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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 22, 1983

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Array Funding frozen says Kenny
By CRAIG BROOKS
B.C.'s three public universities
can expect no increase in their provincial operating grants for the next
academic year, UBC administration
president Doug Kenny said
Wednesday.
"The fiscal outlook is for a zero
per cent increase for next year,"
Kenny told senate.
The suggestion was made by
deputy universities minister Robert
Stewart at a Feb. 7 meeting between
the three university administrations
and provincial government financial representatives, said Kenny.
The provincial government is expecting to run a deficit for at least
the next five years and to receive
less total revenue in 1984 than it did
in 1981, Kenny said.
"If you can't increase your
revenue, you have to decrease your
expenditures," he said.
The "zero per cent increase" will
actually mean a decrease in funding
because B.C.'s current inflation
rate will not be taken into consideration.
See letter, page 4
The freeze will mean B.C. universities will have to look harder at
their existing programs, Universities
Council of B.C. chair Bill Gibson
said.
UCBC is an intermediary body
between B.C.'s three public universities and the provincial universities
ministry.
"A moratorium of indefinite
length on some new and emergent
programs   may   be   necessary,
regretable as this is," Gibson said in
a Jan. 31 letter to Kenny. "(The
Universities) Council feels that a
redeployment of shrinking funds
may have to be made by the board
of each university so that the broad
public interest is served. In
Council's view the level of funding
in the upcoming year or years will
require hard decisions to be taken if
the core offerings of our institutions are to be preserved."
A master of journalism program
will probably have to put on hold
again, Kenny said. The program
was approved by senate in January
1981 but has yet to become a reality.
See page 2: FUNDING
AH WINTER, says student quietly studying under tree. Ubyssey has taken
page 3 also), due to photographer shortage. Staff members threatened to
photographers show up. As for winter, what more can you say other than ■
Prairies."
—sHson hoana photo
to running series of tree photos (see
"drive readers up a tree" until more
- "I'm glad I'm not in Ontario or the
Admin finds $700,000 solution
BY MURIEL DRAAISMA
After many secretive meetings the
university administration has finally
arrived at a budget shortfall solution.
At a recent senate meeting, UBC
president Doug Kenny said the
$700,000 shortfall would be made
up by replacing retiring professors
with lower paid instructors or by
leaving their positions vacant.
Only about 30 faculty members
will be affected by the replacement
solution, Kenny said Monday. The
administration will also be looking
at cutting non-faculty areas of the
budget to cope with the money
shortage, he added.
"No one will be losing their jobs
during these tough economic
times," Kenny told senate Wednes-
A report to
out readers.
Page 7.
day. "We'll be able to find the
$700,000."
Kenny stressed the administration is trying to preserve academic
positions but intends to extract
most of the money from the "faculty side." He said the shortfall could
grow, depending on the faculty
wage settlement, which is currently
under review.
Student board representative
Margaret Copping said she was
recently told a difference of one per
cent in the faculty wage settlement
could mean a difference of $1
million.
"The $700,000 is no where near
the importance of the faculty wage
settlement. The university's ability
to pay is going to be a big issue,"
Copping said, adding she and
fellow student board representative
Dave Frank were "shocked" when
they were told the difference one
per cent could make.
Kenny denied Frank's and Copp-
ing's allegations he was "clutching
at air" to get the amount $700,000
that 130 professors would have to
retire in the next two months to
make up the shortfall.
"I don't know what those people
are saying. The current shortfall is
definitely $700,000. And I have no
idea where this number (130) came
from," he said.
Faculty association president
Jonathan Wisenthal said the faculty
was not as badly affected in the
retrenchment process last year as
the non-faculty areas and he did not
consider the replacement solution
unfair or controversial in any way.
"It's just common sense that we
should be replacing senior people
with fresh blood and it's standard
policy," said arts dean Robert Will.
"We also have savings in the process. There just happens to be more
compelling reasons to do it now."
Bail hearing
adjourned
By KEITH BALDREY
Five people facing 17 charges ranging from car theft to firebombing
three Red Hot video stores must wait at least another week to find out if
they will be granted bail.
The five defendants' lawyers requested an adjournment of Monday's
"show cause" hearing until March 1 when they will present their case for
establishing bail.
Crown prosecutor Jim Jardine outlined his case for denying the defendants' bail, and presented evidence based almost entirely on surveillance of
the five defendants, who were arrested Jan. 20 on the Squamish highway.
As the hearing started, Justice Byron Baston ordered a ban on publishing
or broadcasting evidence from the case.
The defendants have also been charged with robbing a Vancouver IGA
store of $53,000 on Feb. 1, 1982.
They face 16 other charges, relating to the Red Hot bombings, the
dynamiting of a B.C. Hydro substation on Vancouver Island, possession of
restricted weapons, conspiracy to bomb an icebreaker in North Vancouver,
conspiracy to sabotage military aircraft and conspiracy to rob a Brink's armored car.
The courtroom was packed with more than 100 supporters and family of
the accused, reporters and undercover police. People lined up for more
than an hour to gain access to the hearing.
Supporters stood when the defendants walked into the courtroom, and
cheered loudly when they left with fists clenched in the air after the hearing.
More than 50 people who could not enter the crowded courtroom
chanted and sang songs outside.
Two hours before the hearing supporters of the five accused held a rally
at the courthouse to support their right to a fair trial, and to protest against
the media's coverage of the case and the police harrassment of members of
Vancouver's alternative community.
About 200 people, many wearing red fire hats with "We are all the Wim-
min's Fire Brigade" stickers on them, chanted "Free the five, the media
lies," and listened to a variety of speakers.
A member of the defendants' support group criticized the police for
raiding several group members' homes.
See page 2: PROTESTS
The house that cost a lot
By BRIAN JONES
Gimme shelter.
If you happen to be a university
president, Mick Jagger's famous
phrase takes on an entirely new
meaning.
And shelter is exactly what UBC
president-elect George Pedersen is
going to get — $500,000 worth.
The UBC board of governors has
decided to renovate the president's
residence, which has housed the
Botanical Garden offices and
laboratories since 1975. The house
was built in 1950 for $61,000 and
was intended to be the official
residence of UBC presidents.
"We feel it is important for the
president to live on campus and
establish better links with the community and students," David
McLean, board member and property committee chair, said Monday. "To some it may seem to be an
extravagant move. We don't think
it is."
The university will pay $200,000
toward the renovations and plans to
solicit the remaining $300,000 from
private contributors.
"The university is putting up a
very small amount of money to do
this job," said McLean. He said
UBC "showed restraint" in only
spending $200,000.
The board's intention is for the
president to develop contacts with
people and corporations who can
donate money to the university,
said McLean. "For that you have to
have the tools. Things don't happen
automatically."
UBC students should support the
plan and contribute money to help
defray the cost, McLean said. "It's
their house as much as the president's," he said. "This could be a
start to a whole new way of running
UBC."
Pedersen said Monday that his
occupancy of the house was "put
forward as a condition of employment," but that it did not necessari
ly provide for the best in family living.
"There is a fair incursion on your
privacy," said Pedersen. "It's not
all great and glorious."
Student board representative
Margaret Copping said she supports the plan and will not speak
against it to the board.
"If Pedersen can establish contacts with corporations, that's the
money we're going to need, given
government fiscal restraint," said
Copping. "There is every indication
that he will make the most of the
facility, and that is heartening."
Student board rep Dave Frank
could not be reached for comment.
HOUSE SURVEY
What is your opinion on spending $500,000 to
renovate the UBC presidential house?
□    Good idea
No way I
Don't care
Only if I can go for tea
Tear out and drop in ballot boxes marked
"Ubyssey House Survey" in SUB, in Sedgewick
and outside the bookstore.
& Page 2
THE   UBYSSEY
Funding and gears freeze
Tuesday, February 22,1983
From page 1
Pulp and paper engineering and
the recent four-year engineering
program may also have to be held
because of the cut, Kenny said.
"Significant sums of dollars will be
required to start these programs."
After senate members approved
the four-year engineering program
Wednesday, Kenny warned
members, "My guess is this pro
gram won't go through (for funding
reasons)."
The provincial government
would "not be opposed" to enrolment restrictions to help the budget
situation, Kenny said.
Direct funding of certain programs by the provincial government, such as the Simon Fraser
University engineering program "is
not  new,"  Kenny said.  "Where
Protests surround trial
From page 1
"Six of us were interrogated.
They've realized one month (after
the arrests) they don't have enough
evidence," she said.
"We do not recognize their
power. We will not be weakened
and we will not be crushed," she
said.
A spokesperson from Rape Relief
said, "We are a group of freedom
fighters. Many of us have done
limited property damage. It seems
to us the bombing of Red Hot video
is in keeping with the suffragette
tradition and has nothing to do with
terrorism."
Some of the crowd hounded CBC
reporter Harry Phillips for earlier
rumaging through some of the accused's garbage cans, looking for a
story.
Sexually undaunted
(RNR/CUP) — Concern over genital herpes apparently hasn't changed
the sexual habits of American college students.
In a survey of 200 students at Brown University in Rhode Island, only 24
per cent of the men and six per cent of the women said they had changed
their sex habits out of fear of herpes.
Nearly two-thirds said they hadn't made any changes at all, and 24 per
cent said they didn't care because they weren't doing anything anyway.
UBC
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there is government initiative there
will be the extra dollars," he said.
Any time a provincial government sends such a letter, it is an intrusion on university autonomy student board of governors member
Margaret Copping said Monday.
"But when the provincial government is paying the bill, they often
think they can call the shots."
Copping said the board received,
but did not discuss the letter during
the closed session of its Feb. 3
meeting.
"The tone of the letter is very
vague," Copping said. "All the letter says is don't get too cocky,
there's still a recession on folks."
Lflie good day eh and welcome to the wont reed part of the paper. Our topic for today is
freedom from oppression, just at there are an kinds of people who take ex-tax. there are all
kinds of people who are oppressed. The really big problem behind oppression and supresaion
|sof human rights i» a "me first," "i dont care about you or anybody else" kind of attitude
which seams to be very prevalent in our society. People tend to be apathetic even if they
basically agree with an issue. The majority will not get out there and help. "Yes, world peace
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For The Very Best In Entertainment Tuesday, February 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Student aid may be tied to marks
By PAUL WEETMAN
The Canadian Federation of
Students is giving low marks to
plans by the provincial government
to index student aid to academic
standing.
And CFS intends to use the issue
to solicit public support.
"We plan to use the issue to bring
to the public other issues," CFS
staff member Phil Link said on
Monday. "We are going to focus
on that issue, but there are 100
others that are just as bad."
"The argument of the government right now is that the system is
elitist, so lets make it more elitist.
The argument we are going to use is
that the system is bad right now, so
let's stop it before it gets worse."
CFS-Pacific   chair   Donna
Morgan agreed. "It's ridiculous.
That money's awarded for food,
not marks."
"Basically it's (academic standing) a way to save money, because
only first-class students are going to
receive the maximum allowable
amount. Even the financial awards
office said it would be an administrative nightmare."
"I don't think anyone would
argue that students should be pas-
ing," Dan Worsely financial aid officer said. "The idea of academic
progress is not such a bad one, but
if it is set unreasonably high, one
begins to wonder."
At a council of the Ministers of
Education of Canada meeting in
Victoria recently, Secretary of State
Serge Joyal proposed raising the
In the beginning
there were five
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
The controversial four year
engineering program was approved
by senate Wednesday, although it is
unlikely funds will be available to
implement it immediately.
The program will allow students
with a high academic standing to
skip the prerequisite year in science
and go directly into engineering.
But science dean Cy Finnegan expressed concern that the change is
the beginning of a move to a four
year program for all engineering
students.
Faculty association president
Jonathan Wisenthal said he
couldn't see any other reason for
the change. "There is already a program that allows top students to
complete engineering in four years.
If we already have that program
why do we need another?" Wisenthal asked.
When the program was first
presented to senate in January, the
revised calendar description stated
"the four year engineering program
(would become) the normal route."
That statement was omitted from
the revised proposal.
Applied science dean Martin
Wedepohl denied the four year program would become the norm.
"Students must have top marks in
chemistry, math and physics to
qualify," he said. "Their progress
will be carefully monitored ... at
least in the beginning."
Wedepohl said the four year program is necessary. Top high school
students will go to other universities
that offer four year programs if
UBC doesn't provide them, he said.
But UBC chancellor J.V. Clyne
said the four year program will
seriously compromise the quality of
engineering grads by undermining
their educational foundation. "The
changes taking place in society today will undoubtedly require more
breadth in education," he said.
Wedepohl said concerns about
breadth and quality were unfounded, and that the four year program
meets the Canadian Accreditation
Board's requirement that
humanities courses comprise one
eighth of any program. The current
five year program does not meet
that requirement, he said.
Student senator Lisa Hebert
questioned the engineering definition of humanities, which includes
economics, administration,
physical education and public
speaking.
The four year program also
restricts humanities options at the
high school level by requiring that
students graduate with math,
chemistry and physics 12, Hebert
said.
Applied science student senator-
elect Sean Williams who supports
the four year engineering program,
said after the meeting most
engineering students object to the
four year program because they are
misinformed.
In November, 90 per cent of
engineers polled by applied science
student senator Peter Hoenberger
opposed the program.
What is breadth?
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
Senate received a breadth of fresh
air Wednesday when it approved
"the principle that students should
receive a broad exposure to a variety of disciplines . . . before completing any baccalaureate degree."
Discussion of what breadth
means or how to implement it was
deferred until November. Individual faculties will then have had
an opportunity to comment on the
proposed guidelines prepared by
senate's breadth committee.
Breadth committee chair Richard
Spencer said students need breadth
so they will be capable of functioning in a variety of arenas.
Students should receive education in science, technological
development, human behavior,
culture, history and ethics, Spencer
said.
"These are things we should be
giving people in addition to what
they get from their specialty," he
said.
The five year engineering program  is  the only  undergraduate
degree that currently meets the proposed requirements, Spencer said.
The four year engineering program,
which Spencer strongly supports,
does not meet the proposed requirements, he said.
If students can't meet all the proposed requirements then they
should be obliged to meet some of
them in order to achieve a degree of
breadth, Spencer said.
History professor Jean Elder said
that breadth can't be created by
mechanically tacking a number of
units onto an existing program.
"In the statement approving the
principle of breadth, the word exposure is used as though students
will be required to take up a supine
position with their bodies naked to
the weather," Elder said.
Spencer apologized for not including anything about the
philosophy of breadth in the committee's report.
"As a graduate of a four year
engineering program I felt woefully
unprepared."
student allowance to $100 from $56 "We don't know how we're going minimum amount neccessary for a
per week if provincial governments to live with the present budget." student to live on is $6,600 per year,
maintained their present level of Currently, the maximum a stu- Morgan said,
student aid. dent can receive in aid is $3,800. "To a large degree students are
There are now indications the The federal government provides written   off   by   the   government
provincial   government   may   not $1,800 in the form of a loan, at 16.7 because they aren't expecting too
meet their requirements. per cent interest, while the provin- much of the student vote, anyway,"
"As for the student loans, there cial government contributes up to Link said. "The main focus of the
are grave concerns in the govern- $2,000 in grants. work we are doing is outreaching to
ment,"   Dean   Goard,   provincial A study conducted by Capilano the public, making them aware of
university   affairs   director   said. College    has   determined    the our concerns."
.y,"t K
\1        *,»*'-
— eery rodm photo
LATEST BUDGET CUTTING device devised by crazed UBC scientist working on project directly funded by
universities ministry is designed to solve current financial problems by eating up costs. Machine swallowed
several administrators and professor Monday before getting its $50,000 a year quota for day. Machine attempted
to gobble up student council, but was forced to throw mess up after excessive gas and heartburn caused acid indigestion.
'A lot of what I sell is degrading'
By SARAH COX
People have finally taken action
to stop the UBC bookstore selling
magazines which depict sexual
violence against women.
A campaign committee was
formed Friday by people frustrated
with bookstore manager John
Hedgecock's refusal to address objections to the magazines.
"We've reached the end of the
line as far as he is concerned," said
committee member Josephine
Evans. Evans, who has been trying
to get Hedgecock to remove the
magazines since September, said the
university validates the degradation
of women by selling pornographic
magazines in a campus bookstore.
"Selling it propagates the idea
that it's okay for men to use and
degrade women against their wills.
It fosters the lie that women love
anything men might want to do
with them even though it may
humiliate or hurt," she said.
Hedgecock avoids confronting
the real issues by asking for definitions of pornography and calling
removal of the magazines censorship, said Evans.
The issue is not censorship but
human rights, she said. "We're
referring to material which degrades
women and makes profits by ex
ploiting them. Hedgecock is already
drawing a line by not selling child
porn or magazines which show
black people beating and raping
white people."
Hedgecock said he is not in a
position to judge whether the
magazines in the bookstore degrade
women. "They could, l suppose.
I'm quite sure that a lot of the
literature I sell is degrading toward
somebody.
"I don't honestly know if the
magazines show violence toward
women."
Hedgecock said he could not
remove the magazines because he
would not partake in censorship.
"Removing literature from the
bookstore under some kind of
pressure would constitute censorship," he said. Even if a majority
object to the magazines, Hedgecock
said he would not remove them
unless ordered to by his employers.
"We've done a lot to protect the
rights of minorities," he said.
Evans said the educational campaign will be started immediately.
Pamphlets about the issues involved
will be distributed on campus, petitions circulated, and a display and
information table will be set up in
SUB, Evans said.
25 of 2,500 of 25,000
More than 25,000 UBC students failed to show up Wednesday for the
Alma Mater Society annual general meeting.
The meeting, required by the B.C. Society Act, was about 2,500 people
short of the required 10 per cent quorum.
And even outgoing AMS president Dave Frank took the meeting lightly.
Frank failed to submit his president's report, as required by the AMS bylaws. "I had a mid-term instead," he told the 25 people present. "I aced
my mid-term though."
The meeting was presented with financial statements and appointed the
AMS auditors.
The last time an AMS annual general meeting reached quorum was in
1975 when the rock band Chilliwack was hired, two trips anywhere in
"Air Canada's world" and two kegs of beer were given away. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 22,1983
Roofing it
Okay, so maybe you had a rough time last September finding a place to
live, and have found it hard to cover rent and other costs while going to
school.
And, just maybe, you might find it hard to get a summer job to allow you
to pay a thousand bucks to come back to UBC next year.
Big deal.
Just think of the turmoil that must be going through George Pedersen's
mind right now as he sits perched atop Burnaby Mountain trying to figure
out how he is going to decorate his new, renovated UBC presidential
house.
Try to imagine how nervous the board of governors must be as they
wonder whether the man they hired can mix martinis well enough to impress corporate executives. Will Pedersen's Palace enthrall them to the extent necessary for them to dip into their corporate pockets and give
generously, nay selflessly, to UBC?
And what of the government? Will their guilt about holding the universities to a zero per cent budget increase next year cause them to bolster the
budgets of other hardup institutions, like B.C. Place, the banks or the
military, for example?
Then there is the universities' image. Should they sit idley while corporations take a greater responsibility for their funding, and thereby gain a
greater say in their operation and direction?
So rest assured. You are not alone in your dilemmas. Everybody has
perplexing problems.
Look on the bright side. At least you're not being hassled by the board of
governors. They're ignoring you.
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Council warns about new program funding
Douglas Kenny
President, UBC
It has been a consistent policy of
council not to inferfere in the
academic affairs of the universities.
I am now writing, however, to
sound a fiscal warning to presidents
and boards of governors concerning
new and emergent programs started
at the request of the respective
universities before the present
financial crisis descended upon us.
Council feels that a redeployment
of shrinking funds may have to be
made by the board within each
university so that the broad public
interest is served. In council's view
the level of funding of universities
in the coming year or years will require hard decisions to be taken if
the core offerings of our institutions are to be preserved.
As you are aware, the funding of
new and emergent programs is a
discretionary initiative of council.
Once granted to a university, such
funds, in normal times, have been
used precisely for the purpose
given. However, it is felt that in today's unpredictable financial context, these funds should be conserved by boards of governors for those
areas in which high student demand
obtains, and where broad social
policy is best served.
In other words council relies on
the good judgement of boards of
governors to take whatever
emergency action seems wise in the
circumstances. The appointment of
new faculty to teach new course offerings would, in the current circumstances, seem to me to be unwise. A moratorium of indefinite
length on some new and emergent
programs may be necessary, regrettable as this may be.
It is council's understanding that
the academic vice-presidents are
currently attempting to decide what
new and emergent programs ought
to proceed from a system perspective in these times of constrained
funding. This sort of institutional
cooperaton will greatly facilitate
council's own decisions when it
must ultimately deal with these matters. In my opinion there will not be
enough money to continue the past
levels of funding for new and
emergent programming.
In conclusion, let me say that
council relies on each university,
through its president and board of
governors, to expend the limited
funds likely to be available in the
next few years in a manner which
will conserve the excellence built up
in our institutions over a considerable period and to develop only selected new programs meeting
outstanding provincial needs.
William C. Gibson,
universities council
of B.C. chair
The word, according to Maranatha
After having read Gays find God
(Feb. 11), I was struck by the way in
which homosexuality was portrayed
as an alternative lifestyle. In the Bible, God shows us time and time
again that homosexuality is sin, yet
people continue to harden their
hearts to this fact. The basic problem is that people try to reach God
on their own terms and not his.
If you are a Christian, there in no
way you can be a homosexual. In
the book of Leviticus in the Bible,
God considers homosexuality to be
an "abomination" and in the book
of Romans an "unnatural
relation".
God is clearly opposed to
homosexuality but he is equally opposed to fornication, adultery and
drunkeness. In I Corinthians
6:9-10, it states: "do not be deceiv-
'Godiva defiled by gears'
'Gay persecution
is reprehensible'
The persecution of any group of
people (including gays) in our society is reprehensible. Indeed, if
homosexuals have been treated badly by certain Christian groups it is
cause for genuine concern and
repentance on the part of those
Christian groups.
However:
1) The issue does not appear to be
the church's acceptance of
homosexuals per se; rather, the
issue appears to be the church's acceptance of (and blessing upon)
homosexual practices.
2) Even if the church were to fully recognize and bless homosexual
practices, it still would fail in making such practices "right" or
"theologically sacrosanct".
3) While theologians do, in fact,
disagree on Paul's statement in
Romans 1:26, this does not constitute a carte blanche endorsement
of homosexual practices within the
church. Scripture says nothing
specific on the issues of "nuclear
war" or "abortion on demand"
and, yet, we are intuitively aware of
their possible consequences for
mankind. (Though there are scriptural insights which can be brought
to bear on these two issues.)
4) To allow any social or political
group to determine church doctrine
and policy (in order to accommodate their own ends) is to set a
dangerous precedent. The church
(and its doctrine) is answerable to
Christ; not to the state or to current
popular social conventions,
however appealing and "with it"
these conventions may appear to be
(See Romans 12:Iff).
In short, the true church is called
to live in humble submission to the
Lordship of Christ; and, not dic-
tatorially over Christ. This is a fact
which those both for and against
homosexual practices in the church
must remember!
Brian McGregor-Foxcroft
Theology/Regent college
Holy smoke!
Given a choice between full-page
cigarette ads and half-baked
thoughts from fundamentalists on
what God thinks about Pooves, I
would almost read the ads. But
then, without ads for cancer-
causing substances in your esteemed
organ, we probably would not have
to put up with either. It is great to
see moral conviction in idealistic
youth.
Dr. Eric Jeffries
dept. of health care
I am writing in response to Jim
Davies' letter Sexist Tradition Rationalized (Feb. 15). That is exactly
what it is: a sexist event being implausibly rationalized.
Granted, Lady Godiva was a
courageous, honorable woman,
who rode "without loss of honour,
without loss of virtue" through
Coventry. It is encouraging to see
the lady has earned the kind of
recognition and honour she
deserves. Because of her courage,
the people of Coventry were free
from the burden of unfair taxes.
But do you really believe this is
what the engineers are
"honouring" by having a prostitute
ride on the UBC campus with hundreds of scampering, excited gears
and on-lookers laughing at this
ridiculous scene? Do you really
think CKVU gets close-up coverage
to leave nothing to the imagination
in order to honour this great
woman of history? I hardly think
so.
Most people are not even aware
of Lady Godiva's motives nor of
her honour. Who can regard this
prostitute's job, amusing the
troops, getting paid for her exposure as having even the slightest
resemblance of Lady Godiva's act?
Perhaps they think that this modern
Lady Godiva is going to free the
engineering undergraduate society
of its burdensome debt.
Calling the Lady Godiva tradition sexist is not taking away
Godiva's honour, as Davies states:
it is this enactment, this desecration
that the engineers so proudly
honour and cherish every year that
defiles Lady Godiva's deed. It
should be noted also that those who
oppose this act are not necessarily
against the group of people responsible. In fact, some of the gears'
feats are amazing works of
engineering genius.
However, their traditions that are
sexist, homophobic or demeaning
to a particular woman (or women in
general) are in extreme bad taste. It
is embarassing having such
tasteless, disgusting and
discriminatory behavior represent
this faculty because of the immaturity and stupidity of a small
minority within its midst.
Beau Henderson
arts 3
ed; neither fornicators, nor
idolators, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor homosexuals, nor
thieves, nor the covetous, nor
drunkards, nor revilers, nor
swindlers, shall inherit the kingdom
of heaven".
Many of you may agree with the
biblical perspective on homosexuality yet continue to live in fornication. Realize that this sin is no
worse than homosexuality. Sin is
sin and God cannot tolerate it. If
you judge someone because he is a
homosexual while you continue to
live in sin, you are setting double
standards to fit your personal
perspective.
In Matthew 7:5 it says, "You
hypocrite, first take the log out of
your own eye, and then you will see
clearly to take the speck out of your
brother's eye".
As the Bible says in Romans 6:23,
"The wages of sin is death"
(spiritual separation from God). It
is for this reason that Christ died
for us, to give us eternal life. As it
says in John 3:16, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only
begotten son, that whosoever
believes in him should not perish,
but have eternal life."
Darwin Dewar
marantha christian
club president
THE UBYSSEY
February 22, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday through
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office in SUB 266. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising 228-3977.
Excitement filled The Ubyssey office as the happy family prepared for another night of fun at
the printers. "Let's plan where we'll put the furniture in our new home," shouted keith
Baldrey and Charles Campbell. "We're so excited about moving together," gigled Peter
Berlin and Robby Robertson. "We can grow vegetables on the balcony," chipped in Paul
Weetman and Ian Timberlake. "And we can all sleep on the couch," said Patti Flather.
"Woof," said Doug Schmidt as he chased Chris Wong and Robert Beynon around the room.
"Are you ready for dinner?" asked Daddies Arnold Hedstrom, Brian Jones, and Shaffin
Shariff. "We wanna get some sleep. We don't wanna go anywhere," whined Muriel
Draaisma and Sarah Cox. Aunt Lisa Morry took them firmly by their hands. "Let's look at the
gold fish first," she said. They watched Victor Wong, Jean Mustard and Monte Stewart
swim with their mouths open and laughed at the silly fish. "Ooh, look at the funny people,"
whispered Alison Hoenes and Doug Boyd. But Mama Craig Brooks wasn't having fun. He
wished he'd never had so many children.
^ r
Tuesday, February 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
mem-mp>
rifVfV
Lett ers
Who is this God Christ anyway?
I want to express my sincere
thanks for the efforts the staff of
The Ubyssey put into producing our
university newspaper.
Your articles have a radical flair
about them and I think that's good
because it gets the students thinking.
The article Gays Find God (Feb.
11) is an example. I read it with interest because of it controversial
nature. Yet, I think for a lot of
students, it would have been easier
to understand if the author had
done some explaining of what
Christianity is.
The Oxford dictionary definition
is: "The Christian faith, the system
of doctrines and precepts taught by
Christ." But even that's not much
help. What's a faith? What's a doctrine? Who is Christ? What did he
teach?
I guess the most important question for your typical student is: so
what? What does this have to do
with me anyway?
As you can see the more controversial the article the more questions can be stirred up in the minds
of its readers. I know that with
limited space you can't answer all
of them, but for the sake of the
reader, some of them need to be
answered.
M. C. R. McLoughlin
grad studies
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
Tues., Feb. 22—
Free   Lunch   sponsored   by   Hillel   Mothers,
12:30-2:00 p.m.
Wed., Feb. 23-
"Rap with the Rabbi" - 12:30 p.m. - Lunch
available. Dinner — 6:00 p.m. featuring surprise
speakers.
Thurs., Feb. 24—
Network Seminar  —   12:30 p.m.  featuring a
media update and a report on Deir Yassin —
Lunch available.
Fri., Feb. 25 -
Israeli Dancing in preparation for Israeli Week
12:30 p.m.
Sat., Feb. 26 -
Purim Party — 7:00 p.m. Bring your own dessert
and drink.
Henrik Ibsen's
Classic
HEDDA
GABLER
directed by
Beryl Baylis
(MFA Thesis Production)
February 22-26
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $5.00
Students & Srs. $3.00
Box Office: Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre
DOROTHY
SOMERSET
STUDIO
University of British Columbia
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
NOTICE
OF ELECTION
NOMINATIONS FOR THE W.A.A. EXECUTIVE:
- PRESIDENT - VICE-PRESIDENT
- SECRETARY - MEMBER-AT-LARGE
OPEN: FEBRUARY 28, 1983. CLOSE: MARCH 11, 1983
Elections to be held at the annual general meeting on
Monday, March 21, 1983 at 12:30 p.m. in Room 211
War Memorial Gym.
MANAGERIAL POSITIONS OPEN FOR ALL SPORTS
BADMINTON FIELD HOCKEY SOCCER
BASKETBALL GYMNASTICS SQUASH
CROSS COUNTRY ICE HOCKEY SWIMMING & DIVING
CURLING ROWING TRACK & FIELD
FENCING SKIING VOLLEYBALL
APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED UNTIL MARCH 18, 1983
* All nomination forms and managerial applications are
available at the Athletic Office: Room 208 War Memorial
Gym.  '
"HAIR IS" one of Vancouver's most progressive
hair cutting teams, and we are presently looking
for models. If you've tired of looking like everyone
else and are interested in having a creative
hairstyle designed just for you, please give us a
call at "HAIR IS" — 879-8314. Stylists training
from New York, Toronto and London.
1983 GRAD CLASS GIFT
Cut out this ballot and vote for 3 gifts. Ballots marked with more than 3 choices will be considered void.
Place your name, number, faculty, year and signature on the ballot and deposit it in the nearest box.
Please note that ballot boxes may not be available in all locations all week. Last day to hand in ballots is
Friday, Feb. 25, 1983.
Ballot boxes are located in:
Agriculture Undergrad Soc. Office
Buchanan Lounge
Commerce Undergrad Soc. Office
Woodward Lounge
Education Undergrad Soc. Office
NAME
Dean's Office of Engineering
Law Library
Dean's Office of Science
Speakeasy — SUB
Circulation Desk of Main Library
"studentNUMBER
.SIGNATURE   	
FACULTY AND YEAR	
GIFT
1. Handicap access to SUB —
Due to the increasing number of handicapped people attending UBC, we must consider providing handicap access to SUB. Ramps, elevators and maps are some of the things which are needed.
2. Law Student's Legal Advice Society
Requests funds to hire one full time student during the summer so that established clinics do not have to
be closed. Grad class contributed to this last year.
3. Logger Sports Field House
Forestry Undergrad Soc. has requested funds to build a log cabin large enough to seat 75 people at benches. Also included will be washrooms, change rooms and a fireplace.
4. Amateur Radio Society Antenna Replacement
Funds have been requested by this society to replace their aging tower and antenna system, which is
presently rusty and dangerous.
5. Great Trek Plaque
Funds have been requested for a bronze plaque to commemorate 1983 as the 60th anniversary of the
Great Trek. The plaque is to be affixed to the stone cairn in front of the Chemistry Building.
6. Microbiology Commemorative Benches
The Dept. of Microbiology has requested funds to build benches to commemorate the retiring of the
founder of the department, Dr. J. J. R. Campbell.
7. Psychology Benches
Psychology students have requested funds to build benches outside the new Psych, building when it is
completed in the spring of 1984.
8. WUSC — Student Refugee Program
World University of Canada requests funds to a student refugee at UBC who has had to flee his country
for political reasons.
9. East Indian Farmworkers Literacy Campaign
A request for funds has been made for the purchase of cassette recorders for an "English as a Second
Language" program for East Indian farmworkers.
REQUEST       VOTE
$5,000.00 □
$3,000.00   □
$3,000.00 □
$1,900.00 □
$400.00 □
$480.00 □
$500.00 □
$750.00 □
$900.00 □■ Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 22,1983
Violence, threats hit Campus
MONTREAL (CUP) — Violent
homophobia has errupted again at
Bishop's University in Lennoxville,
Quebec, following the Feb. 11
publication of a gay and lesbian
supplement in the student
newspaper.
Three students, two of whom
worked on the supplement for the
student newspaper, The Campus,
received hate letters threatening to
"squash the queers and faggots."
About 500 Campus issues were also
stolen from the newpaper's office.
The supplement was co-ordinated
by Campus staff member Daron
Westman, who is also involved with
local gay groups. He was beaten up
Feb. 13 by three unidentified men,
one of which hit Westman with
a hockey stick.
Westman saw only two of his attackers, who were disguised in ski
masks. Westman suffered a sprained wrist and a cut above the left eye.
An unidentified person or persons sent Westman, Campus editor
Bob Palmer and his friend
Stephanie   Lindeburg  hate   letters
Feb. 14, threatening to break
Westman and Palmer's legs and to
rape Lindeburg. Lindeburg did not
work on the supplement and is not a
Campus staff member.
All three were shocked by the extremely personal, violent tone of
the unsigned letters.
"I didn't see anything (in the
issue) to get people upset," said
Lindeburg. The four-page supplement included a poem describing
violent attacks against gays, stories
on the daily experiences and attitudes faced by gays and lesbians
and a history of the struggle for
recognition of the Bishop's Gay
Students' Alliance.
"I expected hate letters, but
one's that we could have
published," said Palmer.
Westman, who the supplement
described as "still the only open gay
person on campus," was assaulted
three times last year in Lennoxville.
But he didn't expect any violence
this time — just nasty notes.
"I was thinking things had im-
Paper survives
takeover attempt
LENNOXVILLE (CUP) — The
student newspaper at Bishop's
University has survived a sudden
council referendum designed to increase council control over the
paper.
The referendum, held Feb. 15
with only 24 hours notice, was to
encourage students to "throw a
couple of ideas out," according to
student representative council president Bill French.
The referendum asked how much
money students would volunteer
annually to the newspaper, The
Campus, what they thought of the
paper, and whether they approve
the creation of an SRC-controlled
Campus publications board.
The publications board would
appoint the editor and the business
manager. All decisions on the
council-funded Campus are currently "made democratically by staff
members.
The SRC held the referendum
because it thought students were
dissatisfied with the paper's general
orientation, said French.
"We perceived the student
newspaper to be a student service,
as well as a breeding ground for
newspaper    radicals.    It    was
necessary to move in a direction
more responsive to student needs,"
he said.
The council discussed the referendum Feb. 9, but The Campus was
not told of the council's intentions
until the day before the referendum. The SRC constitution has no
provisions for holding a referendum.
The referendum came four days
after The Campus published a controversial gay and lesbian supplement.
The voter turnout was 181, out of
Bishop's 850 students. Twenty-two
students signed a statement issued
by The Campus objecting to the
short notice and the lack of information concerning the issue.
Although students narrowly supported a publications board, they
refused to give the SRC the mandate to make any changes without
first consulting them.
The SCR's actions have been
condemned for infringing on
freedom of the press by the student
newspapers at Concordia and
McGill Universities, the Quebec executive of Canadian University
Press, and the McGill University
student society.
Council wants hike
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Students
at the University of Manitoba are
beginning to mobilize against their
student union's campaign for a 9.5
per cent increase in tuition fees.
The U of M Students' Union
(UMSU) decided to lobby the provincial government for a 9.5 per
cent hike, even though it doesn't set
tuition fees, after university president Arnold Naimark said an increase of between 17 and 25 per cent
is likely.
UMSU president Erik Tatarchuk
said its support for a 9.5 per cent increase would demonstrate that
students realize they must contribute their fair share to the cost of
education.
Science student Darren Gudmon-
don and arts senator Thomas
Therien are encouraging students to
write to both the provincial and
federal governments to lobby for
increased funding and a freeze on
tuition fees.
"Supporters of the 9.5 per cent
increase claim students have to take
more responsibility for the cost of
proved. I guess Bishop's hasn't improved in the four years I've been
here," he said. "It's hard to believe
this is 1983."
The assault against Westman is
being investigated by campus
security.
"The (university) atmosphere is
not very welcoming, it is very fearful," said Westman. "It is very
conservative and it's worse because
it's so small. There's a great deal of
pressure to conform."
The latest assault against
Westman is being investigated by
campus security. Westman is
debating whether he should enlist
the help of Lennoxville police. In
the past, he has found them to be
uncaring and uncooperative.
The university has not been very
supportive either, according to
Westman.
"The principal is not tremen
dously sympathetic about the gay
community. My impression is that
he's not overly concerned," he said.
A special gay and lesbian issue of
the Concordia University
newspaper provoked a similar reaction in November. Three contributors received violent threats
and about 5,000 copies of that issue
were destroyed.
No one has yet been found
responsible.
education, but I'd like to do that
when I'm able to — after I
graduate," Gudmondon said.
Therien siad the UMSU was
"sucked-in" by the university.
"UMSU pushed the panic button
when president Naimark said a 17
to 25 per cent increase would not be
unreasonable. What is amazing is
that UMSU didn't go for the
federal six and five," he said.
Both the Canadian Federation of
Students and the University of Winnipeg Students' Association have
condemned the UMSU strategy.
"Students are already having
trouble meeting the present financial burden heaped on them," said
CFS representative Jeff O'Malley.
"By raising tuition fees 9.5 per
cent, many more students would be
financially barricaded outside colleges and universities. Many people
decide to postpone or even abandon
their post-secondary education
because they simply can't afford
it."
The UWSA executive called the
9.5 per cent plan "reckless and irresponsible."
— ian timb.rlaka photo
Protesters performed guerrilla
theatre outside Robson Square
courthouse during Saturday's
protest against the testing of
American Cruise missiles in
Canada. More than 300 people
ignored a steady stream of rain
and proclaimed an Umbrella
Disagreement against Reagan
playing with his newest toy in
Alberta.
"Refuse the Cruise, Refuse
the Cruise," chanted children,
students, grandparents and
other people who decided to
take action against the first-
strike weapon.
"Young and old together,
we shall not be moved," sung
a group of people sheltering
under an umbrella with a card
board cruise missile perched
on top.
Protesters dressed as cruise
missiles swooped menacingly
up and down on the steps of
the courthouse, and a car
painted with anti-cruise
slogans passed the rally several
times.
Guerrillas dressed as Reagan
and Trudeau critisized increased government funding for
weapons while social services
are being cut and jobs disappear.
After the demonstration,
people painted messages and
slogans on huge pieces of
paper. "Earth Minus Direct Action Equals Apocalypse," proclaimed a message in bright
red paint.
-ian timbarlaka photo Should a
student
council. . .
THE UBYSSEY
. . .control
the students'
newspaper?
REAIERS'REPORT
Penurious paper
poshes palpable plans
Today, The Ubyssey presents a special report which summarizes a proposal to
reorganize the publications branch of the Alma Mater Society.
The Ubyssey has been plagued with economic problems throughout this
publishing year. The staff has been awakened to the hard economic realities of
the current recession — expenses don't drop, only revenues do. But on a more
optimistic note, Ubyssey staff has learned that to survive, strick management
and control over our business operations is essential. We found the
publication's organization lacking and in need of change.
We are presenting a summary of the proposal to our readers before we take it
to student council because you are the true owners of The Ubyssey. The full text
will be presented to student council, Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in SUB 206. All interested people are invited to attend.
The march of time has brought The
Ubyssey to a major turning point. The
Ubyssey is a large part of the Alma Mater
Society and requires full time management
and attention. Consequently, The Ubyssey is
planning for changes in the organization,
management, and mode of production of the
paper to give accountibility to a board of
directors. At the same time, costs will be
reduced and editorial autonomy strengthened.
The proposal is founded on the following
four principles.
1. Freedom of the press. A free press only
exists when there is no outside control —
either financial or editorial. This means the
press must be separate from those it reports
on. The Ubyssey does not now have this
separation and freedom.
2. Students controlling their own affairs.
The Ubyssey believes students are capable of
managing, coordinating and running any
enterprise — especially when professional
resources are available. The Ubyssey can and
will be efficient without council control.
3. Legal and moral responsibility. For the
press this means freedom with responsibility.
It also means upholding high journalistic
standards. The Ubyssey should be held accountable to its readers, not to student council.
4. Sound and professional business practises. The best way to achieve this without
compromising other principles is to have a
board of representatives and direct decision
making processes to over see production and
advertising.
The Ubyssey feels these founding principles and the society structure and regulations outlined in the constitution and bylaws
mean the paper will continue to grow and
provide the service students deserve on this
campus.
Service is the bottom line. Service to
students is why The Ubyssey staff each spend
up to 60 hours a week working on the paper.
On occasion, the paper is criticized for its
content. We accept it without excuses
because it makes us produce a better paper.
And a recent survey actually shows we are
giving most students what they want.
On average, two pages per issue of The
Ubyssey contain your letters. Letters are the
best read part of the paper.
Over 50 per cent of our news stories are exclusively about the university The table
shows what stories we have run from
September to mid-February this year.
But there is more to the paper than this.
The Ubyssey is also a major contributor to
other campuses' news coverage through
Canadian University Press' (CUP) news and
feature exchanges. The Ubyssey commands
great respect across the country from other
members of the 45 year old 55 member student paper cooperative.
The Ubyssey won the Southam trophy for
being the best student newspaper in CUP
seven years in a row before the award was
discontinued in 1968.
As the table shows, CUP is also a major
contributor to The Ubyssey's coverage of im
portant student issues and concerns from
other parts of Canada — we have used about
90 CUP stories since September.
The current situation on The Ubyssey is
grim. This year the paper has been smaller
and required $70,000 from students. Next
year, it will need about $90,000 unless things
change. Advertising is down 32 per cent
locally and 38 per cent nationally. The costs
of production are continually increasing and
the newspaper has no method to control
them.
But the staff is committed to saving and
improving the paper.
CONSTITUTION
The newspaper staff has written a constitution and bylaws to establish a board of directors for an independent society. The society
will be a branch society of the AMS. If the
new Ubyssey Publications Society should
ever dissolve, all assets will remain with the
AMS. The advantage for students is that the
publications society will keep a much more
vigilant watch over business. Currently the
AMS must divide its time on all AMS activities.
The board will be composed of four
students elected at large from all registered
students at UBC, three members of the
newspaper staff, and one employee of the
society.
The constitution and bylaws, along with
the Society Act, ensure the new society and
its board of directors will be responsible to
the owners — the students. A copy of the
proposed constitution and bylaws is available
in The Ubyssey office, SUB 241K.
ADVERTISING
Advertising is the basic financial component of the paper. Advertising furnishes the
paper with its major source of revenue. The
staff's proposal incorporates the ad office
under the management of the new society. It
is crucial to have interaction between the ad
office and the production and editorial
departments. The advertising office will be
responsible to the board through a business
manager. In an economic sense, the ad office
functions best inside the new society. It
doesn't make sense to pay another organization to get ads.
PRODUCTION
The Ubyssey plans to establish an on-
campus production facility. The shop will
have typesetting equipment, paste-up equipment, a process camera, and several
employees. In terms of service, the shop will
UBYSSEY STORIES 1982-83
AMS
42
Media
10
General
24
Health grants
9
Briefs
12
Children
7
Senate elections (4 pgs)
3
Arts
5
Council elections (3 pgs)
3
Engineering 4 year
5
Campus/UEL (trek)
37
Racism
3
Nukes/military
36
Daycare
3
Student aid
24
Civic
3
Post secondary education
21
Public education
2
International
21
CUP (included above)
88
Women's rights
21
Reviews
144
Campus labor
19
Film
38
Admin senate faculty board
19
Theatre
33
Cutbacks
17
Books
27
CES
16
Music
25
National
15
Groups
13
Unemployment
14
Art
6
Provincial (legal)
13
Sports
82
Misc.
13
Mens'
66
Labor
11
Womens'
16
Gay rights
11
Freestyles
6
Pornography
11
Photo essays
3
be available to all students on a reduced cost
basis. Other campus publications will also enjoy the use of the production facility.
It is expected that moving to in-house production will save up to $20,000 per year on
from the operating budget of The Ubyssey.
The paper's costs are presently the highest of
any student newspaper in Canada.
The Ubyssey examined several typesetting
systems. Without a doubt, now is the time to
buy. With the depressed economy,
distributors are offering generous discounts.
A system of four VDT screens will cost
$65,000 compared to $70,000 for a three
VDT system three to four years ago.
The current
situation on
The Ubyssey
is grim.
Advertising is
down
32 per cent
locally and
38 per cent
nationally.
CONCLUSION
Of course, this plan doesn't seem cheap.
But in the long run it will save students
thousands of dollars. The Ubyssey staff
hopes that with the constant attention an independent society offers, the organization
will lower costs and give students a truly
free press which is attentive to the needs of
UBC students.
In review, The Ubyssey will be asking
council to continue to fund the operating
budget of the paper, establish a separate
board to manage the society efficiently, lend
the new society enough money to establish a
production shop for printing in SUB, and
provide space in SUB for the new independent society. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 22,1983
The OLD FORT BREWING CO. reminds you not to forget to see the last two
basketball games, one on Thurs. and second on Sat. when the Thunderbirds go
out against Calgary and Lethbridge.
AMS CONCERTS LINEUP
M.A.S.H4077 NITE
3 Large Screens
Feb. 28 — 6 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Gene Roddenbury
creator and producer of
STAR TREK
Mar. 6 — 1:30 and 7:30
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
CITR PRESENTS
D.O.A.
Los Popularos — Braineaters
MAR. 11 - 8:30 P.M.
SUB BALLROOM
ALL AGES WELCOME
COMING SOON.
THE SPOONS
From Toronto
RATIONAL YOUTH
From Montreal
Advance Tickets for all shows now
available at A.M.S. Box Office
AMS TICKET OFFICE
Open 10-5 Monday-Saturday
VTC
Harlem Globetrotters — Feb. 23, 24
Headpins — Feb. 25, 26
Songfest '83 — Mar. 4
Shakespeare's "The Tempest" to Mar. 12
The Blasters — Mar. 10
Pointer Sisters — Apr. 2, 3
Joffrey Ballet — Apr. 6
Chuck Mangione — Apr. 19
Canucks Tickets, Plays, Symphony,
Opera and Much Morel
AMS CLUBS
AMS Speakers and Students for
Peace and Disarmament Present
Daniel Ellsberg — Mar. 26,
War Memorial Gym
CITR and Georgia Straight Present
Rank and File, Scissors and Melody Pimps,
Mar. 4, Ballroom
AMS CONCERTS:
"The War Is Over" (final episode of
(M*A*S*H) Feb. 28, Ballroom
D.O.A., Los Popularos, Braineaters,
Mar. 11, Ballroom
AMS SPECIAL EVENTS:
Star Trek with Gene Roddenbury,
The Blooper Reel "The Cage" (original
pilot for series)
Mar. 6, 1:30, 7:30, War Memorial Gym
Photofinishing Special: from Western Professional:
with each roll of C-41 develop-print one coupon for
1/3 off reprints. Coupon offered to Feb. 28, coupon
good to Mar. 21.
MARCH FARECARDS FEB. 23-MAR. 5
THE WAR IS
OVER!
See M.A.S.H. 4077
Last Episode on TV
BIG SCREENS in
SUB Ballroom
MONDAY, FEB. 28
6 p.m.
Lookalike Contest, Prizes
Original M.A.S.H. Movie
GET
DRAFTED *
BY
Advance Tickets at AMS Box Office
Presented by A.M.S. Concerts
BREAK THOSE
ACADEMIC CHAINS
Come to the PIT
Saturdays, Noon to 6
Feb. 19: "PINBALL MADNESS"
Black Hole, Sharpshooter, Buck Rogers
Feb. 26: "FOOSEBALL FUN TOURNEY"
ALL MACHINES ON FREE PLAY
PRIZES, SURPRISES
FOR HIGH SCORES, LOW SCORES
& MYSTERY SCORES
FOR SINGLES, TEAMS, COUPLES.
SEE YOU THERE!!!
rr
"PIT
UPDATE
Feb. 24 & 25
9:30 p.m.
HERALD NIX
Rocka Billy
Thursday — Free
Friday - $2.50
GALLERY
LOUNGE
Gary Bowman
Jazzie Blues
Feb. 21-26
9:00 p.m.
No Cover Charge
NOW SHOWING
FEB.-MARCH
IN
THE GALLERY LOUNGE
THE SWEETHEART OF PHOTOGRAPHY
in person
"DEE LIPPINGWELL"
Rock and Roll
Photography Show
Time: noon to 4 p.m.
Date: Feb.-March
Place: Student Union Building
Main Concourse
University of B.C. Tuesday, February 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Peace 'in crisis'
The British and German peace
movements are in a state of crisis, a
British Socialist Worker's party
member said Feb. 15:
"A peak has been reached where
the movements have built up successful demonstrations but they
can't be expected to get bigger,"
■ ■
Zeroing in
Canadians can best protest
against the arms race by opposing
the Cruise missile, the B.C.
chapter of Science for Peace president said recently.
It is important to focus on the
issue of Cruise missile testing in
Canada to further the goal of disarmament, UBC microbiology professor George Spiegelman said Feb.
14.
Comparing '60s anti-war activism
in the U.S.A. with the '80s disarmament movement, Spiegelman said
what is lacking now is not organization but large numbers of people
motivated to protest.
"There are no body counts on
TV," and so people ignore the
dangers of nuclear arms, he said.
Activist tactics should include intellectual argument, street actions
such as demonstrations, elections
and referenda on single issues, and
making disarmament a major issue
in regular party politics, Spiegelman
said.
Duncan Hallas told 15 people at
Brittania centre.
In his speech on The European
Peace Movement in the '70s and
'80s, Hallas called for a "fusion of
the anti-nuclear movement with the
concerns of the working people."
"No major union in Britain has
not called for disarmament," he
said.
Hallas said people must "change
the system because the arms race is
inherent to the present system, with
many non-nuclear states, including
Canada, playing a role."
He criticized the German
"Greens" and Social Democrats
and the British Labor Party for
"being wedded to gradual change
when confrontation is needed."
■ Precision Haircutting
15% OFF
Any Service
KEN    HIPPERT    HAIR
CO.
UBC Village -
Phone: 228-1471
with presentation of ad
to Terry, Karin, Debbie
Expires Mar. 31/83
LAST SALE
OF THE
SEMESTER
Sweaters, ladies .   $12.00
All Corduroys,
Men's & Ladies $12.00
Many Spring styles of
T-Shirts and Jeans
Many Colours
Sale Will Be Held
Feb. 21-25
Feb. 29-Mar. 4
Main Concourse
S.U.B.
R.A.JEANS
BLACK & LEE
TUX RENTALS
NOW 3 STORES
RICHMOND 273 5929
VANCOUVER 688-2481
SURREY 585-0733
MCAT
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HARMED BOS'ECFMG
FLEX-VQE. NOB-RNBDS
CPA* SPEED READING
Sfen&M-H KAPLAN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since  1938
For information. Please Call
__ (206) 632-0634 _
m
HEWLETT
PACKARD
calculators and
personal computers
H.P. 15 C $190.00
H.P.41C $299.00
H.P.41CV  $399.00
Discount Sales
437-6114
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1983 SPRING LECTURES
J. David Singer
Dr. J. David Singer of The University of Michigan is considered the world's leading authority on
the causes of major international war. He has published extensively on his topic and has been
active in communicating his research findings to statesmen and officials. Professor Singer is
known as an articulate, forceful and entertaining speaker with the ability to translate highly
technical knowledge into ideas understood by audiences at many levels. His lectures should appeal to those in the fields of political science, international relations, sociology, history and
psychology, as well as concerned members of the community.
SOCIAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY
Tuesday, February 22 — In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
FROM CONFRONTATION TO WAR
Thursday, February 24 — In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
MILITARY STRATEGY, POLITICAL TACTICS AND SURVIVAL
Saturday, February 26 — In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 p.m. (A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE-PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumlev at Local 5675 for information.
WE'RE DOING IT
AGAIN
NEW SHIPMENT
T-SHIRTS $2"
BASEBALL SHIRTS $549
FOOTBALL JERSEYS ±miKMt
"82" *10
UBC CAPS $3"
WED.-SAT., FEB. 23-26
Lower Floor-
Student Union Building
224-1911
Monday-Friday
9:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
Sat. 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
VISA&
MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 22,1983
TODAY
CUSO UBC
Hearth, from the ground up — primary health
care vs. "A pill for every ill." Part of development
education series, 7:30 p.m.. International House
main lounge.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 11:30-12:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus centre conference room.
UBC POTTERY CLUB
Sign-up for lessons — wheel-throwing — come
in any time and sign up, SUB 251.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
IN CANADA
Film showing — Limits to Growth — a film on
the report of the club of Rome's project on the
predicament of humanity, noon-1:30 p.m.,
Buch. A204.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Hon. William Rompkey, minister of state for
small business and tourism will speak and
answer questions, noon, Angus 226.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Lecture on medical ethics, noon, IRC 1.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Recycling committee, noon, SUB 206.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting — constitutional amendments
proposal and nomination for executive, noon,
SUB 205.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist happening with George Hermanson,
noon, Lutheran Campus centre.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
The economic crisis: Ethics and the Bishops, a
comment on the Catholic Bishop's statement by
professionals, 7:30 p.m., St. Mark's music room.
Phone 224-3311 for more info.
NEWMAN CLUB
Biweekly binge: Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's
lunchroom.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Arts  handbook   —   the  truth will  be  revealed
about arts, noon-1:30 p.m., AUS office.
String quartet, Buchanan lounge.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Anyone interested in gaining job experience or
just enjoying yourself through volunteering is encouraged to contact Volunteer Connections in
the student counselling and resources centre —
Brock hall 200. Call 228-3811 for more info.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Tuition fee receipts available, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
finance department, admin, building.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
The Osmonds The Great Brain, 6:30 p.m, SUB
auditorium. $1.50.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
207.
WEDNESDAY
SPEAKEASY
Information regarding student health and immigration, noon, SUB concourse.
HEALTH SCIENCE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture, whose side is the health care team on,
by Dr. Grantham, noon, IRC 6.
Lecture on the funnier side of health care, noon,
IRC 6.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Dinner followed by programme on attitudinal
healing with Joy Hebert, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beer garden, 4-6 p.m., Psychology annex 123.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Arts   review   will   be   available   in   Buchanan,
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Information    table    —    Environmental    Interest
Group,   Amnesty,   Solidarity,   LASC,   SPMD,
Buchanan.
Bear garden, 4-6 p.m., Psychology annex 123.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Weekly   gallery  meeting,   4:30  p.m.,   Gallery
lounge.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, all members please attend,
noon, SUB 205.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR
DISARMAMENT
Informal meeting with Russian academics on
mutual peace issues, 1:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
SPEC
Farmland panel, 7 p.m., 2150 Maple St. Gary
Runka, landsense Vancouver, Raj Chouhan,
IFU, and Dr. C. Clarke, Agriculture commission
with Evelyn Feller moderating.
THURSDAY
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Women in people related careers, a panel discussion, noon to 2:20 p.m.. Brock hall 302.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting: constitutional amendments
and executive nominations; noon, SUB 205.
CYCLING CLUB
New Zealand touring slide show; noon, Buch.
A102.
NEWMAN CLUB
The Frontier Apostolate, Prince George
College's principal speaks, noon, St. Mark's
music room.
ARTS UNDERGRADS
Graffiti contest, all day, Buchanan lounge.
Trombone quartet; noon, Buchanan lounge.
4TH YEAR DIETETICS
Subway special dinner event — Japanese dinner, 4:30, SUB cafeteria.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOC.
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Reform, a meeting; noon, SUB 111.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, all welcome, noon, Brock hall
304.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
No lecture on orthodontics by Dr. Lear, noon
IRC 1.
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
Herpes, a panel discussion, 7:30 p.m., for $10
IRC 5.
THUNDERBIRD CURLING
Canada west championship brier draw for defending UBC championships, 5 p.m., Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Sons of Haji Omar, noon, Asian centre
auditorium.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Sedimentology of the Lower Cretaceous Gates
and Moosebar Formations, NE B.C., noon, Geo.
Sci. 330A. S. Carmichael, UBC speaks.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Discussion   by  Alwaiz   Nazerali  on  fundamen
talsof Religion, noon, Buch. 216.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, Buch. B224.
FRIDAY
SPEAKEASY
Student    health    immunization    info,     noon,
Speakeasy.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym night, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Osborne gym A.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
BZZR   garden,   film,   1981   Coors   International
classic, 5 p.m., SUB 212.
NEWMAN CLUB
Friday's  fabulous  feast   —   TGIF  soup  lunch,
noon, St. Mark's lunchroom.
ARTS UNDERGRADS
Yacht Race, noon, Buchanan courtyard.
Bear garden and dance with John Doe Band,
4:00-7:30 p.m., Buch. lounge.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
Bzzr garden, 4:30-7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC NDP
Information table,  11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., SUB
concourse.
NOTICE:
STUDENT ART GALLERY
COMMITTEE
is now taking applications for
1983/84 STUDENT
EXHIBITIONS
Application forms in
SUB Room 238
Deadline March 4, 1983
jsaagaagsaa^^
UBC NDP CLUB/EDUCATORS FOR DISARMAMENT/STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
MP Svend Robinson on Nudaar arms in Canada:
noon, SUB 212.
THUNDERBIRD CURLING
Defending Canada west woman's curling champions play draws No. 2, 3. 4, 9 a.m., 2 p.m., 7
p.m., Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
General meeting: 5:30 p.m., geophysics and
astronomy 142.
PEOPLE     AGAINST    WOMEN     HATING
LITERATURE IN UBC BOOKSTORE
Meeting to organize, 3:30 p.m.. Women's
Center, SUB 130, all welcome.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD CURLING
Canada west defending women's champions
play championship draws No. 5 and 6. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre, 9 a.m., 1:30 p.m.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Gourmet ride to Trolls, Horseshoe Bay, 10 a.m.
south side SUB.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Badminton tournament (doubles only),
6:30-10:30 p.m., Osborne gym A.
SUNDAY
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Ride to Whidby Island, Wash., 10 a.m., north
side of SUB.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Game vs. New Westminster Y; 10 p.m., UBC
aquatic centre.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Party reform seminar, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., SUB 200.
NEWMAN CLUB
"Sexuality and the Individual — A Christian Approach," session two; 7:30 p.m., St. Mark's
music room.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome: 9 a.m., meet between SUB and aquatic centre.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Grad student Terence Dawson performs piano
music of Bach, Pavel, Beethoven and Scriabib, 8
p.m.. Music dept recital hall.
MONDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
The Law of the Sea lecutre. Prof. McRae, noon.
International House upper lounge.
"Israel" slide show with Mirium Bloom, 7:30
p.m., International House upper lounge.
At last it's Arts Week — the most
apathetic week on campus.
Arts started its inactivity on Monday
with apathy day. Apathy buttons and
apathy t-shirts are available at the AUS.
Today, the truth about arts will be
revealed in the Arts Handbook. There
will be live music in the lounge at lunch
time today and Thursday.
Wednesday the arts review will be
available and the winners of the literary
competition can come and claim their
monetary dues. On Thursday,
frustrated graffitti talent can go into the
AUS contest in the lounge.
Finally Friday at lunch you can take
part in the annual yacht races in
Buchanan courtyard.
The John Doe band will play for the
Art bear garden and dance. Profits will
go to the aid of solidarity members interned presently in Poland and a petition
for their release will be passed around.
See you there!
TAX REFUNDS NOW!
BENTAX
85% of calculated
refund includes
tax preparation.
BENTAX DISCOUNT CENTRE
Beneficial Income Tax Service
1854 W. 4th Ave.
736-0441
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
PRESENTS
THE TICKET-OF-LEAVE MAN
By Tom Taylor
A Victorian Extravaganza
Directed by Arne Zaslove
MARCH 4-12
(Previews — March 2 & 3)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4.50
Box Office
FREDERIC WOOD THEA TRE ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
International House
1783 West Mall
228-5021
INTERNATIONAL
WEEK
Feb. 28 — March 5
Information Available at International House
PANEL DISCUSSION
WOMEN IN
PEOPLE-RELATED CAREERS
"I don't know what I want to do,
but I want to work with people!"
An opportunity to meet & talk with
women who work with people. Find
out who they are and what their
jobs are like.
PANELISTS
GLADYS ADILMAN, Psychiatric Social Worker,
S.A.F.E.R.
ROSALEE HARDIN, Probation Officer/Family
Court Counsellor, Unified Family Court
BETTY ANDERSON, Gerontologist, Health
Sciences Hospital
SISTER LUCILLE, Director: L'Arche Greater
,Van., Jean Vanier Home for Retarded Adults
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 12:30-2:00
BROCK 302
SPONSORED BY
THE WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
wTHE CLASSIFIEDS-^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2AS
^Sf* Charge Phone Orders taken over $5.00. Call 228-3977. JfiG
5 — Coming Events
TREKKIES OF U.B.C! Subfilms presents
STAR TREK II all this week. Showtimes are
Wed. at 7:00, Thurs. thru Sun. at 7:00 &
9:30 and a matinee at 12:30 on Thurs.
11 — For Sale — Private
ONE WAY TICKET from Van-Frankfurt-
Zurich, good until May 15/83. Price $475.
Call Lui Moser, 224-7266.
40 — Messages
MARK: Your birthday message from your
brother Nicky is available in SUB Rm. 266.
WHEN YOU LOOK at the Brothers-inarms,
remember the ideals of our society.
Schlong.
50 — Rentals
65 — Scandals
20 — Housing
ROOM ft BOARD: On-Campus living convenience in the student residences. Beat
the commuting blues. Vacancies for men
and women. Apply at the Student Housing
Office, 2017 West Mall. The Ponderosa
Building. Call 228-2811.
70 — Services
FOR   YOUR   MARY   KAY  cosmetics,   call
Pam: 266-4812 or Lyn: 271-1737.
80 — Tutoring
25 — Instruction
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners Course or
Basic Coastal cruising. 30 ft. cruiser/racer.
Hands on experience. Registering NOW
Feb. Mar. Apr., classes. Don't be left on
the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after
7. Sailcraft Ltd.
TUTORING SERVICE: undergraduate and
graduate tutoring in geography, natural
resource management and community
planning. Tutor hold PhD in geography and
has seven years university teaching experience. 681-7936 or 669-1284.
85 — Typing
30 — Jobs
THE KEG PRIME RIB
and BOATHOUSE
Have openings for students
wanting to work 2-4 evenings per week. We are looking for enthusiastic, hard
working individuals. No experience needed as we train
our people on the job.
Apply any Wednesday between 2:00-3:30 p.m. 566
Cardero St. by the Bayshore.
TYPIST WANTED, part time. Must live near
or on campus. Work in own home. Call
224-6518.
STUDENTS WANTED who want to lose
weight, feel great, help others to do the
same and earn money too. 681-5659;
669-0818.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736 1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 873-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes,
Bilingual, Word Processor, Clemy,
266-6641.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further, resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone-in, 224-6518.
TYPING — essays, resumes, letters. $1.25/
page: free proportional spacing on
resumes, cover letters. 733-4534.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 8n
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333. Tuesday, February 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Diving 'Birds swoop on to victory
By JEAN MUSTARD
It was a busy three days at the
Aquatic Centre as the Thunderbirds
hosted the Canada West swimming
and diving championships while
other students were on midterm
break. The meet was somewhat
disappointing for the 'Birds as both
the men and women finished third
behind first place University of
Calgary and second place University of Alberta.
UBC coach Jack Kelso felt the
team lacked the depth and
superstars of the top two universities. Calgary's men's team is composed primarily of national team
members.
One of the internationals, Peter
Szmidt gave the meet's outstanding
performance. Szmidt swam the
1500 metres in 15 minutes and 39.07
seconds, breaking the conference
record by a massive 57 seconds.
Further conference records were
trimmed by Megan Watson of
Alberta in the women's 200 breast
SPOR
and Calgary's Tom Ponting in the
men's butterfly 200.
Despite the third place finish,
some individuals did well. Val
Whyte, Ronda Thomasson and Kim
Austin led the women's team.
Whyte swam to victory in the 100
and 200 metre backstroke events
and placed second in the 200 butterfly.
Teammate Thomasson (last years
UBC female athlete of the year)
came first in the 50 and 100 freestyle
races and second in the 200 I.M.
Kim Austin had two second place
finishes in the 100 and 200 metre
breaststroke events and placed third
in the 400 I.M.
Tyler Cant won the only men'
team victory in the 100 metre butterfly. Second plae finished were
achieved by Mike Ball (50 freestyle)
and Greg Lohin (100 breaststroke).
J^m^S-mSL^teaaSmmmmmmmW
n.J.d. photo
IS IT A 'BIRD? Is it a Dinosaur? Well actually it turned out to be a turkey and sure enough UBC's Bruce Holmes
went and stuffed it. Coach Bob Molinski gave thanks following his team's upset of third rated Calgary. Meanwhile lurking at the edge of the frame Lloyd Scrubb, last weeks photo hero, contemplates tickling Holmes' exposed armpit.
UBC footballers dominates draft
By MONTE STEWART
The UBC Thunderbird football
team dominated Canadian college
football last season and last Tuesday they dominated the Canadian
Football League college draft.
Ten Thunderbirds were drafted,
including the first four players
overall.
Offensive lineman Jerry
Dobrovolny was the first player
selected. He went to the Calgary
Stampeders who acquired the Montreal Concordes' first round draft
choice by trading quarterback Ken
Johnson late last season.
Linebacker Steve Harrison was
then selected by the Hamilton Tiger
Cats before fellow linebacker Mike
Emery went to the Saskatchewan
Roughriders. The Edmonton
Eskimos picked offensive lineman
Pieter VanDen Bos fourth overall.
For some unfathomable reason,
the B.C. Lions passed up UBC on
the their first selection and took
SFU receiver Jacques Chapdelaine.
Defensive end Jason Riley was
selected eighth overall by the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.
The remaining UBC selections
were spread out over the remaining
seven rounds. They are as follows:
running back Peter LeClaire: second round, B.C.; defensive end
Carey Lappa: third round, Winnipeg; tight end Pat Cantner: third
round, Winnipeg; offensive
lineman George Piva: fifth round,
Hamilton; and kicker/receiver Ken
Munro: eighth round, B.C.
Although it comes as no surprise
that so many Thunderbirds were
selected, no one can figure out why
the B.C. Lion chose to overlook the
Thunderbirds in the first round and
then chose two Thunderbirds who
apparently do not fit into their
plans. Nevertheless, there does appear, to be a logical reason for doing
so.
The Lions could have taken Riley
but they already have two Canadian
defensive ends in Nick Hebeler and
Rick Goltz. Now comes the questionable part. Why did they pick
LeClaire and Munro. Both are excellent prospects.
Although LeClaire was injured
most of last season, he has already
proved that he is an outstanding
rusher and blocker. Meanwhile,
Munro set a WIFL scoring record
with 146 points last year. However,
the Lions appear to be set at running cack with starters Larry Key and
John Henry White and Canadian
back-up Donnie Taylor. Although
kicker Lui Passaglia was bothered
by a pulled groin for a considerable
part of last season, it does not appear that the Lions needed to acquire a kicker — although Munro
will obviously argue otherwise.
The only apparent reasoning
behind the Lions' selections can be
that they want to make some trades.
Mike Blondal came third in the 50
freestyle and Kevin Stapleton also
came third in the 1500 metre
freestyle.
Nancy Bonham continued her
unbeaten streak in diving by winning the 1 and 3 metre competitions.
On the men's side Stephen Church
came second in the 1 metre and
fourth in the 3 metre events.
Brother Calvin came fifth in the 3
metre. Marc Duggan took third
place on both boards.
Coach Kelso will now be preparing those Thunderbirds who have
qualified for the upcoming university national championships. The
UBC team will consist of 13 swimmers (five women and eight men)
along with four divers. This com-
petiton will be held at the University
of Sherbrooke on Mar. 3, 4 and 5.
'Birds are red hot
By MONTE STEWART
Bob Molinski has not had a
whole lot to smile about this season
but the coach of the men's basketball team was grinning from ear to
ear last weekend. His Thunderbirds
made a couple of oddly named
Canada West opponents look like a
pair of endangered species.
The 'Birds stunned the Dinosaurs
78-66 Thursday and then
slaughtered the Pronghorns 93-61
Saturday.
Saturday, there was no doubt
whatsoever that the 'Birds would
chop off the 'Horns. UBC controlled throughout as Lethbridge barely
went through the motions.
Pat West was outstanding as he
paced the 'Birds with 26 points
while Murray Hanna led the 'Horns
with a mere 12 points.
Thursday, the 'Birds had to battle back to defeat Calgary. After
trailing early, UBC rallied to tie the
score 48-48 at halftime. In the second half, the 'Birds vaulted into a
62-50 lead and made the highly
rated Dinosaur look prehistoric.
The smaller 'Dinos were no
match for the 'Birds underneath the
basket — an area which UBC had
apparently been avoiding in recent
games. "We did a good job getting
the ball inside to (Mark) Marter and
(Bruce) Holmes," said captain
Jamie Boyle. "And we have to do
that to win."
There was only one department
in which the Thunderbirds failed —
stopping "green light" Tilleman.
The deadly Dinosaur guard, who
was the most valuable player in the
Canada West Conference last
season, seemed to be able to score
from anywhere on the court. He
converted 17 of 36 field goal attempts and led all scorers with 36
points.
Pat West led UBC with 29 points
while Bruce Holmes added 12
points.
With two games remaining, the
hoopsters still have a chance to
finish third. They trail Alberta by
two games.
The 'Birds face the Golden Bears
in Edmonton Thursday before
travelling to Saskatoon for a Saturday night engagement with the
Saskatchewan Huskies.
The 'Birds must beat the Huskies
to secure a play-off spot while a
pair of victories in the final two
games of the season together with
two Alberta losses would ensure a
third place finish.
More importantly, by finishing
third, the Thunderbirds would
avoid meeting the first place Victoria Vikings in the opening round
of the play-offs. Alberta must
defeat the undefeated Vikings as
well as the red hot 'Birds to lock
down third place.
Coach Molinski will probably
have a lot more to smile about when
team returns home next week.
Women gymnasts winners
By DOUG BOYD
UBC men and women gymnasts
were in Edmonton at the University
of Alberta this weekend competing
in the Canadian Western Universities Athletic Association Gymnastics Championships.
The women's team placed first
with 128.40 points, outdistancing
second place Alberta (124.65 pts.)
and third place Manitoba (119.15
pts.). They were lead by Anne
Muscat who captured the women's
individual title.
Muscat, who placed second in the
vault, beam and floor exercises,
edged teammate Patti Sakaki by .25
points to take the individual title.
Sakaki placed third on the bars,
second on the beam and won the
women's vault. Hallie Lecker contributed to the team's success with a
second on the bars, while Lani
Wong tied for second in the floor
exercises.
The men's team gained a respectable third in the competition.
Mark Byrne lead the way with a
first place tie in the vault and placed
second in the battle for the men's
individual title.
Both men's and women's teams
will be sending gymnasts to the
Canadian University Athletic
Union   Championships   at   York
University in Toronto on March
11-12. The women's team will be attempting to improve on their second place finish of last year when
they were edged out by Manitoba
by only a single point.
Huskies sweep UBC
The number-two ranked University of Saskatchewan Huskies sled
through the icy Thunderbird Arena
this past weekend to pick up a two-
game sweep, but had to overcome
some stubborn opposition by
UBC's Thunderbirds.
UBC centre Dave Brownlie had a
hat trick Friday night, but it wasn't
enough to give the Thunderbirds
the win. Husky Peter Anholt scored
the winner at 8:34 of overtime in
leading his team to a 6-5 win in a
game that saw nine goals in the second period. Right winger Graham
Kerr and left winger Grant Morris
also scored for the 'Birds.
On Saturday night, left winger
Jim Allison and centre Greg
Cockrill scored enroute to a 3-2
'Birds loss.
UBC closes its 1982-83 season
with a pair of games this weekend
against the Golden Bears in Edmonton. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 22,1983
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