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The Ubyssey Jan 31, 1984

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Array UBC Archives Serial
Vote to ban arms research fails
By CHRIS WONG
Last week's referendum calling
for a ban on arms research at UBC
attracted more voters than the
Alma Mater Society executive elections but failure to reach quorum
means the results that saw a majority vote in favor of the ban are
nullified.
Voter turnout reached 2,876 with
58 per cent in favor of a ban on
nuclear, chemical, biological and
space weapons research on campus,
the establishment of an ethnics
committee to evaluate all UBC
research, and full disclosure of
funding and research.
The 1,728 "yes" votes fell short
of the number needed to reach
quorum, according to AMS bylaws. Ten per cent of the student
population must register a "yes"
vote for the referendum to pass.
The number of votes needed for
quorum is unrealistic, said Gary
Marchant,   an   organizer   for   the
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 32
Vancouver, B.C. Tuosday, January 31.1984
aOrr^w
228-2301
—stuart dee photo
TO SAFEGUARD HEALTH it is advisable for swimmers to limber up properly and to examine the pool deck for
tell-tale vestiges of the persistent herpes aqueaous virus before entering the water. In spite of the eradication of
the nasty little critters, scientists in biology have been attempting to create life out of the primordial soup at the
UBC aquatic centre. "All the components are there: water, heat, light, dead skin, snot, piss . . ." said excited
scientist.
Wolf killing won't save cariboo
By WAYNE NIKITUK
A UBC zoology professor says
the provincial government's plan to
kill wolves in northern B.C. will
probably not increase the cariboo
population it wants to preserve.
Anthony Sinclair, who studied
wildebeast and buffalo herds on
Tanzania's Serengetti Plain for 20
years, said his research shows
predators are not always responsible for declines in animal populations.
"What we've done is make
studies that show it's not necessarily
the   case   that   predators   control
populations, and that populations
could easily exist in harmony
without predators."
Wildlife managers believe
removal of a predator will allow an
animal population to increase, and
eventually collapse. But when a
deadly virus which infected the vast
wildebeast herds of East Africa was
removed, the population greatly increased and gradually levelled off,
Sinclair said.
Government officials say the opposite is true, in a bid to justify the
plan to exterminate wolves.
Wallace MacGregor, a big game
specialist in the Victoria fish and
wildlife department office claimed
the numbers of wolves in the hunting area southwest of Nelson are
too high, and that the government
must eliminate some to preserve the
cariboo population there.
Although MacGregor admitted
the environment ministry does not
fully understand the wolves' role in
the ecosystem in question, he said
the government has enough data to
justify the hunt.
"The ministry is at fault to a
point in that we haven't done an
See page 2: GOVERNMENT
campaign against military research
on campus.
"It essentially makes it impossible to pass a referendum at UBC
unless you have total AMS backing
and a lot of money to spend," said
Marchant.
A quorum requiring five per cent
of the student population to vote
"yes" would be more realistic, he
added.
Marchant said the referendum
was also unsuccessful because of
limited AMS advertising and the
organizing time available. Voters
were also asked whether they
wanted a ballot instead of being
handed one automatically, he said.
But Marchant said he was pleased
with the ratio between "yes" and
"no" votes, adding the campaign
increased awareness about military
research. "I think we've at least
helped to scare (military research)
away from coming here."
George   Hermanson,   another
of the educators for nuclear disarmament steering committee, said he
was "somewhat puzzled" by the
result.
"There were over 3,000 students
who signed the petition (calling for
the referendum). Why didn't they
get out and vote?"
Marchant said current research
projects underway at UBC do not
involve the production of weapons
of mass destruction which the
referendum was directed against.
"We think this is a relatively
clean campus now. But (military
research) is coming into universities
at an unprecedented rate. There's
no reason to believe that UBC is immune to that."
The administration was
cooperative in providing information on research conducted on campus, he said. CAMROC may now
go directly to administration with
its proposals on banning arms
research    on    campus,    Marchant
CAMROC organizer and a member    said.
Irregularities
disrupt election
By GORDON CLARK
Although more students voted in
this year's Alma Mater Society elections than last year, ballot stuffing
at the McLeod building poll marred
the proceedings.
During tabulation of the ballots,
poll clerks discovered 45 votes were
cast Thursday, while only 23
students signed the register to vote.
The AMS subsequently invalidated all ballots cast at the
McLeod poll because the number of
votes cast there could not affect the
entire election results.
Elections commissioner Simon
Seshadri said two other irregularities occurred at the poll.
Daily tabulations showed there was
reduced voting at every poll on
campus except for the McLeod
building, he said.
"It was the only one that was
up."
Although the AMS is uncertain
who stuffed the ballot box, current
AMS vice-president Rene Comesotti said she is convinced council
will catch the culprit.
"People usually brag about
things like this," she said.
The suspects will be tried before
student's court, she added. And if
found guilty, offenders might have
to pay fines or be expelled from the
AMS.
"It's up to the student court. We
will find out who did it."
Meanwhile, candidates for the
AMS executive can  begin to rip
down their posters littering campus.
The lucky winners listed below can
stop campaigning and will assume
office Feb. 15.
Margaret Copping is the new
AMS president, winning with a
total of 1,113 votes. Peter
Nishihama was a relatively close second with 744. But the elections'
surprise was Sean Williams, who
ran on a campaign of terror and oppression and beer, and who managed to secure 627 votes.
Doug Low won the vice-
presidency, although his total of
904 votes barely surpassed Peter
Roosen's 816.
With the largest show of support,
Glenna Chestnutt swept to victory
with 1,705 votes, easily defeating F.
Ian Weniger by 954 votes.
"Of course I'm pleased. I hope I
can do a good job," said Chestnutt.
James Hollis won a third consecutive term as finance director
with 1,393 votes. Doug Dosdall was
second with 584.
"Certainly I'm pleased with the
results," said Hollis, "I'm looking
forward to working with a dynamic
new executive."
Dosdall said he would probably
run again next year after gaining experience in campus clubs.
"I expected it to be a bit closer."
Hollis said he didn't think
Dosdall ran a serious campaign.
"His posters were silly," he said.
Nancy Bradshaw was elected external affairs coordinator with a
total of 1,477 votes, defeating Duncan Stewart by 570 votes.
UBC bars dry up with free liquer giveaway
By JIM HUNTER
Special to The Ubyssey
Last call. The Pit and Gallery
Lounge are drying up.
All student alcoholic facilities on
campus will be closed starting
Wednesday, as a result of a decision
last week by UBC's board of governors.
"We've just taken delivery of
three months' supply of beer; it
could not have come at a worse
time," said Alma Mater Society Pit
manager Patrick Chapman.
"I have been directed to just give
it all away starting at 1 p.m. today,
since we could not possibly sell it by
tomorrow."
The decision, made at a closed
section of last week's board
meeting, is designed to help reduce
campus vandalism, rowdiness and
the negative effects of alcohol on
the university's public image, said
board chair David McLean.
"UBC students drink 40 per cent
more than the general public,
leading to increased vandalism,
lower academic achievement and an
undesirable perception of UBC in
the eyes of the community."
The closing of campus alcoholic
facilities will take effect until April
30 with an extension "very likely,"
McLean said.
The administrative move comes
almost six years after a similar
closure in 1977. Student council,
under pressure from the board and
the RCMP, closed the Pit and
lounge at the time for the same
reasons. The facilities re-opened
two months later.
PIT BEER . . . give away at 1 p.m.
"I hope the board will come to its
senses and realize this will not solve
the current problems," said an irate
Alma Mater Society general Charles
Redden.
But until the decision is recinded,
the AMS must close the two bars. A
special student council meeting will
be held in the Pit tonight to discuss
the matter. Student input is
welcome, said AMS president-elect
Margaret Copping. The beer would
have gone stale by the end of April,
she said, so she authorized the giveaway.
But there is some good news for
thirsty students. The board will
issue special occasion permits — the
licenses held by dances and beer
gardens — for weekend events,
said administration president
George Pedersen. "But a campus
patrol officer will have to be present
to supervise, of course."
The board received numerous
complaints from area residents, said
vice president academic Robert
Smith. Students caused $35,000
damage around SUB in 1983, he added. "We can't afford that."
Universities minister Pat McGeer
has also indicated he does not support student drinking facilities on
See page 3: REAGAN Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31,1984
Fire exits closed for asbestos removal
By VICTOR WONG
Physical plant sealed off all three
fire exits in SUB during the second
stage of asbestos removal that is being completed this week.
But assistant physical plant director Dennis Haller said there was
no hazard from working on all the
exits at the same time. "We were
satisfied that there would be adequate exits in the event of a real
fire," he said.
Captain Afflack, a UBC fire
prevention   office   spokesperson,
said protective sealing was arranged
in the form of a tunnel so exits
could still be used.
No more than one exit was completely sealed at a time, and signs
were placed near work areas indicating the location of the other
useable exits, Af flack added.
"We felt we should keep as many
of the exits operable as we could,"
he said.
"There's still some painting and
repairs to be done in some areas,
but the asbestos itself should be
gone by this week," said Haller.
The only areas in SUB requiring
asbestos removal are the
mechanical rooms, which will be
done during May and June, he said.
Haller said both workers and
students were free from health
hazards during the removal. "The
areas where asbestos is being
removed were completely sealed,
and the workers were working
under workers' compensation
board supervision," he said.
The type of asbestos being
removed is Crocidilite, a blue variety from South Africa. "It does tend
to be more dangerous than the
Canadian type," said Haller. He
added SUB was the only building
on campus with this type of
asbestos insulation.
Student health services physician
Dennis Farqhuar said some kinds of
asbestos are more poisonous than
others. "But as far as I'm concerned, all kinds of asbestos should be
considered bad," he said.
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From page 1
adequate job in disseminating the
information to the public. We
haven't explained the rationale of
this hunt to the public so it will
understand."
MacGregor said he is aware of
Sinclair's findings, but added no
one fully understands the interaction between wolf and cariboo
populations in the wild.
"We know the wolf is a factor,
but the question is whether or not
the wolf is the main factor in the
predator-prey relationship."
In the 1940's and 1950's, the
government carried out an extensive
poisoning program based on the
same wildlife notions that Sinclair's
research seems to refute.
MacGregor admitted the program
was ultimately self defeating.
"After the poison program we
had an increase in cariboo and
sheep populations. This in turn led
to an increase in the wolf population. These additional wolves cause
a decrease in cariboo calves,
thereby reducing the overall
numbers of cariboo. It's a bit of a
vicious circle."
Clint Davy, coordinator of Project Wolf, a Vancouver-based coalition of groups opposed to the extermination, said the government's
motivation in killing the wolves is
primarily economic.
"They are looking at wildlife
management with dollar signs in
their eyes, as they do everything
else. There are many big game companies that depend on the cariboo
and elk population for a livelihood.
Non-residents, including many
Americans, spend thousands of
dollars here annually for the
privilege of hunting big game. Man
is the main predator, not wolf," he
said.
Davy said he also fears the reper-
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cussions of the hunt. "We must
consider the further consequences
of this action; just like 20 years ago
it was a mistake to poison so many
wolves indiscriminately."
Project Wolf will try to interfere
with the hunt which will be primarily carried out from helicopters. The
group will film the killings in an attempt to bring greater public
pressure on the government, Davy
said.
MacGregor said environment
minister Tony Brummet gave his
final approval for the hunt Friday.
.A
QuicheS
<£M/.f UBC
£■    INTRAMURAL
SPORTS
Title: ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
1984-85
Students are invited to apply for one of
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Applications available in the Intramural
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Deadline is Friday,,
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Honorarium is available.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Government to spy on Canadians
Lawful Canadians, not foreign
spies, are the targets of the proposed
new Canadian security force, says a
local civil liberties group.
An information campaign was
launched by the Vancouver Coalition Against the Canadian Security
Intelligence Service at a news conference Friday.
Bill C-9, now before parliament,
is "a blank cheque for the creation
of a police force with totalitarian
powers," said spokesperson Don
Stewart.
"The 'security force' could plant
bugs to monitor the private lives of
anyone. Personal mail, telephone
calls, government income tax
records, or medical records would
all be subject to interception and
scrutiny."
Bill C-9 is solicitor-general
Robert Kaplan's latest effort to
replace the RCMP security service
with a civilian agency. The first try,
Bill C-157, was withdrawn early last
year amid irate criticism, some from
provincial attorneys-general. The
senate then held hearings and issued
a report in November.
Craig Paterson of the B.C. law
union told the Friday conference
that Bill C-9 is "a very quick rewrite, with certain specific
modifications" to meet senate suggestions.
Paterson said the current security
service should be abolished and not
replaced.
"The popular image is of them
trying to catch foreign spies," he
said. "But most of their activities
are aimed at Canadian citizens
engaged in peaceful, lawful and
democratic forms of dissent."
MP Svend Robinson (NDP-
Burnaby) called the bill "an assault
on the privacy of all Canadians."
He vowed to do everything possible
to block its passage, but admitted
that without the support of the Progressive Conservatives, who are
split on the issue, the bill could
become law as early as this summer.
"An intelligence agency that has
the power to open first-class mail
and examine income-tax forms of
law-abiding Canadians has no place
whatsoever in a democratic Canadian society," he said.
Peace activist Andrea Clark said
a non-violent training workshop
held in Cold Lake, Alta. last year
was watched by RCMP while some
Vancouver women who attended
have since complained of being
under surveillance.
A public meeting will be held
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at the First
United Church, 320 East Hastings
St. in Vancouver. Speakers include
MP Robinson, UBC professor
Shona Lamb of Educators for
Nuclear Disarmament, and Evert
Hoogers of the Canadian Union of
Postal Workers, who will speak on
how the RCMP continues to illegally open mail.
rz-
U.S. companies
in bed with govt.
By PATTI FLATHER
Giant U.S. military corporations
which help further the arms race are
inextricably linked with the
American government, a sociologist
charged Monday.
The "iron triangle" in the U.S.
consists of the federal bureaucracy,
elected American officials and
military corporations, Alan Brain
told 25 people in SUB 119 in a
speech on the U.S. arms economy.
Brian said money, influence and
personnel flow freely within the
triangle. "This creates a community
of common interests such that the
power they have defines the national security debate."
These common interests prompt
more military production and new
weapons systems, he said.
Military corporations such as
Boeing, the Seattle-based producer
of air launched cruise missiles to be
tested in Canada, have large
Washington offices to lobby the
government for future defence contracts, he added.
"There's a hugh weapons lobby
in Washington," he said, citing a
congressional vote on the MX
missile system which 1,500 lobbyists
attended.
"Main military corporations tend
to have a large degree of reliance on
government contracts," said Brain.
Boeing,   which   produces   several
other U.S. military weapons
systems, is the worst case of the
eight major American corporations, he added.
"The amount of investment they
put into new produces is disproportionately government money," he
said, adding the U.S. taxpayer
therefore subsidizes this corporate
research.
"It's very far from a private
enterprise system."
Board members of the major
military corporations heavily influence U.S. defence policies, Brain
said. Often task forces examining
new weapons systems include top
board members, such as the
Strategic Arms Limitations Talks
task force in which two Boeing
board members were involved.
"Some corporations also undertake what seem like grassroots community efforts. They pour money
into them and urge members of the
public to support MX missiles ..."
Brain said.
Congress members have difficulty determining whether letters are
written by individuals or are
corporation-backed.
Brain said weapons can be
bought and used by individuals,
whereas weapons systems are
employed by a group of people
whose labor is divided to make the
system work.
"Only nation states can afford
weapons systems."
— Stuart daa photo
BIZARRE AUTO ACCIDENT occured Monday when car driven by engineering students and carrying several
dynamite sticks blew up prematurely in failed attempt to move engineering block to new bookstore. "We
miscalculated the location for the correct trajectory," said student privy to plot. Driver of car was not injured and
suffered no ill effects, save for inability to sleep at night without someone holding his hand.
Grits lay it on for student press
By CHRIS WONG
TORONTO — Sitting at a table
dominated by young Liberals, some
mouldy bureacrats, and a group of
confused student journalist, John
Roberts took on a God-like appearance Friday in a tiny restaurant
on Yonge street.
The young Liberals saw no wrong
with Roberts as they laughed at all
his jokes, while the elder bureacrats.
kept up a steady flow of conversation with their boss — the employ
ment and immigration minister.
And while the restaurant staff
buzzed around Roberts, a television
crew busily prepared cameras and
lights to document the scene.
Meanwhile, the 30 student journalists flown to Toronto at government expense sat in the shadows
waiting for their chance to speak.
When it came after Roberts made a
five-minute speech, their remarks
were far from complimentary.
After  spending the morning in
Reagan will nuke president Pedersen
From page 1
campuses, McLean added. Because
liquor licensing laws require the
board's permission to proceed, the
board is within its jurisdiction, he
said.
But the extreme action has
angered AMS executive members.
"That's almost $100,000 profit
gone," said an exasperated finance
director James Hollis. "We will
either have to cut services or ask
students for an AMS fee increase to
make up the shortfall."
President-elect Copping said she
is concerned about the AMS's lack
of input in the decision. "They
didn't ask us for suggestions, just
whamo!''
The AMS will appeal the decision
at the Feb. 16 board meeting, Copping said. Student representative
will present ways of decreasing vandalism and removing UBC's
negative public image without closing drinking facilities, she said.
To stream-line the flow of people
to the Pit this afternoon and
tonight, the AMS business office in
SUB 266 will issue numbers starting
at noon. This will ease the congestion in the Pit, said vice president
Renee Commesotti.
"We don't want a repeat of the
Cincinatti tragedy." The give away
starts at 1 p.m. precisely, she said.
"There will be enough to last well
into the night."
Students not able to pick up a
number at the AMS business office
can reserve a place in line by calling
special phone numbers. Students
with surnames starting A-D should
phone 228-3974; E-H, 228-2307;
I-N, 228-2121; O-S, 228-3751; T-Z,
228-2811.
Current AMS president Mitch
Hetman said no students have complained to him yet. "I am sure
students will not be inconvenienced
too much," Hetman said. "I have
plenty of beer in my fridge, given to
me by the breweries for stocking the
Pit with their products."
The only watering hole left on
campus will be the faculty club, said
Petersen. But campus chaplain
George Hermanson said faculty are
the ones to worry about.
"The faculty are often the source
of the problem," said Hermanson.
"If the Pit is to close, so should the
faculty club."
The motion to close SUB's drinking facilities was introduced by
pedersen after a presentation by the
UBC Maranatha club, said student
board representative Dave Frank.
"But I missed it. I was out having a
drink."
Hollis said he would not leave office until the situation is resolved.
"If it take four more years, I'll still
be here. The AMS needs me. I am a
big asset."
Sun columnist Les Bewley
said he was pleased about the move.
"Back  when  1  was at  UBC,  we
never had bars. Why should those
bleeding heart liberals and irresponsible engineers deserve such a
privilege? Those students will have
to sober up and face facts."
"The Pit will re-open by the time
I have finished my second term,"
said U.S. president Ronald Reagan.
"Bannin' beer ain't the 'merican
way. If I have to nuke the board to
make them change their mind, I
will," he added.
"I am sure its just a mix-up in the
dates just like Lalonde did to me,"
said Tory leader Brian Mulroney,
while looking for his luggage.
"Where's that no-chinned globetrotting bellhop of mine anyways?
Joe! Here Joe!"
Pope John Paul II defended the
move. "Except as a sacrament,
alcohol is the root of all evil."
McLean said the Catholic
chaplaincy's Communion Wine
would be confiscated. "Boy am I
pissed," said John.
metro Toronto job centres geared
towards "disadvantaged youth"
between the ages of 15-24, the aspiring journalists were wondering
when Roberts would mention
employment for university
students.
They were equally puzzled at why
the government went to the trouble
of paying their air fare, hotel and
food bills to go on a tour of little interest.
"There's not one simple, single
reason for asking you to come,"
said Roberts.
He denied it was a ploy designed to
beef up his image for election time.
"If you think I think I'm going to
get any votes out of this, forget it.
I've been in politics too long to
believe that."
ANALYSIS
Roberts said the intention of the
half-day of activities was to provide
information on the government's
youth programs.
"We also want to use you. We
want to use you as a means of
reaching out to young people," he
said.
But earlier in the day, Diane
Flaherty, Canadian Federation of
Students national executive officer,
criticized the government's attempt
to get "free advertising."
"It's an insult to the student
press. The disadvantaged youth
programs aren't really a burning
issue. The only burning issue here is
how the department of employment
and immigration is so frivolous with
their money," she said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31, 1984
Mom. Towy   brutish
Missed
An amazing thing happened last week, and it would be a pity if students
at UBC did not note the event.
Those who chose to vote last week in the glorious Alma Mater Society
elections were faced with a referendum designed to eliminate arms
research on campus. Unfortunately, the motion did not pass because
quorum was not reached. But the results of the voting reveals many
things.
For referendums to pass, AMS bylaws state that ten per cent of the
members must vote in favor of them. This would require at least the support of 2,876 students. And although the results of 1,728 for, and 1,148
against indicate a win for the referendum organizers, the AMS rules about
quorum are not as unreasonable as they seem.
The most interesting thing about the referendum is it attracted roughly
400 more students than the headlined AMS executive elections.
This reveals that there are a significant number of people on the campus
who are prepared to vote on issues they believe in, but who do not care
about who is running the AMS.
Over 400 people actually came up to a polling booth, picked up a referendum form, filled it out and walked away paying no attention to the mish
mash of names on the AMS election forms.
People no longer think the AMS is all that important — why else would
they have not taken the little extra time to fill out the blanks for the five
positions? It was certainly not through ignorance about the election,
because it received far more attention than the referendum.
The people who did not vote for the AMS elections were making a clear
statement. Instead of wasting their time electing people who are only going to get sucked up by the business oriented AMS where their vote really
makes no difference in the structure of the beast, these people voted on
something they knew was important.
The military research referendum could have passed if only a few more
people supported it. On a campus of 28,760 students, the 1,000 more required for quorum is hardly an impossibility.
The referendum that failed gave students at UBC an opportunity to do
something that has never been done anywhere in North America. The
referendum's possibilities are endless, but we'll just have to wait for next
year.
Search for peace lacks revolutionary zeal
By ROSS PINK
The U.S. and the Soviet Union
have succeeded in landing men on
the moon. Advances in medicine
have eradicated diseases once
dreaded by humans. Our advancements in communication and transportation are nothing short of astounding. Yet the same revolutionary zeal which inspired these and
other past endeavors has been lacking in the greatest and most important endeavor of all — world peace.
In the final analysis, none of these
past accomplishments will matter if
our propensity toward war precipitates a nuclear holocaust.
Today, the prospect of regional
or global conflict leading to nuclear
war is not unthinkable. We have
never been so precariously balanced
between world conflict and world
catastrophe. Unless prudent peace
measures are adopted by all nations
the balance of terror may overcome
us.
Understandably, many today are
given to despair and doom. It does
not have to be this way — the problems of today were created by humans and surely they can be solved
by humans. There are still avenues
to peace open to us.
The first avenue to peace is a return to the spirit of the 1970 Nuclear Non-Proliferation treaty. The
intentions behind the NPT were
honorable and peaceful.
The basic aim of the treaty was
threefold. Firstly, it was designed to
contain the number of nations holding nuclear weapons; secondly, to
initiate arms reduction between the
nuclear states; and thirdly, to assist
non-nuclear states in using nuclear
technology for peaceful purposes.
In each case, the goals of the treaty
were extremely optimistic in light
of the small sacrifices the nuclear
nations were willing to make. Whether or not the non-nuclear nations
would have permanently bound
themselves to this treaty is subject
to debate. Though one point remains certain: the nuclear states
never fully intended to sacrifice economic and nuclear advantage for
the sake of the NPT.
The first obstacle to the success
of the NPT was the failure of the
U.S. and the Soviet Union to initiate effective vertical disarmament.
Many of the non-nuclear signatories to the treaty maintained that
their renunciation of nuclear weapons should coincide with substantial nuclear disarmament.
When the disarmament process
failed to gain momentum, the non-
nuclear states became disenchanted
with the treaty. The Japanese ambassador to the NPT talks, Senjin
Fsuruoka warned, "Unless the nuclear weapons states keep their part
of the bargain ... the treaty will
lose its moral basis."
Eventually, as ambassador Fsuruoka had warned, the credibility of
the NPT was diminished. The partial failure of the NPT has led to a
dangerous escalation of nuclear
weaponry and a situation where
more nations possess the nuclear
option.
Although the NPT may be dor
mant it is not dead. Most nations
still adhere to the principle of the
NPT. By returning to the aims of
the NPT the nuclear powers would
achieve the twin objectives of multilateral disarmament and the containment of the spread of nuclear
weapons to other nations.
The second avenue to peace is a
nuclear limitation treaty between
the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Unless these two superpowers can
reach an accord, future disarmament talks will mean nothing.
perspectives
For this reason, the recent peace
initiative by prime minister Pierre
Elliot Trudeau is important. By
placing the nuclear issue at the forefront of world opinion, Canada and
other concerned nations may persuade the superpowers to reach a
meaningful accord.
The third avenue to peace is Soviet-American cooperation and coexistence. Rapprochement between
the superpowers is the only responsible policy to follow in an age when
both powers have the capacity to
annihilate the other. Rancorous debate and belligerent threats are unlikely to change the actions of either
superpower — therefore they must
be avoided.
The strident ideologues in Russia
and America do a disservice to the
cause of peace. Each accuses the
other of being a dark and menacing
power, incapable of trust and bent
on total world domination. Rigid
ideology only serves to distort perception and creates misconceptions.
Ideology excludes the prospect of
coexistence or accommodation —
and to this extent it is dangerous.
No matter how repugnant the
Soviet system remains to the free
and democratic world, it is a system
with which we must coexist. Just as
surrender or submission of our
ideals and interests would be an unwise policy, so to would a belligerent foreign policy.
In the age of nuclear weapons,
war between the Soviet Union and
the U.S. makes no sense. In 1963
John F. Kennedy noted: "Should
total war break out again, no mat
ter how, our two countries would
become primary targets. It is an
ironical but accurate fact that the
two strongest powers are the two in
the most danger of devastation."
This is not a time for cynicism or
cautious inaction. It is not a time
for nations to retreat to the sanctity
of their own borders, leaving others
to do the bidding for peace.
The world is a tinderbox of discord and disunity. If the forces of
world war are unleashed upon this
planet for the third time in this century — it will inevitably lead to nuclear war. If that happens, no nation
shall be above the battle, no nation
shall be safe. The winds of war will
scatter destruction over every inch
of this planet.
Peace and disarmament are the
greatest challenges facing humankind. They are challenges that will
require all the fortitude and strength
that humankind possesses. They are
challenges that will require great vision. For what Pericles once said is
still true today, "Where there is no
vision — the people shall perish."
Ross Pink is a fourth year arts
student in international relations.
THE UBYSSEY
January 31, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"What kinda story shall we pull this year?" cackled Gordon Clark gleefully. "How about
shit replacing asbestos?" asked Muriel Draaisma. "Sounds good to me," said Patti
Flather. Wayne Nikituk disagreed. "How about Bill Vander Zalm running for
chancellor?" suggested Peter Berlin. "Too scary," muttered Mike Tracey. "Chris Wong
climbing the clock tower?" said Debbie Lo. Victor Wong reminded them that Chris hated
heights. "Let's vote on it," whispered Andrea Bakke. "Don't be so damn democratic,"
cried Sarah Millin. "How about a sports theme?" enthused Harry Hertscheg. "Sports?
No way I" bellowed the mysterious NJD. "Can we at least get Tom Hawthorn to write
it?" Monte Stewart wanted to know. Jim Hunter seconded the idea, and everyone
agreed. Then the staff of the Ubyssey moved to item number two on the agenda.
k}S*lS%i&&
-•:■'    ■   t
v
%■;,>> 'Oil
r
"We deal with tl by talking about il.1 Tuesday, January 31,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Drunk and joking poll clerks appal observer
Acting as a scrutineer, I was appalled at the way in which and by
whom the ballots were counted.
By the time the third ballot was
being tabulated, the poll clerks and
their supervisors had begun to drink
(after all it was Friday).
Throughout the evening they told
jokes that would offend every
ethnic, religious and social minority. Or they argued about what high
school was better, or if North Van     representatives,    and    several        No one likes to be watched when
was better than West Van (not how
to help East Van become better). I
was thoroughly disillusioned that
these people are university student
representatives. Such was the atmosphere of the post election, official count.
The count was done by absolutely
non-impartial people. They ranged
from a student senator, two AMS
members of the student administrative commission. Their lack
of neutrality was especially apparent with the military research
referendum. When "yes" votes
deemed to be substantially ahead,
loud grunts and groans emanated
from some sections of the round
table. And try as Simon (AMS elections commissioner) might he could
not stifle them.
Students lose because of biased stories
I would like to say that on
reading the interveiws on the
various candidates for the Alma
Mater Society general election in
the Jan. 20 issue, I felt angered that
the interviewers placed their own
opinions on the particular candidate that they interviewed into the
actual write-up.
Q/6llinis
Tfo'2
from
3 to4
<t ,v con i.i.
Ipi'r pt'r\i»D
Hi\\- con a
{per person/
.,i ti-n ,,l r.niisi''
$2.50
$1.25
t±.
MO.N'IWV   l-KIDAY
n« tin-hick ill ihr nlla
„.      A
I feel that as students, we should
have the right to choose for
ourselves which candidates would
best represent the student body. In
a time when the education system is
going through the greatest setbacks
financially, we need to take advantage of the support that is available
to us. The AMS election is one of
them.
But in order for the students to
make the right choices in the AMS
election, an account of each of the
representative should be made with
the least amount of bias. Because in
the long run, it is the students who
lose, not the defeated candidates.
Amy Lam
arts 1
ATTENTION ALL CHRISTIAN STUDENTS
LEARN HOW THE CAMPUS WILL
BE CHANGED FOR CHRIST
LEARN HOW YOU CAN BE INVOLVED
PROBE MINISTRIES:
STUDENT UPDATE FORUM
STUDENT MOBILIZATION MEETING
JAN. 31, 1984 BUCH A 106  7:30 - 9:30 P.M.
Do Not Miss This Important Event
Sponsored By All The Christian Communities At UBC
THIS WEEK
AT HILLEL
Tues. Jan. 31 — Home-cooked Shefa Dairy
Lunch - 12:30 p.m.
Wed. Feb. 1 — Lunch Available — 12:30 P.M.
Thurs. Feb. 2 — NETWORK SEMINAR —
Media Misrepresentation of the war in Lebanon -
Film and lecture
Guest Speaker - ILYA GEROL, Province colum-|
nist 12:30 P.M., Buchanan A-202
G.S.C.
LOUNGE
5:00-12:00
NIGHTLY
LUNCH
12:00- 1:30
DINNER
5:00 - 6:30
Daily Specials at $3.50 and lower
-SIRLOIN STEAK
-SEAFOOD NEWBURG
-STUFFED LEG OF PORK
-VEAL SCHNITZEL
-SPECIAL QUICHES
10% Discount/1 Day Membership
On Lunch Or Dinner At The
Cafeteria Of The Grad. Student Center
Expiry Date: Feb. 15, 1984 Liquor Excluded
NO RETURNS
OF TEXTBOOKS
AFTER TAN 31
The Bookstore regrets that,
due to the need to negotiate
and arrange for the return of
overstock to publishers in
specific quantities and by a
deadline, NO RETURNS OF
WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS will be accepted
after
JANUARY 31st 1984
The last day for changes of
classes is Jan 13th, 1984 so the
needs of students changing
classes will be accommodated.
Because of the 10-day rule
TEXTBOOKS BOUGHT
AFTER JAN 21st 1984 WILL
BE NON-RETURNABLE.
/
they are assumed to be honest, yet
candidates and constituencies have
a right to honesty and democracy
during tabulation of the ballots.
That is why I would like to suggest
that with other elections the ballots
be tabulated by an accounting firm
or some other neutral third party,
or at least have a mandatory
scrutineer for every candidate, and
sober poll clerks.
Helen Reeve
arts 2
Corky says:
Spruce up for the new
Spring Term
Come to Corky's for a perm I
HAIft
CORKYS
STYLING
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
Active Components
9070 Kingsway
Vancouver (15 Mln. from
downtown. Straight up
Kingsway.)
Tt 438-3321
Store Hours:
Mon - Thurs 8-6:00
Friday 8-9:00
Sat. 9-6:00
Visa and Mastercard Accepted
CHINESE NEW V6AR
Brtd loox I
and Cdemletki
Tun %*. X*tpfn fy. y, 19*4
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Combo fide Spool
only *zi5
SPECIAL SPORT EVENT!!
The Running of the Centipedes
Thursday, February 9, 1984
12:30 p.m. "RACE CENTRE"
Registration Deadline Mon. Feb. 6, 1984
Rm 203 WMG Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31, 1984
V'Skl
TODAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic  class,  4:30  p.m.  to 5:30 p.m.,   SUB
207/209.
DAVID THOMPSON UNIVERSITY
Speaker: Gary Shaw, Student Society President
speaks on proposed closure, noon, Dorothy
Somerset Studio (behind Freddy Wood theatre).
WEDNESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Singing, bible study, discussion, noon, SU8
213.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., SUB concourse.
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
General meeting, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Alpha Delta
House, 2270 Wesbrook Mall.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest speaker: Dale Maranda on "The Magic of
the Subconscious", noon, Buch D327.
BAHAI CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Booktable, check out the buttons, too, talk to a
Canadian dissident, noon, SUB Concourse.
THURSDAY
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, 7:30 p.m., SUB 205.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Lecture by Dr. Alan Brain, title: What About The
Russians?, noon, Hebb Theatre.
YOUNG LIBERALS OF UBC
The Hon. Jean Chretien, Minister of Energy,
Mines and Resources will speak to students and
faculty, SUB Auditorium.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., for information call 228-8554 or 224-4553.
STUDENTS AGAINST THE BUDGET
General meeting, noon, Lutheran Campus
Center.
ANARCHIST CLUB
A discussion on "Nuclear Disarmament — A
Creative Approach," noon, Buch D352.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic class, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting, Boeing field trip seminar —using the VOR, noon, Henning 302.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Tour of the UBC Dental clinic, noon, John B.
Macdonald Bldg.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT IN
SCRIPTURE
Discussion: Prophecy Tests in Biblical Text (Isiah
53), noon, Scarfe 204.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Two films on Thailand: "KA RORN — Southern
village" and "Temple of the Twenty Pagodas",
noon, Asian Center Auditorium.
FRIDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Asian Week — Chinese pastry sale, 11:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m., SUB ground floor — Asian Week
info booth.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
The Ultimate Car Rally, $2 for members, S3 for
non-members, 7:00 p.m. SUB meter parking lot
loop.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Folk Night, 8 p.m. to 1:00 a.m., Garden Rm.,
Graduate Student Centre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for ballet and jazz classes, noon,
SUB 216E.
UBC LIBERALS
Policy committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
SUB 224.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Game vs Athletes in Action, one of the top touring teams in North America, featuring Marvin
Oelph, formerly of University of Arkansas Razor-
backs, 8 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women host the defending conference champions University of Victoria Vikettes in a battle
for third place, 6 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
THE PIT . . . kiss it goodbye (see page 1)
COMING SOON
Rt. Rev. Stephen Barham
PH.D
LECTURE SERIES
Psychology
and the Bible
Feb. 28 - March 2
at noon hours
Charismatic Christian Fellowship
Maranatha Christian Club
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HOT^
w£HILIk
COOL
SUDS
AT
o/ellinis
Ail the chili
&
bread you can eat
AT*
^*&**
oo'
(at the back of the village)
IN SUB
Basement
for a variety
of sandwiches
coffee and snacks
Open daily 7 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Fridays till 6:00 p.m.
ARTS
UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
GENERAL MEETING
3:30-4 p.m. Feb. 3/84
BUCH. LOUNGE
Posting of new Constitution
Followed by refreshments
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 20% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
The Hairline's team of experts wants
to give students a break!
10% OFF
our regular prices
Monday - Thursday
(Student A.M.S. card required)
2529 Alma
224-2332
Mon.- Fri. 9:00-7:00
Sat. -9:00-5:30
t-THE CLASSIFIEDS-^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
HALF PRICE SALE! at OLD MEETS NEW
Jan. 28 thru Feb. 4 only! Vancouver's
largest & best selection of new & used furniture & antiques. All V4 price for 1 week
only. 120 & 140 W. Hastings (across from
Woodwards, downtown). Shop early for
best selection. 669-9636.
BEAT THE WINTER BLUES! Come to
International House Folk Dancing & experience dances & music from all over the
world. No experience or partner necessary.
Meets Weds. 7:30-10:00 p.m. For info, call
738-1246.
FORMER    UNIV.    PROF. (10   yrs.    exp.)
will critique & edit term papers, theses,
manuscripts.   Reasonable rates.   Fast turnaround. 669-1284.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar composition,
spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
85 - TYPING
15 - FOUND
GOLD CHAIN with 2 pendants.  See Gary
@ Filmsoc rm. 247.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
20 - HOUSING
VACANCIES IN STUDENT RESIDENCES
for Ladies. Room & Board. Come to the
Housing Office or call 228-2811.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
35 - LOST
LOST:   Pearl   ring.   If  found   call  941-9880
Great sentimental value.
40 - MESSAGES
SONGFEST is almost  here so  let's get  it
together. Crooster.
70 - SERVICES
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U —TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING  SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSINGIMicom.l student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva 876-5333.
THESIS TYPING on UBC Computer. Experienced with Data Analysis, RMT, SPSS,
etc. References available. 872-0841, 8-9:30
a.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: all phases, fast
reasonable. 25 yrs. exp. Electronic type
271-6755.
TYPING: situated close to UBC. Experienced
fast, £r accurate. Available on short notice
732-1745.
90 - WANTED
WANTED: Childcare for young infant, three
afternoons a week 12-5 at my house.
732-9044. Tuesday, January 31, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Board chair gives rationale for increased fees
I felt I should write to you in connection with the tuition fee increase
that has recently been implemented
by the board of governors.
The need to increase tuition fees
is only a part of the university's
overall financial problem of having
to meet an expected budget deficit
in 1984 of some $18 million despite
the financial restraint measures implemented by the administration in
1982 and 1983. This deficit results
from reduced funding of the university by the provincial government as
a result of its reduced revenues. In
order to meet this deficit, not only
must fees be increased, but expenses
must be severely cut back and only
by prudent management of our expenses will we be able to ensure that
the university can continue to
operate.
This budget cutback for 1984 was
unexpected and unprecedented and
necessitated very drastic action by
the board and decisions that were
difficult yet necessary.
The issue of raising tuition fees
was first raised in the early fall of
1983 when it became apparent that
not only would the 1983 budget be
severely strained, but the 1984
budget would undoubtedly be cut
back in light of the severe financial
situation existing in the province of
British Columbia.
In order to put the matter in
perspective, the revenues of the
government will be severely curtailed due to the recession and this, of
course, affects every agency funded
by the government and, of course,
the university is no exception. The
board discussed this matter in the
early fall of 1983, at which time it
was decided to take no decision but
to request that interested groups
have an opportunity of making
presentations before the board.
This was done at our December
board meeting and we heard formal
representations from the Alma
Mater Society, International House
and the Graduate Students Association.
In addition, we had a number of
presentations by interested groups
that came in, both prior to our
December meeting, and thereafter,
and which were circulated to all
board members.
I particularly wanted to commend the AMS for their presentation which was most positive and
helpful to the board in its deliberations. The Graduate Students
Association and International
House, as well, assisted the board in
coming to grips with this very important issue.
On Jan. 19, 1984, the board received a petition from a number of
students on the campus, as well as
heard an informal presentation
from students who had gathered to
express their concern on this issue.
The board appreciated the manner
will now be implemented ait UBC
will be comparable to those in Ontario. The government is still going
to bear the lion's share of the cost,
although the students are now increasing their share somewhat.
In regard to the request that our
decision be delayed, we felt we had
no alternative but to implement the
!>.«fc
in which the students conducted
themselves which was responsible
and at all times courteous.
After hearing all the above
presentations, and after a lengthy
debate which lasted some two
hours, the board decided to implement the recommendation of the
administration, which was done
with great concern and a full
understanding of the consequences
of the decision. The fee levels that
decision now because the budget for
the university must be set for next
year. As well, calendars must be
printed so that they will be available
to prospective students coming to
the university. In addition, we felt
it was important that studsnts be
advised where they stand so that
there would be no illusions that
perhaps somehow we could avoid
taking these very difficult decisions.
In summary, the board felt that
while it is its responsibility to provide accessability to a university
education, at the same time we have
a very serious responsibility to provide sufficient revenue to ensure
that this university can be properly
operated. These interests must
always be balanced, and the decision taken by the board we feel is in
the best interests of all concerned.
In addition, the board will still
face a number of very difficult decisions which must be made to further cut the operating costs of the
university so that we will be able to
live within the revenue that will be
available to us in 1984.
All sectors of the university will
be affected and each will have to
bear their fair share of cutbacks if
the university is to meet this financial crisis responsibility.
These are not easy decisions, and
no member of the board or the administration is taking these issues
lightly or without a great deal of
concern. The board appreciates the
concern shown by the students and
particularly the responsible way in
which most of the students have
faced these issues.
David G. McLean
board of governors chair
MOLSON MALT
When you've got
Molson Malt
you've got it all! Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 31, 1984
Volleyballers split in Saskatoon
UBC volleyballers came out even
after a pair of showdown games in
Saskatoon on Friday night.
The games will probably determine first place in both the men's
and women's Canada West divisions.
Both contests went to five games
as the UBC men and University of
Saskatchewan women hung on to
their unbeaten records.
The men's match was particularly
close. With UBC winning the final
game by the minimum two points
after they allowed the Huskies to
win six straight points and pull back
to 13 all. The final score was 9-15,
15-5, 13-15, 15-7, 15-13.
UBC coach Dale Ohman said he
wasn't too happy with his team's
performance and the manner in
which they almost let their opponents off the hook. "We won't
always be able to play average and
beat a good team," said Ohman.
Standouts for UBC were Chris
Frehlick with  24 'kills' and  Paul
Basketbirds are
playoff-ready
Two wins in one weekend have
established the UBC women's
basketball team as legitimate playoffs contenders.
The 'Birds opened their home
stand with a 50-46 victory over their
chief playoff rivals the University of
Alberta on Friday night.
On Saturday they comfortably
despatched winless Saskatchewan
64-44. Such a double triumph
against Canada West rivals has not
occurred in living memory.
Coach Jack Pomfret said he was
pleased with the team's effort,
especially the second half of the
Alberta game, when the team rebounded well and worked hard.
He said that if they continue to
work hard the team could gain a
few more wins and possibly make
the playoffs.
In Friday's game Linda Edwards
was the 'Birds top scorer with 15
points, Cathy Bultitude with 11 and
Nadine Fedorak with 10 also reached double figures.
UBC's big edge over Alberta was
the accuracy of their shooting, they
hit in 47% of field goal attempts
while allowing their opponents only
a 29% mark.
Alberta had 20 more free throws
but only converted ten of their 22
chances while UBC made both of
theirs.
UBC have now completed half of
their ten game Canada West divisional schedule. Four of the six
teams advance tot he play-offs in
Victoria. The hosts gain an
automatic berth while means that
UBC has to beat out at least two of
the other five for a place.
The battle for that last both appears to be with Alberta who now
have an identical 2-3 record to the
'Birds. While their chief rivals play
twice this weekend UBC's only
game is at the War Memorial Gym
on Friday night where they host
UVic who have shown disappointing form this year.
Promfret said that his team will
"go after UVic." "We haven't
beaten this year. We could, if
we work hard," he added.
STANDINGS
Team
W
L
Pts
Calgary
5
0
10
Lethbridge
4
1
8
Alberta
2
3
4
Victoria
2
3
4
UBC
2
3
4
Saskatchewan
0
5
0
Close loss, close win
By MONTE STEWART
If the weekend's basketball
games had been horse races both
would have required a photo finish.
Friday, the UBC men made a late
rush going into the clubhouse turn
but were nosed out at the wire as
Alberta Golden Bears prevailed
70-76 before a sparse but entertaih-
ed crowd at War Memorial Gym.
Saturday, the contest between
UBC and Saskatchewan Huskies
was almost a dead heat; however,
this time, the 'Birds did an effective
job at jostling for position and
recorded their first victory of the
regular season with an, oh so close,
77-76 decision over the Huskies.
The weekend split may prove
costly to the 'Birds. Although the
team has played only four regular
season games, the play-offs are
already on the horizon. The Canada
West season stretches over only 10
games with the top four teams
qualifying for post season play.
Friday, the Thunderbirds trailed
early but come on near the end of
the first half to enjoy a narrow
34-31 lead at the midway point. In
the second half, both coaches
substituted extensively. At one
point each team was playing with
five players who did not start the second half. Despite such liberal
substitution, the two teams remained neck and neck until the final 22
seconds of the contest.
Ken Klassen paced UBC with 18
points while Marty Basso and Pat
West contributed 12 and 11 points
respectively.
"I don't think we can criticize the
effort of our team," said UBC
coach Bill Edwards. The first year
coach was obviously disappointed
with the outcome.
After narrowing the 'Bears lead
to only two points, 68-66 with only
22 seconds left, UBC called a time
out. The 'Birds inbounded the ball
after the break but could not get off
a good shot until there were only
nine seconds on the clock and only
two seconds left on the 30 second
shot clock. The ball came outside to
Doug Eberhart, who at 5'9" is the
smallest 'Bird. Mike Suderman had
no trouble blocking his attempted
jump shot. Second later, UBC committed an intentional foul to try to
regain possession of the ball.
However, as a result of the bonus
situation, Suderman went to the
foul line and sunk both shots to put
the game out of reach.
Saturday, the 'Birds edged out
the team which deprived them of a
play-off berth last season 77-76.
Husky Paul Humbert was by far
the best player on the court. He
scored 24 points while converting 71
per cent of his field goal attempts.
Klassen led UBC with 20 points
while Paul Johansson was the next
highest scorer with 10 points.
This Friday, the 'Birds host
Athletes in Action in an exhibition
game. Saturday, they face the
defending champion Vikings at
War Memorial. Both games start
at 8:30 p.m. CITR FM 102 will
broadcast Saturday's game live
beginning at 8:20 p.m.
CANADA WEST BASKETBALL
STANDINGS
MEN
Team
W
L
Pts
Victoria
4
0
8
Calgary
2
1
4
Alberta
2
1
4
Lethbridge
1
2
2
UBC
1
3
2
Saskatchewan
0
3
0
Thiessen with 23. A kill comes when
a player makes a shot which the opposition cannot return to end the
rally and win the point for his or her
team.
The women's match was almost
as close with Saskatchewan coming
out on top 15-12, 15-6, 10-15,
10-15, 15-5.
The defeat means that it will be
very difficult for UBC to catch
Saskatchewan for first place in the
west. If they finish second, which
looks likely, they will have to travel
to Saskatoon again for the best of
three western play-off series.
On Saturday both teams defeated
the University of Alberta in four
games.
The men won 15-5, 15-4, 16-18,
15-3 to run their league record to
10-0. Brad Willock served five aces
with his famed 'spike' serve.
Ohman said that Willock, who is
the 'setter', was a tower of strength
throughout the weeken as he lead
the attack setting up kill opportunities for other players.
The women won their game 15-7,
15-11, 14-16, 15-2. Anita Hollens-
tein led the team with 14 kills and
four 'stuffs'.
CANADA WEST STANDINGS
VOLLEYBALL
MEN
Team
W
L
Pts
UBC
10
0
15
UVic
7
3
10
Saskatchewan
6
4
10
Calgary
5
5
7
Lethbridge
2
8
3
Alberta
0
10
0
WOMEN
Team
W
L
Pts
Saskatchewan
10
0
15
UBC
7
3
11
Calgary
5
5
7
UVic.
4
6
6
Alberta
2
8
4
Lethbridge
2
8
2
Hockey playoff
hopes remain
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
UBC Thunderbirds' play-off
chances remain alive after a two-
game split against Saskatchewan
Huskies in Saskatoon over the
weekend.
The 'Birds lost 4-1 in a rather
disappointing game Friday night.
Jim Allison opened the scoring to
give the 'Birds a 1-0 lead after the
first period, but the defending national champion Huskies came back
with two goals in each of the last
two periods to put it out of reach.
The Huskies outshot the 'Birds
38-21.
On Saturday, forwards Grant
Harris and Daryl Coldwell scored
two goals apiece to lead UBC to a
well-deserved 5-2 win. Defenseman
Rick Amann scored UBC's other
goal.
The 'Birds still have a chance to
make one of the two play-off spots,
but to do so, they will have to win
nearly all of their eight remaining
games. After Alberta Golden Bears'
6-3, 4-2 sweep of last place Calgary
Dinosaurs last weekend, first place
is virtually out of the question.
Finishing second won't be easy
either. Half of Saskatchewan's
eight remaining games are against
lowly Calgary, while UBC still has
to play high-flying Alberta four
times, including a two game series
in Edmonton this coming weekend.
CANADA    WEST    HOCKEY
photo
Team
W
L
Pts
Alberta
13
3
26
Saskatchewan
10
6
20
UBC
7
9
14
Calgary
2
14
4
THUNDERBIRD CATHY BULTITUDE prepares to score another two of
total 11 points she scored to give UBC Thunderbirds a 50-46 win over U of
A Friday. (See story, left.)
Ski team wins second meet
With five first places in six events
the UBC ski team slid to a comfortable victory in their second conference meet of the year.
The victory clinched first place
for UBC in their division of the
American National Collegiate Ski
Association north west division.
UBC now advances to the regional
finals in Bend Oregon where they
will race against the top two teams
from the other two divisions.
The only event UBC did not win
was the woman's cross country race
in which Rhonda Delong was second and Darcy Estabrook was
fifth. The fifth finish clinched the
skimeister overall prize for the
veteran Estabrook. She was first in
the Giant slalom and eighth in the
slalom after a fall.
The men's skimeister was won by
first year Stuart Gairns who was
seventh in the cross-country, first in
the slalom and third in the giant
slalom.
Other victors for UBC were John
Hilland in the men's giant slalom
and Susie Fenton who was first in
the  slalom,   with   UBC's   Donna
Wright second. UBC also finished
one and two in the men's cross
country in which Ole Anker-Rauch
was first and Paul Van Danker was
runner-up.
The extent of UBC's domination
was particularly impressive because
traditional northern powerhouse
Whitman College, from eastern
Washington state, entered even
though they are in another division.
They wanted to check out UBC.
They were swept aside as easily as
the rest of UBC's regular competition.
Team member Bob Leitch, who
was fourth in the giant slalom, said
the team was very optimistic about
the regional finals. He said they are
as good as last year's team, which
went all the way to the championship finals, in alpine events and
much stronger in cross-country.
Runners set new record
UBC runners broke a Canadian
open track record for the second
time in a week in New York on Friday.
The UBC team clocked a time of
seven minutes 33.4 seconds in the
rarely run 800m. relay at the annual
Millrose indoor games at Madison
Square Gardens.
The time eclipsed the old record
set by a team from the Scarborough
Optimists Club in 1976 by nearly
five seconds.
In spite of their record breaking
pace  the   UBC  team  could  only
finish ninth in the field of 38 college
teams. First were Arizona state
university with a time of 7:27.4.
Arizona were over four seconds
faster than second place Villanova.
The UBC team was anchored by
Simon Hoogerwerf who broke the
Canadian open indoor 1000m.
mark last week. The fastest leg,
however, was run by Ian Newhouse
who completed the third leg, which
begins and ends with a change-over
in 1:50.2. The first two legs were
run by Ian Gillespie and Andrew
Dawson.

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