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The Ubyssey Nov 9, 1982

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 17
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 9,1962
228-2301
UBC gets used president
Students in dark over changes new man
from mountain will bring to campns
By BRIAN JONES
and SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Not since Moses has there been
such interest in a man coming down
from a mountain.
And by God, students will have
to wait and see if the Georgia
Strait will part to reveal more
university funding from Victoria
when George Pedersen becomes
UBC president in July 1983.
The UBC board of governors announced Friday that Pedersen
would resign as Simon Fraser
University president and succeed
Doug Kenny as UBC president.
Kenny's term expires June 30, 1983.
Pedersen "is ideally qualified to
provide the educational leadership
so vital in a comprehensive institution such as UBC," stated board
chair Leslie Peterson.
But when reached for comment
Monday, Pedersen was hesitant to
discuss his organizational plans for
UBC.
"I honestly do not know that
much about UBC's organizational
structure," Pedersen said. "One
thing I've learned over the years is
not to prejudge what you are going
to do in future situations."
"I obviously know a little about
UBC, but it is from a distance."
Pedersen also had very little to
say about issues other than UBC's
administrative structure.
Referring to future retrenchment
because of provincial government
funding cutbacks, Pedersen said, "I
obviously don't know the UBC
budget, so I can't comment on how
it will be done."
Pedersen said post-secondary
education is not presently a priority
with governments, and that in the
past B.C. universities have not
made as good an effort as they
could have to defend their own interests.
"There ought to be more of a
concerted effort among the three
universities," he said. "There is a
good case to be made (for university
funding), but we have to collect the
data to place in front of those making decisions."
But SFU student board representative John Knowles said Pedersen
was less than effective in defending
university funding.
"At SFU, he's never made more
than token efforts protesting
government cuts," said Knowles.
"Since he's been president, the
board   of  governers   has   become
more and more secretive about giving information to the public."
But UBC student politicians were
more positive about Pedersen.
"I think he's got a lot of potential to do a good job," said student
board of governors representative
Dave Dale. "It was a very solid
choice."
Alma Mater Society president
Dave Frank was hesitant about
commenting on Pedersen.
"I haven't met him," he said.
"We could certainly do worse but I
won't say anything further than
that."
problems? Ask the other gay,
* says cutbacks plaped Kenny
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
A press release dated 9 a.m. Friday Nov. 5 marked the beginning of
the end for administration president
Douglas T. Kenny.
With the appointment of SFU
president George Pedersen as his
successor, Kenny will begin to wind
down his eight year tenure as UBC's
chief executive officer.
Kenny's term of office has been
plagued by cutbacks which he
euphemistically renamed retrenchment, protests which he rarely
acknowledged, and criticism for not
speaking out more strongly against
stingy Social Credit government
funding.
Kenny throughout his term continually tried to balance the
diametrically opposed forces
fighting for power and control of
limited resources at UBC.
Kenny also modernized the
univesity's administration.
Students returned to UBC in the
fall of 1975 to find Kenny had appointed three new administration
vice presidents and a number of
other people to senior administrative posts around campus.
Kenny's moves were part of a
plan to divide up responsibilities
and operate a more decentralized
university than under president
Walter Gage.
Some called the expansion of the
president's office bureaucratic.
But during his term of office
Kenny produced two major reports
on   the   university.
Kenny has left his imprint on the
university. How much of it will be
left after Pedersen takes control remains to be seen.
In a telephone interview Monday,
Kenny said the major problem
Pedersen will face is funding.
"In these times of restraint it's
hard to maintain programs and at
the same time expand investment,"
said Kenny.
On the reorganization of the administration, Kenny said that would
be a matter for the new president.
But he did say, "One always has
to keep in mind that this is a big institution and you do have to have
decentralization with a major
graduate and research
component."
Kenny said Pedersen is a good
appointment for UBC.
Kenny will remain at UBC and
return to teaching and research in
the psychology department.
"I entered the presidency with
enthusiasm and I am going back to
teaching and research with equal
enthusiasm," Kenny said.
applause galore, bat 'no
^comment,' as UBC deans
welcome Pedersen's arrival
By CRAIG BROOKS
With reactions from "we
welcome him" to "it's & great appointment," UBC deans and administrators generally approve of
the appointment of George Pederson as UBC's new president.
Arts dean Robert Will declined
comment on the appointment, since
he was a member of the presidential
selection committee. "Obviously,
it's a great appointment. I wouldn't
be party to it if it wasn't."
Education dean Daniel Birch,
also a selection committee member
also declined to comment much.
"People will be looking for a
general academic leader," Birch
said.
"We welcome him," said vice
president administration James
Kennedy.
Forestry dean Joseph Gardner
said he has not yet formulated any
opinions on Pederson's appointment. "I don't want to comment
right now."
A<el   Meisen,   applied   science
associate dean, said Pedersen would
be a benefit to his faculty.
"(Pedersen) knows the needs of
technology in an industrial and
academic setting. We've been very
positively impressed with what Dr.
Pederson has done."
SFU board of governors student
representative John Knowles said
Pederson has had good relations
with deans during his SFU presidency. "Deans fall into line pretty
closely. If there was any discontent,
we didn't hear about it at the
board."
But Simon Fraser University
English department chair Jerry
Zaslove said he sees problems with
Pedersen's UBC appointment.
"I'm afraid it's the first step
toward multiversities," he said.
"This makes us very vulnerable to
what the Socreds want."
Multiversities is a concept where
all universities in a province or state
are under one administration and
name, as in California. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9,1982
ME OF $20M FEE BEOTTODII
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If the referendum passes:
• Intramurals will be able to maintain 8- improve its programs.
• The AMS will be able to continue
its grants to campus clubs,
societies, media, and groups.
• Students can initiate needed
building and service programs.
Don't forget, a survey sheet at the
polls will allow you to priorize the
proposed building projects!
VOTE VOTE
Monday, November 15—
Friday, November 17
Pay Polls 10 a.m. ■ 4 p.m.
S.U.B.
C.E.M.E.
C.P.S.C.
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
Angus
Buchanan
Scarfe
War Memorial Gym
MacMillan
Law
Lassere
Hebb. Theatre
MacLeod
Walter H. Gage
Day Care Coordinator's Office
Evening Polls 4 p.m. ■ 8 p.m.
Monday, November 15 only
S.U.B.
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
Place Vanier Common Block
Totem Park Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Poll locations and times are subject to change
VOTE
FOR THE
FUTURE Tuesday, November 9,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Cap faculty to strike today
By JANE BARTLETT
Capilano College's faculty
association is staging a one-day
walkout today to back contract
demands. If contract negotiations
are not settled by noon on Friday,
the faculty will be on a full-scale
strike next Monday, said Ed
Lavalle, chief negotiator for the
faculty union.
Return
to Ireland
By KELLEY JO BURKE
Irish civil rights activist Bernadette Devlin McAlisky ended her
North American speaking tour
abruptly in Vancouver this
weekend.
Devlin McAlisky will return immediately to run in the Republic of
Ireland's election, called Friday.
As a citizen of Northern Ireland,
Devlin McAlisky has the constitutional right to candidacy in the
Republic of Ireland. She will run in
Dublin North Central, the Irish
Republican prime minister's riding.
Devlin McAlisky said Sunday her
platform for the upcoming election
will be based on the republic's
economic recovery through
repatriation with Northern Ireland.
"There is no solution to Ireland's
problems until we stop avoiding the
central problem," she said.
Devil McAlisky said nationalization of resources must follow reunification of Northern and
southern Ireland. Multi-national
control of Irish natural resources,
particularly British-based corporations, is extremely debilitating to a
country with 20-25 per cent
unemployment, and a severe housing problem, she said.
Following Ireland's refusal to
participate in the Falklands action,
"Britain used her economic power
to punish Ireland for her political
independence," Devlin McAlisky
said. A severe Irish economic
depression was the result, she said.
Devlin McAlisky said it was
unlikely that a British withdrawal of
troops from Northern Ireland
would precipitate a bloodbath.
"Given that the British control 90
per cent of the guns in Ireland, the
major de-escalate in weaponry
would limit the violence," she said.
"Anyway, our chances are still better without them."
The popular belief that the Ulster
protestants would attempt to wipe
out the catholics in Northern
Ireland is unfounded she said, and
propagated by the British.
"We actually have^more faith in
the protestants than the British
do," she said.
Devlin McAlisky was a member
of British parliament for six years.
Her major political activity outside
of office is with the National
H-Block Armagh Committee. She
campaigns to have Irish prisoners,
convicted of political crimes, given
prisoner of war status, and separate
internment.
She said that the tension between
the political prisoners and ODCs
(ordinary decent criminals — a
British denotation) is increasing.
In 1981 Devlin McAlisky was
shot in the back eight times by a
would-be assasin. Her husband was
also seriously wounded. She quoted
the judge who sentenced the
assailant as saying to him, "You
shouldn't have taken the law into
your own hands."
"The only crime in the Ulster
community is to get caught," she
added.
Devlin McAlisky is a political independent. When asked how her
tour was funded, she said, "By the
international conspiracy of terrorists, no doubt."
The association is striking to
pressure the college administration
to stop the hiring of more administrative directors and to protest
the refusal of the college to add a
"no layoff clause.
Association president Bob Cook
said the reason for the walkout is
"to show that we reject the
employer's last offer and that we
reaffirm our negotiating position."
The administration proposes to
hire non-union administrative
directors to replace existing faculty
coordinators. Currently, faculty
members give up teaching class sections to perform administrative
duties.
College president Paul Gallagher
said   the   reason   for   hiring   ad
ministrative directors is to reduce
administrative costs. He said it was
a question of reallocating current
resources since the college faces a 10
per cent provincial funding cut next
year.
Lavalle said if there is to be a
budget reallocation, money should
go towards maintaining current
class schedules.
"The money has to come from
somewhere. We feel that (the hiring
of directors) will increase the
number of sections lost. The money
should go to maintaining classes if
anywhere."
Cap College's student union
voted unanimously to support the
faculty association in its outstanding demands, according to an Oct.
25 press release.
Marc Rovner, student union executive officer, said the faculty
"preserve the integrity of what's being taught." The issue involved,
said Rovner, is the quality of education.
"We are worried about the impact these additional administrators
will have on students. We are also
concerned about the long term effects it will have on the college and
the community's access to education."
Cook said that Capilano College
has "a history of rough negotiations" but there has never been a
faculty strike. "We hope to bring
them to the table ... to bring them
to their senses," said Lavalle.
Red Hot porn
under fire
-craig brooka photo
GRIT DETERMINATION is seen on face of forestry student sawing her
way through foot thick tree stump. Bizarre ritual is only part of strange
happenings that occur in the forestry games area, between the field
hockey pitch and 16th Avenue. Just wait to the log burling pond freezes
over this winter — it should be interesting.
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Burnaby residents with support
from Vancouver anti-pom groups
picketed Red Hot Video's store at
4439 E. Hastings Friday.
About 100 people with placards
walked in front of the store chanting slogans against Red Hot.
Red Hot Video has corne under
fire lately for selling and renting
films which show rape, coercion
and exploitation of women.
The picket was organized by an
ad hoc anti-porn group based at
Simon Fraser University. It lasted
for one hour.
Red Hot store manager Dan
Kotyk, said every one of the films
which protestors were complaining
Future shock coming to UBC
By LISA MORRY
The next 20 years will be the
toughest for higher education, a
former University of California
president said Saturday.
"A crisis is now approaching for
post secondary education with the
cessation of growth and the prospects of decline," Clark Kerr told
200 people in IRC 2.
Reasons for declines in enrolment
include smaller numbers of university age people, inflation and
unemployment, Kerr said.
The United Kingdom is reducing
university funding 15 per cent over
the next three years, Kerr said.
"Australia has reduced funding by
five per cent for the same reasons.
"When university expansion
began, there were great shortages to
be filled in our expanding industrial
society," Kerr said. "It is partly
because of this great success that we
now find ourselves in cessation."
But Sweden, Australia, New
Zealand, Utah and B.C. seem to be
immune from decline and
demographic changes, Kerr said.
Kerr said he doesn't know how
far enrolment will fall because
"over the next 20 years there will be
quantitative changes in students
and funding."
Kerr said he is concerned about
declining enrolment rates because
institutes won't have room for
younger faculty with new ideas.
"Faculties get old year by year
which reduces advancement and expansion into new fields," he said.
"This does not mean quality is going down. Older professers tend to
be better instructors."
Internal conflict can become intense in a declining economy with
scientists arguing against humanists
over who gets funding, Kerr said.
"It is more difficult to plan for a
decline than for growth. I have seen
tragedies involving presidents who
tried to plan for future decline."
The challenge for the next 20
years is to maintain the quality of
education and provide for the
future, Kerr said. "I would love to
be president of UBC about 1997 to
replace professors and buildings. I
have a tremendous optimism about
the future," he said.
Kerr said change is necessary to
keep our system dynamic.
"Academics kick and scream all the
way to change," he said, and added
he had never seen a group so conservative about their own affairs
and radical about others as faculty
members.
Kerr doesn't expect drastic
change by the year 2,000 but recommended that every year one to three
per cent of "something" be discontinued by institutes and replaced
with new programs.
Kerr said "sexism and racism
must be eliminated from universities. Women have more need of an
education, men can always get a job
like truck driving," he said.
about had been removed from the
store's shelves.
But anti-porn group member
Diane Coulombe said the store has
400 x-rated films and a handbook
which directs customers to films
with subject headings like Young
Girls and Rape and Bondage.
The picketers handed out leaflets
criticizing governments for not
upholding section 159 of the
Criminal Code which states explicit
sex paired with violence, crime,
horror or cruelty is obscene.
The leaflet urged that a loophole
in the law, which allows the sale of
copies made from illegal originals
be closed.
Store owners near the Red Hot
outlet were not disturbed by the
protest except one complaint by one
merchant about noise.
Jesse Martinez, manager at the
Manila Market clothing store said
"if the government allows it, where
do you draw the line?
"If we don't like it we should
vote for a government that doesn't
legalize pornography," Martinez
said.
Before Kotyk opened the franchise with his brother they asked
neighboring merchants if they were
opposed to having a Red Hot store
there.
Kotyk said community groups
were not consulted before the store
opened.
CFS discusses own problems
VICTORIA (CUP) — The novices looked apprehensive, the experienced looked resigned, and the staff
looked prepared for a week of sleeplessness and wincing debate.
There are about 150 of them, and for better or
worse, they are making history in Canadian student
politics.
Representing- about 40 post-secondary institutions
from across the country, delegates at the second national conference of the Canadian Federation of
Students gathered in Victoria this week.
The opening plenary scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday
night began awkwardly. It started almost an hour
late and the very first motion — accepting the proposed chair — prompted a 15 minute debate.
Adopting the conference agenda took almost an
hour. And the number of abstentions on many votes
indicated mass confusion.
However, there was a high spirit of optimism at the
plenary, and the delegates seemed determined to
develop the student movement in Canada and lay
ground for fighting cutbacks to post-secondary
education.
UBC's Alma Mater Society sent two formal
delegates, student senator Lisa Hebert and arts rep
Stephen Leary, to the conference. The AMS also
funded two part-time representatives.
As a prospective member of CFS, UBC receives a
majority of the benefits of full membership, including voting rights at the conference.
According to CFS chair Brenda Cote the week's
events will include strategy sessions on cutbacks,
student unemployment, workshops on student services, and women's issues in education.
The National Training Act will receive particular
attention. The federal government is formulating this
policy to limit vocational education to specific, untransferable skills. CFS supports students' rights to
a general education, Cote said.
On a sour birthday note, in Nova Scotia St. Mary's
University council, the first student union to join
CFS, is threatening to withdraw if they don't see a
major change in attitude in Victoria.
All Student Unions of Nova Scotia members are
upset by CFS hiring practises. CFS-Atlantic
representative Christine Soucie asked SUNS to participate in the interviewing of new Atlantic field
worker candidates. These interviews were then invalidated by CFS chair Brenda Cote. Provincial student organizations are not allowed involvement in
CFS staff hirings, Cote said.
SUNS executive officer Peter Kavanaugh said that
CFS practises nepotism.
"CFS is turning into a retirement home for ex-
student politicians," he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9,1982
No comments
Just who is the mysterious man
from Burnaby mountain, and what
exactly will he do when he moves
his dynasty to West Point Grey?
We only wish we knew.
Don't look to administration-
types at either UBC or SFU for
answers. They dare not come out
publicly with an opinion.
Perhaps UBC deans are afraid of
offending their future boss?
Or perhaps they've been administrating for so long that "no
comment" is the most intelligent
thing they have to say.
Then again, perhaps they like to
emulate their bosses, past, present
and future. Neither Doug Kenny or
George Pedersen are very free with
their comments, and as a result
students are needlessly kept uninformed about issues that are of vital
importance to them.
Tell us, Dr. Pedersen, what can
UBC students expect when you
take over as president? No comment.
Dr. Pedersen, what are you going
to do to fight funding cutbacks?
No comment.
Dr. Kenny, how will the nature of
UBC affect Dr. Pedersen's
presidency? No comment. Ask
:Pedersen, he says. No comment
again.
And what of the presidential hir
ing committee? Their no comments
still echo across the phone lines,
causing at least one Ubyssey
reporter to freak out with
phenomenal frustration. Their
silence is a deafening roar over the
campus.
So as usual students are left
helpless to the whims of forces
which obviously do not consider
them worthy of input or dialogue.
But don't worry. The government and the administration will
look after us, right?
No comment.
Memories
"Old soldiers never die, only
young ones do."
Remembrance Day ceremonies
condition people to believe that killing can be acceptable and that dying in war is heroic. As long as
these ceremonies continue to
justify and glorify past wars,
governments will be able to convince the public that future wars
may be necessary.
Wearing poppies and observing
moments of silence will continue to
be meaningless until we begin to
channel our energies into changing
our attitudes, halting the arms race,
dismantling all weapons, and ending all war.
News item: George Pederson to become UBC president in
July, 1983
Old hack advises future campus investment
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Twenty dollars. When you put it
like that, it seems like a lot of
money.
But if UBC students don't vote
Yes on the upcoming Alma Mater
Society fee referendum, services
that you couldn't duplicate for a
thousand times the money may be
lost forever.
(freestyle)
I'm not the sort of person who
goes around advocating fee increases of any sort. Maybe you saw
me at the tuition protests, or
mouthing off against the last AMS
referendum. During my years on
The Ubyssey it was almost a habit
to critically pick apart every new
bid for student money that came
along, and in most cases the No
argument was easy to find — and
defend.
Not so with this new referendum;
not unless you don't give a damn
about any activity outside of
classes.
Maybe you've seen one of the
posters blanketing the campus; or
heard a presentation on the issues at
a residence or undergraduate society meeting. You'll have gathered
that the $20 increase will go towards
three areas: the AMS itself ($2), Intramurals ($3) and a building fund-
($15).
If you read the posters or listened
closely, you'll know that Intramurals is desperately short staffed and the accessibility of the program is threatened. Already limits
have been placed on registrations to
counter the funding problem, and it
will certainly got worse even though
more and more students are participating.
You'll also know that the
building fund will be put towards a
variety of projects and that you will
also be voting on the priority you
want those projects to have.
But do you know what the $2 for
the AMS is for, and what will happen if the referendum is defeated?
Unfortunately, the AMS $2 has
been one of the least detailed issues
about the referendum even though
students will feel its impact the
most. Essentially what will happen
if students decide that an extra $20
on top of their $1,000 tuition fee
isn't worth the effort is that clubs,
campus media and discretionary
grants to undergrad societies will
wither away and die.
AMS services that are essentially
self-supporting, such as The Pit the
art gallery lounge, the copy centre,
the games room and the business
office, will continue. The profits
from these enterprises and the
$10.50 you already pay towards the
AMS will ensure that some student
activities can take place. (UBC
already has the lowest student fees
in Canada).
But the student activities that
make UBC one of the most vibrant
campuses in the country — the
dances, speeches, demonstrations
and general good times put on by
clubs and undergrad societies —
will either have to switch to a totally
cost-recoverable basis (a near impossibility) or be drastically curtailed. I think we'll see a lot of the latter.
According to AMS president
Dave Frank, the AMS will "stall
out." He says $15,000 in grants
normally distributed on an annual
basis will disappear completely.
There will be no new services.
Future councils will likely be forced
to lease out parts of SUB to
generate needed funds.
Everyone's favorite campus
media, The Ubyssey and CITR, will
"be facing bankruptcy," he says
(Evidence of the financial crunch
can already be seen in the twice
weekly issues of The Ubyssey — cut
back from thrice-weekly last year.)
The AMS may even have to start
charging for room bookings in SUB
just to cover the costs of cleaning
and maintenance.
And to top it off, there will be no
money to grab promising opportunities — high power antennas for
CITR, special student conferences
and forums, increasing student jobs
on campus, and the like.
Are you convinced yet, or do you
still have a few doubts? Maybe,
you're thinking, this scenario is just
too extreme to be true.
Maybe, but is it worth taking the
chance?
I still have a few reservations
about this referendum, as I'm sure
most people do, because I think
that it tries to solve too many pro
blems at one blow. I still remember
the huge reserve funds the AMS had
stashed away over the years to provide extra funding in tight times.
The reserve funds are still there,
Frank says, but are shrinking rapidly. Although $500,000 is still left,
much of it is untouchable because
of Society laws and regulations.
And although he says he is glad to
see the funds dwindling, Frank
points out that the money isn't
totally useless to students in their
current predicament — the interest
off the locked-in funds account for
one-sixth of the AMS' budget.
I also have a few doubts about
the ability of future councils to administer the new revenue wisely.
Yes, I place a lot of trust in the willingness of the current council to
abide by the results of the priority
survey for the building fund projects (with the proviso that if a
totally inappropriate choice tops
the list council has the right to concentrate on another area).
But, UBC has had a few wacko
councils in the past, and what's to
stop them from reappearing? I
guess the only answer to that is: us.
Both The Ubyssey and CITR are
around to act as watchdogs for our
interests, and if the wackos still
don't get the message we can start
pulling strings from the club,
undergrad and faculty levels.
Funnily enough, the money isn't
the biggest concern for me. God
knows I'm broke enough and barely
scraping by on a work study job,
but when you compare the $20
needed to maintain and improve
student life to the $1,300 I shelled
out for tuition and books this year,
it really is insignificant.
What is significant is the message
that will be beamed to the administration and public at large if
students decide to vote No on what
amounts to a two per cent increase
after sitting back weekly and letting
the board of governors slip a five
per cent tuition hike past us last
week.
If we vote Yes, we're telling the
world that we value our services and
that we're willing to put our money
where our mouth is when it comes
to campus projects like daycare and
housing. If we vote No, no student
can ever again convince the Powers
That Be that we really do want and
believe in improved services, hous
ing sports facilities and the like on
campus.
If we vote Yes, we do ourselves a
favour by providing the funding
needed for clubs, undergrad
societies, media and student groups
to prosper, and even grow. If we
vote No, we are only doing a favour
for those few people out there who
have never joined a club, gone to a
dance, visited SUB or attended a
student function.
For the first time, I've found
referendum where a No argument is
hard to find and, when found, indefensible. Although I have my
reservations, I feel the benefits far
outweigh the grim alternative.
The referundum vote will be
held from Nov. 15 to 19, with polls
all over campus. Find the time to
vote — it's not hard to do.
And when you do vote, vote Yes.
It's the only workable answer to our
current problems.
Freestyle is a column of wit,
humour and long, drawn-out opinion open to the Ubyssey staffers.
Nancy Campbell is an old grey hack
who advocates eight inch news
stories but can still froth at the
mouth when she wants to.
Le*tt ers
Solidarity ' in fullest sense'
The UBC solidarity study group
is sponsoring an open forum on
Solidarity, at 12:30*noon today in
Buchanan A100. Speaking briefly
at the start will be Slavonic studies
head Bogdan Czaykowski and Stan
Persky, ex-UBC radical and author
of the book At the Lenin
Shipyards.
The UBC solidarity study group
believes that firstly Solidarity must
be defended on the very basic
grounds of human rights, workers
rights, and the principle of self-
determination. But we also believe
that Solidarity must be defended on
political grounds, that it is a progressive organization in the fullest
sense.
In particular, the concept of
economic, as well as political, self-
management is an idea we feel has
the profoundest implications, not
only for the workers and people of
the East bloc, but for the workers
and people of the world. One might
say that  Solidrity  has  revitalized
democratic socialism by re-thinking
its programme. What do you think?
Fraser Easton
arts 4
THE UBYSSEY
November 9, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial Dhone 228-2301/06. Advertising 228-3977/78.
The following individuals at great risk to their own lives, and the safety of their loved ones,
have agreed to join the ranks of the PLO committee (Preppie location and obliteration). The
heroes are: Arnold Hedstrom, Brian Jones, Sara Cox, Lisa Morry, Cary Rodin (only recently
recovered himself), Victor Wong (who has mixed loyalties), Robby Robertson, Nancy Campbell, Craig Brooks la big cry baby, but a feisty one), Peter Berlin, Bernie Gonzalez, Harry Hertscheg, Alison Hoens (always knew she was undercover) Monte Stewart, Phil Keuber (team
mascot), Rick Katz (who is with us in spirit). Glen Sanford (career anarchist), Doug Fraser
Jane Bartlett, and Shaffin Shariff, who resisted the impulse to abstain. Hope you feel better
Eric. Oh, Kelly Jo cleared away the alligator bits. Tuesday, November 9,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
'Money belongs to students'
Once again we are asked to increase our student fees. This will be
the third time this has occurred
since I have been at UBC and, once
again, the real purpose of this
referendum (to increase AMS
revenues) has been hidden between
a sugar-coating of supposedly-
desirable projects. My question:
Why couldn't this increase be submitted in several parts so that we
students could reject the nonsense
and pass the justifiable parts? So
answer that one.
What with the present calibre of
student government, I can see no
reason whatsoever to allow these
kiddie politicians to fool with any
more of my hard-won money. What
relevance does the AMS have for
the average student? None, most
likely. Once again, special interest
groups are attempting to obtain an
institutionalized foothold — by obtaining public money for their
specific projects. Examples:
daycare(?), a parkade(?), the
Whistler cabin(?!) . . . how many of
GRAD'S
Phone   now   for   complimentary portrait sitting.
RESUME PHOTOS
AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
flmograph*
Shidios IH*
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
CHARLIE'S
GIRL
Classic and modern
hair cutting for
men and women.
STUDENTS ONLY
Cut, wash, blow dry
Gents $10
Ladies $15
JOICO JOI-GEL
AVAILABLE
3615 W. 4th Ave.
734-3841
UBC's 30,000 students actually use
these facilities?
My other concern is precisely
this: the AMS is no longer the body
which supposedly represents
students; rather, it has become a
self-perpetuating business. Financial concerns have become paramount to it — the price of beer, a
parkade to raise revenue, cancellation of one day's Ubyssey, games
room prices, not to mention other
schemes   to   raise   dollars.
When election-day rolls around,
special interests (AMS, clubs, off-
campus organizations, and other
axe-grinding groups) are going to be
rushing around madly urging you to
vote to give them your money. This
has happened before and will happen again. The fact that our AMS
fees are the lowest in B.C. is
something to be proud of, not
something to bemoan. Only a large
NO vote on polling-day can ensure
that they remain that way. Your
money, especially in these hard
times, belongs in your pockets, not
those of the kiddie politicians and
special interest groups.
Be warned: you will be faced with,
a barrage of propaganda telling you
that you need the things the money
will be spent on. Students must be
prepared to look critically at these
statements, to see through the
smokescreen and to come to an intelligent decision, rather than to
once again simply to blindly vote
for the option they have been propagandized with the most often.
Chris Fulker
unclassified 5
REMEMBER
TODAY IS
STAEDTLER
DAY AT
THE U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
SkVNWKU
TRAVEL W.
■Tunc
-Vancouver to Tokyo (R.T.)    $ 964
— Airfare and Railway Pass    $1050
—Special Low Fare to Asia:
Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore, Manila,
Penang, Bangkok, Jakarta, Columbo
e.g.: Vancouver-Kuala Lumpur(R.T.)   $1260
—Special  Group  Fare to  Many Oriental  Cities  for
Education Programme
1719 Davie Street
(604)6827212
FASHIONS
for the
CASUAL
MAN
and
LOIS TOO...
casual Jashtons for women and men
2150 West 4th Avenue
736-1021
CASUAL   •  COMFORTABLE   •  AFFORDABLE   •  FASHIONABLE   •  SEXY TOO
STUDENT SPECIAL 10% OFF
WITH THIS AD
French Language Training
2 Beginners Classes start Nov. 17th
Monday-Wednesday 9:30-1 1:30 a.m.
and 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Other Classes: Admission after Evaluation Test
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
The Center for French Studies
327-0201 6161 Cambie St.
FRIDAY. NOV. 12 ISSUE
Because of the Rememberance day holiday, the
deadline for advertising? both display and classified for
Friday's paper is 4 P.M. TODAY. Letters, 'Tween
classes, etc. must be in by 10 A.M. WEDNESDAY.
All pro or con letters regarding next week's referendum must appear in Friday's paper, since AMS election
rules prohibit opinion pieces running during polling
week.
Today and Wednesday are full news/production days
for Ubyssey staff members.
ATTENTION
B.C. STUDENT ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM GRANT RECIPIENTS
The Ministry of Education has recently mailed multi-part forms headed "Notification of Award/Enrolment Confirmation" to students
who qualified for B.CS.A.P. grants. To ensure that a grant cheque
will be available on the indicated disbursement date, the student
must have the confirmation form endorsed by the Registrar's Office,
located on the second floor of the General Services Administration
Building. No confirmation, no cheque! Do not delay! Confirmations
received by the Registrar after December 1 may result in delayed
grants for those concerned.
AWARDS & FINANCIAL AID
Room 50 - G.S.A.B.
GET A FREE TACO
WITH THE PURCHASE
0FAT0STAD0
@TACg)
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 7 days a week
2028 W. 41st Street, Kerrisdale
Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square F:ood Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(Closed Sundays)
This coupon is good for a FREE TACO
with the purchase of a Tostado.
Coupon must be presented. One offer per person.
OFFER GOOD SUNDAYS TO THURSDAYS ONLY.
Expires November 25/82.
(w/Vf^ii WO   l-JUVCM IUCI    4L-\JI \-t£-. ■
■— — — •■—■—■■»»■—•**■» —.i Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9,1982
DEADLINE FOR FRIDAY
Due to Remembrance Day, the deadline for
Tween cleasea it 10 a.m., WEDNESDAY.
Thank you.
TODAY
AMS PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Paul Wateon apeaka on tha 1963 Sea Shepherd
campaign to stop the seal hunt, noon, SUB
auditorium, free. Again at 8 p.m., #2 with AMS
card.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Recycling committee, gueat speaker Mercia
Spickney on paper recycling market, noon, SUB
208.
PACIFIC BALLET THEATRE
Perform works from fall program, noon, SUB
ballroom. Free.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner/program, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, noon. Bio. Sci. 5468.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Paty from the Department of Neurology
speaks on neurology, noon, IRC 1.
LEON AND THEA KOERNER LECTURE
Philosophy seminar and discussion on Moral
Motivation, noon, Buch penthouse. Prof. Paul
Grice. University of Washington.
INTRAMURALS
Register through Friday for Buchanan badminton grand prix Round II, $5, Intramural office
gym.
Drop-in badminton, 6:30-8:30 p.m.. Gym A and
B, Osborne.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly meeting, all are welcome, noon, SUB
211.
SOLIDARITY STUDY GROUP
Open forum on Solidamosc, noon, 8uch. A100. ■
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL
ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon - 2 p.m., SUB 211.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Basic Eucharist, noon, Lutheran Campus centre.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
WEDNESDAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Alumni night, featuring speakers and a music
party, 8:15 p.m.. Graduate centre.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance  languages,   7:30  p.m..   International
House.
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
General meeting, 4:30 p.m., SUB 213.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Community dinner, 6 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Open meeting on Poland, 1 p.m., SUB 212. Day
of Action.
THURSDAY
STUDENT LIBERALS
Meeting for all thoee interested in attending
model parliament, 2 p.m., SUB 206.
CYCLING CLUB
Touring and racing events,  planning for '83,
noon. Bio. Sci. 2449.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Convocation 1962: Solutions to the arms race.
Several prominent speakers discuss solutions to
the arms race, 1-5 p.m., SUB auditorium.
REMEMBERANCE DAY
Classes cancelled, all day, all over UBC.
FRIDAY
CANOE CLUB
Pool sessions for Kayakers, 10 a.m.-12 p.m..
Aquatic centre.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Bzzr garden, 8 p.m.-midnight, SUB 212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Happy hour; cheap refreshments and cheap talk,
4:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
INTRAMURALS
Bingo bowl night, 7-10:30 p.m., SUB games
room.
SAILING/WINDSURFING/SKI CLUBS
Ski   bunny,   beach   bum   interclub   broomball
challenge, 8:46-10:15 p.m., Thunderbird Winter
sports. Meet 7:30 p.m. upstairs.
ORAL ROBARTS OF THE
THEATRE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Informal  reading;   bring  something  dramatic,
rhetoric, lyric or narrative, everyone welcome,
noon. Brock hall 302.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
A War Story,  true story of Canadians in a
Japanese prisoner of war camp, noon, SUB 205.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
AMS CONCERTS
Powder Blues, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom. Tickets $8
at AMS ticket centre. No minors please.
UBYSSEY/CUP
Feature writing seminar with freelancer and ex-
Ubysseyer Tom Hawthorn, 4 p.m., SUB 241k.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
CSA badminton tournament, 6 p.m., Osborne
gym B.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Square  dance  and  dinner,   6:30  p.m.,   SUB
bellroom.
INTRAMURALS
3 on 3 basketball, all day. War Memorial gym.
Draw up Friday.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women vs. Brendon University, 8:30 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men vs. Grads, 6 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL/CITR RADIO
Live broadcast of Canadian semi-final game from
Halifax, 8:45 a.m., FM 101.9, cable 100.1.
SUNDAY
SAILING CLUB
Work crew, 10 a.m., Jericho.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practise and training session, 10 p.m., Aquatic
centre. New recruits welcome.
MONDAY
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Lawrence Abello on Euthanasia, noon, SUB 206.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening,  7:30 p.m..  International house Gate 4.
SAILING CLUB
General  meeting,   movie  and  information  on
winter sailing, noon, SUB 206.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Resume and interview clinic, noon, Buch. A104.
SPECIAL
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
10% OFF
(with AMS card)
AT
JOHNART
UNISEX
HAIRSTYLING
2691 W? Broadway
738-8011
=~^4j>:
ONLY AT
FELLINI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
r~>
•GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
* NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1982 AUTUMN LECTURES
Lewis Thomas
Dr. Lewis Thomas is the chief executive officer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York.
During his career he has held the position of Dean of Medicine at Yale University and at the New York
University School of Medicine. Dr. Thomas has a broad range of interests within the areas of science and
medicine, and is widely regarded for his ability to synthesize current trends in medical and scientific fields.
His wide popular appeal derives from his effective scientific writings of which "Medusa and the Snail" is
probably the best known.
THE SMELL OF INDIVIDUALITY IN NATURE
Wednesday, November 10 — in Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
MATTERS UNSETTLED BY SCIENCE
Saturday, November 13 — In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m. (At Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Tuesday, Nov. 9 — 12-2 p.m.
B'NAI BRITH WOMEN'S FAMOUS SALAMI
LUNCH — Featuring Salami Sandwiches, Salad,
Pieces and Cookies.
Wednesday, Nov. 10 — 12-2:00 p.m.
SHEFA VEGETARIAN LUNCH - Our special guest
is Prof. Irving Abella, author of "None is Too
Many", and the featured speaker at KRIS-
TAUNACHT.
6:00 p.m. Mrs. Feld Carr joins us for dinner and we
will all go to hear her speak afterwards.
SUBFILMS Presents
Thurs.-Sun. 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00 SUB Auditorium
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional tines. 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads dm not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
PublicationsOfiIce, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
20 — Housing
65 — Scandals
ON CAMPUS: full room and board,
shared accommodation $1240 per term,
phone 224-3606 or 224-9431. Ask for House
Manager.
COMFORTABLE CHINESE home can
accommodate Taiwan, Hong Kong,
Singapore students. Furnished, convenient. 261-7033.
ROOM FOR RENT in shared Point Grey
house. Female preferred. $225 & utilities.
224-0024 after 6 p.m. Avail Nov. 15th.
NEED TO RAISE MONEY for your club
or student assoc, & support student
workers at the same time? Call West Wind
Circle T-Shirts at 327-5778 eve. We do silk
screening & custom designing.
BOBBI OUR DEAREST. Happy B Day,
Now you're legal! M The Gang.
70 — Services
25 — Instruction
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
CANADIAN INSTITUTE of Tai Chi Chuan.
Classes starting in Nov. Steve 731-3021.
85 — Typing
30 — Jobs
FULL TIME-PART TIME JOBS. Contact
Randy at 324-8391. 25-50% commission.
UBC STUDENTS wishing to help staff the
polls in the AMS Fee Referendum, Monday, Nov. 15 through Friday, Nov. 19,
should contact Terry Jackson at 228-3971
or sign up at AMS offices, outside SUB
238. Poll clerks will receive an honorarium
of $3.00 per hour worked.
35 — Lost
LOST: Last May in SUB, gold ring. Plain
band with inlaid brass and copper strips.
Reward. 274-0284.
LOST: Black wallet in Sedgewick on Wed.
Reward offered. Phone Shahraz, 227-2551.
LOST: Nov. 1. Blue Norco 10-speed off
back of car between University & Arbutus
St. along 10th. Phone Chris, 734-0803.
40 — Messages
WOULD THE GIRL who witnessed car with
license plate KDG 525 hit my white '73 VW
Bug and left a note on my windshield on
Oct 18 in B-2 lot please phone 222-2735 &
leave name & phone no. for Dave. Otherwise I'm out $150.
THE HOUSE OF LORDS has convened.
Schlong.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208. Word Processing Specialists for Theses, Term
Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
TYPEWRITING. Minimaf" notice required.
Phone 732-0529 mornings to noon or eves,
till 10. Reasonable rates. Kits Location.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPING. Fast & accurate. $1.10 per page.
Please call Katey at 224-4264 or 929-6790.
SUPERIOR quality presentation of all academic assignments. Experienced, reliable.
$1.25/page. Iona, 985-4929.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. Word Processor. Clemy,
266-6641.
99 — Miscellaneous
B. POLLEN or B. Slim for sale. Great for
Stress. Call anytime. 876-3641. Tuesday, November 9,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Clapping gree
Page 7
By BRIAN JONES
The audience of 800 is on its feet,
clapping in unison, whistling, and
shouting "more, more." The noise
continues unabated for several
minutes, then grows louder as the
five Salvadoran musicians that
comprise Yolocamba-Ita come back
onstage.
They'll sing one more song, they
tell the audience, on one condition
— a collection must be taken to aid
the struggle for justice in El
Salvador.
"Agreed?"
Hundreds of hands rise. As the
musicians tinker with their instruments in preparation for their
finale, coins, two and ten-dollar
bills are dropped into buckets passed through the audience.
The young men in Yolocamba-Ita
have amazing rapport with their audience, as they showed during their
concert Saturday at the Sir Charles
Tupper auditorium.
The charm and energy of their
music easily shatters the language
barrier between them and their
Canadian audience. The ease with
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
THE
DEVILS
by John Whiting
An M.F.A. Thesis
Production
Directed by Beryl Baylis
NOVEMBER 8-13
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $5.00
Students: $3.00
Box Office: Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
DOROTHY SOMERSET
STUDIO
UBC GRADUATE
STUDENT SOCIETY
NOTICE OF
ELECTIONS
Nominations are now open
for the election of
TWO GRADUATE
STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES
to the Selection Com
mittee for a new Dean
of Graduate Studies
Closing date for
nominations is
THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 18,
1982
which this is done comes not only
from the music, but from political
solidarity between the group of
musicians working for the
Salvadoran revolution, and their
Canadian supporters.
For the music of Yolocamab-Ita
reflects not only the traditional,
cultural roots of Salvadoran folk
music, but also the political turmoil
in the tiny country's three year-old
civil war. Before each song, one of
the musicians explains through a
translator what the spnj*. is about.
-jgbey ring.a vm^^~ Mo
•tfgttor RdttpfO, "'%h<f * '
assassinated by ^fernn%it
;\«SB..J#fch 2jp"Jm&^foT
. outspofop oppiiitioil to the
Junta. TOsy fAig a Ham<
Maria Elena Salinas, #16
Salvadoran wotnil who
mtadercd.byJftie anpy because of
her partfdpatk^ iivthe liberation
movement. Theygiag of the guerrillas whoJTtght i$,-t?ie Farabundo
Marti National liberation Front
(FMLN), oh^fe in the liberated
zones, and of the new, free El
Salvador that will CQj&e with the
Outside El S^sdf^^^pread infor
,     ^^.v tM r^ttadng; the;|B$8#  Ration aboifc the sMktion ia the
pas t%l to Bteke soM alfeut th^' country, andio gain support forthe
ans
tuatitifl of ouf people, and to
fi^-M^tifefiral roots that have been
repressed since 1932," Volocamba-
Ita|||mber.Guillerm(j Cuellar says
in Wuiterfjew. "We tq^gfood
sincpaiie banning that 6ur|toork
was fofcur people." I
YoloS||lj|-Ita  was   formed
1975, andll|rformed in Salvai
schools, clfcches, factories,
_peasant comr^uuto, says Cudftj^ aj|o-#
Jhe popiipr fjfeeinent grelfP .jxvet
..This   is
,*dSferd»..Cai
to
Sgers, poets,
part of the
ftic Revolutonary Front,
joined the MPC because we
ifstood that all our people were
participating in the struggle, so why
not artists?" Cuellar says. "We
thought that the artists have to be
inside, as the others, in the fight for
change."
In    1980,    the   FDR   asked
Yolocamba-Ita to work and travel
movement,  fibe group
rn^Veil to Mexico, and in the past
Wo years has brought their music.
-and   message., to   people   ia
;; Nkaragiia,  Cqfta Rica,  Panama,
ffPeru, -SjjJain.jFrance,   West Ger-
?*l-nany,  tie jfetherlands, Sweden,
Denmark^pgium, and England.
oloc^|rt?«*Ita's   third
.da. Tk group is n^t
theJ&.S., andras
Theji^ently
links wifli^went to theAmericai^risulate in
mtp-Ita joined -^Vancouver to try to Jfff visas to play
lar Culture,    in  Bellingham,  bJR  were  unsuc
cessful, says Cuepr.
"They said, '\p don't like people
who go to Niqjfagua.' "
But Cuellar^ happy that the
group's messiMjfcj.. is reaching
Canada. *"**
"We have seen the difference
between 1980 (the yea* of
Yolocamba-Ita's first Cahadiaa
tour) and this year. The solidarity
movement in Canada has grown
very much,"
says Cuellar,
.■.-■;.'■&
"This
year we have seen more opposition
of the Canadian people to
American intervention. Two years
ago Canadians were not very aware.
Cuellar urges Canadians to put
pressure on their government.
"Canada has to take an independent policy about Central America.
It is a right of the Canadian people.
Canada doesn't have to take the
saj|»e policy as the U.S."
But American intervention will
not stop the Salvadoran people,
says Cuellar. "Even with their
economic and military support
from the U.S. the (Salvadoran)
government cannot have a military
victory against our people."
As the interview ends, Cuellar
has some questions of his own.
What are UBC students like? Do
they know what is happening in El
Salvador? Are they sympathetic to
the Salvadoran people's fight for
freedom?
Perhaps UBC students can
themselves best answer Guillermo
Cuellar's questions — Yolocamba-
Ita will give a free concert at noon
Wednesday in the SUB party room.
%? k<& /^m U.
Real Men's Diet. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9,1982
'Birds field hockey champions
By ALISON HOENS
The football team has to wait
another two weeks until it has the
chance to be crowned national
champions, but the women's field
hockey team need not wait — it has
already done it!
Last weekend in Calgary, UBC
captured their third Canadian
championship in five years, after
defeating the defending University
of Toronto Blues 3-1 Sunday.
"It is true that we have a lot of
talented players, many of national
calibre, and all of them performed
to their capabilities," said coach
Gail Wilson.  "But we also have
valuable substitutes and less experienced players: their performances were equally outstanding,
particularly Carrie Lockwood who
has played virtually every position
this year and Alison Palmer who
made key saves throughout the
tournament."
UBC entered the final after accumulating a 5-0 record in round
robin play versus the Universities of
Calgary, Toronto, New Brunswick,
Dalhousie and York. The 'Birds
outscored their opposition 12-2.
"We approached the championship cautiously, one game at a time.
We knew that New Brunswick and
Toronto were the teams to beat.
But nothing was known about York
and Dalhousie," Wilson said.
The turning point for the 'Birds
was   the   game   against   New
Brunswick. Down 1-0 with 15
minutes left, they tied the score.
"The goal gave them tremendous
intensity and determination — the
first time that they have needed to
be  determined  all  season,"   said
The final game versus Toronto
ended in a 3-1 UBC victory. Dana
Sinclair, Helen Olynyk and Joni
Franks scored for the 'Birds.
Wilson believes the satisfaction
of winning was dampened by the
fact that only two UBC players,
Sinclair and Jean Mustard were
chosen as All-Canadians.
"I take part of the blame. All
season I have emphasized and spent
the time on teamwork and although
it did pay-off in this championship
it denied individuals the chance to
shine probably hurt them in the
selections,"   Wilson   said.
(SPORTS
College semi-final Saturday
By PHILIP KUEBER
What can be said about a football
team that has scored 117 points in
its last two outings?
Well, the latest victims of the
UBC football team, the Manitoba
Bisons, were embarrassed 57-3 Friday night and head coach Dennis
Hrycaiko had plenty to say.
With a shrug of the shoulders and
a wry smile, Hrycaiko offered
praise for the winners rather than
excuses for his team's lacklustre
performance.
"I'll be very surprised to see this
team (UBC) lose to anybody," said
Hrycaiko. They are a complete
team in every sense of the word."
Hrycaiko expressed his sympathy
for the Thunderbirds' future opponents in the Atlantic Bowl.
"Whoever it is they're going to
have their hands full."
The game's scoring was as diverse
as one could expect. Glen Steele
had touchdown runs from one and
nine yards out. Reserve Sheldon
Petri also rushed from 12 yards for
a major, and Kent Bowling had the
other offensive touchdown with a
one yard scamper. The remaining
points came from some spectacular
individual efforts.
Laurent Deslauriers returned a
punt 92 yards, and Dave Singh
returned  a  kickoff 92  yards  to
T'Birds hockey squad
sliding a little less
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
UBC men's hockey team is making progress.
Last year the Thunderbirds opened their regular season by losing to
the Alberta Golden Bears 13-2 and
10-5.
This year the 'Birds still lost both
gafnes, but by less, 8-4 and 4-2.
Saturday's contest saw the 'Birds
trail the Bears 2-0 after one period
and 2-1 after two before losing 4-2.
Alberta's highly-touted Ace
Brimacombe led with two goals
while centre Gregg Cockrill and
defenseman Darcy Alexander
replied for UBC. Back-up goalie
Graham Makerwich had a busy
night for the 'Birds as he faced 49
shots, while his team mates could .
only muster 26 at the other goal.
Women win?!
Can it be true? More victories for
the women's basketball? Yes.
Last weekend the team travelled
to Regina for the Queen City
Classic Tournament. They became
finalists after winning all three
preliminary games. But they lost in
that game against the Regina Springers 67-62 after defeating them in
the preliminaries 70-62.
"This year's team is better than
previous years because of the constant intensity exhibited by the
players: you can't ask for more
than that," said coach Jack Pomfret. "I was very pleased with their
performance."
BUDDING    SPORTS   JOUR-
IS ACUTS
The Ubyssey has, as you are no
doubt aware, an absolutely first
class roster of writers on major
sports.
What we need (T need, lets be
frank) is more sports obsessed types
prepared to give up their time to do
the snotty little bits.)
241k SUB, please, please please
Friday's game was much closer in
shots — Alberta outshot UBC 35-26
— but more one-sided in goals, as
the Bears won 8-4. Despite trailing
4-1 midway through the game, the
'Birds came back to tie it with three
goals in the span of two minutes
nine seconds near the end of the second period. But four unanswered
goals put the game away for the
Bears.
Ron Parent and Terry Sydoryk
led the Bears with two goals apiece,
while left winger Dave Brownlie
netted two for the 'Birds. UBC forwards Jim Allison and Daryl Col-
dwell scored one each, while Ian
McEachern minded the nets for the
'Birds.
About 400 fans turned out at the
Thunderbird arena Friday evening
and 200 were at Saturday evening's
game.
The 'Birds will still be looking for
their first win against Canadian
competition this season when they
travel to Saskatoon this coming
weekend for a pair of league games
against the Saskatchewan Huskies.
The next home games are the
following weekend versus the
Calgary Dinosaurs.
CANADA WEST FINAL
1961-82 STANDINGS
W    L    GF GA PTS
Saskatchewan             14     7    203 63 34
Calgary                          14    10    100 87 28
Alberta                         11    13     91 89 22
UBC                                 6    18     67 122 12
\m
HEWLETT
PACKARD
calculators and
personal computers
Discount Sales
437-6114
highlight some outstanding specialty team work. The final major came
from a 52 yard interception return
by defensive back Brian Branting.
Ken Munro rounded out the scoring
with two singles two field goals, and
seven converts.
The defense was stingy giving up
a lone field in the third quarter. The
Bisons were not able to penetrate
Thunderbird territory until the last
few minutes of that quarter.
The Birds now travel east to play
in the Atlantic Bowl, for the first
time in the team's history. The identity of the opposition will be settled
Tuesday when the Mt. Allison
Mounties play St. Francis Xavier
X-Men.
The two teams played on the
weekend, but the game was called
on account of darkness. After
regular times they were tied 35-35.
After two overtime periods, the
score was 38-38, and it was beginning to get dark. The stadium had no
lights.
The winner of the Atlantic bowl
will advance to the Vanier Cup; the
national championship game.
NOTE: A reminder that the game
will be broadcast LIVE from
Halifax on CITR radio, at 8:45
a.m., Saturday, November 13th.
—alison hoens photo
"MASTER! MASTER!" cries the SFU Clansman as the obviously superior
UBC Thunderbird levitates before his very eyes. The Thunderbirds' mystic
powers enabled them to defeat the SFU basketball team 76-61 Saturday
after a Friday loss. Next game vs SFU tonight at 8 p.m. on the hill.
Big 'Birds spiit classic with Clan
By MONTE STEWART
Just when it appeared that a successful tour of South Asia had proved meaningless, the men's basketball team quieted their critics Saturday for the time being. After losing
79-61 to Simon Fraser University
Clansmen Friday, the 'Birds
displayed the stuff which true contenders are made of and beat SFU
76-61 Saturday to even the
Buchanan Classic at one game
apiece.
Friday, it appeared the 'Birds
could do nothing right as they were
outhustled and outmuscled by the
larger Clan in a rather unexciting
game. At this point, the optimistic
outlook for this year's version of
the UBC hoop squad had virtually
disintegrated.
Although UBC came out flat Friday, the Clan was just plain lousy
at War Memorial Gym Saturday.
The Clan relinquished an early lead
to trail 33-31 at the half. After that,
a Thunderbird victory was never in
doubt as UBC controlled the boards
and played with much more intensity and will to win. SFU took the
'Birds lightly following the Friday
win.
The Clan did not help themselves
very much as they converted only 34
per cent of their field goal attempts
compared to a 50 per cent UBC success   rate.
The third and deciding game ot
the series is tonight at SFU at 8 p.m.
Hopefully, the 'Birds possess the
quality which all good teams
possess in order to come from
behind.
AMS    AMS   AMS    AMS   AMS
co
<
CO
IS
<
CO
<
col
A.M.S. CONCERTS
presents
POWDER BLUES
with special guest
FRIDAY, NOV. 12, 1982,
8:30 P.M.
S.U.B. BALLROOM
Advance tickets at A.M.S. Ticket Office
No Minors Please!!f
co
>
>
2
C/3
AMS    AMS    AMS    AMS   AMS

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