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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 1968

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Array PROtection
begins with
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. L, No. 10
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY,  OCTOBER  1,  1968
224-3916
— ntiln jouon photo
UBC ENGINEERS Ralph Kalberg and Doug Horswill sail on the Fraser River in Sunday's canoe
race sponsored by Simon Fraser University Outdoor club. The engineers, as usual, were up the
creek, managing to finish last. However, they had no excuse as they did have a paddle.
Pub in SUB' to be topic of
Tuesday main-mall meeting
Do you want a pub in SUB ?
A special general meeting
will be held Tuesday noon on
the main mall, or in the gym
if it rains to discuss this issue.
But students will get a
chance before Tuesday to bring
this up, because Minister of
Eductaion Les Peterson will be
giving a speech Wednesday
noon in Angus 110.
It was suggested in Monday's
council meeting by Alma Mater
Society Coordinator Jill Camer-
' on that "students should come,
listen, participate in the discussion, and bring beer along."
Grad student Peter Brock
said his original intention to
have pub-ins was to point out
the absurd state of the liquor
laws, and not necessarily to get
a licence for SUB.
'We hadn't even intended to
apply for a licence," said
Brock. "We thought we should
do this just to bring the issue
up."
"The university is a social
organ and should be the vanguard of liberalism, so we
thought it should start here."
Councillors generally agreed
it would be almost impossible
to get a permanent liquor licence until the liquor laws were
changed.
External Affairs officer Tobin Robbins pointed out there
Charity
time again
Students are being asked to
dig in their pockets again.
On Wednesday, between
10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., the
United Appeal will be making
its annual tour of the campus.
Volunteers will be coming
around through the classes between these times.
So come on, students give a
little.
are only two pubs in B.C. not
attached to hotels, and those
were set up before the liquor
laws were made up.
"I don't think the students
who signed the petition requesting for this general meeting
weer aware of this and that it
means a total revision of the
laws," he said.
Engineering representative
Fraser Hodge brought up the
question of the amount of public support a pub in SUB has.
Hodge said that the general
feeling he had received was
that the public thought it was
"just those stupid students acting up again."
Commerce representative
Russ Grierson thought the public was in favor of the central
issue, but that people felt students were going too for with
pub-ins.
"If other licences on campus
such as the one Cecil Park has
are cancelled because of what
the students do, the public
won't be mad at the government, but at those who forced
the cancellation," he said.
Hodge suggested that students march on Victoria and
demand a confrontation with
Premier Bennett.
"We've got to go to Victoria
and beat him on his own
ground," he said. "We should
get students from the University and talk him down."
Robbins suggested we should
not only include students from
other universities, but also
start aligning with the people
downtown.
"We should get petitions
started off campus, and get a
mass campaign going on downtown, maybe get on open line
shows."
Brock complained that councillors were being very hypocritical if they decided not to
take a definite stand and just
let the students drink if they
wished.
"You can't keep it under
your hat and hope that no one
notices," he said. "It's up to
the council to bring drinking
out into the open."
SUB squabble
on key issue
By JOHN GIBBS
Who is going to.get keys to
our glorious new Student Union Building now that we have
it?
At present the only master
key in existence is in the hands
of SUB building manager, Dave
Cooper. According to Graham
Vance, recently hired assistant
to AMS general manager, Ron
Pearson, that's the way H
should be. "For security reasons, I think the fewer master
keys, the better."
Vance who was AMS coordinator in '64-'65, has been
hired to help the transition of
operation from Brock to SUB at
$475 a month, not to exceed
three months, according to
Donn Aven, AMS treasurer.
Aven was responsible for the
hiring.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt also said Monday he didn't
think any students should have
keys.
"As for myself, I don't want
one . . . and I don't think any
other student will need one; if
they have a legitimate reason
for being there, they will be
allowed access."
Jill Cameron, AMS co-ordinator, said any student with an
office in SUB should have an
outside key. "What good is an
office key if you can't get in the
building. As far as I'm concerned the whole key policy is
based on maximum security."
Zirnhelt said a "building
pass" plan was under discussion by the SUB management
committee which is responsible for such policy decisions.
The plan would give club
officers, and others with a
"legitimate reason," access to
the building 24 hours a day by
presentation of a pass—yet to
be issued!. He added that
nothing was final and all such
decisions would have to be
ratified by council.
Housing squeeze
makes 200 leave
The student housing crisis forced 200 married grad students
to drop out, says the Alma Mater Society housing bureau administrator Carel Howe.
She said the possibility of city council opening illegal suites
to students was the only hope for married students who couldn't
find other housing.
Council refused in August to open the suites. "We asked
people to open up their suites anyway, but it was difficult because the city has 12 inspectors who do nothing but check for
illegal suites,"  she said.
The illegal suites are self-contained units in single-family
dwelling areas.
Miss Howe said in an interview that the AMS housing
bureau, established in August, was successful in generating support in the community for students seeking housing.
"It was a success in getting homeowners to take in students,
but for couples it did a lousy job," she said.
"We received 800 more listings than last year, but people
only wanted to give rooms or room and board."
These would be inadequate for married students, she said.
DAVE ZIRNHELT (left) and WILLIAM WEBBER, faculty association president, grimace through their blood donating publicity stunt Monday morning in SUB. The Red Cross blood drive
continues until Oct. 4 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. In SUB
meeting rooms. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 1, 1968
AND ALL THROUGH THE HOUSE, not a thing was stirring, not even a mouse — except a hundred firemen in the girls John of the library Friday afternoon.
Talk opens study groups,
classroom reform' discussed
The Student Christian Movement is organizing a unique study project to discuss student
reform.
To start the project, SCM will present a
speech by Father Gerald McGuigan on Reform
in the Classroom in Ang. 104, Wednesday noon.
At this meeting, students will be invited to
join any of five study groups to discuss university reform.
The study groups will meet one hour a
week for three weeks to present papers to a
public meeting Oct. 24. At that meeting it will
be decided how the project will continue.
In an interview Monday, Fred Harris, SCM
treasurer, said: "Before we decide what action
we should take, we should be clear on what we
want.
"Consequently, we have broken the ques-
■?*£■£■'*■**'--a '£"$&**
tion of university reform into five topics which
are neither mutually exclusive nor comprehensive but merely ways of looking at this
massive institution, the multiversity, in order
to get a better education for our time spent."
Harris said the project so far has three
group leaders: Profs. Bill Willmott, anthropology; Bernard St. Jacques, classics; and Don
Brown, philosophy.
"We feel that radicals comprise only a small
percentage of UBC students," said Harris. "For
example, the Students for a Democratic University are all for students running everything.
But commerce students are against students
running too many things.
"For this reason we would like students
from all faculties and departments to attend
the project."
Windsor shafts CUS
with two to one vote
WINDSOR (CUP) — Students at the University of
Windsor rejected membership in the Canadian Union of
Students by a margin of almost two to one Friday.
The referendum was the second in two years at Windsor — last year CUS squeaked in with a slim unoiled
margin.
The vote, 1184-675, was interpreted by student council treasurer and Anti-CUS leader Bob Baski as a rejection
of "confrontation".
Baski seeks to substitute "conciliation" for confrontation. He says the vote proves Windsor students don't want
their student governments to make statements about international affairs.
CUS Ontario field worker Ted Richmond, on the Windsor campus for the whole campaign, disagrees. He says the
campaign was won by spreading anti-CUS "lies" like "CUS
supports Communism and Separatism".
These charges refer to CUS resolutions supporting the
National Liberation Front in Viet Nam and self-determination for the people of Quebec.
CUS supporters say CUS general policy and structure
was not even mentioned in the campaign.
Richmond objected to the limited time allowed for the
CUS campaign. He said he expected a full year of discussion of CUS would see Windsor rejoining in the spring.
Directory
finds jobs
for grads
A career directory designed
to help graduating students
find post-graduate jobs is now
available in UBC's placement
office.
The directory, published by a
Toronto firm, contains outlines
of industrial and governmental
opportunities for graduates.
It is now in its tenth year of
publication and is distributed
to more than 30,000 graduates
across Canada.
Student services director A.
F. Shirran told The Ubyssey on
Monday that the directory is a
"worthwhile survey."
A recent report by a management consultant firm shows
that 80 per cent of respondents
to a survey said the directory
was useful to them in finding
a job.
4 underground FILMS
THE   CONNECTION    100 min.  B. & W.  35  mm   by
Shirley Clarke — based on the play by Jack Gelber.
An honest look at the real world of heroin addicts.
(Restricted).
SAN FRANCISCO TRIPS FESTIVAL: 9 min. color 16 mm by Ben Van Meter. An
audio-visual assault on the senses.
COLOR FILM: 9 min. color 16mm by Ben Van Meter. Heads abound in Golden
Gate Park.
THE MATTRESS: 9 min. black and white  16 mm by  Robert Bresson. Second
Prize, 4th Independent Filmmakers Festival.
Tonight and Thursday — One Showing Nightly at 8:30
OLYMPIA THEATRE
2381  E. HASTINGS (AT NANAIMO)
Adults $1.50 — At the Door — Students $1.25
THE WAGE-INFLATION
FALLACY?
DR. JOHN  K. GIFFORD
University of Queensland
THURSDAY, OCT. 3 - ANGUS 212
12:45 - 2:00
Stop In and Take a Look
at Our New Playboy Ties
2140 WESTERN PARKWAY
AT THE VILLAGE SQUARE
Presenting
Mr. Paul Almond
DIRECTOR OP ISABEL
2:00 p.m., Tues.
Freddy Wood
AN INFORMAL
DISCUSSION OF FILM Tuesday, October 1,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
WHO SAYS nobody reads The Ubyssey? Even if it is only those who are more interested in reading than in developing warmer relations with the opposite sex.
Bank says  we're sorry',
veep apologizes for boner
By JAMES CONCHIE
The Bank of Montreal has issued an apology
to students whose accounts were changed to
i chequing accounts without their permission or
knowledge.
In a letter to The Ubyssey, Bank of Montreal senior vice-president A. J. Ellis apologized
to all students affected by the change.
Students who had personal savings accounts
returned to campus this fall to find their accounts changed to true chequing accounts.
Personal savings accounts carry three per
cent interest. The depositor pays 20 cents per
cheque but has free withdrawal privileges.
No interest is paid on true chequing accounts. The depositor pays 10 cents for every
cheque and every withdrawal.
Ellis assured depositors they will continue
to receive interest on their deposits until the
situation is rectified.
The letter did not say whether students
would receive the full five per cent interest or
only the three per cent paid on personal savings accounts.
Ellis suggested that students not satisfied
with the present situation could open a savings
and a chequing account.
The savings account would pay full interest
but would have no chequing privileges. The
chequing account would carry no interest.
There would be no charge for transfers of
money between the accounts.
Ellis said that although the action was taken
without notifying the depositors, the bank felt
it was acting in the best interests of its customers.
Bureaucrats call law to quell
New Brunswick university sit-in
•FREDERICTON (CUP) — A
court injunction requested by
the adminstration of the University of New Brunswick
Monday forced an end to a
five-day sit-in supporting a
suspended professor.
Fifty students have been living in the office of activist pro
fessor Norman Strax since he
was suspended Thursday.
Strax, a nuclear physicist,
has been active in forming
Students for a Democratic Society at UNB.
University president Colin
MacKay said Strax was dismissed for "obvious" reasons,
but refused to elaborate further.
The injunction to end the sit-
in is believed to be unprecedented in administration-student relations in Canada.
A board of governors subcommittee meets Wednesday to
review the suspension.
Bikinis top engineers
in two-day canoe race
Two bikini-top clad sisters Sunday put a team of UBC engineers to shame in a two-day canoe race.
Janet and Virginia Wyman won the women's class in a 40
mile race down the Fraser River from Mission to Annacis Island.
The race, sponsored by the Simon Fraser University Outdoors club, drew 40 entries.
The girls spent the night at Fort Langley with other entries.
"We didn't get any sleep said Virginia. "Our sleeping bags were
sent to Vancouver by mistake and we had to share one bag.
"On top of that, the engineers kept us awake all night with
an air-raid siren."
Which is perhaps why Doug Horswill, eng. 2 and Ralph
Kalberg, eng.  2, were  among the last to finish.
Mexican students
ready for talks
MEXICO CITY (CUPI)—Student leaders in this embattled
capital city are reportedly
ready to begin talks with the
government after a week-long
running gun battle between students and police.
At least 17 people were killed and more than 500 arrested
in rioting and shooting last
week as students protested
army occupation of the University of Mexico.
Leaders of tbe Student National Strike Committee pleaded Thursday for an end to violence.
If the leaders meet with government officials, they will be
pushing their demands to end
a three-month strike by 88,000
students.
The students are asking for:
release of political prisoners;
elimination of sections of the
criminal code dealing with subversion and public disorder,
used by police "to suppress students";
dismissal of the Mexico city
police chief and his assistant;
elimination of a special corps
of riot police;
an investigation of brutality
against them and indemnity to
the victims;
a greater voice in the running of Mexican universities.
However, police and student
leaders fear a new rash of violence will follow a mass rally
being held Friday night in
Northern Mexico City.
Petition aims to oust
AMS treasurer Aven
A petition is being circulated for the recall of AMS treasurer
Donn Aven.
A spokesman for the group circulating the petition, which
gathered 50 signatures in a brief canvass Monday, said he disagrees with some of the actions Aven has taken while in office.
(Under the AMS constitution, if a petition for the recall of an
executive member is signed by 2000 students, he is removed from
office and a by-election held. The member removed is eligible
to run again.)
"The executive in a six to one vote (Aven opposed) during
the summer asked Aven as executive member responsible for
staff to take steps to terminate AMS general manager Ron Pearson's contract in December, but Aven refused to carry out the
decision," the spokesman said.
(The matter eventualy came to student council where the
executive was over-ruled.)
"Aven was also responsible for destroying material for a
council-authorized Tumm Est orientation edition prepared during
the summer by Steve Garrod," he said.
(Council, dissatisfied with Garrod's Tuum Est, authorized
another group to prepare the Tuum Est which was distributed
during registration week.)
"Aven also turned down special events co-chairman Michael
Lange's request for a floating fund, under Lange's control, which
he could use to prepare his program.
"Now Lange must bet Aven's approval for any group he
brings to campus.
"Other students may agree with Aven's way of running
things, and they can vote him back in after the recall," the
spokesman said. "I think he should be replaced."
O M0RALMAN IS STILL SEARCHING FOR TH0MA5,
—   - THE RABBIT THAT EVERVBCW HATES.
^b,r . ^^jJuu
{/WRrWIrW.'VOirVE got tocat^thatL
CRABBIT.' TVE PAP6R eAVS HE'S H0PRlBi.£p Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 1, 1968
mvmsEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising, local 26. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 1, 1968
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EDITOR: Al  Birnie
City  Desk    Paul   Knox
News   John Twigj
Managing    Mike Jessen
Photo .... Fred Cawsey, Powell Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
Paul *Humpty' Knox, The Ubyssey's
beleagured city editor, was so over-
whipped into action by slave driver
Birnie that he forgot to send in a list
of names of those who worked. Apologies are extended to those excluded,
but here goes. Freelance Pango Pango
correspondent James Conkout was pursued by simetimes here-sometimes not
blorgess Dale Wik. Volkoff showed, and
endured council but Vasil didn't. Gibbs
played in the John, iceman Brynjolffson
froze when his name was mis-speUed.
Twigg branched out into the pun game.
These also worked: Buren Ryen, Lair.ie
Wellrat, a host of former eds, and too
few others.
Withdrawal
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
As of this date, we terminate
all future advertisement instructions with 'Ubyessey', (sic)
pending a "clean-up" of the
filth now being printed.
Yours* truly,
FIRBANK'S LTD.
D. Firbank, pres.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Editorial blorgs today ceased
existence because the Asses and
Mules Society ran their weekly
meeting beyond deadline for
the umpteenth eon in a row.
STUDENT SENATE
BY  STUART  RUSH
For a student senate
By STUART RUSH
The upcoming senate elections have sharply
focused the attention of students on the issue
of student representation on the senate. The
issue is one that is linked to many other issue-
areas in the university and is therefore tied
inexorably to the entire student drive for a
more liberated and human university environment. For instance, the question of representation magnifies student demands for a democratized university government which in turn is
the major prerequisite for qualitative curricula
and course content changes in the faculties. The
representation question is a pivotal one since
out of it may rise the unified student action
necessary to insure a re-allocation of power to
the students.
The students, all 20,000 of us, have been
given four places on the senate. It is expected
that these seats will provide the voice-power
needed to convey the multi-directional opinions
of the student body. In addition, the student
body is viewed as only one faction among many
which must be represented in the decisionmaking routine of the senate; and thus deserves
no more than a few seats. I reject this paternal
and unjustified analysis as I think all students
must.
LARGEST SINGLE GROUP
The student body is the largest single
grouping in the university. It is composed of
individuals with many differing views as to
how university life should be ordered. These
views must be represented and expressed on
the governing councils of the university. None
but a student can represent the particular point
of view of the student. Furthermore no small
group of students can hope to represent the
diverse opinions within the student population.
When institutional decisions are being made
which directly effect the lives of students then
they should have, by right, a role in participating and formulating those decisions. This role
should be in relative proportion to student numbers, to the degree to which university decisions
shape their lives, and to the different levels of
student experience. If the concept of participatory democracy is to realised an equal number
of seats must be reservted for the students on
all university governing bodies, specifically on
the senate. Clearly, then the four senate seats
represent meaningless concessions from the senate. In plain language, it is 'tokenism'.
PRESENT OUR CASE
What steps can the students take during
these senate elections to demonstrate to the
faculty and to the administration that four
seats are not enough? First, we must present
our   case   reasonably  and  honestly   to  those
people in the university who do not share in
the belief of participatory democracy. This
will serve to create and sustain within the
student body a mentality of change as well as
belief in the democratic method.
Second, the election must be exposed as a
futile process and totally without student en-
dorsation. It must be dramatized as a farce. It
must be held up as being a lame attempt to
placate demands for democratic involvement.
If we can achieve this, the faculty and business
people on the senate may be concerned enough
to review their position.
Third, the election campaign must point out
the disparity between how the senate presently
operates and how it ought to operate to guarantee the restructuring and humanizing of university life.
ALTERNATIVE ACTION
Fourth, it is not sufficient to expose, contradict and criticize. The students must provide
some alternative action. Any action must not
only continue the exposing and ridiculing process but more importantly take some constructive steps to which the student body can
relate.
The idea of a student senate embodies action on all four points. It would be established
as a parallel institution shadowing the functions and decisions of the existing senate.
Initially the student senate would be composed of students elected during the present
elections. Once established it would invite the
participation of an equal number of faculty,
including teaching assistants, and graduates.. It
would deliberate on subjects affecting the whole
university community and come to decisions on
them. Implementation would have to be carried out by confrontation and by faculty pressure within the channels of their own departments. Departmental committees would become the chief avenue of change.
CLARIFY THE ISSUES
The student senate could be built up from
the number of students running in the forthcoming elections. Throughout the campaign
they would clarify the issue of token representation, point out the undemocratic aspects of
the senate and provide the alternative of a
parallel senate as means of accomplishing
student goals.
The concept of a student senate must not
be dismissed as absurd and unworkable. It
seems absurd because it is novel and untried.
It seems unworkable because it implies that
change can be brought about by channels other
than the existing ones. Only student support *
is needed to make the concept of a student
senate an operational reality.
mw^^^^^&mmKSm
Africa
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
From October 2 to 5 a symposium on Africa — Conflict
and Prospect is to be held at
UBC. According to the organizers the purpose is to extend
to many Canadians a knowledge of the problems facing
Africans and the responsibilities of other countries towards
them. To start with, let young
Africans start to realize that
the responsibilities of Africa
and our people are our problems. We are now independent
and the. more of us that become
educated should know that
America, Canada, Britain,
France, and Russia are not responsible for Africa.
What alarms me is the composition of 27 speakers and
moderators taking part in this
symposium: five are Africans,
the other 22 are what Time
magazine will call 'experts' on
African affairs (whatever that
means.) This raises the question, does a Canadian, American, British, or French citizen
with a doctorate degree in political science plus or minus two
years in an African country
automatically become an expert
on African affairs ?
This symposium would serve
a better purpose and achieve
more far-reaching results if of
every three speakers two are
Africans. I am sure Africa can
still produce enough people to
hold symposia simultaneously
in all major world capitals.
What disqualifies such names
as Julius Nyerere of Tanzania,
Nkruma, former president of
Ghana, Tom Mboya and Odinga
of Kenya and a host of other
African political science and
economics professors. What
about African ambassadors all
over the world?
The aspirations of my Grade
12 cousin in Nigeria will be
better told to his Canadian
'counterpart by one of those
men than by a professor from
Chicago.
It seems we young Africans
still regard the few intellectuals we have as inferior, we
better learn fast.
I do not say a professor from
Sussex university knows
nothing of Africa but not as
much as an African even if that
African holds only a bachelor
degree.
Or maybe the organizers feel
the symposium won't be successful with many African
speakers. (Poor mentality.)
Or did UBC and AMS co-
sponsors threaten to withdraw support if they show too
many black faces ? (Foreign
aid.) Whichever be the fear, a
symposium on Africa needs
more African speakers. An
American can read or study
Africa but he can never know
what is the African Conflict.
Let us for a moment agree
with the organizers that a professor at Vancouver, Chicago,
or Paris is more an expert on
African problems than one
from Nairobi, Lagos, or Kampala, why not one such 'expert' from Moscow, Warsaw, or
Peking ? Or do young Africans
think their governments do not
take aid from the communist
countries ?
If my fellow Africans want
to wake up our sleeping giant
let Africans beat the drum to
the world.
Gold bless our native Africa.
SAM AIMA (Nigeria)
agriculture 3 Tuesday, October 1, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Math curriculum revisions
face week of questionnaires
By FRANK FLYNN
This week is a critical one
for the proposed new mathematics curriculum.
In an effort to initiate implementation of the new first year
courses by September 1969, a
joint student-faculty committee
will have questionnaires distributed to the more than 3,000
students currently taking math
courses.
The questionnaires, to be distributed in math classes on
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, will seek student reaction
to the new first-year program
* for first year.
The current program in first
year consists of two courses,
math 110 and 120. Both are
worth three units of credit.
Math 110 is a course in fundamental math and is meant for
students who desire to proceed
no further in math.
Under the new program this
course would become math 130
and cover material designed for
students who wish only limited
exposure to mathematics.
An important feature of this
course would be that the material covered will be left to the
discretion of the instructor.
Ubyssey reporter Flynn is a
mathematics major He was
science undergraduate society
president in 1966-67.
The greatest changes in the
new program will occur in
math 120.
Currently an introduction to
.calculus, and as such a prerequisite to just about every
other math course in the university, math 1-20 will cease to
exist as it is now known.
The new proposal is for four
courses, worth five units combined, to be offered in first
year.
Students not wishing to be
mathematicians but needing
math for other courses would
take courses numbered math
100 and math 121.
Math 100, worth two units,
would be the first course in
calculus.
Math 121, worth one unit,
k would meet two hours a week
for half a year.
This course will be an introduction to vectors and matrices
and will cover determinants,
and other related subjects.
These courses, 100 and 121,
although closely related, can be
taken separately. Math 12 is
the prerequisite for both.
Students contemplating careers in mathematics will be
able to take a revised math 120,
an introduction to mathematical analysis.
Like Math 121, it will be
worth one unit, will meet twice
a week for half a year, and will
be offered in both terms of tiie
year.
What is really new about this
course is that it offers the prospective mathematician a taste
of theoretical mathematics, so
necessary for an honors student.
Currently, a student doesn't
encounter this until second
year, and thus 120 will afford
an early opportunity to sample
what lies ahead.
Finally, there will be math
140, an introduction to linear
programming. It will be operated in the same manner as
120 and 121.
Thus the mathematician-to-be
can, if he wishes, take as many
as five units of math in first
year.
But what happens after first
year ?
In about one month, students
will be given another questionnaire and asked to evaluate the
program for second, third, and
fourth years.
The first year revision is
only the beginning of a completely new program.
To quote the preamble to the
forthcoming first-year questionnaire: "The contemplated
changes affect not only the
content, organization and numbering of courses, but also the
traditional method of distinguishing between major,
honors, and various service
programs.
Students will be . . . confronted with a greater number
of choices in the selection of
their individual programs."
But do students in first year
know whether or not they want
to be mathematicians ?
If so, why ? If not, did they
once want to be mathematicians
(or physicists, chemists, engineers) and then change their
minds later ?
These and other questions
will also be asked in this
week's questionnaire this week
and why students select their
majors' and honors' subjects.
The committee will then correlate the various sections of
the questionnaire in an attempt to answer such questions
as "do students in first year
know what they are going to
do later".
If students approve the program, it must then go through
the math department, the faculty of science curriculum committee and finally the senate
for final approval.
The new program faces many
obstacles    in   this   sometimes
Uruguayans
get support
MONTEVIDEO (CUPI) —
Bank clerks went on strike last
week and organized labor called another nationwide walkout
today to protest President
Jorge Pacheco Areco's closure
of high schools and universities
in Uruguay.
Saigon paper censured
SAIGON, Vietnam (LNS) — Another daily newspaper in
Saigon has been censured by the South Vietnamese government,
this time for carrying a picture of Ho Chi Minh and a North
Vietnamese negotiator, Thuan Tui, on the front page.
The government claimed that "readers might get the wrong
idea".
Three months ago, the Saigon government closed down three
other papers for printing an AP story on the corruption in
Saigon.
very long route.
A loud yes from the students-
would heavily influence its
speedy implementation.
VARSITY
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE LTD.
tsso.
A Complete
Automotive Service
All   Models — All  Makes
"32 Years at this Location"
10 Ave W& Bianca 224-7424
ttUDAS
* Guaranteed as long as
you own your car
* Free 15 Minute Installation
* Free Inspection
* Installation Specialists
* Custom Pipe Bending
876-6631
685-4417
10%  Discount to
U.B.C. Students & Staff
by mentioning this ad.
DUAL EXHAUST'SPECIALISTS   -   SHOCK ABSORBERS
1875 KINGSWAY
M
UFFLFB
SHOPS
II
■vvjiflf.  , - --.yj^-^as^sMffa'a^a
tMiJE
^HOUSE^J
Oct. 1 -6
The
DRINKl
S_0U>f
DRINKS
POPPY      PS_1
CAWIIW        mW4
FAMILY    fusHf
Light  Show   Fri.
•F/36-9920*!
Available at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
In The Village - 1'/- blocks
from Memorial Gym
Mother Tuckers
Yellow Duck
Cliff Moore
732-7565
SPECIAL EVENTS "SPEAKERS"
"HUELGA"
(The Grapes of Wrath)
Film  on  Delano Farm  Workers'
STRIKE
TODAY - 12:30 - Hebb Theatre
Introduced by Union Organizer, Tony Mendez
HELD OVER
MONDAY - FRIDAY
September 30 - October 4
HAROLD  PINTER'S
rue Homecoming
Student Tickets - $1.00
Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
NEXT WEEK
Your New 1968
STUDENT TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
"BIRD CALLS"
Buy a Pre Sale Ticket Today
ONLY-75c-ONLY
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE, BROCK
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, BROCK Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 1, 1968
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Pango Pango religious circles
were in an uproar today with
the rumor that blorg high
priestess  Jillibus   Macameroon
is a virgin. Lack of virginity is
a prerequisite for ordination in
the sect.
The priestess strongly denied
thd rumor. However, informed
sources state the rumors are
true, despite long and hard
attempts to remedy the problem.
CAMPUS
BARBER SHOP
now
OPEN
Monday to Saturday
8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.
8 CHAIRS FOR FAST SERVICE
Featuring the very latest in men's hairstylings
BRUSH CUTS    -    RAZOR CUTS    -    TINTING
Come and See Us
Ground Floor
New S.U.B.
— dick button photo
BIRD QUARTERBACK ROGER GREGORY uncorks one of his
14 attempted passes through the outstretched arms of Willamette University Bearcat defensive end Tom Weahers.
Bearcat defensive halfback Jim Bailey looks on.
JV   Basketball
Notice to all basketball players: the Jayvee team try-
outs will start Monday, Oct. 7 at 4:30 p.m. Players should
report to the War Memorial Gym area.
Attention Skiers . . . Its Here!
THE LARGEST PRESEASON SKI SALE EVER
ONLY THREE DAYS (OCT.  3 - 4 - 5th) SO HURRY!
Remember Thurs., Fri. and Sat. - That's All
SKI POLES-Lots of Poles
Reg. $12.95 NOW $7.95
GRESYIG SKIS-Complete with harness
Reg. $40.00 NOW $24.95
BUCKLE BOOTS-French with moulded soles
Reg. $85.00 NOW $65.00    i   Mk   M WI        <$T ty
JUST EVERYONE IS RACING TO  VARSITY SKI SHOP"
HERE'S SOMETHING SPECIAL - for only the three days, all of our new stock items will be available to you
at 10% off. This includes all of our new Koflach Buckle Boots, ladies' and men's; our new models of Tyrol
Jackets, Tyrol Lace Boots, etc. Remember, this offer is only good for the THREE-DAY SALE.
SEE US AT
IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
4510 W. 10 AVE.-224-6414
(FRANCHISE  ITEMS  NOT  INCLUDED  IN  SALE)
LOCATED JUST TWO BLOCKS
OUTSIDE THE GATE
OPEN EVERY DAY — 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.
FRIDAY TILL 9 P.M. Tuesday, October 1, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
The Student Christian Movement presents
Father Gerald McGuigan
from Arts  I
SPEAKING ON
Reform in the Classroom
Wednesday, Octofaier 2
12:30 in Angus 104
Why UBC quarterbacks don't last very long.
* dick button photo
Grid Birds mauled by Bearcats,
4 injuries added to 40-0 insult
The UBC Thunderbird football team was badly mauled
Saturday by the Willamette
University Bearcats.
In running up a 40-0 score
the Bearcats were held scoreless for the first 12 minutes,
but they recovered a blocked
UBC punt and ran it in for the
first score.
After that, Bearcat quarterback Mike Shinn picked apart
the Birds' pass defense gaining
a total of 246 yards and three
touchdowns through the air.
Shinn also broke the Northwest Conference career passing
record.
One of the Birds' best performers of the game spent most
of his time running through
the middle of the line. Dave
Corcoran gained 44 yards out
of the Birds total of 107 along
the ground.
Other specks of hope for the
Birds came from the running
of Paul Danyliu, who managed
to move the ball without too
much help from his blockers,
and from the pass receiving of
Tom Ellison.
UBC injuries include guard
Jim Fornelli, end Rod Smith
and halfback Bob Whitehead as
well as Corcoran.
Coach Frank Gnup said after
the game, "Get me more players."
It sounds as if the coach isn't
quite happy with his personnel.
Other football news is
brighter as the Jayvee team
held the Seattle Cavaliers to a
14-6 loss.
Birds beat Barbarians,
take 3 of 4 in rugby
The UBC rugby teams had a
very successful weekend, with
three of the four teams winning
their games.
The Birds after a bad first
half played their own wide
open style of rugby to defeat
the Barbarians Firsts by a
score of 14-5.
Doug Schick scored on an 80
yard run to bring the Birds
back into the game just before
half time, the half time score
being 5-3 for the Barbs.
Tom Fraine, Dave Austin and
Rob Hungerford all got unanswered second half tries and
Don Crompton added a convert.
Coach Donn Spence said, "The
team played badly in the first
half, but they started playing
their own wide open brand of
ball in the second half."
In other games the Braves
defeated the Barbs Seconds by
a score of 17-0 while the Totems
defeated the Barbs Thirds by
an 8-3 margin.
The Tomahawks were the
only team that lost as they
were downed in their Junior
Intercollegiate league game by
a score of 9-3.
INVITATION
first meeting of
Full Gospel Students
(charismatic   renewal   interest
you — you should come)
Monday  6:30-10:00?  p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTER
CHINESE SUPPER (.75c)
meet othrs and find out
what's   up   for this   year
(D.   Bennett, M. Boring,
Wilkinson,  etc.)
Bring a friend —
More information or a ride?
call 266 925 — Bernice Gerard
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Special General Meeting
A Special General Mjeeting will be held at 12:45 p.m.,
Monday, Oct. 7, 1968, outside SUB to discuss ways and
means of getting a Pub in SUB.
JENNIFER JOHNSTON,
(Acting AMS Secretary)
Student Library Committee
Applications are now open for four positions on the
Library Committee. This committee is advisory to the
head of the service and may make suggestions or
recommendations concerning developments or changes
in the library which may affect students. Anyone inter*,
ested please contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS box 55.
FILMSOC  PRESENTS
1
68
i
69
SEASON OPENER
JAMES MASON MAXIMILLIAN SCHELL
in
"THE DEADLY AFFAIR"
PLUS
RICHARD  BURTON OSKAR WERNER
THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD'
Thurs. & Fri., Oct. 3 & 4
In Old Aud.
ADM.
THURS.    Affair - 12:30,  4:15,  8:00
Spy — 2:15, 6:00, 9:45
FRI. Spy -  12:30, 4:15, 8:00
Affair - 2:30, 6:15, 9:45
50c
She's off. With the crowd.
An all-day excursion.
Doesn't matter what day it is.
It could be any day of the
month. Because the modern
internal sanitary protection—
Tampax tampons—are part
of this active girl's life.
She's free, unhampered,
comfortable and secure.
That's the great part abo \
Tampax tampons. She can cai /
"spares" in her pocket or
purse.The container-applicato?
and the Tampax tampon
can be disposed of
easily—they just flush
away. Be as active as you like.
Get Tampax tampons now.
DEVELOPED BY A DOCTOR
NOW USED BY MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARR1E. ONTARIO Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 1, 1968
TWEEN CLASSES . .
Spies open Filmsoc season
Season opener, The Deadly Affair and The Spy Who Came
in From the Cold, Thursday
and Friday, noon continuous,
Old Auditorium.
SUB COMMITTEE
Meeting on formal opening,
SUB committee rooms, 224,
today, noon.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Ladies' meeting noon today,
room H, main floor, SUB;
new members welcome.
DEBATING UNION
General meeting, Wednesday
noon, Bu. 102. All welcome.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
First meeting for future
members, to outline year's
activities, Wednesday noon,
Bu. 202.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Teaching meeting Thursday
noon with Ross Carey from
Los Angeles, now on B.C.
staff, noon in Ed. 201.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting Wednesday noon,
Bu. 100, to discuss party
plans for Saturday night.
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE
OF CANADA
Toastmasters practise in public speaking every Tuesday
noon, Eng. 204.
ENGLISH LITERARY UNION
English students interested
in the proposed student-
faculty affairs committee
meet Thursday, 7:30 p.m.,
Buchanan lounge.
NEW DEMOCRATS
Meeting Wednesday noon,
Bu. 217.
UBC  ROWING  CREW
General meeting Thursday
noon, War Memorial Gym,
rooms 211-213. Rowers must
be 6 feet, 180 lbs. or larger.
UBC SOCREDS
Socreds present Attorney-
General Les Peterson, Wednesday noon Ang. 104.
AQUA SOC
Meeting in SUB at noon
Tuesday to Friday. Bring
lunch.
DANCE CLUB
Dancing instruction today
and every noon in SUB ballroom extension. Come and
dance or watch.
WOMEN'S CURLING
Meeting and practice Wednesday 8:30 p.m. in Thunderbird sports arena. All interested please attend.
ARTS UNDERGRAD
SOCIETY
General meeting noon today
in Buchanan lounge. Speakers: Ralph Stanton, Carey
Linde, Jill Cameron.
SUS
Meeting of science frosh
Thursday noon, Hen. 200.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Organizational meeting
Thursday noon, SUB meeting
room A.
ECONOMICS SOCIETY
Dr. K. Gifford of University
of Queensland speaks on
Wage-Inflation Fallacy,
Thursday, 12:45 p.m., Ang.
212.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting today, noon, Buchanan 205. All members please
attend.
IWW
Meeting Wednesday noon of
Industrial Workers of the
World, SUB TV room to organize students on a Vancouver-wide basis.
SDS
Meeting on democratization
of the university and senate
elections tonight in SUB conversation lounge at 7:30 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Film, The Grapes of Wrath,
on Delano grape workers
strike, noon today, Hebb
theatre.
AQUA SOC
NAUI certified scuba courses
available, come to room 119
in SUB, 7 p.m. tonight.
STUDENT
CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
Father     Gerald     McGuigan
speaks Wednesday noon, Ang.
104 on Reform in the Classroom.
ARTS LECTURE SERIES
Anthropology prof Cyril Bel-
shaw   speaks   Wednesday
noon, Bu. 106 on current issues in anthropology.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
General meeting noon Thursday in SUB room A.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting at International
House rooms 402 and 404,
noon today.
CANOE CLUB
Inaugural meeting noon today, Ang. 110. Plan for
Thompson River trip Thanksgiving weekend.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Meeting Thursday noon,
Ang. 110. New members
come and find out about
membership requirements.
Friday is last day for applications.
NISEI
General meeting Thursday
noon SUB 125. Coke party
after meeting.
ucc
General meet on clubs SUB
policy Thursday noon, Bu.
204.
PRE-MED
Meeting Wednesday noon
Wes. 201. Film "Smoking
and Lung Cancer", problems
of early diagnosis.
FAL
Meeting noon today in SUB
meeting room to discus Day
Nurseries.
NEW DEMOCRATS
General meet noon Wednesday, Bu. 217.
PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE
All girls interested: meeting
Thursday noon, SUB 105. Dr.
Yeo speaks.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
Executive    meeting    Thurs.
noon Bu. 224.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents tor the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-6781.
"UNDERCUT '68" FIRST BIG BASH
in SUB, with 'Hank and the Hobos',
Oct.   11th.   Dress:   hard-times.
.DANCE TO THE FIVE MAN CARGO,
Friday, Oct. 4th, at Place Vanier.
Resident $1.00, non-residents $1.35.
TOMORROW'S EYES — DANCE —
Friday, Oct. 4 — Totem Park — 9
to  1.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST MON. SEPT. 24 ON CAMPUS.
Man's watch. Gold case. No strap.
Reward.  Call  Don  929-1705  after  6.
17,324,025.2 EMPTY BOTTLES OF
various descriptions at "Undercut
'67", owners may claim same at
"Undercut  '68".
LOST: THURSDAY IN SUB, BLACK
wallet — Reward. Please call Cornel
at 435-8844.
LOST LADIES' WATCH ON BEACH
below Fort Camp, Sat. 21st. Phone
Ray  224-9662,  leave message.
Rides & Car Pools
14
FUNSEEKERS: ONE (1) MORE
driver needed for car pool from
Capilano Highlands. Phone Lance
at 987-9902. 	
DRIVERS NEEDED EAST BURN-
aby from Canada Way and Edmonds
8:30's - 5:30's, M-F. Call Gordon,
522-1950.
WANT CARPOOL FROM New Westminster for 9:30's.  Vicki,  584-4763.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VID-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.	
UBC BOWLING CLUB
Mon.   night   league   (mixed).   Meeting
Thurs.,   Oct.   3   in   Henry   Angus   207
at  12:30  p.m.  —  All  Welcome.      	
DIAL - A - DATE
P.O. Box 3348-U
Vancouver 3, B.C.
Send   $1.00   with   your   name,   age,
description,    telephone   number,    likes
and  dislikes,  for our  monthly
'DIAL   -  A  -   DATE"  list
Your name will be on it.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore; at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.  	
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
Wanted Information
17
LARGE REWARD! FOR RETURN
of or information leading to the
return of a purple 10 spd. bicycle
missing from steps of Hennings Bid.
Tues. 24.  RE 8-9423.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
AUTOMOTIVE
18
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 RAMBLER STATION WAGON,
$795. Must sell! 224-0355 after 5:00
p.m. or before 9:00 a.m. 	
'51 FORD CUSTOM V8, USED BY
Widow. Mech. very good. Radio,
tow  hitch,  $150.  733-3626.       	
'53 CHEV, NEW ENGINE; NEW
tires; needs trans- Will sell all or
parts. 435-7301	
1955   CHEV   4-DR.   AUTO.   6.   VERY
good  shape.  $250.  733-7628.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
'56 AUSTIN, RELIABLE, WELL
maintained, mechanically sound, new
brakes, snow tires, for $250. Mike at
922-8441.
VW DELUXE 1959, GOOD MECH.
cond, radio, chains, ski rack. $400.
Phone Bob 261-2440.
1967 FORD FAIRDANE G.T. 390 CU.
in. 4-speed, 31,000 miles, power disc
brakes, white w/red int. Phone
872-2277 or 327-4463.
1966 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE, RED. Excellent condition. Offers or $1,450.00.
327-4364.
TIP TOP COLLISION, 167 PEMBER-
ton, N.V., 988-4613. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Courtesy car. Open
Saturdays.
Motorcycles
26
'65 HONDA 305SS, $295. EXCELLENT
condition.   738-5952.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
THE PAISLEYS LOVE-ROCK MUSIC
and multi-colored Strobic Lightshow
must be heard and seen. For bookings call Paul 731-7301, Love and
Peace.
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6623
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Scandals
37
WHAT WENT ON AT "UNDERCUT
"67"? Come to "Undercut '68" and
find out. Friday, Oct.  11,  SUB.
SEASON OPENER. THE SPY WHO
Came In From The Cold, and The
Deadly Affair. Thurs. and Friday
in Old Auditorium.
INSTRUCTION
Typing
40
FAST   ,   ACCURATE      TYPING      MY
home, 25c per page. Phone 325-6637.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640. 	
TJTING   DONE   AT    HOME.    TERM
papers,  essays,   etc.  Phone  736-0538.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
Help Wanted—Male 52
MEN WANTED TO DELIVER FOOD
orders. Late evening work. Must
have own car. The Friar. 224-0833,
4423 W. 10th.
Male or Female 53
TUTORS REQUIRED, HIGH SCHOOL
Mathematics and Sciences. Minimum: fourth year. 6:30-6:30 p.m.
Phono  736-6923.
Special Classes 63
Tutoring 64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.	
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS, PHY-
sics, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent tutors. Phone 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR STUDENT TELEPHONE
directory. Buy pre-sale tickets for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publica-
tions Office, Brock Hall.	
VARSITY  SPECIALS
Students' desks    from 14.95
New bunk beds   pair 29.50
Book cases  from 8.95
New  252  coil  Hollywood  bed
complete    49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
THE WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING
35 S.L.R. $40. Others $34, $25. Fac-
tory  prices.   Ph.   SID  298-9110.
ONE    COMPLETE    SCUBA    OUTFIT
(6'1"), $150. Phone Brian 876-6980.
PHILIPS TABLE COMB. RADIO-
record player. Best offer. Silvertone
portable record-player $15. Call John
at 733-2469 after 5:00.
MUST SELL FULL LENGTH RED
ladies' suede coat. Size 12. Leaving
for  tropics.  733-1831  after  6:00 p.m.
MUST SELL NEAR-NEW MAJESTIC
portable typewriter, perfect shape.
$40 or best offer. 684-6864 after 6.
BABY GERBILS AVAILABLE THIS
week free! Great pet fun for children or adults. Minimal care required.
Evenings 874-9481.
1963, 1964 and 1965
TOTEMS
(The UBC Yearbook)
25c — To Clear — 25c
Publications, Office Brock
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS   ON   CAMPUS   (M)   224-9662.
2250 Wesbrook,  kitchen privileges.
ACCOMMODATION     AVAIL ABLE
close to UBC. 2 male students. Bed/
breakfast. Phone 224-4294.
LARGE SINGLE ROOM. BREAKFAST
made when food supplied. Ironing.
Mrs. Roberts, 3215 W. 34th. Ph. 261-
2831.  $40 month.	
GIRLS: CALL 228-9127. ROOMS, ONE
single,   one   double.   Share   own   kitchen,    bathroom.    Any    nationality. A
Non-smokers.	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM FOR
male, kitchen privileges. Blenheim
and  21st.  Phone:  733-8702.
TWO   SLEEPING  ROOMS  $45   &  $60. "
Men  or  Women  —   Suits  2  to   3  —
No     restrictions.     Near     Beach     &
U.B.C.   224-3833.	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR SENIOR
student.   Near  University.  224-1754.
ROOM AVAILABLE NEAR CAMPUS.
Full house privileges. Male only.
After 6 p.m. Available Oct. 15.
224-4506.
Room & Board
82
FOR 2 QUIET AND CLEAN MALE
students with Chinese family. Pleasant upstairs rm., 3 meals, $85 per
month. 876-3127 or 568 W.  19th Ave.
ROOM AND BOARD, NEAR BEACH.
Excellent  meals.  736-5030.
RODM AND BREAKFAST-SUPPER.
2466 W. 6th Ave., Van. 9. 733-0984.
$90 per month.	
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
at Phi Delta Theta house. 2120
Wesbrook,   224-9073.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
STUDENTS, 2 TO SHARE HOUSE
with same, vicinity of Cambie &
20th for October 1st. Contact Glen
David or Normand at 2316 Dunbar
after  5:00 p.m.	
PRIVATE FURNISHED BASEMENT
suite to rent. Two male students.
Kitsilano area. Phone 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
or  after  6  p.m.  731-1629.	
WANTED CHRISTIAN GIRL TO
share basement suite. Reasonable.
Call Pauline  at  733-0584.        	
WANTED 4 GIRLS TO SHARE UP-
per half of house with two others
— desks, lamps, cooking facilities,
sitting room, bathroom, semi-private entrance, phone, linen. $43.00
each.  Evenings 733-4476.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
WANTED    SENIOR STUDENT    TO
share   unfurnished apartment  with
two  others.   Phone 263-6180  after  6
p.m.
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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