but I still don't know
what they want!") However, we
should realize that land claims is a
wide open issue; several settlement
models exist around the world, and
others are possible. It would be folly for Indians to commit themselves
Work a poll
Now that the Christmas bills (as
well as tuition and other fees) are
starting to roll in, students are undoubtedly looking for ways to earn
some money. As it happens, the
AMS needs people to work as poll
clerks for the Board of Governors
(Student Rep) elections on January
15, 16, 17. Interested students
should come to SUB 246 and sign
up. All positions are on a first
come, first served basis, with many
hours available.
Simon Seshadri
AMS director of
administration
IFC charity blitz
Coming up on Wednesday,
January 15th, 1986 at 8:00 p.m. in
the AMS SUB Ballroom is the
Inter-Fraternity Council/Pan
Hellenic/Alma Mater Society sponsored BALLROOM BEACH
BLITZ. This is a fundraising evening for this year's charity, the
United Way. Music is being provided by the PIT's infamous DOCTORS. Tickets are $3.00 and can be
purchased at the AMS Box Office.
The dance is open to the entire
university except minors. Come out
and support a worthy cause and
have a lot of fun.
Jonathan Mercer
AMS Vice-President
to one path at this early stage,
before negotiations even start. They
are insisting that negotiations begin
on land claims, and now is not the
time for them to indicate what they
would settle for. But since most of
us need more certainty to feel comfortable with advocating negotiations begin, I can only suggest we
look at the settlements in Alaska,
Australia, Maine, Norway, New
Zealand, and especially the two in
Canada, to get an idea of how it can
be done.
Secondly, one student asked the
panel why Indians couldn't integrate as good capitalists, following the "American model." He
cited Alaska as an example, which
is absurd, since 1) to the extent that
Alaskan Natives are involved in
business is precisely because they do
have a land settlement, and 2) that
settlement, which is based exclusively on a business model
(Natives were given land and money
in the form of corporations), is
widely acknowledged to be a lousy
one, and badly in need of verhaul.
As a matter of principle I also can't
understand the argument to
faithfully "follow the American
model." Canadian Natives are
showing originality in pursuing
their own claims, and are learning
lessons from settlements elsewhere;
something which more Canadians
(such as this particular student)
should try in theier own field. Indeed, Canada's handling of land
claims will be scrutinized as a possible model for the rest of the world.
Lastly, although I was very impressed by the attendance and expressed interest, I also realized very
few people know much about land
claims outside of what they read in
the papers. There is a large and interesting literature dealing with land
claims throughout Canada and
elsewhere. Those really interested
should get a few books out of the
library to read. This issue is neither
new, nor unique to Canada.
Ken Leghorn
community and regional planning
graduate studies 6
Ride not fun
To all those who agree with the
Lady Godiva ride:
O.K. so you don't see anything
about this event that is offensive.
You think nudity is fine and the
woman is doing this parade of her
own free will and why don't we all
just go back to our books and mind
our own business. Right? But you
know why this really is wrong? I'll
tell you. When you guys are following that naked woman around campus what are you doing? You're
having a great time, drinking and
chanting and showing off your
macho power. And, you are
laughing. You're laughing at sexuality and not as just a funny joke.
If you don't quite get the point yet,
think about one more thing. Would
it be OK for anyone to be on that
horse? For anyone to be leered and
laughed at? How about your sister?
Your mother? Your wife? That's
the point fellas — so let's see a little
respect... to quote a famous singer
who knows all about this
man/woman abuse trip.
Janice Kirk
graduate studies/nursing
Ubyssey quiz provokes
1. The Ubyssey's brilliant, thorough news coverage is:
a woman's bedside companion.
2. Tiie Ubyssey treats the AMS:
as A MS TAKE.
3. Politically, the Ubyssey is;
a spiritual leader a la Shirley McClaine (sic), a
guru so to speak who is out on a limb and
dancing in the light of the universe beyond
present day understanding but asterally (sic)
within the realms of reincarnation
and will be returning every year to deal
with lessons yet to be learned
and onward to Bag wan, T.A., Our Lord who knew
the value of women and onto Nirvana where
all us loose right-brain thinkers reside most of the time.
(cxistentially that is).
4. The Ubyssey needs: <■»*•* '>"«»
jvjj;                                                        graduate studies-nursing Friday, January 10, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Sexist ride must be stopped
From page 4
Meisen, the Dean of Applied
Science, thinks that it may harm the
faculty. Both Dr. Davies, the
Associate Dean, and Dr. Spencer,
the Director of the Core Program in
Engineering, expressed concern that
this sort of event discourages
women from entering the faculty.
In fact, while women enter other
non-traditional fields, Engineering
continues to have a low percentage
of women students. Ontario's
President of Professional
Engineers, Claudette MacKay-
Lassonde, says that "Women's problems in Engineering do not come
from any feminine difficulty with
mathematics or abstract thinking . .
. they come from discrimination by
men." (Globe and mail, Nov.
28/85).
If engineers do in fact need to be
"bold and creative", they would do
well by stopping the ride and ending
the sexism in their faculty. We
could also benefit from their bold
creativity if they worked against
sexual harassment and made this a
safe campus for women.
MYTH #5. The UBC administration's disapproval of the ride will
stop it.
REALITY. In the past years
faculty members, Deans, and the
President of the University have
condemned the ride. Yet each year
the administration has refused to
take steps to stop the ride. This
passive tolerance of a public act
degrading women has allowed the
ride to flourish. The Administration's disapproval allows the
"boys" to be "naughty" while
their inaction makes it safe. These
are essential elements in making the
ride "fun".
The new president, Dr.
Strangway, when approached by a
group of concerned students in
December, stated that he is against
the ride and feels that it was totally
inappropriate on campus. He
thinks the ride should be stopped
and is considering a public statement to this effect. Dr. Meisen also
feels that the ride is
"inappropriate" and he has told
the EUS that he expects them not to
hold it this year. Dr. Meisen also
said the ride is "offensive to a
significant proportion of the
University Community and to (him)
personally."   Dr.   Spencer   agrees
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
presents
MAM
BARBARA
By George Bernard Shaw
with Leon Pownall as
Undershaft
Directed by Antony Holland
JANUARY 15-25
Special Previews M
JAN. 15 & 16 *
2 for 1 J
regular admission t
tggagggiiiguT
Curtain: 8 p.m.
HOU>
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Student Tickets: $4.50
FIEKRIC W00I THEATRE
Box Office    Room 207
Support Your
Campus Theatre
that the ride is offensive and "for
that reason alone it should be stopped."
The reality is that until these attitudes are translated into administrative action, the ride will
continue.
MYTH #6. You don't have to
watch the ride if you don't like it.
ALTERNATIVE MYTH. The
best way to deal with the ride is to
ignore it.
REALITY: You can't ignore it, if
it is happening on your campus in
front of you. Many students only
discover the ride by accident.
The ride harms all women on
campus, whether or not they view
the ride. It poisons the academic atmosphere with its sexism. The ride
harms women by its direct public
ridicule, and tolerance for the ride
is an institutional tolerance of
discrimination. Women cannot
have an equal place at UBC as long
as the ride takes place.
The Coalition Against Sexism on
Campus (CASC) will be holding a
public meeting Jan. 16, at 6:30 p.m.
in SUB 205. Join us and permanently stop the ride Peeping Tom
Parade.
Jacqueline Larson and Janet Patterson are two UBC students who
advocate social change.
\\\ Oh What A Fun III
Y« place to be Iff
Home of the frosted mug
Thru' Jan. 11th —David Sawchuk
Jan. 13-18— Richard Stepp
.-.v: as.
0„
BRITISH COLUMBIA LEGISLATIVE
INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME
PURPOSE
WHO IS
ELIGIBLE
LOCATION
WHEN
STIPEND
APPLICATION
DEADLINE
HOW TO APPLY
To provide research assistance to Members
of the Legislature and to a government
ministry. To provide interns with an opportunity to gain firsthand experience of the
legislative process.
The competition is open to graduates in the
fields of political science, history,
economics, sociology or geography from a
British Columbia university.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
January 1—June 30, 1987
$1,000 month.
February 15, 1986.
Programme literature and application
forms are available from the eligible departments at Simon Fraser University, University of Victoria and University of British Columbia or from:
Dr. R. Kenneth Carty Elaine N. Dunbar
Department of Political Science   Office of the Speaker
University of British Columbia     Room 207, Parliament Buildings
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5 Victoria, B.C. V8V 1X4
ATTENTION
B.C. STUDENT LOAN
RECIPIENTS
Students who applied for B.C. Student Assistance for the
1985/86 winter session, and received approval for a B.C. Student Loan are reminded that they must pick up their BCSL
Certificate I from the University. BCSL Certificates I are
available in the lobby of the General Services Administration
Building between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., January 6th to
10th and there after from the Registrar's Office. Loan recipients must pick up their Certificate I in person. A student
card of driver's licence must be presented as identification.
The Certificate 1 must be presented to the student's lending
institution for negotiation within 30 days of the authorization
date.
B.C. Student Loan Certificates 1 which are still unclaimed as
of February 15, 1986 will be returned to the Ministry of
Education for cancellation.
ELECT/ON
STUDENT REPRESENTA TIVES TO
SERVE ON GOVERNING BODIES
Evening Polls, Wednesday, January 15, 1986
as follows:
4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
(Board and Senate At-Large Elections Only)
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Sedgewick Library S.U.B.
Daytime Polls, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
January 15, 16 and 17, 1986
9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
MacMillan
Law
Henry Angus
War Memorial Gymnasium
(Subject to students being available to run these
polling stations.)
S.U.B
Buchanan
C.E.M.E. Building
Computer Science
Scarfe
Hebb Theatre
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Candidates from which TWO are to be elected:
Phil Bennett (Ph.D. Candidate-Astronomy)
Bob Gill (M.A.Sc. Candidate-Geological Engineering)
Claudia Gilmartin (Third Year Commerce & Bus. Admin.)
Don J. Holubitsky (First Year Law)
SENATE REPRESENTATIVES
FROM INDIVIDUAL FACULTIES
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION (one to be elected)
Alice Daszkowski (Third Year)
Karen Nishi (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the Henry Angus Building only)
FORESTRY (one to be elected)
Carol Chapman (First Year)
Gerrard Olivotto (First year)
(Voting will take place in the MacMillan Building only)
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
(one to be elected)
Tracie Green (Third Year)
Dan Martinusen (Third year)
(Voting will take place in the Woodward Library only)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE
ALLOWED AND STUDENTS
REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S.
CARD TO VOTE
(It should be noted that any allegation or irregularities with these
elections must be submitted in writing to the Registrar within 48
hours of the close of polling (exclusive of weekends or public
holidays) and must include the signatures of at least three students
eligible to vote. I Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 10, 1986
AMS against ride
By VICTOR WONG
The AMS has put itself on the
record as disapproving of the infamous Lady Godiva Ride, staged
by engineering students during
Engineering Week in February, and
will ask the EUS to discontinue it.
Engineering representative Jim
Wickens said the EUS wants to find
out what exactly UBC doesn't like
about the Godiva ride. "Is the problem just a nude woman on a
horse?" he asked. "Is it the nudity?
Is it the horse?"
Arts representative Barb Waldern
said the ride "just stinks." She called the event facetious and said it
demonstrated an immoral attitude
among the engineering students.
Wickens said, "This isn't a Bible
college."
When council member Nicoletta
Riccino asked why the EUS
just rent another horse and hire a
naked male to ride it, Wickens said,
"A lot of people we talked to felt
the ride portrays UBC as
chauvinistic. I get the feeling that
having a male and a female rider
would make it worse." In defence
of the ride, Wickens added, "It's
the one event that we get the most
participation in, and the most attention."
• • •
The Alma Mater Society is considering whether or not to publish a
report which deals with academic
stress and the effects of pressure on
students.
Campus-
Cuts
The report, prepared by UBC
Students for a Democratic University, identifies items such as heavy
course loads, financial problems
and limited communication between students and faculty as causes
of student stress. It recommends
reducing course material and public
forums on university finances and
elimination of UBC's course
withdrawl policy as ways by which
UBC could reduce a stressful environment.
Alicia Barsallo, an SDU member
who worked on the report, said the
report was compiled by talking with
several counselling services on campus. At the AMS student council
meeting Wednesday, she said there
was a need for such a report. "We
went to every single place we could
to find documents on academic
stress, and found absolutely
nothing," she said.
Under a proposed scheme recommended by SDU, 5,000 copies of
the report would be published, with
the AMS subsidizing half the cost.
The reports would then be sold
through the bookstore, the
undergraduate societies and/or the
various student counselling services
for a small fee. Barsallo estimated
See page 8: NEW      A
Also Open Sunday 12-5
5736 University Blvd.
(UBC Village)
228-1471
C & S MURPHY
INDUSTRIAL
FIRST AID
located in
Richmond   Surrey
273-7317     589-5588
Offering Industrial
First Aid Courses
Leading to WCB
Certification
Days, Evenings
and Weekends
Phone for Information
C & S MURPHY
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF
STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
SENIOR RESIDENCE ADVISOR FOR 1986-87
Single Student Residences
The ideal applicants for these positions will be students
who are in their final undergraduate year, are
unclassified, or are graduate students and who have
substantial experience living and working in residence.
This position will be attractive to those who have skills
and interests in working in an extensively people
oriented field. Major responsibilities include the following:
( a ) Supervising the residence's Advisors
( b ) Being the contact person between the Department
and the Residence Association
( c ) Ensuring that proper standards of behavior are
maintained.
Those interested in applying to be a Senior Residence
Advisor should submit a resume and letter explaining
their reasons for being interested in the position to Pat
Buchannon, Assistant Director of Student Housing, at
the Ponderosa Housing Office (mailing address: 2071
West Mall, University Campus, Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1Y9) on or before Friday, January 17, 1986. Please
phone Pat at 228-5778 for further information about
this position.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Ljticht-'on  Smoryttsbi)r(f
ifhH/ittc Chitwsv Cuisiin
228-9114
10-    DISCOUNT ON
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V,i.. Fr,    11  30 4 00 !.■ m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
2142 Western Park
UBC Village
LAST CHANCE!!!
. . Back by Popular Demand .
UBC DANCE CLUB'S
NEW BEGINNERS CLASS
Learn to
— Jive —Rumba
— Waltz —Quickstep
— Cha-Cha -Tango
— Foxtrot —Samba
Registration: January 10-17. 1986
Class Time: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Class Begins: January 13, 1986
AMS: $20 NON-AMS: $40
For more information: SUB 241J 1228-3248)
"This will be the last session before Fall, 1986*
DON'T MISS IT!
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On Course Books
• Course books bought for
Second Term courses may
be returned for full refund
any time up to January
31st (the ten-day rule has
been eliminated).
• Books must be unmarked
and in saleable-as-new condition.
• Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After January 31st all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
BOOKSTORE
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
AUTHENTIC JAPANESE DINING
RESTAURANT
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OPENING SOON AT PAN PACIFIC VANCOUVER HOTEL JOINING AN
INTERNATIONAL CHAIN OF FIRST CLASS JAPANESE RESTAURANTS
We have part time positions opening from FEBRUARY and over 50
full time positions during the coming summer.
No restaurant experience required. Your application for employment
should be received no later than JANUARY 22, 1986.
RESTAURANT SUNTORY
PAN PACIFIC VANCOUVER HOTEL
Suite 333, 999 Canada Place
Vancouver, B.C. V6C 3B5
TOKYO   LONDON   PARIS   MILANO   HONOLULU   SYDNEY
SINGAPORE      ACAPULCO      MEXICO CITY      SAN PAULO
and soon in VANCOUVER
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND FILM-
NIGHT Feb. 4. Planetarium. Camping
(Kontiki)/Adventure Tours/Biking. Pre-
registration ($3) only at ANZA TRAVEL,
201-1754 W. Broadway, Vane, 734-7725.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
640 K M.S.-DOS lap top computer, 80x25
line display. Fully portable, only 12 lbs. &■ 4
hrs. free training, 10 free disks. Only
$123/mo. Phone Capricorn, 681-5713.
TRANSPORTATION vehicle, 1973 BMW
2002. Terrible body, great running cond.,
new carb. Transmission overhauled. 7 tires.
AM/FM. Sun-roof. A steal, $1500 firm.
Dave, 224-4560.
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITERS in excellent condition. Underwood scriptor $125/OBO.
Smith Corona $275/OBO   Call 874-5148.
BOOK $5 OR LESS. Econ., math., anthr.,
soc, hist., psych., phil., eng., geog.,
polsci., comput., eco. Eric 732-9832,
228-6170.
RCA COLOR TV, 20" XL100, hardly used.
1985, $385. 224-7922 or 580-3215.
20 - HOUSING
85 - TYPING
ACCOMMODATION is available in the
U.B.C. Student Residences. Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s newest residence facility, is
accepting applications from students who
are 23 years of age by December 31st, 1985
or who are graduate students. Totem Park
and Place Vanier Residences have immediate vacancies for men and women of
any age for room and board accommodation. Come to the Student Housing Office,
2071 West Mall, or phone 228-2811, for
information.
MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME AT THE
DEKE HOUSE - 5765 Agronomy Road.
Live without rush hour & within minutes of
SUB! Rooms are NOW AVAILABLE FOR
RENT. INCLUDES-3 meals per day - 8
washrooms kept tidy by our weekly cleaning service — free parking — cable TV &
TSN, movies, music — use of stereo
system.
Our prices per school term are $1350.00 for
a shared double room 8- $1600.00 for an exclusive single. This opportunity is open to
all UBC men.
Please phone either Terry Marleau or Erik
Madsen at 222-1135 or 222-2619 for details.
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp.
Theses — Equations — Reports
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ACCURATE TYPING from legible work.
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ANYTIME, FAST, ACCURATE: term
papers, theses, resumes, etc. At 5940
Crown. Chrystal Typing, 261-3157.
25 - INSTRUCTION
TYPIST will type essays, theses, etc. 1.25/
page. Call 736-0052 after 6:00.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your WP &
typing needs. P/U & del. on campus. Stud,
rates   Mastercard. 985-4250.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
30 - JOBS
STUDENTS' DELIGHT. Earn $400-$1000 per
month part-time working from your home.
Call Mr. Morgan, 687-3927.
KEG BOATHOUSE RESTAURANT will be
recruiting next Wednesday on campus.
Look for details in Tuesday issue.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
FEBRUARY 15, 1986 LSAT
on January 21, 25, 26, 1986
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
1-800-387-1262
WORD WEAVERS Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
80 - TUTORING
40 - MESSAGES
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE. Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
STUDENT WANTS to buy your large
frame bicycle. Call Dave 224-4560 and leave
message.
INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING? G.  F.
Strong Rehab Center has openings for
library monitors for the patient's library.
Hours flexible. For info, contact Coordinator Volunteer, 734-1313 local 245.
FOR FAST RESULTS
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
perience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscrpts., resumes,
mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wknds.
731-1252. Friday, January 10, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Ui/A
W4&?<
Key Exchange, a charming romantic comedy
about the pitfalls of the mating game, taken from the
Broadway play, is showing at the Ridge Theatre.
Showtimes are 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Films about Issues continues playing at the Surrey Art Gallery, with Dream of a Free Country and
For a Woman in El Salvador. Speaking, which
play Sunday, January 19, at 2:00 p.m.
HiMiC
Canadian Chamber Orchestra is holding its Gala
Premiere Performance at St. Andrews-Wesley
United Church (Burrard Er Nelson) at 8:00 p.m. on
January 10.
The Barber of Seville, a new Vancouver Opera
production, opens Saturday, January 18 at 8:00 p.m.
in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
54-40 and Thin Men play in the SUB Ballroom
Friday, January 9 at 8:00 p.m. Tix will probably be
around $8.00, but who knows? The AMS ticket office
certainly doesn't.
Masterpiece Music performs Beethoven,
Kodaly, and Brahms at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre, Sunday, January 12.
TODAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Membership drive, noon, SUB 58.
AMS ROCKERS
General meeting  —  practice space,   12-1  p.m.,
SUB 241B.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Bible study, noon, St. Mark's College — Music
Room.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
Women's gymnastics meet — 'Birds vs. University of Alberta Panda's, warmup at 12 p.m.,
meet at 1:30 p.m., Osborne Centre Gymnastics
Gym.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
New Year's Dance, 8:30 p.m., SUB Party Room.
80th UNIVERSITY HILL SEA SCOUTS, CUBS, &
BEAVERS
Bottle drive, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., UEL Housing & U.
Hill Elementary School.
MONDAY
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Theology courses — The Nature of the Church,
Fr. Paul Burns, Christian Decision, Sr. Kathleen
Crowley, 4-5 p.m., St. Mark's College — Music
Room.
CANADIAN FEDERATION OF STUDENTS IC/O
TRAVEL CUTS)
David Smith speaks about the Student Work
Abroad Programme, noon & 3:30 p.m., SUB
212.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Letter writing group, 4:30 p.m., SUB 213.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: James Dean in  "Rebel Without A Cause",
7:30 & 9:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
HEALTH SCIENCES STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Red Cross blood donor clinic, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.,
I.R.C
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB Party Room.
EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Meeting to schedule riding lessons, 3:30 p.m.,
SUB 215.
THE UBYSSEY
Production day for Tuesday's paper, everyone
welcome to write, layout, photograph and hang
around, all day, SUB 241k.
TUESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly Testimony meeting — all are welcome,
noon, SUB 211.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting — all members welcome, noon,
SUB 213.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Unicon '86 general meeting, noon, SUB 249A.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB Party Room.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Theology Courses: The Nature of the Church —
Fr. Paul Burns, Christian Decision Making — Sr.
Kathleen Crowley, 4-5 p.m., St. Mark's College
— Music Room.
UBC
(E-X-C-E • L- L
IHE    EATE
E-N -T) ^T
R Y
1FREE
LUNCH
DINNER
DAILY
SPECIAL
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
the daily specials and receive the least expensive one FREE.
This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
Vancouver Calls Me, being a mixture of musical
merriment, naughty humour, dedicated frivolity, and
serious delight, is playing at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre at 8:30 p.m. until Saturday, January
11. There is a Saturday matinee at 2:30 p.m.
Waves of White, a comic and sometimes
touching look at the need to challenge our fantasies
and our fears, plays at the Waterfront Theatre on
Granville Island from January 14 to January 18. Call
685-6271 for times, prices, reservations.
Talking Dirty plays at the Arts Club Theatre on
Granville Island from January 7 18. Showtimes are
8:30 (Monday-Friday! and 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. (Saturdays).
Mauryne Allan Dance Theatre, is at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre January 17 and 18 at
8:30 p.m.
Jzx-luhih
The Joy of Form, an exhibition of fifteen paintings by three contemporary B.C. artists, at the Burnaby Art Gallery, January 9 to February 2.
Paintings and Drawings by Colin Fraser, at the
Carnegie Art Gallery until January 19.
lone Mclntyre — Old Masters and John F.
Granzow — Silverworks, at the Richmond Art
Gallery until January 20. Also, paintings by Mark
Lisson are at the Gateway Gallery from January 15
to February 12.
Art about Issues, a group exhibition of social and
political subjects at the Surrey Art Gallery from
January 10 to February 9.
Monsters from the Smithrite, assemblages by
Ken Gerberick at the Pitt International Galleries
showing until January 18.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1986-87
These positions are open only to full-time registered
U.B.C. students. Successful applicants will be required
to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed
job descriptions are available at the Ponderosa Housing
Office and at the Front Desk of each single student
residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier, W. H. Gage,
and Acadia/Fairview.
Applications will be accepted from January 6 to January
17, 1986 at the Front Desks of the Single Student
Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
War Memorial Gym L-Lower Intensity
, * Gym B West Osborne H-Higher Intensity
Session: Jan. 13 - Mar. 21/86. l**\
HMVjo Jump
COST:   $40.00 — Choose any of the classes listed above as many
times a week as you like, any time, any location,
any intensity.
$ 2.00 — Drop-in per class.
Registration: Second Term - Jan 2 - 17 at
Intramural-Recreational   Sports   (Rm.   203).   War
Memorial Gym or late registration during first week
of exercise class.
Sponsored by Recreation U.B.C. For Fitness Information.
•VALID UNTIL JAN. 17/86 738-4169
Ht ITTTTHtT IH I ttttTTTTTHTTTrnTT
JANUARY SHOE SALE
20 to 40% OFF
CLARK SHOES LTD.
British Footwear Importers
■    4580 West 10th Ave.
224-7922
M«imilHTtllIlimTlT»HT»TTIT/
LSAT & GMAT
PREP TRAINING
Centers across Canada and the U.S.A.
• Taught by Professionals & Educators
• Lecture Format • Low Tuition
• Local Offices & Staff
• Application Essay Assistance
• Flexible Hours • Practice Tests
• VISA Accepted • Tape Library,
Weekend courses (Fri. evening, all Sat. & Sun.)
(Sexton §)
Educational Centers y
B.C. & Yukon
(604) 684-4411
Alberta
(403) 278-6070
414-1200 Burrard St., Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2C7 Ontario
(416) 968-9595
YOU NEED MONEY
WE NEED REFEREES
so let's get together
Referees are needed to officiate in:
* Fort Camp Hockey League
* Nitobe Basketball League
* Intramural Floor Hockey League
Referees   are   paid   according   to   level   of   play
officiated.
To find out more, attend
The New Referee's Orientation
Thursday, January 16
12:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gymnasium Room 211
ufuO (fti%cu%uACL&... fab aood wotis! Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 10, 1986
New law firm for AMS
From page 6
the printing cost to be approximately $2,500.
Council member Kirk Hancock
disapproved of the scheme, saying
the report presented nothing new.
"It reads similar to a Psychology
100 text," he said.
Hancock added the report did
not suggest anything individual
students could do to relieve their
stress burdens. "The paper provides nothing by way of remedies,"
he said. He added the report's conclusions corresponded strongly with
SDU philosophy. "That last page
— the SDU manifesto is essentially
what it is," he said.
Council member Rebecca
Neuvramont said the report was too
subjective. "To print it, I think,
would be suicide," she said.
Council will reconsider the report
Jan. 22.
The AMS is now doing business
with a new law firm.
AMS legal business, which deals
mainly with employment and leasing laws, had previously been conducted with help from the law firm
Fraser Gifford. This year the AMS
is switching to the Davis & Company firm, one of the largest in
Vancouver.
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt
said the decision to switch was
made because a larger and more
diversified firm was needed for an
expanding AMS.
Among the members of Davis &
Company is former Socred
attorney-general Allan Williams,
according to administration director Simon Sheshadri. "We need access to that kind of high power,'' he
said.
Nationally known-journalist,
author and professor Barry Zwicker
will lead a seminar and discussion
on "The Arms Race and The
Media", noon. Wed., Jan. 15 in
The Ubyssey office, SUB 241K. All
members of the university community welcome. Mr. Zwicker is the
former education editor for the
Globe and Mail, an advocate of
various East-West exchanges, and
author of War, Peace and the
Media. See you there!!!
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — if you're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut $20 Color $30 Perm
"Remember It's The Cut That Counts''
Sulci's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St.,
Vancouver,
738-0519
Our  Art  Director is also interviewing hair models with potential  tor
photographic and demonstration work.
The glitter and glwnor of the happy holidays is over. The season's standard grey and Bloomy wet
weather is back. Setting a Suitably somber tone for finding out the fateful and anxiously awaited results
of exams. Mindlessly the multitudes slowly sir* into a dull grey depression. Welcome to wonderful
1:986..,..
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
* specialty papers
* volume discounts
#s copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
A LANDMARK DECISION
The decision to pursue a legal career at Gonzaga
University can impact a lifetime. Our School of Law
is ABA AALS accredited with both full-time and
part-time programs. Please write or call for our
catalog.  ,
(509I 328-4220  FAt   <7 i!
GONZAGA   UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
Office ot the Registrar PO  Box 3528    Spokane  Washington  <.M220-352K
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
CTms
Earns
for AMS.
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
4:00 p.m., Friday January 17
Nomination forms can be obtained from the AMS.
Admin. Asst., SUB 238
Submit Nominations to the AMS. Administrative Asst, SUB 238

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