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The Ubyssey Nov 19, 1981

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Array Cost-cutting criteria leaked
By MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
The secret's out.
The cost-cutting criteria to bail
UBC out of its current fiscal crisis
have been leaked.
The guidelines of the president's
committee on fiscal retrenchment
were published in a graduate student association newsletter Monday.
Programs offered elsewhere in
the province, electives not essential
for a degree, and small classes may
be in danger according to the document. And "How easily these students can find employment after
graduation," is also a factor.
Newsletter editor Liz Hancock
refused to say how they obtained
the document. "I'm curious to see
what the reaction will be," Hancock said Wednesday. "Hopefully
it will be outrage from a student's
point of view."
Criteria being used to determine
cutbacks are:
• The uniqueness of the program within the province and on
campus;
• The efficiency of the program,
with efficiency judged in terms of
cost;
• The appropriate institutional
home for the program . . . e.g., elementary components may go to
community colleges;
• Contribution to society and
economy;
• The appropriate level of financial support for such a program.
The document suggests cancellation of programs if superior programs are available elsewhere. UBC
"should not duplicate if 'minor'
(programs) are available or better
undertaken elsewhere. Retain essential, dispense with fringe," the document recommends for basic educational programs.
"It doesn't phase me," student
board of governors representative
Anthony Dickinson said. "I'm not
surprised. But I would submit that
the subjective criteria are the more
interesting ones," he said.
Dickinson said quality, appropriate level of financing and contribution to society are the major subjective points.
Dickinson said the education policy may be in trouble because of
course duplication. He said they offer programs similar to others on
campus in areas such as psychology
and history, making them an obvious target.
Arts dean Robert Will called the
document "very comprehensive.
No one can quibble with those particular sets of criteria. They are
helpful, but they're no panacea.
I'm sure the committee is thinking
night and day the best they can."
viip  | IDVCCCY
Vol. LXIV, No. 27
Vancouver, B.C. Thursday, November 19,1981      a^fgUMS 228-2301
Feds blamed
Post-secondary education in B.C.
is headed for even rougher financial
times after last week's federal budget, a B.C. student leader said.
"The objective of the federal
budget is to force the provinces to
increase their commitment for properly funded post-secondary education," said B.C. Students Federation deputy chair Rhonda Lavigne.
"There is no guarantee the province will really use their share of the
federal tax increase for this purpose. In fact, this budget is an open
door policy for further provincial
cutbacks," she said.
The budget removed $5.7 billion
from federal funding of various
provincial programs, but added further provincial tax advantages for
the provinces, resulting in a net $1.9
billion shortfall over the next five
years.
Lavigne said if the provincial
government decides to put its extra
tax revenue into projects such as
B.C. Place and Pier B.C., instead
of post-secondary education and
health, education cuts could get
worse.
Currently all post-secondary students in B.C. face a $370 tuition fee
increase because of the federal cuts.
UBC students also can expect an extra 15 per cent increase to conform
to the board of governors' indexed
tuition fee policy.
BCSF executive officer Gordon
Moore said Wednesday that the
failure of AMS executives to inform
UBC students will make UBC "the
last place to lift up its head to resist
the federal cuts."
Moore said the Simon Fraser
Univeristy student council is speaking to classes to inform students of
the issues. "Once students know,
they're pissed off," he said.
UBC has got many resources to
fight the cuts, but student action is
stymied by the "conservatives" in
the AMS, Moore said.
— «rlc aggartaon photo
UNKNOWING STUDENT VICTIM of bad acid trip awakes to find herself dressed in ridiculous terry nightgown
and working as store detective in Bookstore. Woman makes silent appeal to oblivious Brit fingering briefcases.
Man subsequently ran off with case, taking one of the mannequin's hands with him. Fortunately student awoke to
find herself back in Totem park and promised herself never to take illicit drugs ever again.
Records destroyed in freak accident
By AL BANHAM
A power failure Saturday destroyed the
computerized academic records of thousands
of UBC students and graduates.
The accident means students intending to
graduate this year will not receive their official degrees until December, 1982, at the
earliest. Countless additional problems will
also result.
The lost records included marks and
course registration of students currently attending UBC as well as the permanent
records of graduates with degrees granted
after 1972.
"We don't even know what we are missing," said records and registration coordinator Patricia Angus Tuesday. "We will
have to reconstruct and recomputerize
records from hundreds upon thousands
of pieces of paper."
"They (the computer programmers)
guaranteed that such a thing could not happen. We are outraged," said registrar Ken
Young.
"This is the worst disaster that's ever happened at UBC, at any university I've ever
heard of,"-he said.
Meanwhile the university has taken immediate action to initiate record recovery.
The university is requesting students currently registered in a degree program to phone
the registrar's office next week to confirm
their course load and have their permanent
record verified, Angus said.
Special telephone numbers, valid until the
228-3751, N to S 228-6101 and from T to Z
228-2307.
Graduates should phone 224-5857 to confirm their degree with the university.
Associate registrar John Piercy confirmed
the restoration process will take several years.
5f .
CENTRAL COMPUTER . . . power failure
end of November, have been set up.
Students should phone the following
numbers depending on surname: last names
starting with A to D should phone 228-2121;
names   from   E   lo   H   228-3159,   I  to  M
means no student record for thousands
"We have to retrieve current class lists and
final exam results, validate them with individual professors, and have them reentered into the computer system," he said.
UBC's current hiring freeze will slow the
process considerably, said Piercy.
"Since we can't hire more staff, we have
been instructed to close the registrar's office
to students effective Monday," he said.
The office may not re-open until February
and those students who want to make course,
changes for January will have to wait until
then, Piercy said.
Piercy advised that students with business
to conduct with the registrar should try to do
so before Friday afternoon or face the three
month wait.
The records were destroyed during a
routine master file update said Ida Beth
Monroe, the operator on duty when the accident occured.
Monroe said the IBM 370/148-2 computer
stopped processing as it should have when
the power failed-. But when the auxilliary
power generator came on, and the operator
restarted the system, the CPU program status
check light came on.
The power failure reprogrammed the computer memory into a unique pattern of bytes
and load modules that zeroed the disk
records, said Monroe.
Reaction from the university community
varied from shock to astonishment.
See page 3: J.V. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19,1981
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CLASS Thursday, November 19, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Smith slams feds on fees
By JOHN KNOWLES
The federal government is to
blame for the education funding
cuts that will raise tuition fees next
year, provincial education minister
Brian Smith said at Okanagan College Nov. 16.
Next year's federal budget, announced last week, is a gloomy one
for education in B.C., Smith told
college administrators and student
representatives at an informal luncheon.
The budget includes massive reductions in federal subsidies to provincial education and health programs totalling $5.7 billion over the
next five years.
Student union representative
Nobu Ono said Smith claimed to be
surprised by the extent of the funding cuts. "He called it full of bad
news, a gloomy budget," Ono said.
"He said he was expecting bad
news, but not all bad news."
B.C. will face a $100 million cut
in federal subsidies to health and
education that Smith said will result
in a $35 million cut in next year's
education budget.
Ono said Okanagan College
could lose up to $2 million from its
$16 million budget because of the
education cuts.
He added Okanagan College students will feel the cuts most directly
in tuition increases.
Canadian Federation of Students
representative Mike Miller said
Smith told students at the meeting
the province spent approximately
$380 million on post-secondary education this year. But Miller's own
figures, compiled from federal government publications, indicate a
total of $550 million spent on B.C.
education alone.
Both Miller and Ono attributed
the discrepancy to political expediency.
"The whole name of the game is
who's paying," Miller said. "Both
sides are saying they're paying
more. That's the whole battle right
there.
"We know the federal contribution has risen with inflation," Miller said. "So if there's been cutbacks, it's been the province's
fault."
The federal government subsidizes post-secondary education and
health services through Established
Programs Financing, a shared-cost
program of cash transfers and tax
credits negotiated in 1976 to replace
the federal policy of matching provincial spending dollar for dollar.
Miller said cuts in B.C. education
funding have been apparent for at
least the last two years, as the provincial share of education costs has
steadily decreased since 1976.
Ministry staff who accompanied
Smith hinted at fee increases for
Okanagan College. "There were indications from his staff that tuition
fees will be going up," said Miller.
Smith was receptive to suggestions that the colleges and institutes
act be revised to require student
representation on college boards,
giving students voting power on
financial decisions such as college
budgets, Ono said.
The act now forbids student representation on the board.
UBC woken by
activated SAE
While the Alma Mater Society is
having its own sleep-in in response
to funding cutbacks at UBC, the
Students for an Accessible Education are holding an information
forum.
"The importance of fighting tuition fees is that we have to change
the priorities of the federal and provincial governments," said SAE
spokesperson Paul Yaskowich
Wednesday.
Yaskowich said the forum to be
held Thursday, Nov. 26 will feature
guest speakers from the faculty.
James Foulks, Canadian Association of University Teachers president; Hugh Greenwood, board of
governors faculty representative;
and English professor Bruce Grenberg will provide a faculty perspect
ive on funding problems.
"The emphasis for this forum is
going to be on the faculty. This will
provide students an opportunity to
ask SAE questions about other
things," said Yaskowich.
Yaskowich warned if the provincial government forces the university to pay for the shortfall caused
by the federal curtailment of Established Programs Funding, it will set
a dangerous precedent.
"If they set this precedent of
sticking us with the federal shortfall, then you can be sure they'll
continue that tradition in the future
and you'll see a university that is
not accessible," he said
Canadian Federation of Students
spokesperson Mike Miller will also
speak at the forum.
Staff pickets FAS
xfrtfC
craig yuilt photo
WHO KNOWS what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow, that's who. While student pretends to practise
Tai-Chi in front of the music building, his shadow betrays him to be a creeping agent of social change, attempting
to smash the state and overthrow capitalism, freedom and democracy.
EDMONTON (CUP) — Three
staff members of the Federation of
Alberta Students (FAS) picketed
the FAS office at the University of
Alberta, Nov. 10.
Two of the picketers were staff
members protesting their firing at a
FAS executive meeting that day.
The third marched in sympathy
with them and protested against be-
J.V. to trek over capitalistic computer goof
From page 1
Arts dean Robert Will said his
faculty will have all but 10 per cent
of the arts records recovered by the
end of next week.
"It could be the answer to our 10
per cent funding shortfall," Will
enthusiastically added.
UBC chancellor John Valentine
Clyne said, "In my day students
would have held a great trek over
such a computer error."
UBC chaplain George Herman-
son said, "With these kinds of
things, you wonder about the role
of God. Not that God, as in the
UEL to veto en GVRD
University Endowment Land residents exercise their only local voting rights Saturday when they decide who will represent them in the
Greater Vancouver Regional District.
NDP candidate Ray Cantillon, a Vancouver lawyer, is challenging
independent incumbent Iva Mann for UEL GVRD director.
Cantillon is promoting non-profit housing cooperatives in the
UEL, saving 1,300 acres for parkland, rent controls, public disclosure of development proposals and access to the Vancouver Public
Library System for UEL residents.
Mann said Monday she has "a good feeling" about how students
react to her as GVRD director. She said her duties as GVRD
representative include participating in many committees.
The GVRD has produced 1,092 non-proft rental units over the last
year, she added.
Cantillon said he fears students may lose their right to vote in a
proposed UEL municipality.
biblical sense, is real in any way."
Student board of governors reps
Chris Niwinski and Anthony
Dickinson said it is too bad they
couldn't have lost their track record
on the board.
"That comment was off the
record by the way," said Dickinson. "Get it? Off the record. It's a
joke."
"It could have been much-
worse," said Niwinski. "They could
have wiped out everything after
1965. I'm fully prepared to accept
the loss of all records aftei 1972."
Al Soroka, spokesperson for the
UBC committee against racist and
fascist violence, denounced the occurrence, denounced the university
and denounced the computer's
manufacturer, International
Business Machines.
"Computers are a tool of the imperialist capitalist system. This accident is just another example of the
collapse of the capitalist system."
Polish trade union leader Lech
Walesa, in town for secret meetings
with   the   Communist   Party   of
Canada, said Monday, "I only
thought such incompetence could
happen in the Soviet Union or the
Polish Communist Party. I see
Soviet-style incompetency
spreading all over the world."
In Victoria, Universities Minister
and future UBC president Pat
McGeer said students and
"alumni" would just have to start
again.
"I suggest they take full advantage of our dynamic new KNOW
program," he urged. "Television is
the educational medium of the 80s
and the sooner people realized that,
the sooner we can quit wasting all
that money on professors and campus buildings.
"Metaphorically speaking, I am
digging a finger into my hand in
anguish over the matter. Do you
know how much, this accident will
cost?1' asked administration president Doug Kenny.
"That's right Doug," added
vice   president   Michael  Shaw.
"I agree Mike," said Alma Mater
Society president Marlea Haugen.
ing locked out of the FAS office.
Southern Alberta fieldworker
Steve Howard and researcher Percy Toop claimed their dismissals
were unjust.
"It is our opinion that our rights,
as outlined and protected by the
collective agreement, have been
violated, and in fact we were
wrongfully dismissed by the FAS
executive," said Howard.
"Subsequent legal advice has
substantiated our position," he
said.
FAS president Lorraine Mitchell
would riot comment on why the two
workers were fired.
"The position of the executive on
that is that we can't disclose that information." Hiring and firing are
traditionally confidential, she said.
She said workers have channels
for complaining about unfair treatment.
The two workers also withheld
comment on the reasons for their
firing.
' 'We feel that any such discussion
at this time could have a divisive impact on the federation, and we
would like to avoid this at all costs,
even though such discussion would
lend support to our position," said
Toop.
Mitchell said the FAS executive
met in closed session Nov. 10 and
decided to accept a staff evaluation
report recommending Toop and
Howard be fired, but that the third
picketer, Matt Shaughnessy, be
kept on as Northern Alberta
fieldworker. Page 4
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19,1981
.     "OPEN SEASON
•XiJf r~ 3 .•
BA, A CruUfNt1 OR TJCs'
On "ttReflfi rimit U>i\r£n„rry!
NO LIMIT ..x
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■wCtKCr   Kacrr^Kal-f
! )y>yyy ■<■■
Of course Pat, as I told the bankers, show compassion
as you're picking them off.
THE UBYSSEY
November 19, 1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
"This is great," said Verne McDonald as he poured champagne for former graduates Arnold Hedstrom, Kathy Ford and Craig Brooks. "All I have to do is
phone the registrar's office and tell them I have a degree to get one." Glen Sanford exclaimed, "Maybe Eric Eggertson, Julie Wheelwright, Nancy Campbell
and myself could get degrees that easy too." Meanwhile Lawrence Kootnikoff and Mark Leiren-Young complained to Dirk Sion and Muriel Draaisma that the
university had really screwed them this time, losing all their first class marks. Craig Yuill told Pat Chow they should have used a photographic process instead of
a crumby computer. Fred Banning and John Boyle agreed as they reached for the phone to call the registrar's office. "Gullible idiots," muttered Al Banham.
"The story was fake."
University won't pay
What goes first?
For the first time in their cloak and dagger existence, the retrenchment
committee's tight security has been broached.
Do you think your courses are valuable? Chances are, somebody else
doesn't. Check out the committee's complicated criteria for cutbacks.
Look at terms such as "viability and enrolment." That means looking at
how many students apply to a program and how many of them get jobs
afterwards. Strange, didn't they just finish explaining how universities
aren't technical schools? But these days everything needs to be justified.
Justification is the key. Maybe your course can be justified by its "contribution to society . . . expanded knowledge," or, "an improvement in
quality of life." But considering the emphasis on dollars and cents you
have to wonder what emphasis actually is placed on "expanded
knowledge." After all, how do you justify knowledge on a calculator?
Examine the strange philosophical questions the retrenchment committee wants to answer. When they say, "dispense with fringe," what is fringe? And what is quality? And why is efficiency measured by cash
registers? The document covers every angle but the recurring theme is
money. Courses need to be justified.
There's another tough question posed by the criteria. How the hell does
UBC expect community colleges and other universities to pick up our
slack. And why should UBC cease to be a comprehensive university? What
fiscal justification can there be for forcing students to forfeit their UBC
education in favor of a trip to Victoria or Nelson or a community college?
Maybe we should just hope a course will willingly commit hara kiri and
save us all.
Maybe the chemistry department will blow itself up for the insurance
money. A doubtful solution, but then we won't have to justify anything.
Will love conquer?
Love just might conquer all.
The Ubyssey staff could not help but be taken back when arts dean
Robert Will told us "I love you people; you just misunderstand me."
We cannot possibly plead innocent, for misunderstanding is the inevitable, unfortunate result when newspapers seek some sort of truth in
the thicket of information and misinformation that so often entangles us.
And we would like to tell dean Will that we love him as well, because we
appreciate that honest expressions of love are all too rare in our society.
With new found tenderness, we apologize for so stridently demanding
Will's resignation for the past several years.
Perhaps Will and The Ubyssey will come to a better understanding after
this mutual exchange of frank affection. In the meanwhile, we think it best,
for all our sakes, that Will resign as dean.
By MIKE BURKE
On Thursday, Nov. 12 negotiations between the Teaching Assistants' Union and the university
reached an impasse. Among the issues yet to be resolved are wages,
union security, and quality of education.
The controversy over these issues
is relevant to the university community as a whole in that it clarifies
the administration's position on a
number of educational principles.
ment opportunities of foreign students.
It appears that everyone in the
university community, save the
members of the administration's
bargaining committee, recognizes
the financial crisis faced by graduate students. In The Ubyssey Oct.
27, 1981 Roy Nodwell, head of the
physics department, was quoted as
saying: "One of the problems is
graduate students rely on TA income for graduate education ... I
perspectives
In order to maintain a viable
graduate program, TAs must be
given an adequate wage. If TA
wages do not keep pace with the increase in costs, the administration
will encounter difficulty in attracting new students to UBC and current students will experience financial hardship.
According to information supplied by the university, the costs of
attending graduate school have
risen 25 per cent in the past year.
Despite this development, the university has offered TAs a 14.2 per
cent increase in wages, and markers
a 13.7 per cent increase.
The faculty of graduate studies
estimates that, for a first-year graduate student, the costs of attending
UBC in 1981-82 are $9,490. The
maximum TA wage offered by the
university is $5,835 — an amount
which is $3,655 below costs.
In other words, TAs and markers
are being offered an amount of
money which the university itself
admits is far below a decent living
wage.
As a method of financing their
educational career, many people in
the bargaining unit rely exclusively
on the TA wage. Income from other
sources is by no means assured: few
scholarships are available; last year,
only 52 per cent of applicants were
awarded a summer stipend; there
are legal constraints on the employ-
don't know how some survive on
that amount of money."
At present, approximately two
per cent of the university's operating budget is devoted to paying the
wages of some 1,000 TAs and
markers. To substantially increase
these wages would entail little additional cost.
The university has the ability but
not the will to pay. The administration is not prepared to bear the relatively insignificant cost of maintaining a viable graduate program.
The dispute over wages also involves the principle of equal pay for
work of equal value. There are now
four categories of employees: Graduate Teaching Assistant-1 (Ph.D.
students); Graduate Teaching Assistants (M.A. students); Undergraduate Teaching Assistant; and
Marker. The discrepancy in wages
among these categories is enormous
— Ph.D. students receive the maximum wage, markers the minimum.
But since the job description of
all TA positions is exactly the same,
there is no reason to have three distinct TA classifications. In evaluating assignments and essays, markers
have an important responsibility
which should not be underestimated.
The TA union wishes to reduce
the wage disparities among all classifications; the university seems
committed to preserving substantial
discrepancies. In effect, the administration is questioning the value of
work performed by M.A. students,
undergraduates, and markers.
Underlying the demand for union
security is the belief that TAs and
markers would benefit from an organization that is effectively able to
speak on their behalf. Otner campus employees have organized unions; the faculty has formed an association; students have created
various organizations to deal with
their concerns. The purpose of the
TA union is to protect the interests
of student employees.
A union security clause would
maximize the effectiveness of the
TA union. The annual turnover rate
of TAs and markers at UBC is approximately 50 per cent. Due to the
influx of new employees to the bargaining unit, the union must launch
a massive membership drive at the
beginning of each academic year.
This annual campaign to sign
new employees requires a great deal
of effort and strains the limited resources of the union. A security
clause would eliminate the need for
such a campaign, free these resources, and allow the union to concentrate solely on serving the interests of TAs and markers.
The TA union's security proposal
states that employees who are not
members of the union have the option, within 30 days of the ratification date or employment date, of either joining the union or completing a membership exemption card.
Since joining the union is optional,
the proposal protects the freedom
of choice of TAs and markers.
The proposal also states that employees who fail to exercise their
option within the specified period
would have to complete the requirements of union membership. This
latter clause simply places the burden of decision on employees who
do not wish to join the union. By
facilitating the participation of employees in the affairs of the union,
the security proposal would increase the representativeness of the
union.
..AND I'M HA/WTO &P0RTW7HE
jmjuy 7m ya* PROPOSALS/WINS
TO LVWISAlAa INCREASES, TENURE,
i m? PrVmnoHsmps&mintMosr
CflRBFU. OONStPBtAMON 0/ THE
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a oium system for isrmeRADEs
DID NOTSTRIKe US AS A TFRRJBLY
PRACTICAL, NOT10SAY EQUITABLE,
SOUmON TO THE PROBLEM.
WBOAFPALSOSHrVWmCONCWI
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imichmw adversely affect career
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OUR PROPOSAL MI6HTBEABTT
TO ABOLISH DEMORALIZING
"A's'? F0R.THB STUDENTS.
The university's negotiators are
antagonistic to the notion of union
security. They demand that the union hold a membership drive and at
the same time wish to place insurmountable obstacles in the way of a
successful drive. They are determined to weaken the organization
which seeks to promote the interests
of TAs and markers.
In the past two months, university administrators have taken every
opportunity to reaffirm publicly
their commitment to quality of education.
Given these pronouncements, it is
surprising to learn that the TA un-
• ion has had difficulty in gaining acceptance of its quality of education
proposal. The university has dismissed a clause which recognizes
that "teaching assistants have an interest in providing educational services to their students that are of
high standard and value."
And, the university has rejected
the union's offer to cooperate "in
maintaining and improving the
quality of education rendered by
teaching assistants."
The TA union's contract proposals are fair and reasonable. The
principles for which the union
stands should be applauded. But
the university rejects these proposals and refuses to acknowledge
these principles. The university's
questionable attitude has led to the
impasse in negotiations.
Mike Burke is a political science
graduate student and member of
the UBC Teaching Assistants Union. Perspectives is a column of opinion, humor, analysis and creative
energy open to any member of the
university community. All submissions must bear the author's name
and student identification. Thursday, November 19,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
To survive, students must fight against cuts
Your career as a student may be
finished. Tuition fees are increasing, summer jobs are becoming
more scarce and funding cutbacks
are eroding some of our classes. Are
you willing to fade into the annals
of history? Yet another extinct species left in the wake of Progress.
Our "progressive economy" is regressing rapidly, our leaders are telling us to "sit back and take it,"
everything will work out in the end.
Student polititions will even make
such "insignificant statements" as
tuition increases are "non-issue."
Let us study for a moment the
characteristics of this particular
non-issue (escalating tuition) and
see if it can provide a guideline to
determine what is an issue. This
particular "non-issue" consists of
at least a 60 per cent tuition increase, according to provincial
finance minister Hugh Curtis, for
next year. In real terms this
translates into an increase in excess
of $400 for the average science student, in addition to the current fee
of about $690 (depending on what
year one is in). This does not include the Alma Mater Society or
undergrad fees. Consider also that
science is by no means the most
costly as far as tuition is concerned.
At this point we have shown one
aspect of a non-issue; it contributes
to the student's financial burden. Is
this contribution merely an annoyance or is it a handicap? According   to   the   student   counselling
resources centre the average income
for students last summer was less
than $4000. With this amount
students must cover their university
expenses; $350 to $700 on textbooks
and supplies, and living expenses of
at least $350 per month (including
everything from a movie to room
and board). Upon addition of the
above figures it becomes apparent
that this non-issue adds up to quite
a handicap.
Paradoxically, the assertion that
student accesibility is a non-issue is
incorrect! It is an issue of paramount importance. Tuition fees,
government cutbacks and housing
costs are relevant. In order to survive we must fight back. The question; how? Can the problem be
Scientists can 9t built bridges on faith
I'd like to say a few things about
Andrew Labun's attempted rejoinder to Gary Marchant's
Perspectives article. I would agree
that any suggestion that all Christians want to form indoctrination
schools was unfortunate, and even
antithetical to the message of Mar-
chant's article, as I understood it.
The point is that the Moral Majority and its Scientific Creationist wing
are parading their fundamentalist
views under the guise of "Christianity" when, in fact, any real
Christian should be ashamed to be
associated with them.
Unfortunately, Labun isn't
satisfied with this justified criticism.
He feels it necessary to offer his
own views on the evolution-creation
controversy. Since he's commenting
on my discipline, let me try to give
an explanation of the problem in
terms of his — that is, with respect
to a situation one could encounter
in engineering.
If someone proposed the construction of a bridge supported by
forces absolutely unknown to
Newtonian mechanics, would
Labun consider it a reasonable
engineering alternative?
If that someone made the further
proposition that the bridge was in
fact to be supported by
undemonstrable forces whose existence had to be accepted on faith,
would Labun accept that as a
realistic argument?
If that someone insisted that all
present bridges were structurally
flawed, that the new bridge was better, that its method of construction
should be taught in engineering
classes forthwith, and that anyone
opposed to its teaching was
dogmatic and narrow-minded —
would Labun consider that someone to be demonstrating rational
thought?
I hope his answer would in all
Frunch
lessons*
Frunch-as in Friday
lunch. 15 classic burgers,
tons of other great stuff.
Intriguing starts, fabulous
desserts. 11:30 on-7 days a
week. Yum. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
three cases be "No." He would,
most likely, invite the renegade
engineer to actually build the bridge
and empirically demonstrate its
superiority. In other words, he
would want to test the new idea
before deciding to accept it or reject
it — let alone teach it.
The point is this: in engineering,
as in biology, as in any science, it's
very easy to come up with new
ideas. It's not even that hard to
criticize many of the existing ones.
But until you're willing to submit
your brainchild to objective testing
of its inner consistencies and its explanatory and predictive power,
and until you're willing to accept
the results of those tests whichever
way they go, you can't call yourself
a scientist. The Scientific Creationists are not scientists because
while they freely espouse alternative
explanations for the observed order
in nature, and merrily attack neo-
Darwinism as if it were the theory
of evolution (with a strange mixture
of justified and spurious criticisms),
they will not examine their own
views critically, or ask whether they
are testable.
The idea of a supernatural
creator is not scientifically inadmissible a priori. If somebody could
offer empirical evidence for the existence of such a being, evidence
that could not be interpreted in any
other way, then I, for one, would be
impressed. But if I am asked to suspend critical judgement and accept
the assertion on faith alone, or on
the basis of an appeal to my sense
of egalitarianism or Christianity,
then I'm sorry, but that's nbt good
enough. I will not accept as scientific (or rational) any teaching that
tells me nature is an inextricable
mixture of natural and supernatural
events. Such a view leads to an arbitrary definition of the "investigative barrier" between secon
dary and primary causes ("The problem's too hard? Don't worry, it
must be supernatural."; "That's
enough, son, you've looked long
enough.").
The Scientific Creationists also
like to claim that the theory of
evolution is a religion, based on
faith. Lest anyone criticize me on
these grounds, let me admit now
that aspects of rational thought (of
which science is one example) are
based on faith: a faith in reason,
and the elucidating power of critical
argument. Unfortunately, this approach only works if everyone plays
by the rules.
Finally, to avoid being accused of
neglecting Labun's examples of the
grave weaknesses of evolutionary
theory, I offer the following.
1) Lack of transitional forms —
yes, neo-Darwinism certainly has
problems with that one, doesn't it?
(I suggest a reading of Waddington
and Lovtrup, among others). 2)
Frequent inversion of the fossil sequence — geological catastrophism
is a thoroughly acceptable
phenomenon. 3) Tacit denial of the
Second Law of Thermodynamics —
examine the basis tenets of
biophysics and organismic biology
before swallowing this plum.
Richard O'Grady
grad. studies
zoology
Book bucks bad
It seems incongruous that $6
million bookstores should occur
simultaneously with tuition increases and reduction of
teaching assistant staff. The
university should spend less on
road widening and leaf raking by
the physical plant; not less on
education quality.
Judy Thomas
forestry I
solved from within the society or
must we take action from without?
Consider for a moment the latter,
change from outside the political
system. Quite simply revolution,
armed insurrection. I suppose administration president Doug Kenny,
Bill Bennett or even Pierre Trudeau
would listen to us if we arrived on
their doorsteps carrying guns and
clubs, the People's Vanguard! In
reality such fringe group mentalities
are ridiculous and ineffectual, not
to mention bloody destructive. Our
society may not be perfect, but armed insurrection is not the answer.
Rather we must work together in a
pluralistic sense. In our fight
against tuition increases and for an
accesible education we cannot allow
"splinter groups" to form.
There is now one organization,
Students for an Accesible Education (SAE) that is working hard and
fighting the real issue of accesibility. This group is totally
autonomous with no political affiliations, be it local UBC political
bodies or other political groups.
SAE is a diverse group, with
members from many faculties including arts, applied and pure
sciences. SAE are students with a
common goal; an accesible education. The issue of tuition increases
cannot be tossed aside as a "non-
issue," nor can you claim to be
apolitical. Both are fallacies inherent in your very presence at this institution.
Charles R. Menzies
SAE member
science rep. on student council
Racism is not good
The Committee Against Racist
and Fascist Violence has now been
constituted and is beginning a
regular program of activities. We
call on all students, faculty and
staff who are against racist and
fascist violence and against the war
preparations of the two superpowers to unite with us.
The two superpowers, the United
States and the Soviet Union, are
building up their arsenals of
weaponry, launching aggressive
wars against many peoples and
countries, and preparing a world
war to settle which superpower will-
dominate the world. The threat of
war involving the direct participation of the Canadian people is a
very real danger. The Canadian
state is deeply involved in the
preparation of a war on behalf of
the interests of U.S. imperialism
and the Canadian bourgeoisie. Imperialist world war, however, is not
an inevitable, natural calamity. It is
a calamity being prepared in a
systematic way by a small class of
billionaires who are striving to
-dominate world markets and make
maximum profits.
The issue is: what are the Canadian women, youth and working
class to do in the face of the
popularization and increase of the
armed forces, the step-up of arms
production, and the spread of war
hysteria? What are the people to do
in the face of racist and fascist
violence which is being stepped up
by the state as part of their preparation for war? The answer is that the
people must rise up and fight
against the warmongers, the racists
and fascists.
Every serious person is urged to
attend this series of forums and
others we will hold.
Garnet Colly
UBC Committee Against Racist
and Fascist Violence
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run for
election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE - SEVENTEEN students (five at-large
and one from eech faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00p.m. on Tuesday, December 22, 1981.
SOUTHERN
COMFDRT
Its special taste
made it famous. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19,1981
Tween Classes
]
TODAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Policy and leaner; commit*** meeting on the federal budget and implications for students, noon,
SUB 117.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., Buch. 206.
T0ASTMASTER8
Election night, 7:30 p.m.. Forestry 278.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Dr. P. Suefeld will ipeak about grad school re-
quirementa, noon, Buch. 100.
CLASSICS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 2225.
DEBSOC
Supermouth '81: Ombudsoffice vs. Debooc on
Does UBC treat us all like, shit?, noon, SUB 215.
Meeting for sll thoee attending the university cup
on Saturday, Nov. 21, important, 1:30 p.m.,
SUB 215.
AMNESTY UBC
Group meeting, noon, SUB 115.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Ms. J. Voris speeks on dental hygiene, noon.
Woodward IIRCI 1.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Maraist literature and discussion, noon, SUB
plaza.
Fifth in series of classes on The revolution betrayed, 7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
ISMAIL STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Jamat Khana ceremoniee delineated in simple
terminology, noon, SUB 119.
CITR
Cross Currents: A look at environmental and
consumer issues. 3 p.m., cable fm 100.
Thunderbird Report: Phil Keener highlights the
WIFL final between UBC and the University of
Alberta, and other sports action, 5 p.m., cable
fm 100.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting end information on UBC open
chess tournament, noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB 213.
IVCF
Campbefl Henderson speaks on Fsith and work,
noon, Chem. 260.
CSA
Prof. Overmyer speeks on Optimism and hope in
Chinese thought, noon, Buch. 104.
UBC SOCREDS
General meeting to discuss resolutions for convention, noon. SUB 208.
EIG
Slide preeentetion on B.C. Hydro's next pro-
poeed dam, site C on Peece River, noon, Buch.
221.
GAY UBC
General meeting, Margo Dunn speaks on
Women's culture and literature, noon, SUB
207/209.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Panel diecussion: Women in law, noon. Law
157.
CAMPU8 CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Panel  diecussion:   Shering  Christ  with  your
friends, noon, SUB 111.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
General meeting, noon, St. Mark's muaic room.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec   volleybell   drop-in,   7:30   p.m..   War
Memorial gym.
WARGAMERS
General meetings, all members attend, noon,
SUB 218.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer meeting, noon, SUB 113.
TA UNION
Membership vote on UBC's final contract offer
~ extremely important, noon, Grad Centre bedroom.
CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Biology 2449.
FRIDAY
FROSH
Badminton open to all first year students, 4:30
p.m., Osborne gym A.
LEON AND THEA KOERNER LECTURES
Stanley J. Kahrl, Ohio State University, speaks
on Bringing the pest to life, noon, Buch. 106.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Film excursion to Les Enfants Du Pardis, more
information at meeting, 7:10 p.m., meet in front
of Voncouver East Cinema.
French conversation hour, noon. International
House mein lounge.
VOLUNTEER CENTRE
Anyone who wants to be a volunteer phone
228-3811 between 12 noon and 2:30 p.m. for
plsoement time.
CITR
Dateline International: north-south dialogue whh
Internetionel Youth Assembly, emphasis on Can-
cun conference, 3 p.m., cable fm 100.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Senator Ray Perrault, leeder of the government
in senate, will speak, noon, SUB 207.
HISTORY ASSOCIATION
Organizational meeting, noon, Buch. 203.
CONTEMPORARY ART SOCIETY
OF VANCOUVER
New York Tunes art commentator Grace Gtveck
speaka on Fresh talent and new buyers brighten
the art world, 8 p.m., Vancouver Art Gallery.
MUSUM STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Muslim Junta (Friday prayers), all Muslims requested to attend, noon, International Houae
lower lounge.
BSA
General meeting, logo contest results, new
members welcome, noon, IRC B76.
[
Hot I
Liberal Bay's
working for you
Dazed Skeletal shapes running
naked in the streets; deathly
visages of decay; floating spheres
of fragmented thought; insanity inside and outside of a fragile egg.
These are all images concocted
by an idiot, a derailment of reality.
In other words, nothing. Just like
the Liberal party. Well, sort of.
Senator Ray Perrault has different ideas and he will expound on
them on Friday, noon, in SUB 207.
The UBC Student Liberals (who are
challenging everybody to give them
a shake — strange people) are thrilled about themselves at having the
leader of the government in the
senate come to UBC and so is
everyone else.
We don't know what he will be
talking about, but he will hopefully
mention his government's $2 billion
withdrawal from post-secondary
education and health.
Maybe Senator Ray can explain
why you may have to pay almost
$500 more in tuition next year,
without the student loan ceilings
being raised. Show up if you are
concerned.
Now to dig a hole.
^Oljttart     HAIRSTYLING
25% OFF
BODY WAVES .      •  COLOURS
•  PERMS        •  HENNAS
WITH PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
(EXPIRES DEC. 23)
2691 WEST BROADWAY
VANCOUVER, B.C.    V6K 2G2
PHONE: 738-8011
STREAKS
I
TA UNION
Special general meeting to accept
or reject UBC's final contract offer — Today (Thursday) at 12:30
in the Graduate Centre Ballroom.
Members only. Memberships
available at the door.
Please Attend
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Weekend retreat theme: How doea religion affect our lives st school and work?, call 224-3311,
Rosemary Heights, White Rock.
WARGAMERS
Bzzr, games night, 7 p.m. to midnight, SUB 212,
212a.
EIG
Video showing: Hunger and Urban Growth and
Land Use, noon, Library Processing centre, third
floor.
SATURDAY
CSA
Pleete bring racquet* end balls, 7:30 to 9:30
p.m.. Armory.
CITR
Making Waveel Joe March looks into funding
problems at the university, 4:30 p.m.,.cable fm
100.
Behind Four Wads: Fraternity houses as a housing alternative by Jane Kokan, 3 p.m., cable fm
100.
Thunderbird Football: Play-by-play coverage of
WIFL cancelled since 'Birds lost last weekend.
CHESS CLUB
UBC open chess tournament, registration at 9
a.m., Angus 425 and 421. Further information at
Thursday's meeting.
INTRAMURALS
Men's Buchanan badminton tournament, round
2, no time given, Osborne centre gyms A and B.
SUNDAY
CHESS CLUB
UBC open chess tournament, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.,
Angus 425 and 421.
CITR
Laughing Matters: Jerry Eberts snd Joe March
take a lighter look st addiction featuring the Neu-
trina Brothers, Marty Feldman, Dudley Moore
and Peter Cook, 4:30 p.m., cable fm 100.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Underwater hockey (surprise!!, 10 p.m.. Aquatic
centre.
MONDAY
CVC
Roller skating party, 8 to 8 p.m., North Van Stardust. All tickets sold in advance at SUB 216a.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec badminton, drop in for a great time, 7:30
p.m., Osborne gyms A and B.
CITR
Making Waves, Joe March looks into saving the
CPR roundhouse from the imperialist Socreds
buiding B.C. Place.
Offbeat, a comic roundup of the week's off-
beet news.
Merting Pot, Mike Mines talks to UBC professor
of landacape architecture Doug Patterson, about
Vancouver's cultural landscape.
TUESDAY
ADVENTI8T CHRISTIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
Diacuasion on I Corinthians — basic Christian
principles applied to daily lives. Everyone is welcome.
WEDNESDAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Need a partner for badminton, squash, swimming or jogging? Regieter, noon, SUB 215.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture by Tsnnis MscBeth Williams on Some
effects of television, noon, Buchanan 100.
VOC
General meeting and slide show, noon. Chemistry 206.
Peruvian
midgets.
Yes, these fidgety little
rascals are terrified when
they see the size of our
monstrous burgers. 15 classic
burgers. And other great
stuff. 2966 W. 4th Ave. by
Bayswater. Open daily
from 11:30a.m. Opening soon
in Lima, fl '>ui nnnlini
mux (iRAXDlii.
SAY YES TO THE POLICIES YOU WANT
ELECT
RAY CANTILLON
GVRD DIRECTOR
Saturday, November 21, 1981
8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
U-HILL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
5943 Chancellor Boulevard
NEED A RIDE? CALL: 224-7921
PAID FOR BY THE UEL-NDP
Rice
Water
▼      T   CANADA
rice
aterhouse
CANADA
Accounting students interested
in applying for summer employment in our Vancouver, Burnaby
and Kamloops offices should
forward their U.C.P.A. forms to
the Canada Employment Centre
on campus, Room 214 Brock
Hall, by December 15, 1981.
Interviews will be held in our
Vancouver office prior to
January 15, 1982.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
C-wwi¥i#f-GW — 3 HnM, 1 -dtey #3.C3? ttckfltloraf Hum
adrniee. D—tmeis 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Boom 241, S.U.B.. UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2AS
5 — Coming Events
60 — Rides
PHILLIP HEWETT
B.A., M.A. IOxon.1, S.T.D.
"CREATION, CREATIONISM
and CREATIVITY"
A UNITARIAN APPROACH
10:30 a.m., Sunday,
November 22
UNITARIAN CHURCH
OF VANCOUVER
West 49th at Oak St.
66 — Scandals
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11 - Fpr Sale - Private	
LEAVING COUNTRY. Must sell urgently,
Pontiac s/w, good condition $850; Norco
10-speed, new $350; portable stereo
recorder (Pioneer) $225; new men's ski
jacket, only $55 ($100 if n#w). Call Robert,
228-0753.
CALCULATOR HP33E still under guarantee,
no defects. Best offer accepted. 228-0410
evenings.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
ROOM AND BOARD available immediately.
Psi Upsilon Fraternity House, 2260
Wesbrook Mall. Ask for Rick Grey or
Steve, 224-1421, 228-8943.
25 — Instruction
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hairstyl-
ing. Student hairstyle, $8. Body wave, $15
to $25. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
30 — Jobs
WE CAN HELP supplement your income.
Mature, responsible housesitters needed
for the North Shore. References essential.
Please phone 922-6435 or 926-2519 for further information.
DEPENDABLE, confident students to handle
Imported Giftware. Commission basis with
bonus. Interested please phone 270-7884
for details.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factuTns, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
7
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.I.
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. Close to
campus. 266-5053.
ESSAYS, THESES. MANUSCRIPTS, including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
ESSAYS, Theses, Manuscripts, Resumes.
Fast, professional typing. Phone Lisa,
873-2823 and request our student rate.
SPECIALIZING in academic typing. Fast,
dependable, top refs. North Vancouver.
Iona Brown, 985-4929.
35 - Lost
90 — Wanted
40 — Messages
PLEASE LEAVE my friends alone. You are
upsetting me. The Goddess. Plants Rule.
INVESTOR DESIRES to meet electrical
engineer on revolutionary concept to form
company. Mr. Pelman, 669 7848.
50 — Rentals
99 — Miscellaneous Thursday, November 19,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Remembrance Day evokes eternal questions
"Let the dead bury the dead."
North American society ignores
death as Margaret Mead so
graphically illustrates this point.
Life is celebrated in births and marriages but the inevitability of
ultimate death is avoided. Death,
though interesting in its morbidity
as a topic, is too great a reminder of
our short existence to be dealt with
often. Funerals become infrequent
ocassions that are pushed aside.
The dichotomy in the appreciation
of death is the appreciation of life.
For most of us this is a singularly
personal revelation.
However, one day of the year has
been set aside for the recognition of
those who died in the two world
wars — Nov. 11. The "ipso facto"
reservation of a day for
rememberance says much about the
human response to war.
Remembrance Day ceremonies
tend to emphasize two things: the
respect for those who died in war
and the hope that war on such a
scale will not be repeated.
Every year in early November
veterans appear in shopping malls
and supermarkets. In exchange for
a donation they give out symbolic
poppies. Upon these a certain
respect is bestowed due to the right
of experience — a rare case of
acknowledging the elderly in North
America. And more important, in
my view, is that the services of a
lifetime to society be repaid with
this respect and its associated
privileges.
History is also worth remembering. Not only who these people
were, but what they fought for and
why they fought should be
remembered. As every grammar
school student learns, history
repeats itself. After two lessons on
the effects of all out war, a third
should be prevented by examination
of the causes and developments of
the first two. An oversimplified approach such as this fails to understand the complexity of war. Even
so, the injurious effects of such
rapid change and carnage of
humanity serves as a reminder of a
world situation to be kept at bay.
After remembering death and
war we contemplate peace. The promise and continuance of peace, may
not be the complete eradication of
aggression, but at least some degree
of global harmony, is a state that is
universally thought desirable. This
fragile condition continues to be
difficult to maintain. In fact a state
of war is the more common situation. The last nearly 40 years have
been a comparitive if not unusual
period of calm. Hence, the fear and
expectation of another world war as
if it were an ice age that returns with
circular regularity. With the advent
of nuclear weapons a feeling of
helplessness has occurred. Apathy
r
Intrasports
WOMEN'S SUPERSTARS
The Forestry "C" team of K.
Kerr and M. Teevan tied with the
Kappa Kappa Gamma "A" team of
T. Wei and D. Sinclair for the
championship. Recreation was
third.
BASKETBALL
Women's standings at the end of
the second short league have
Forestry leading division I while
Agriculture leads division 11. In first
round playoff action Education
taught Commerce a lesson beating
them 24-22 in division I, while in
division II Phs. Ed took Sciences
46-20 and Engineers beat Forestry
19-8. Finals in both divisions are
Dec. 1.
In division I men's play, Law remained undefeated downing Kappa
Sigma 44-42 in a barn-burner.
has been one response to nuclear
power. It is reasoned that a nuclear
war would be so quick and so
thorough that little could be done
to stop it, if that type of war happened   and   if   it   is   inevitable.
What do we remember every
Nov. 11? The survival of peace?
The death of people? The threat of
war? The production of memorials
like Galiipoli, Soldier of Orange,
and Apocalypse Now are very appropriate for a contemporary examination of war. After the participants of both world wars have
died what will happen to the spirit
of Remembrance Day? I fear that
this opportunity to think about
these valid and existentially problematic questions will go unheard
in the 60 seconds of silence.
Sarah Collings
art history 3
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NOW YOU'RE 19.
NOW YOU
HAVE A CHOKE
IN TOMORROW
F
•••
... you're on the Provincial Voter's List.
To have the right to choose,
you have to register to vote.
It's easy Just contact your nearest
Registrar of Voters or Government Agent.
But don't put it oft. Do it today.
And have a choice in tomorrow.
REGISTER
Province of Chief Electoral
British Columbia   Office
Queens University at Kingston
Master of
Business
Administration
Queen's University at Kingston offers a modern,
discipline-based approach to the study of management in
the complex organizations of today and tomorrow. The
learning atmosphere in the School of Business is lively,
informal, intimate and flexible. Persons from almost all
academic programs will find MBA studies rewarding.
Financial assistance is available.
Professor W.E. Miklas
Chairman, MBA Program
School of Business, Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Please send information concerning Queen's MBA to
Name Graduating Year
Street 	
City
Province
University
Program
HI YOUR READDJG?
FINALS START IN 4 WEEKS!
WORRIED ABOUT ALL THE READING YOU HAVEN'T DONE? Finals are
four weeks away, and this is your last chance!
CALL EVELYN WOOD TODAY AT 985-9594 FOR INFORMATION ON HER
SPECIAL STUDENT'S COURSE. It's guaranteed to triple your effective
reading speed before finals — or refund your tuition!
THIS IS THE SAME SPEED-READING COURSE YOU'VE SEEN ON
TELEVISION, the one JFK made his White House staff take, the one that
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WORRIED ABOUT FINALS? Call Evelyn Wood! Learn how you can do an
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CALL 985-9594 TODAY — BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE!
Call Evelyn Wood for information on the special
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Hurry! Enrollment is limited!
E3 Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics
985-9594 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19,1981
ma:
UD-C90
CS508
k*i»s»»*i***»«*#fc*i:
iff"
Y
The CS508 features Dual Vario-belt drive
which assures a high degree of speed, accuracy and absence of drive system vibration. Semi-automatic with ULM tonearm and
comes with ULM 52 cartridge.
|90-minute
premium-
quality blank
cassette tape
allows clear
I wide-range
I recording
I with low
(distribution.
[88
reach.
Record Cleaning System
M0 m i      The Discwasher ]
%JF#*9W  WW%M^Mm^t\7M superior record
care device that |
thoroughly
cleans micro-
dust and fingerprints off record |
surfaces. Feat*
ures a patented
directional fibre
and exclusive D4|
fluid. Improve
sound and prolong your rec
ords' life.
.95
ONKYO
TA2050
*9**W/V#'    >
\\\\\\\
For complete recording flexibility the Accubias adjust fine
tunes the TA2050 for each tape
you use. Other features: soft
[touch controls, wide range peak
meters and permalloy
record/playback heads.
^vvv
YEAR
/WARRANTY
T617
V102
R82
The T617 AM/FM Cassette player gives you super fidelity and
outstanding tuner section, and the ultimate convenience of
auto-reverse    operation.    With    the
V102's    you    get   solidly    designed
speakers that deliver a full range of
sound. Attractive padded, perforated
grilles that can be mounted in almost   ^^Wkt^f "^g installed
any location    -meam    •*--'   -m   package a
-'WV
S YEAR
7 WARRANTY
T-103
®V380
oWk
YEAR
WARRANTY
1
An ideal system wherever
I space is tight, the 2-way
R82    offers   fine    performance with bass response
I that belies its modest size.
Recommended    for    use
| with amplifiers or receivers
rated from 10 to 60 watts
RMS per channel.
each
T500
9427BI
—i  . . •a**"-'
##S
-fn*-.
A deluxe under-dash cassette player with auto-reverse plays
both sides of tape without flipping it over. Locking Fast-
Forward/Rewind separate Bass and Treble, Eject. Balance control. Small enough mount out of sight in your glovebox! With
the V380 Powerplay Twin surface mount
speakers you get higher efficiency and
power capacity. Horn loaded dome high
frequency and black and chrome grille.    ■   *^M '^Minsta/led
Rated at 20 watts     B     km     km package!
ii ■   e » m m a
HMM »   •   BI   M«r
The T500 AM/FM cassette player is designed
especially for most import and X body cars. Features
locking fast forward/rewind, local/distant control
and power-off eject. Practical, solidly designed,
twin flush-mount 9427B speakers
have hemispherical dome
radiator for wider frequency
response	
package
installed^
PRICES VALID ONLY WITH THE PRESENTATION OF THIS AD.
WE TAKE
TRADES
PHONE ORDERS
ACCEPTED
MasterCard
VISA
556 SEYMOUR STREET, 687-5837-2696 E. HASTINGS STREET, 254-1601

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