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The Ubyssey Sep 16, 1986

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Array ^BC Archive §«*&
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 3
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 16,1986
228-2301
■*">**>■
Rooms scarce r
Canadian University Press
By JAMES YOUNG
Vancouver landlords are choosing students over Expo guests, say
housing administrators at the two
local universities.
But that's small compensation to
students facing the tightest housing
market in five years.
Bob Frampton, residence administrator at UBC said an increase
in applications to on-campus housing this summer indicated local
landlords were changing student accomodation into more profitable
bed-and-breakfast for Expo.
"Now, a lot of people who had
decided to piggy-back on the fair's
appeal are deciding they would
rather convert back and rent to
students risk having an empty
bed," said Frampton.
There are an estimated 2500 such
bed and breakfasts in the Vancouver area, charging guests
$45-$65 per person per night. But
Frampton said profits from such
accomodation must already be
dropping as the number of out-of-
town Expo visitors declines.
At Simon Fraser University,
housing manager Geoff Ward said
Expo had not affected listings with
regular landlords, even during the
exhibition's peak summer months.
But with metropolitan Vancouver's apartment vacancy rate of
0.9 per cent, the lowest since October 1981, students say housing is
often substandard or overpriced.
"I have rented places close to the
university in the past, and have not
had a problem finding something in
my price range of $2O0-$3OO," said
AMS gets funds
By EVELYN JACOB
The AMS will receive government funding of up to $28,500 for
its bursary program from the Fund
for Excellence in Education.
The provincial government announced in August an emergency
student aid fund designed to help
students suffering financial hardship who would otherwise have to
postpone their studies in post-
secondary institutions.
$100,000 has been set aside for
B.C. colleges and universities —
which will be allocated on the condition individual student societies
raise matching funds for the
specific purpose of assisting needy
students.
UBC has been alotted the largest
portion of the fund, with Simon
Fraser University and the University
of Victoria receiving $12,000 each.
"We're hoping to raise as much
money as possible," said AMS
president Simon Seshardi, "$28,500
is the least we will raise."
The provincial student aid program was severely criticized when it
was first announced last July for
being almost exclusively achievement oriented and not what was
needed to ease the financial burden
of students in B.C.
The Canadian Federation of
Students slammed the needs-based
portion of the fund, complaining
student societies were doing what
governments weren't.
Robert Clift, Simon Fraser student society president, said Thursday the university may refuse their
portion of the fund because accepting the money "legitimizes
something that was a fraud to begin
with."
"The money was taken out of
student aid in the past and has now
been given back to us. . .that's a
scummy way of providing funding
said
to post-secondary education,
Clift.
SFU student society was the only
university to ask for a return to the
grant system in its student aid proposal to the excellence fund this
summer which was later rejected by
the post-secondary minister's office.
UBC student board representative Don Holubitsky said he does
not agree with the criteria of the excellence fund, which rewards only
the best students in the province,
but said that refusing to participate
in the program and letting additional sources of money disappear
is "ridiculous."
"Of course we (UBC) could
always do with more money, but we
were pragmatic. Our proposal conformed to the guidelines of excellence and at least we got some
money," said Holubitsky.
Five $250 AMS bursaries were
allocated to students last year who
demonstrated need and who helped
the community in some way.
There will be a minimum of nine
bursaries available this year.
Holubitsky said 100 bursaries will
be created for students in the next
10 years if government funding continues.
The AMS bursary fund was
created two years ago in response to
the student aid crisis, when the Bennett government slashed funding to
financial assistance programs.
The AMS makes a yearly mandatory contribution of $11,000 to
the bursary fund which is raised
through the student lottery, the
Vancity Exchange, TCU SUB lease
revenue (now Hi-tech video
machines), and through donations
from council and individuals. The
total value of the AMS bursary
fund is currently estimated at
$41,000.
UBC student Martin de Jonge, arts
2.
"But this year, there have been
occasions when I've arrived at a
place at the same time as four or
five other students, and just as
quickly the place has been rented,"
he said.
Anna Metaxas, a UBC grad student in oceanography said
apartment-hunting in Vancouver
was dismal compared to Montreal.
"For $275, you can get an apartment in Montreal, downtown, in a
high-rise, with everything
included," she said. "Here you
can't get anything for $275 — you'll
be lucky if you share."
An April study by the Canada
Housing and Mortgage Corporation indicated Expo was a major
factor in the decline in rental housing vacancies, with Vancouver ex-
\ •' x
*.,' /*
periencing the largest decreas*evpF.
the 24 metropolitan areas surveye
The study also estimated
employees of international and corporate pavillions would occupy
1000-1500 rental units, and students
now speculate a large number of
vacancies will appear after Oct. 13,
when the fair closes.
Among those benefitting from
Expo's close are the 782 students
finally moving into Fairview Crescent new residences which UBC
rented to Expo Corporation for
more than three times student rents.
"The one year tenancy of Expo
has allowed us to retire a large part
of our debt and also pay for our
furnishings," said residence administrator Frampton. However,
Expo is really only a short term factor, in Vancouver's rental housing
'/market, said. ifc|/nut Pastrick,
OTn<omfci>for CHMC's B.C. and
YulTcffwlrmion.
"The vacancy rate will go up
after Expo, but not by all that
much, and then resume to the level
it was at before," he said.Pastrick
said the vacancies will decline and
rents will increase in the long run,
because of the lack of rental housing. Construction is currently not
profitable without government
assistance.
A moderating factor will be the
migration of people away from
B.C. and its weak economy, to
other parts of Canada, he said.
Pastrick. was not enthusiastic
about prospects for student housing.
"Students are always in a difficult position for housing," he
said. "But it is not going to be any
easier over the next few years."
— rory alien photo
THREE WEIRD SISTERS concoct deadly potion to seduce unsuspecting young virgin males. Wicked smiles tell
tale of woe and plunder as the ghosts of young men linger in front of Mary's screen door driving burned out
Chevrolets.
Former sfudenf senator murdered
By ROBERT BEYNON
Friends cannot understand why
anyone would kill UBC student
Barry Mah.
The fourth year commerce student was found in the Mount Pleasant Community Centre parking lot
last Tuesday night with serious head
injuries. He was brain dead
Wednesday. His heart stopped at 9
p.m. Thursday.
Mah has six credits left in a commerce degree which he hoped to
complete after Christmas this year.
He was an active Maranatha
ministries member, a student
senator in 1984-85 and unsuccessfully ran for AMS director of
finance in 1985.
Bad news for new bills
You will have to wait until the middle of October before you can turn your new $2 bill into
quarters at SUB.
That's when the Alma Mater Society will
modify the bill-changing machines in the student
union building to accept Canada's new currency.
AMS business manager Charles Redden said
the AMS had decided to wait until the new $2
bills were in wider circulation before modifying
the machines. At present the machines do not
accept the new $5 bill which was first issued in
July and has since entered into general circulation.
The machines use a microprocessor chip to
scan various designs of the old currency before
issuing the appropriate number of quarters.
"We'll be putting in new chips that will
recognize both currency designs," said Redden.
"They'll all be done at the same time, so that
there'll be no loss of service."
Redden said the total cost of modifying the
machines would be $250.
He added the AMS was undecided about what
to do when the $1 coin is issued next year.
His photo and a testimonial were
published on a poster distributed
nation-wide by Maranatha
ministries, a controversial Christian
organization.
Mah was beaten with a club or
long, blunt instrument. Police have
no suspects of motives.
His friends are shocked said
Keith Coleman, Maranatha
ministries' pastor and close friend.
"He was a real outward going guy
— a nice guy — who made friends
easily," he said.
Coleman said Mah would do
anything to help his friends.
"Sometime in the future he was
hoping to be a federal politician,"
added Coleman.
Mah, 26, was an active Progressive Conservative member and
had been a delegate to the last PC
leadership conference. Coleman
said some federal cabinet members
knew him.
Camile Dionne, former UBC student and friend who attended the
leadership conference with him,
said she was so upset when she
heard of his death that she forgot to
write the funeral's date down.
"I've been half-shattered since,"
she said, adding Mah was a very
friendly man with no enemies.
AMS president Simon Sheshadri
knew Mah when he was a student
senator. He said Mah was a cons-
cientous guy who got involved in
politics because he"wanted to make
a difference to Canada.
He lived at 1976 Napier Street
with his parents. He worked for
Census Canada this summer and
had started looking for new work in
a managerial position.
Services will be held at the
Glenhaven Memorial Chapel
Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
Barry Mah Page 2
••»»*.•"■.'*. Oil!*
THE    U BY S S E'Y
Tuesday, September 16,1986
Shhhhhhhhh
A crackdown on eating and drinking, and disruptive behavior has
begun in Sedgewick and Main
libraries, UBC's head librarian said
Monday. Douglas Mclnnes said the
libraries are making a special effort
this year to control noise and
eating. The libraries have hired five
monitors to police Sedgewick and
Main for consumers of food and
drink, and for rowdy students in the
study areas.
Students who persist in breaking
the rules may face a loss of library
privileges. "Suspension is a definite
possibility," Mclnnes said.
The monitors will first issue warnings and copies of library regulations to the violators. Repeat offenders will be asked for identification and asked to leave.
The crackdown is designed to put
a halt to non-study use of the
libraries, and is receiving, some
positive response, according to
Mclnnes.
"Sedgewick is a library and not a
social centre," said Mclnnes.
Although he said there had been no
demand from students for the new
rules, the policy has not met with
much opposition.
"Food has in the past created
problems by encouraging silverfish
and other paper-eating vermin, and
computer terminals have been
damaged by drink spills.
"People who want to use the
libraries to study will find it better
in the future," said Mclnnes.
Students views were generally in
favour of the crackdown. Bruce
Foster, arts 3: "I'm highly supportive of the new rules. I didn't like
Sedgewick before when the silent >
part was quiet and the quiet part
was really noisy."
But Paul Dhaliwal, applied
science 2, objected to the changes:
"you can't think if you can't eat,"
he said.
"In ttits chapter w* have to aakouraafvaawheihar tnanveanapMaR, thi
H there a tabto which hu a eertam intrinsic nature, and continue to exist
Ins table merely a product of my imagination, a dream-table m a wsrv
n of the greatest importance."
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trim I an not looking or a
dream? Thie question
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Application for Six Positions on the 1986/87
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works both Wednesday, Friday
and Saturday nights in the Student Union Building.
The Team is responsible for assisting the Proctor in
protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding security
teams hired for any function, and implementing
SAC policy in SUB.
Application forms are now available in the AMS
Executive Secretary's office, SUB Room 238.
This position is open to UBC Students — both
males and females.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED BY
4 p.m., Wednesday, September 18th, 1986
BAOCW'SCEOOL
SPECIALS MOM
UBCB0O&SSOIE
R205
PENTEL
SUPER
BALL
MICRO
Reg. $1.79
$119
-Lea.
Course Books
Sessional course books may bt
returned (auompanied by original receipt) tor full refund any time up to
the session deadline
Fall Session       Sept 30, 1986
Arter the respective deadline all course
books mil be NON-RETURNABLE
Books must be unmarked and in
saleable as-new condition
Pentel    2
Q305
PENTEL
MECHANICAL
PENCIL
SHARPLET 300
Reg. S3 AS
$T79
Non-Course Books,
Merchandise & Supplies
Returns will normally be accepted up
to    10 DAYS from date of purchase.
when accompanied bv SALES
RECEIPT.
NO RETURNS on sale items, spc
cial orders, electronic and computer
goods; al! sales final.
REMEMBER to keep vour receipt
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
SSSflp
BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIALS
20% OFF CALCULATORS
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Reg. $432.83
Back-to-School
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Sale Ends September 30, 1986   __\ HEWLETT
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Thursday, Sept. 18 is HP DAY!
HP Sales Representative will be at the
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Remember — Thursday, Sept. 18 from 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
See you there!
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
$**■■*• - Tuesday, September 16, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Make BC nuclear weapons free
By CASSANDRA FREEMAN
Forty-six B.C. districts and
municipalities have declared
themselves nuclear free zones, a
Vancouver City Hall alderman announced Saturday during the second annual B.C. Peace Conference held at U.B.C.
Libby Davies joined over 100
delegates from 41 different B.C.
locations to discuss the problems
and possible strategies involved in
making Canada a nuclear weapons
free nation.
Peter    Brown,    a    member   of
Operation Dismantle, an Ottawa
based national disarmament group,
and Mike Wallace, U.B.C. professor of political science, discussed
the federal government's contradictory nuclear weapon's policies.
According to Wallace, while
Canada has a long history of supporting a comprehensive nuclear
test ban, "it is not prepared to
speak out publicly against the
United States" on the issue. He said
although the Canadian delegation
to the Disarmament Conference in
Geneva is presently working for a
moratorium   on   nuclear   weapons
testing, Canada abstained in the last
U.N. vote so as "to avoid conflict
with the U.S."
Wallace said "the Canadian
Department of Defense regards
their chain of command as coming
from Washington not Ottawa."
Speaking to a half full SUB
auditorium, Brown said while
prime minister Brian Mulroney insists Canada is a nuclear weapons-
free country, Canada allows warships to dock in Canadian harbours
which "almost certainly" carry
nuclear weapons.
According to Brown, in the first
half of 1986, there was a 150 per
cent increase over 1985 in the
number of U.S. warships and submarines entering Canadian ports.
Eighty-three per cent of the ships
enter West Coast ports.
At a press conference at city hall
Friday, alderman Libby Davies said
members of City Council are
gathering support to pressure the
provincial government into declaring B.C. a nuclear weapons-free
zone.
"This would have enormous
significance nationally, said Davies.
"It would say to the federal government we've had enough of your
hyprocrisy," she added.
At the close of the Peace Con-
verence delegates agreed to mount a
local campaign to convince the provincial government  into declaring
B.C. a nuclear weapons free zone.
Local peace groups will solicit petitions from city council to submit to
the provincial legislature.
Delegates to the peace conference
also called on the Federal Government to work for international acceptance in establishing a
demilitarized zone in the high Arctic. "The Americans have never
formally accepted our sovereignty
to the high Arctic, and this is a sore
point in Ottawa," said Wallce. He
said an Arctic treaty with the
Soviets and Scandinavians would
allow Canada to establish its
sovereignty over the area.
The B.C. Peace Conference was
organized by "End The Arms
Race," a Vancouver-based coalition of 230 peace groups and peace
supporting organizations in the province.
Pub boycotts beer
ROOKIE U.B.C. CHEMIST discovers Love Potion #9
by accident while trying to invent a cure for apethitis, a
disease striking two out of three UBC students during
the third week of classes. This disease increases in in
tensity during the month of November and takes over
the individual's personality as the month of December
approaches.
By EVELYN JACOB
Carling O'Keefe products will
soon disappear from the shelves of
the Pub at Simon Fraser University.
The student-run pub's board of
directors on the urging of SFU student society, voted unanimously on
Sept. 2 to halt the sale of South-
African linked Carling O'Keefe
products on campus.
Sales of Miller beer, Black Label,
Extra Old Stock, Carlsberg, Cin-
cinatti Cream Ale, and Fosters will
cease as soon as the pub's current
stock is eliminated.
The board's action came after
SFU campus union CUPE 236
learned that dividends from. Carling
sales could find their way back to
South Africa.
"The purpose of the boycott is
not to destroy Carling but to force
the breaking of the South-African
connection," CUPE member Nick
Witherford said in an interview Friday. Witherford, speaking on
behalf of the union said the Pub
intends no "hostility" toward Carling. He said he hopes the present
boycott will pressure South-African
owners to sell Carling to Canadians.
Carling O'Keefe is owned by
Rothman's International, a subsidiary of the South-African parent
Rembrandt Corporation which
owns the third largest non-union
mining corporation in South
Africa.
The Pub voted last year to stop
the sale of Rothman cigarettes but
did not boycott Carling O'Keefe
because they believed erroneously
they were legally obliged to sell the
products.
The union has since established
with the B.C. liquor control board
Groups say Ontario gov't subtle about cuts
By MICHELLE LALONDE
TORONTO (CUP) — Funding
for colleges and universities is
dwindling across the country, but
the Ontario government is the most
subtle about funding cuts, say
educational and student groups.
Tony Macerollo, chair of the
Canadian Federation of Students,
said the Ontario government is
"dismantling post-secondary
education piece by piece—it is just
not as blatant as the B.C. government." The Social Credit government dropped all student aid grants
two years ago, and has frozen or cut
provincial contributions for three
years.
In Ontario, cuts are coming
through the back door, Macerollo
said. Several schools have introduced new administrative fees that
sidestep the government's ban on
incidental fees. Ryerson
Polytechnical Institute in Toronto,
for example, recently introduced a
$30   penalty   for   students   who
choose to pay their fees in installments.
A 35 per cent increase in the controversial computer fee at the
University of Waterloo prompted
the Liberal government to this summer ban incidental fees, but allow
universities to annually raise the
cost of tuition by five per cent.
"The administrations will keep
coming up with these neat little
ways to get around the tuition ceiling," said Barry Hayward, president of the Ryerson student council, "until the government begins to
provide adequate funding."
While Ontario has a problem
with incidental fees, Macerollo says
students in other provinces face
stiff problems. Newfoundland
students weathered a 30 per cent-
plus unemployment rate this summer, restricting access to post-
secondary education. In Nova
Scotia, students pay the highest fees
in the country with a base charge of
$1500. Tuition fees in Quebec may
triple next year as the government
reconsiders the fee freeze students
have enjoyed for 17 years.
"All in the name of budget cuts.
We have to start looking at post-
secondary education as an investment, not a cost," said Macerollo,
who served last year as student
council president at Carleton
University in Ottawa.
Ontario ranks next to Nova
Scotia as the province with the
lowest proportion of its annual
budget spent on post-secondary
education. Alberta ranks highest.
In a news brief, the Council of
Ontario Universities says costs at
Ontario universities have increased
by 94 per cent since 1977, while the
government has in the same period
increased grants by only 68 per
cent.
The cost of replacing
depreciating equipment in Ontario
has been estimated at $89 million
per year, while in 1984 -85, only $53
million  could be  found  for new
equipment.
"The longer the delay in addressing this issue, the greater the problems will be, and the larger the
cost of replacing them," says the
Council brief.
Many of the Liberal
government's education problems
may be inherited from the Conservative government that ruled Ontario for more than four decades.
Since 1977, enrolment in Ontario's
colleges and universities has jumped
by   20   per   cent.
"This has adversely affected instruction. Faculty-student ratios
have deteriorated. There is less
faculty and student contact, more
large classes, (and) fewer written
assignments."
Although no significant enrollment change is anticipated for the
rest of the decade, the brief warns
the system is not prepared to handle
a possible enrolment bulge should
the province drop Grade 13.
that the pub will not lose its license
if it refuses to sell Carling beer.
The Pub joins student-run bars in
the University of Victoria, Alberta,
and Ottawa in recent boycotts of
South-African linked products.
"This is a clear indication that
the sale of South-African connected
products is repugnant to students,"
said Witherford.
SFU student society president
Robert Clift said however, he did
not receive a petition from students
to stop the sale of Carling products,
and has no idea how students feel
about the boycott. Despite
numerous attempts to reach the
Pub, the Ubyssey was told members
were top busy to comment on the
recent action.
SFU student society resource coordinator Stephen Howard said
Pub members are hesitant to talk to
the press: "they're trying to maintain good relations with the
breweries," he said.
According to Howard, Carling
O'Keefe products amount to 20 per
cent of the Pub's overall sales.
In a prepared statement to the
Pub's board of directors, Carling
O'Keefe regional sales manager
Barry Bock said Carling hopes the
Pub will withdraw its boycott
because Carling is 50 per cent
Canadian-owned.
"How we were treated at SFU
was unfair," said Bock. "We're not
bad people. "Although Rothmans
is Carling's major shareholder, over
80 per cent of remaining
shareholders are based in Canada,"
he said.
Bock said Carling employed over
1400 Canadian students in 1983,
with total wage bills of $8.9 million.
AMS finance director Jamie Collins said Carling sales to the Pit Pub
and Gallery Lounge are approximately $270,000 a year, which
amounts to 30 per cent of both
bars' total sales. Carling also provides a "service" to undergraduate
society activities, fraternities, and
clubs on campus.
Asked to explain the service,
Bock refused to comment. "We
(Carling) have been involved in a lot
of functions on campus for years,
but I cannot disclose how or who
we contribute to for competitive
sales reasons."
The AMS has stated repeatedly it
will not boycott the sale of South-
African tied products in SUB
because it cannot make moral decisions for students.
"We make decisions on issues
that affect students as students,"
said AMS president Simon
Seshadri.
"The Apartheid question affects
students as people," he said. But
Clift said student societies have a
responsibility to take the lead on all
issues of student concern. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 16, 1986
Freedumb
Yesterday Brian Mulroney gave a powerful speech on
freedom of the press. Perhaps the Prime Minister
believes it is better to give than to receive, because he
refused to listen to what anyone else had to say.
Mulroney made two speeches while in Vancouver
and attended a Conservative gathering in town without
saying a single word to the press.
At first the irony of his actions when related to his
speech seemed humorous. Yet this is not a laughing
matter. The most powerful person in Canadian public
office hasn't held a formal press conference in almost
half a year.
People need to know what the prime minister thinks.
It is interesting to compare Mulroney to Pierre Trudeau.
When Trudeau gave the West he finger, everyone knew
exactly what despicable things he thought. Mr.
Mulroney is another matter. Not only do we not know
what goes on in his pinstriped mind, we no longer know
if anything goes on up there.
Please Mr. Camp, more Brian Mulroney.
y'~...?^ki:d:.
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Council seeks criticism from those who know
As a member of the AMS Student's Council, I would like to respond to Dermod Travis's letter appearing in the Tuesday, September
9th, UBYSSEY entitled "AMS
spends lots for little". Reading this
letter I realized how little he actually knows about council's activities.
For instance, with regards to the
food bank, the AMS undertook to
initiate a food bank and involve an
on-campus volunteer organization
to operate the project on a full time
basis. The AMS never had any intention of running the food bank,
nor is it to be AMS funded other
Busy student blithers
I'm getting sick and tired of
reading Dermod Travis' insulting
letters in The Ubyssey. After all the
actual work has been done by
others, Mr. Travis seems to be able
to find plenty of time to write
lengthy letters to The Ubyssey telling council what should have been
done instead.
Yet when 1 asked him to join the
External Affairs Committee, he
replied, "1 don't have time." When
Simon Seshadri invited him to get
involved in any way he could, he
said "I have no interest in student
politics."
If Mr. Travis feels that the AMS
does not do enough, it's up to him
and to anyone else who feels the
same way to step in and help get
things done. Or if you can't find
time for that, at least come to us
and give us your constructive suggestions while there's still time to
do something about them, rather
than waiting until it's too late for
them to do anybody any good.
If you have some venom to get
rid of, Dermod, use it against a
government that considers Sunday
drinking a more important issue
than education. Don't waste your
valuable time uselessly attacking
and insulting Students' Council.
We are the sub-zero percentage
of the UBC population that actually
gets involved in trying to make life
better and easier for all of us. In addition to trying to work with an uncaring and unresponsive government, we have to fight the massive,
sluggish, omnipresent apathy of
people like you who would rather
blither on endlessly about the incompetence of others than try to do
anything concrete themselves.
Carol Pedlar
coordinator of external affairs
THE UBYSSEY
September 16, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
It was another late night at the printers when the phone rang over the clatter of Jeffrey Schwartz's
typewriter. "You're holding us hostage?" questioned Jeffrey. His mouth hung low. "We must write a
conservative paper from now on?" "That's right" crackled the voice on the other end, sounding earily
like Robert Beynon. "If you fail on this assignment you will be forced to do all your shopping at the
Vanderwack Mall". Peter Berlin squealed and Jennifer Lyall glared in disbelief. No more rampage
against provincial funding she thought. Her world now crushed, she fainted. Dan Andrews, being the
only one to catch her sudden fall. Betsy Goldbert, James Young and Evelyn Jacob stared off into the
distance, their eyes fixed with a permanent glaze. "What shall we do?" cried Michael Groberman.
Svetozar Kontic, Steve Chan, Laura Oakley and the rest of the gang took a quick consensus deciding
to risk their entire future social lives by buying clothes from this back woods mall. "Oh well" sighed
Pradeep Jethi, "it will be in the name of free press". "And unbiased journalism" added Corinne Bjorge.
Meanwhile George of no last name, Cassandra Freeman and David Ferman were scrambling for the
phone to find a late night propane conversion shop.
than the initial administrative and
organizational costs.
The AMS simply initiated the
project to fill a need on campus.
Contrary to Travis' incorrect allegations, the AMS Food Bank is in fact
working with the Vancouver Food
Bank, and has been doing so since
May. I am also interested to note
that a food bank has been established at Simon Fraser University for
two years with considerable success.
Regarding the B.C. Transit issue,
I wonder if Travis recalls last summer when  AMS External  Affairs
Coordinator Duncan Stewart
valiantly battled B.C. Transit and
the government on bus fare hikes
and post-secondary student concession fares to no avail.
Had we paid someone for
another summer to fight in vain
Travis would likely have criticized
us for that. As it was, SFU Student
Society President Rob Cliff was unsuccessful in his bid.
Last February, the AMS Hiring
Committee requested ideas for sum
mer projects for the AMS to undertake. As the member of that committee who reviewed the proposals,
I did not see any proposals
originating from Travis in any area
despite requests for student input.
Student's Council is not afraid of
criticism, as an input it can be quite
constructive. Coming from one
who does not know the facts, nor
expends any effort to help,
however, it is valueless.
Doug Martin
president, engineering
undergraduate society
Breathtaking fun at CLUBSPO '86
Attention new students, returning students, young and old! This is
just a reminder of the exciting and
long awaited for event at UBC —
CLUBSPO '86.
Currently the AMS has 160 affiliated clubs, encompassing a wide
spectrum of topics ranging from
sports to politics, religion to concern groups. There is a club on campus   for  everyone.   Remove  your
Get involved
I have read Dermod Travis' letter
to AMS President Simon Seshadri
in The Ubyssey (September 9th).
What the hell is your problem?
If you do not like the way the current AMS government is running
things, why don't you do something
other than writing 500 words of garbage? Get involved! The only way
to change things is to become active, whether it be with council,
SAC, etc. Your views on various
Council committees, and indeed
Council itself, will really carry some
weight. If you can't be bothered to
become actively involved, your
views carry no weight.
You came to Council with some
good suggestions in May, yet you
were unwilling to become involved
politically. Neither do you come to
see the executive to discuss your
concerns now. The AMS executive
makes itself available to all
students, and in fact, we encourage
students to voice their concerns to
us.
We don't hide behind our office
doors; I suggest you stop hiding
behind the press.
Martin Cocking
Director of Administration
head from the books and broaden
your experiences at UBC by joining
a club. It is a good chance to meet
people, develop new interests, learn
something new and have fun, all the
same time.
The opportunity to see what
clubs UBC offers will occur this
Thursday and Friday, September 18
and 19 in the Student Union
Pavilion from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m.  All clubs  will have display
booths on either the upper or lower
floors of SUB. Come and take this
opportunity to see what terrific
clubs UBC offers.
If you have any questions regarding joining or establishing a new
club please contact Laura Chanin
or Brent Watkins in the SAC office
- SUB Room 246.
Get involved and make the most
of your university years!
Laura Chanin
clubs commissioner
Students of UBC — Unite and Write! If >ou have something to gripe
about, or a message for the UBC community, or an opinion — let us know.
The Ubyssey welcomes all letters but please remember that they must be
typed on a 70 character line and triple spaced. Bring your words of wisdom
along with some identification to room 241K, SUB. Long standing Ubyssey
policy allows venerated editors to chop out any racist, sexist or
homophobic remarks and of course we reserve the right to edit letters for
brevity.
Don't let anger stew inside you and rot out your innards. We need a letter more than your grandmother does so sit down now — quick, while the
spirit moves you, write like you've never written before. Practice makes
perfect and old wives tales always hold a grain of truth.
If you aren't writing for the betterment of the human race, then write
because it will improve your essay style. Write to make a long story short or
write to make a short story well known. Write because you mother told you
to, although she meant write home. This is not only directed to right-
handed conservatives. We also take letters from ambidextrous socialists.
Write left! But write.
**.£<
\>«V^V
Taste for adventure is tasteless
You   allocate   three-quarters  of
page 12 of your issue of 28 February
1986 to a colour advertisement for
Export "A" cigarettes. There can
be no doubt that this ad, headlined
"A taste for adventure," promotes
smoking. Its appearance in The
Ubyssey is clearly targeted to promote smoking among the under-26
age bracket characterizing the bulk
of your readership.
Cigarette smoking is established
as an addictive syndrome causing
reduced physical efficiency and
leading to crippling diseases. In the
face of mounting evidence of
endemic smoking among persons
age 25 and under, your publishing
this advertisement is irresponsible.
Richard Seaton
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 16,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
U.of M. quality jeopardized
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
government of Manitoba is jeopardizing the quality of education at
the University of Manitoba with
"unfair" funding policies, according to university administrators.
Vice-president academic Fred
Stambrook said the government's
University Grants Committee has
increased operating grants by a level
"which does not do justice to the U
of M or the needs of the Manitoba
public."
The UGC in May granted 2.97
per cent increases in the operating
budgets of the U of M, the University of Winnipeg, Brandon University and St. Boniface College.
Mark Rogers, president of the U
of M student union, said the across
the board increases do not cover the
costs of more specialized and expensive programs offered at the
university.
"In Manitoba, post-secondary
education is given a low priority,"
Rogers said. "All universities have
the same position, but we are most
severely hit, especially as a result of
our diversity."
The University of Manitoba —
the largest in the province with
22,437 full and part time students
— is employing a number of
strategies to deal with an expected
shortfall of $3.7 million this year.
The university has already
reallocated funds. A university
senate report says the fuel and
utilities budget for the year has been
transferred to academic expenditures, leaving the campus
vulnerable in the case of an unexpectedly severe winter.
The most controversial cuts are
to academic programs.
Dean of Arts John Finlay said,
"We were obliged to cancel 85
(undergraduate) courses and six
graduate courses we intended to offer." Enrolment in the faculty of
arts dropped four per cent this year
after years of steady increases.
Enrolment in the science faculty
jumped by seven per cent this year,
straining laboratory and research
facilities shared with engineering
and medical students.
"Over the last two or three years,
our ability to offer adequate
laboratory instruction has become
seriously impaired," Stambrook
said. "The long term, cumulative
effect on the university is in fact
alarming."
He said the U of M graduate program "lacks an adequate system of
graduate support." He pointed out
that $3.2 million is set aside for
graduate student support in Saskatchewan's universities, while the
larger and more diverse graduate
faculty at the U of M has a gross expenditure of $1.3 million.
Tuition fee hikes of eight per cent
will not make a dent in the expected
budgetary shortfall. Academic fees
for students will total almost $22
■ dan andrews photo
BARONESS PHILIPPINE DE ROTHSCHILD wrestles furiously with her liege over last bottle of vintage
Mouton Cadet as Ubyssey photog. attempts to distract them both and pilfer bubbly.
Chartered
accountancy.
It's your chosen profession.
Now you are looking for the right firm to train with, an
exceptional firm to provide you with:
• well-honed and up-to-date technical knowledge.
• exposure to a variety of industries & experience.
• scope for your own initiative.
• career development opportunities.
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You should talk to t&TblK'he Ross
If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession and
gain experience in accounting, auditing, tax, business valuations, electronic data processing and insolvency, Touche Ross
is the firm for you. We will be on campus:
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, October 20, 21 and 22.
Submit your application, accompanied by recent transcripts, to the Employment Centre on Campus until October 3.
We will be in contact with you as soon as possible.
^louche Ross
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS/MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
million this year, representing only
13 per cent of the university's total
income.
Student union president Rogers
does not expect a tuition fee increase of more than three or four
per cent next year. Tuition fee increases are tied directly to the UGC
grant for next year.
"I don't see a danger of the
operating grant going below two
per cent," said Rogers. "The provincial government is responsible
enough to give at least that."
He added the federal government
should assume more responsibility
in financing Canada's post-
secondary schools.
The U of M administration will
not only have to cut spending, but
be more accountable for fiscal planning.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 16, 1986
Women question; men interrupt
By Maggie DeVries
and Melinda Wittstock
Reprinted from the McGill Daily
Canadian University Press
A researcher, pen and paper in
hand, is sitting in on an informal
meeting between students planning
a benefit concert to raise money to
send school supplies to Nicaraguan
students, hit badly by the U.S. trade
embargo against the Sandinista
government.
She is listening carefully to the
discussion, noting words and pronunciations, documenting the
number of hesitations and interup-
tions, and timing the length of the
students' utterances.
Jeremy: "I think the benefit should
take place a week Saturday ... I've
made arrangements for three bands
to play ... at this point, we only
need to delegate duties — Tara,
how would you like to take care of
the information tables at the
benefit?"
Tara: "Um, well sure, I guess I
wouldn't mind too much, but, well
(pause), I'm sorry to say this, but I
don't know if we should have the
benefit so late though because the
ship for Nicaragua is leaving two
Post unfilled
UBC is in no hurry to find a new
vice-president of academic and student services, AMS president said
Thursday.
"It's more important to get the
best candidate for the position and
not make a snap decision," said
Simon Seshadri Wednesday.
The newly-created position will
replace the two associate vice-
president and posts of academic
and student services.
The positions are currently held
by Cyril Finnegan and Neil
Riseborough.
Seshadri said a seven-member
committee has interviewed only
three candidates, who are currently
under consideration.
"There is a possibility we will interview more people, but we
haven't got anyone formally
scheduled for interviews right
now," said Seshadri. He said no
new candidates have been interviewed since July. Seshadri would
not say if the applicants were from
UBC or from outside the university,
and would not disclose if
Riseborough or Finnegan are being
considered for the position.
Riseborough said he will make no
comment until the position is filled.
days before and ..."
Jeremy (interrupting): "Well, we've
already established that the date of
the benefit is Saturday." (seven second pause.)
Tara: "Don't you ... I (stammer),
well it seems to me you . . . you . . .
you . . . probably (pause) well,
maybe it is too late, but I feel —"
Jeremy (interrupting): "You're
right Tara. It is too late to change
the date . . .
Studies such as this are part of a
growing field of language research
— the role of gender in speech. The
emphasis rests primarily on how,
under what conditions, and why the
sexes talk differently.
Recent studies, like the one by
University of California sociologists
Candace West and Don Zimmerman, have found that, in average
conversation, women ask 70 per
cent of the questions while 96 per
cent of all interruptions are made
by men.
Not only do men do the lion's
share of the interrupting, but men
speak with more conviction and
often appropriate women's ideas as
their own. Women are more likely
to turn statements into questions,
preface their statements with
apologies and seek male validation
for their ideas.
From board of trade meetings to
local peace groups to student councils to classrooms, this pattern is
typical.
More and more researchers are
trying to discover how and why
these differences in the use of
language between women and men
came about. And feminists have
connected these differences to
discrimination against women. "Inspired by the women's movement,"
See page 9: Men
FAMOUS
CATHY
OZOS N*5
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ONLY TRYING TO POINT OUT
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SHOTOKAN KARATE
Monday and Wednesday
8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Gym E, Osborne Centre, UBC
Beginners classes start Sept. 15
For further information
Call Rec. UBC 228-3996
"T. Ohshima - Shihan"
Community Sports
offers a  lU /O discount off
regular prices of all merchandise
to all UBC students, staff & faculty
SEVEN MONTH SKATE
SHARPENING PASSES FOR
3355 W. Broadway
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733-1612
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9:30 A.M.
CLUBSPO86
THURS. SEPT. 18   FRI. SEPT. 19
STUDENT UNION fWILION
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER MUSIC
Six Concerts (Series I) $75.00
Festival Winds with Menahem Pressler,
Piano (U.S.A.) Oct. 7, 1986
Slovak Chamber Orchestra (Czechoslovakia) Nov. 18, 1986
Emerson String Quartet (U.S.A.) Jan. 13, 1987
Da Camera (Canada) Feb. 24, 1987
Takacs String Quartet (Hungary) March 10, 1987
Talich String Quartet (Czechoslovakia) March 31, 1987
Three Concerts (Series II) $40.00
Camerata Bern and Narciso Yepes, Guitar
(Switzerland/Spain)
New Zurich String Quartet (Switzerland)
Moskquintet (Moscow State Wind Quintet)
and Piano (U.S.S.R.)
Oct. 21, 1986
Feb. 10, 1987
March 24, 1987
Complete Series $115.00
(include Series I and II plus
Beaux Arts Trio, April 28, 1987)
Available A.M.S. Box Office
Full Time Students Half Price
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
****presents****
Sharon Pollock's
BLOOD RELATIONS
Directed by Charles Siegel
SEPTEMBER 17-27
Special Previews - Sept. 17 & 18
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8 p.m.
• STUDENT SEASON TICKETS •
4 Plays for $13 •
• •
September 17-27
• ••
BLOOD RELATIONS
Pollock
THE CRUCIBLE
Miller November 12-22
THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
Moliere January 14-24
THE WINTER'S TALE
Shakespeare March 4-14
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre Tuesday, September 16,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
J
D
Reviews of the 1986 Vancouver Fringe Festival
Sit-com disappoints
V\iWJ       A      ?*"-
n
(	
1
1
6TH AVF
1 1
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BROADWAY
□
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a
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kiEDaizii
ipp^i
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r8
LOCATION OF VENUES
1.GRUNT GALLERY, 209 E. 6th Ave
2.MAIN DANCE PUCE. 2214 Mam St
3.WESTERN FRONT, 303 E, 8th Ave
4.ANZA CLUB, 3 W  8th Ave,
5.MOUNT PLEASANT NEIGHBOURHOOD
HOUSE, 535 E. Broadway
6.BRUHANSKI THEATRE STUDIO
164 E, 11th Ave.
7.HERITAGE HALL, 3102 Main St
8.VANC0UVER LITTLE THEATRE
3102 Main St. (Enter via Watson St)
9.CAMBRIAN HALL, 215 E  17th Ave
10.FRINGE CLUB, Vancouver's Tonite
(Downstairs)
11.INFORMATION CENTRE  2422 Main St.
(Just north of Broadway)
By PRADEEP JETHI
If you like theatre as sit-com,
Shared Accomodations is for you.
The play operates as a sort of
Three's Company set in Kitsilano.
Shared Accomodations
By Leslie Taylor
Mount   Pleasant   Neighbourhood
House
535 East Broadway
September 19, 20, 21: 11:30 p.m.
On the eve of his thirteenth birthday, Tom, a yuppie depressed at
not having accomplished anything
in his life, discovers that his
brother, Kevin, is having a
homosexual affair with Richard,
another member of the co-op house
they share.
Throw in Nichole, television anchor person who hates having doors
slammed, Harriet, a born-again
Christian, and Mike, a political activist and neat freak, add some formulaic plot twists, and you have a
pretty blase comedy.
It appears the audience is meant
to gain an understanding of relationships and the need to feel good
Local Dark Horse stumbles
By JEFFREY SWARTZ
Craig Duffy directed Stefan
Schutz's Mayakovsky at UBC a few
years back. At this years Fringe
Festival he and Dark Horse Theatre
have chosen the Russian poet's self-
titled Vladimir Mayakovsky: a
tragedy as one their projects (the
other is The Serpents Tooth).
Vladimir Mayakovsky: a tragedy
By Vladimir Mayakovsky
Directed by Craig Duffy
Heritage Hall
3102 Main Street
September 16, 18, 2 p.m.
Through poetic monologues
spoken in demi-prophetic voice, the
play is a dialectic towards consciousness, with The Poet (played
by Brent Fidler), the central figure.
He is alternately mocked and
revered by The People and The
Oldster, whom Mayakovsky has
conceived as representative types
rather than conventional
characters.
Duffy has caught the spirit of
Russian revolutionary stylization;
the vaudevillian delivery can be seen
in   early   Russian   films   such   as
Eisenstein's Strike!
Still, there is little dramatic conflict here apart from a battle of visions, though eventually the suffering of humanity and the inevitability of revolutionary upheaval find
their articulation. The performance
I saw was rushed and hard to
follow, with only Jason Metz as
The Conventional Young Man attaining sufficient tension to move
the play beyond affected stylization.
Subway moves
By JEFFREY SWARTZ
Alexina Dalgetty's three Subway
Plays together constitute a whole,
each piece supporting the others.
The Subway Plays
By Alexina Dalgetty
Vancouver Little Theatre
3102 Main Street
(enter via Watson Street)
September 16: 3 p.m.
September 17, 18: 12 noon
The action revolves around
grandmother Hetty (portrayed in a
fine performance by Valerie Laub)
who has made her home in the subway in which she believes her husband met his death.
In Listening to the Angels her
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
THE CRUCIBLE
By Arthur Miller
(to be presented November 12-22)
A UDITIONS
TIMES:  FRIDAY, September 19 (12:30-4:30 p.m.)
MONDAY, September 22 (5:30-9:30 p.m.)
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF
Audition materia/ available in Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-3880
to arrange an audition appointment.
AUDTIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
about one's-self, but the inability of
the actors to make their characters
believable subverts the dialogue so
it is just preaching and screaming.
SAVE A FORTUNE
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Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
companion is Sam (Tom Laxell), a
subterranean musician who has
trouble getting his clarinet to make
music; and Meg (Robin Rohatyn), a
spinster (or is she?) whose strongest
feelings are reserved for her
unopened cans of food until the
gentle Sam draws out deeper
secrets.
Dalgetty's plays show strong
writing promise, especially in her
ability to derive humour from the
trivial. Although her use of
playwriting convention is too often
transparent, with a too casual willingness to turn the plot with a profound twist, The Subway Plays are
clear, thoughoutful, and entertaining.
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A.
"V^7 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 16, 1986
Peace groups protest warships
By JAMES YOUNG
In a series of protests on Sept. 11,
12 and 13, students from five local
campuses demonstrated against
nine U.S. warships visiting Vancouver.
Students from Langara,
Capilano and Emily Carr colleges,
along with UBC and Simon Fraser
University, participated in the Vancouver Peace Flotilla Coalition
which protested against the warships and the nuclear weapons they
are believed to be carrying.
"Our plan was to meet the warships and slow them down," said
Dave Roscoe, a member of
Langara's Students for Peace and
Disarmament who was in an inflatable Zodiac raft operated by the
environmental group Greenpeace.
Roscoe said he called to the U.S.
sailors and told them to jump ship
if they had any concern for the
world. "We told them they were
welcome as civilians and the ships
were welcome without nuclear
weapons aboard," he said.
Roscoe said he was worried about
the possibility of a nuclear accident
and the identification of the port as
a military target.
In the Sept. 11 protest, about 30
of the Flotilla's small pleasure craft,
sailboats and kayaks formed a
floating picket line against the warships, including an aircraft carrier,
the U.S.S. Constellation.
The ship stands 10 storeys high, is
the length of two football fields and
has a crew of 5,000.
Seeing the Constellation emerge
from the fog, Roscoe said he felt a
mixture of fear and awe.
"I felt a chill come through me,"
said Roscoe. "I was thinking tHat
these boats have millions of dollars
of hardware on board that could be
used to annihilate the citizens of the
world."
While the U.S. Navy will not
state whether particular warships
are actually carrying nuclear
weapons, activists say this is a safe
assuption to make.
They cite former U.S. Navy officials, including admiral Eugene
Carrol who said, "all U.S. warships
that are capable of carrying nuclear
weapons do carry nuclear
weapons."
According to the Washington
based Center for Defense Information, the Constellation can carry
147 nuclear weapons on its aircraft
alone, with potential destructive
power varying between 47 and
12,000 times that of the Hiroshima
bomb.
Johanne Paradis, a graduate student in linguistics at UBC, called
the aircraft carrier a "death
machine," and said the protestors'
actions were not anti-American.
"We have nothing against the
sailors enjoying our city — we just
don't want nuclear weapons in our
harbour," she said.
"If the warships were from
anywhere in the world we would
protest against them," she added.
As a result of the demonstration,
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Peace demonstrators die en masse.
police arrested three people: two
from Greenpeace, and charged
them with the dangerous operation
of a motor vessel in the inner harbour.
Roscoe and Paradis said the
police, representing four different
forces, acted aggressively towards
the protestors who had been
ordered to stay outside a 100 meter
zone around the ships.
"The Zodiacs were not even
within the 100 meter limit and the
police came and tried to swamp
them," said Roscoe.
At a city hall press conference,
Peter Brown, executive officer for
the Ottawa-based peace group
Operation Dismantle, said the U.S.
Navy experienced 60 accidents with
nuclear weapons in the 20 year
period from 1965-85.
"Every time one of these ships
comes in we are risking an accident
on the scale of Chernobyl," said
Brown.
He said a ship fire could ignite a
conventional explosive surrounding
the plutonium in the core of the
nuclear weapons.
"Bear in mind we are dealing
with the most toxic chemical that
we are aware of — one millionth of
a gram if inhaled, can almost
guarantee lung cancer," he said.
Brown also said U.S. Navy visits
to Canada are increasing
dramatically   with   warships   spen-
- Steve chan photo
ding 272 days in Canadian ports in
1985, an increase of 250 per cent
over the average for the past ten
years.
The 1986 rate has increased by
half again, he said. Of the total
number of Canadian visits 83 per
cent came to the west coast ports of
Vancouver, Esquimau and
Nanoose Bay, with the others stopping at Montreal, Quebec City,
Charlotte town , Halifax and St.
John's.
Both Roscoe and Paradis said
students have a part to play in the
Campaign.
"If we want a future, then we
have to fight for it," said Paradis.
CA
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September 26.
9A
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Canada's leading accounting professionals Tuesday, September 16,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Men dominate conversations with women
From page 6.
writes John Pfeiffer in the science
journal Science '85 "the boom (in
this research) started little more
than a decade ago."
Prior to the mid-'70s, differences
in speech patterns were often explained by researchers — mostly
male — as innate, biologically-
determined inferiorities on the part
of women. Pfeiffer uses the example of Otto Jesperson, a Danish
linguist who, writes Pfeiffer, "has
earned a prominent place in the
feminist rogue's gallery."
In 1922, Jesperson wrote in his
book Language: "Women much
more often than men break off
without finishing their sentences,
because they start talking without
having thought out what they are
going to say."
This loaded statement intimates
that women are somehow less 'rational' than men, rather than looking to the underlying reasons why
women speak differently than men
and how that is connected to their
subjugation in a sexist society.
Jesperson neglects to mention
that men are usually the culprits
that succeeded not only in breaking
off women's sentences through interruption, but also in judging what
is a legitimate thought. Jesperson's
statement is an attempt to justify
the interruption of women by men.
"Such belittlement of female
conversation may be somewhat less
frequent nowadays. But it lives on
in everyday contexts, hardly surprising since it involves attitudes
embedded in thinking that gets
passed on like bad genes from
generation to generation," writes
Pfeiffer.
Over the last decade, studies such
as West and Zimmerman's have
succeeded in telling us more about
the different ways in which men and
women use language as well as exposing myths concerning the differences in speech patterns between
the sexes.
Nancy Henley and Barrie Thorne
write in Womanspeak and
Manspeak: Sex Differences and
Sexism in Communication, Verbal
and Non-Verbal, "the first myth is
that women speak more and longer
than men. This is simply not so,"
they write. "In study after study,
men have been found to speak more
often and at greater length than
women, and to interrupt other
speakers more than women do."
Some men even go to the extreme
of interrupting entire meetings:
Last February, some women were
meeting in the Women's Union Office at McGill, when one man walked in and brought the entire meeting
to a halt. "The man seemed completely oblivous to the fact that a
meeting was in progresss," says
Gardner, "and by interrupting it,
he intimated to the women present
that his concerns were somehow
more important than theirs."
Men not only do most of the interrupting (and the talking), but
they often choose what to talk
about. Public relations consultant
Pamela Fishman found that not only did women ask 70 per cent of the
questions, but that men succeeded
more often in starting conversations
and keeping them going. Fishman
taped 52 hours of conversation between three couples, a social worker
and five graduate students, who
consented to having tape recorders
in their apartments.
"At times I felt that all the
women did was ask questions ... I
attended to my own speech and
discovered the same pattern," said
Fishman.
Fishman discovered that women
asked the question "D'ya know
what/" with great frequency. Pfief-
fer describes in his article how other
research by other investigators
found that children frequently use
this phrase to communicate with
their elders. "It serves as a conversation opener, calling for an answer
like "What?" or "No, tell me," a
go-ahead signal that they may speak
up and that what they have to say
will be heeded."
Fishman also discovered why
women need such reassurances
from men: In the 76 efforts in taped
conversation to start conversations
or keep them going, men tried 29
times and succeeded 28 times, while
women tried 47 times, sometimes
for as long as five minutes, with
dead-end results 30 times. "It could
have been worse," wrote Fishman.
"Each of the male subjects in this
experiment professed sympathy for
the women's movement."
Men are also renowned in these
various studies for appropriating
women's ideas. Cheris Kramarae, a
professor of speech communication
at the University of Illinois and coauthor of The Feminist Dicitonary,
told Science '85 what happened
when, as the only woman member
of an important university policymaking committee, she tried to
communicate with the chair(man)
before the start of the meeting.
Kramarae asked for certain items to
be added to the agenda, but when
the chair paid no attention to her,
she "gave up." Once the meeting
started, he featured her ideas in a
review of the agenda and, turning
to a male colleague, said: "I don't
remember who suggested these
changes. I think it was Dick here."
Kramerae says women are often
heard but not listened to, "as if you
were speaking from behind a
glass". She adds that women will
often not be listened to in a meeting
until a man professes agreement
with her ideas.
Kaler agrees: "A woman will say
something, a man will like it, and
then it becomes valid."
As a result, said Kaler, "women
end up competing for the attention
of men, because their ideas have a
better chance of being implemented
THE
AMS IIMBl WKNIINS OFFICE
IS NOW CALLING FOR
VOLUNTEERS
TO HELP IN ITS DAY TO DAY OPERATIONS. VOLUNTEERS
WILL BE REQUIRED TO DEAL WITH COMPLAINTS AND
STAFF THE OFFICE DURING THE WEEK.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE ASKED TO SUBMIT THEIR
NAME, YEAR, AND PHONE NUMBER BY SEPTEMBER 26, 1986
TO:       AMS OMBUDSPERSON
SUB 100A, 228-4846 or MAIL BOX 60,
c/o AMS Business Office, SUB Rm. 266
if men support them. It's unfortunately an easy pattern to fall into
— even in non-hierarchical forms
of organization, conversation seems
to revolve around men."
Kaler says women should try to
decentralise meetings by talking
directly to other women in the room
during a meeting and not men. "To
stop men from dominating things
all the time, women should try to
bring other women into the
decision-making process by
nominating them for positions of
responsibility, backing up their
ideas, in short, providing the support network which men usually
give each other."
Henley and Thorne point out
that women are more likely to
disclose more personal information
to others than men, whereas men
"manipulate others by keeping
their cool and maintaining an
unruffled exterior." Women have
been socialized to display their emotions, their thoughts and ideas, but
giving out this information about
themselves, "especially in a context
of inequality, is giving others power
over them," write Henley and
Thorne.
Kaler says that men and women
both speak emotionally, but that
"women are less subtle about it."
Women have traditonally been
found to be more sensitive than
men to non-verbal cues, "perhaps
because their survival depends on
it," say Henley and Thorne.
Women's "socialization to docility
and passivity makes them particularly likely targets for this subtle
form of social control . . . their
close contact with men, for example
as wives and secretaries, entails frequent verbal and non-verbal interaction  with   those  in  power,"
Henley and Thorne add. Body
language communicates status and
power, and the fact that women are
more likely to avert their eyes in
See page 10: Women
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LOOKING FOR A CHURCH?
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• Sunday worship service at 12:00 noon
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 16, 1986
Women's speech cut short
"^^k^^i^
From page 9.
conversation and take up far less
physical space than men — gestures
of submission, they write — should
be seen in the context of a sexist
society and as a result of sexist
socialization.
"The tendency to hesitate, to
apologize, and to disparge one's
own statement are examples of conversational patterns associated with
females and with subordinate persons in general," continue Henley
and Thorne.
Kaler offers advice to other
women about how to combat this
pattern: "The biggest thing to overcome is the fear of saying just one
thing that can be seen as 'dumb'
and to not apologize for speaking.
"You have to try to make
yourself realize that if you have an
idea, go for it. It's worth taking the
risk to say what might be rejected,"
adds Kaler. It is also important, she
says, to be aware of the dynamics of
a meeting or a conversation, "to see
if the others notice that men, for example, are doing all the talking."
Kaler also has good advice for
women who find themselves being
interrupted constantly: "Keep
speaking and keep raising your
voice until it is so embarrassing for
the man to interrupt that he stops.
When he stops, lower your voice to
a normal level again. They'll get the
hint," she says.
Asked if women have to start
talking and acting like men to be
listened to, Kaler says that it is "unfortunate," but "if you're dealing
Keith Baldrey the Vancouver
Sun's political newshound will take
a break from sniffing out Vander
Zalm stories to give a seminar at
The Ubyssey this Friday.
Baldrey will discuss reporting BC
politics. So if you're interested in
provincial politics or you're an aspiring journalist come along to SUB
241k at 4 p.m. on Friday. Who
knows, you may be the first to hear
the provincial election date.
with men and want to be part of the
decision-making process,
categorically yes."
"Talking like a man," she says,
"Means that people take you more
seriously — if you're more decisive,
speak lounder, don't turn
statements into questions, swear
and make eye contact," you will be
seen "almost as androgynous". As
a result, your ideas will end up having more of an impact, Kaler adds.
Henley and Thorne point out
however, that there is a tendency
for many people and researchers to
see male speech patterns as a norm
and female speech patterns as a
deviation from that norm. Male
speech patterns and behavior tend
to be seen as correct because they
are seen as the norm, they explain.
Women of so-called 'indeterminate gender' — those who
challenge sexist stereotypes of
women's use of language — may
get listened to more by men as Kaler
suggests, but they also threaten
men, who are used to having the
ball in their court.
The question of how women
should attempt to close what Pfeiffer calls the "conversation gap"
between the sexes becomes central
to any discussion of differences between male and female language use.
It is also a difficult question:
Should women mimic male conversation patterns and body language,
or should they concentrate on
fighting the worst abuses of male
speech patterns? Or, should they attempt to do both?
These questions and questions
like them will continue to occupy
the attention of many feminists until such time as total equality between the sexes is reached. Yet,
fightng sexist stereotypes with
regard to language use is part of the
struggle against a sexist society.
What follows from this conclusion is that women must challenge
men's tendency to dominate conversation and physical space, while
mimicking men in the short term to
force them to listen.
However, men have ways of dealing with women that challenge, and
thus threaten, them. A woman may
be told by a man that because she
interrupts him, he has every right to
continue to interrupt all women all
the time. Thus, it could be said that
it is a bit of a contradiction for
women to utilize male language-use
tactics in order to challenge male
speech patterns.
Whatever path women choose to
take on the road to eliminating sexist speech patterns on the part of
men, men must be more receptive to
criticisms of their dominance
through language use and recognize
that women are the only legitimate
articulators of their own oppression. After all, women are the victims of sexism and therefore are
more able to recognize its
manifestations. Men must learn to
listen to women and listen to
themselves, looking for examples of
sexism in their behavior.
It is not women's responsibility
to change men; it is men's responsibility to change themselves.
THE DINER
Serving U. B. C. and West Point Grey for
the last 28 years
We put our Sole into your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Price — including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
and Sundays
1:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
455S W. 10th Ave. - 224-1912
We accept Chargex
FOR UBC,
LARGE FRIES
ARE FREE
Present your UBC
student card before
ordering and receive a
complimentary order
of large fries with any
purchase. Valid only
at McDonald's®   on
Broadway at Blenheim.
IT'S A
GOOD TIME
FOR THE
GREAT TASTE
McDonald'**
3310 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
No caah value.
Limit one per customer, par visit.
Valid until October 16. 1986.
TUESDAY (Today)
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Club meeting, noon, Brock 304. 'Origins', a film
discussing evolution and creation. Parts 1 & 2, 7
p.m.. Wood, 6
ST. MARKS FAITH AND JUSTICE GROUP
First  meeting   of  the  year,  7:30  p.m.,   Music
room, St. Marks College.
UNITED CHURCH/UBC FELLOWSHIP
Informal  worship  every  Tuesday,   noon,   Luth.
Camp. Centre.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOC.
Year's first lunch, noon, Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
'Origins',  a  film discussing  the origins of  the
Earth, continues. Part 3 & 4, 7 p.m., Wood, 6.
GRAD STUDENT SOCIETY and
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTH AFRICA
Present   the  film  'Generations  of  Resistance',
noon, SUB auditorium.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOC.
Is holding its first general meeting for all Psychos
at noon (12:30), SUB rm. 212.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Is   holding   its   first   general,   meeting   at   noon
(12:301 in SUB 206 (council chambers).
CITR
Will play The Best In DAnce Music from 8:30
p.m. 1:00 a.m. at the Pit pub (SUB).
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOC./HILLEL
Is serving lunch at noon (12:301 at Hillel House.
THE UBC FILM SOCIETY
Will    be    showing    a    film   at   7    p.m.,    SUB
auditorium.
THURSDAY
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOC./HILLEL
Is serving lunch at noon (12:30) at Hillel House.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENT ASSOC.
Will be holding a general meeting for all Poii. Sci.
students   and   electing   its   executive   at   noon
(12:30) in Buchanan B232
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Presents parts 5 & 6 of its evolution film 'Origins'
at 7 p.m.. Wood, 6.
COMMITTEE AGAINST
SEXUAL HARRASSMENT
Will  hold  its  first  organizing  meeting al  noon
(12:30) in Brock 106A.
AIESEC
Is holding The Great Scooter Sale from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., in the plaza between SUB and the
Aquatic Centre.
DEPARTMENT of ASIAN STUDIES
Lecture-demonstation on S.  Indian veen by L.
Ranganathan, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
INTER-VARSITY    CHRISTIAN    FELLOWSHIP
General  meeting   —   everyone welcome,   12:30
p.m., Chemistry 250.
CAMPUS-CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, noon, Woodward 4.
CITR
The  Best  in  Dance Music.  8:30 p.m.   lo  1:00
a.m., the Pit Pub.
UKRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Club days, watch for our booth, all day, SUB.
FRIDAY
FREE FLICK FRIDAY
"Maria," refreshment to follow, 7:30 p.m. Music
room, St. Mark's College.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick Libraries, 10:30
a.m. and 12:30 p.m., everyone welcome. Meet
at Main Library, main entrance hall.
SORORITIES OF UBC
Rush kickoff, 12:00 noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB
plaza north.
UBYSSEY SEMINAR
Reporting BC Politics by Keith Baldrey, Vancouver Sun's chief Zalm watcher. Sub 241k 4
p.m.
Talking 'bout my g-generation.
Our generation in South Africa is
struggling for justice. Our generation in Canada needs to know
about it. Come view Generations of
Resistance, directed by Peter Davis
of Mandela fame, in SUB
auditorium at noon on Wednesday.
This powerful film covers the anti-
apartheid movement in South
Africa featuring the students and
women's movements. This event is
sponsored by the Grad Student
Society and Students for a Free
Southern Africa. Peter Davis will be
there to answere questions after the
film. Be there.
They don't come much hotter
and flashier than the Blasters.
These masters of burning rhythm
and blues will be at the Town Pump
in Gastown tonight only.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
I RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines. 1 day $2.75; additional!
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi-l
tional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.[
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day\
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS	
COLLECTOR'S DOLL-TOY
Sale. September 21, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Royal
Towers Hotel, 6th St. & Royal Ave., New
West.	
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1976 TOYOTA Corolla SR5, blue. Good
condition. Asking $2500. Tel. 228-9442.
'65 VW SEDAN. Runs great. Good student
car, $550 firm. 731-5939 before noon.
HP-41VC excellent condition. $200.00
Call Fernando 224-4285 after 5:00 p.m.
HONDA ELITE 150 scooter. Like new.
$1,500.00. 224-2318.
'72 OLDSMOBILE. Loaded. $700 OBO
738-3164.
H.P. 97 HEWLETT-PACKARD program
mable printing calculator. Like new. $800.
437-7741 Bob.
40 - MESSAGES
NEVER RETYPE AGAIN!! Wordprocess
now at $100, not $2500. Free info. ROBINSON BOOKS, POB 76799U, VANCOUVER,
B.C. V5R 5S7.
70 - SERVICES
SCOOTERS!!
Only 5 left, so Hurry
1986 Honda Spree 50cc
low km $525.00
736-4299
ST. MARK'S CHURCH
KITSILANO
West 2nd & Larch    731-3811
Anglican        Episcopal
SUNDAY SERVICES
8:00 a.m. EUCHARIST
10:30 a.m. SUNG MASS
WEEKDAY EUCHARISTS:
Tuesday at 7 a.m.
Wednesday at 10 a.m.
Thursday at 6 p.m.
We welcome the UBC Community
to our Parish!
85 - TYPING
20 - HOUSING
GORGEOUS 2 BDR. on Kits Beach. To
share. On direct bus rte. N/S. Easy goin.
M/F for Sept. or Oct. $300. Ph. 731-5939
bef. noon.
30 - JOBS
LOOKING FOR MATURE person who en
joys sales, is hard working, responsible and
organized. Approx. 25 hrs./wk. Must be
able to work days, nights, wknds. Call
Diane at Work Warehouse 736-2678.
RELIABLE HOUSESITTER for elderly
gentleman while hsekeeper has time off.
Mon. 5 p.m. overnight to Tues. 9 a.m. &
Tues. 5 p.m. overnight to Wed. 9 a.m.
Close to UBC bus. (Westsidel Refs. Driver
lie. preferred. 228-9255.
MINIMUM  NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
TYPING? YOU BET! Thesis, term papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Kits area. June, 738-1378.
WORD PROCESSING letter quality. Near
UBC $1.25 per page. Call 228-8968.
WORDPERFECT is my speciality for all
your typing/word processing needs. Call
Colleen 987-2324.
35 - LOST
REWARDI Ring lost Sept. 14, 3:30 pm
outside Asian Centre in parking lot. Dropped beside a oar. Please call 263-5966.
STUDENT/FACULTY BATES
$1.50/pg. dble. spaced text.
Equations & tables: $14.00/hr.
Resumes: $5.00/page
50 personalized fo.m letters only $35.00
Cerlox binding & photocopying.
Fast, professional service.
Jeeva's Word Processing
201    636 W   Broadway
876-5333 m/c tt visa Tuesday, September 16, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Television warps gentle minds
By JOHN GUSHUE
Canadian University Press
When Aldous Huxley revised the
foreword to Brave New World in
1946, 14 years after publishing the
first edition, he was careful to note
that the pleasure-drenched society
he feared would evolve within 600
years might actually "be upon us
within a single century."
That same fear appears to be the
catalyst that drove Neil Postman to
write Amusing Ourselves To Death,
a shrewd and jarring critique of the
influence of television on a society
that has been trained to just want to
have fun.
Amusing Ourselves To Death
By Neil Postman
Viking
Postman wrote this book during
1984, a year during which
academics and media analysts were
drawing  a  frenzy  of connections
between George Orwell's novel of
the same name and the more
frightening realities of modern
society. Postman gives Orwell his
due, but also notes the similarities
between the often-compared Nineteen Eighty-four and Brave New
World are not as simple as they appear to be.
Orwell devised a world where terror was imposed through the
deprivation of pleasure. Huxley, on
the other hand, feared terror could
be as easily created through the excessive supply of pleasure. And it is
Postman's theory that Huxley, not
Orwell, may turn out to be right.
Postman — a respected New
York critic and educator — is a prophet's prophet; he draws simple
lines between Orwell and Huxley to
media seer Marshall McLuhan, introducing their warnings and
predictions together before delivering an alarming message of his own.
Simply put, Postman fears the
methods of learning and communication are not only changing,
but are radically deteriorating.
Perhaps the subtitle of the book
best illustrates his point — Public
Discourse in the Age of Show
Business. Drawing on the intellectual and historical property of centuries of civilization, Postman
makes elaborate and impressive attempts to show a society dependent
on Eyewitness News, Johnny Carson and Miami Vice is a society going down the tubes.
One of the strengths of
Postman's work is an extensive use
of historical background. To prove
that Americans of 200 years ago
were of a society more passionate
about learning, literacy and debate,
he provides lengthy examples of the
popularity of pamphlets,
newspapers, journals and rousing
public arguments in Ben Franklin's
New England before discussing the
death of same in today's media
and culture.
Unlike many media critics,
Postman doesn't take shots at the
type of shows that people watch;
for him, to improve television is a
futile activity, as long as our education system is allowed to continue
falling apart at the expense of
television.
Postman is not an obsessed man,
bent on wrecking television sets to
cast out evil demons; rather, he offers his own writing as an example
of the rhetoric and exposition that
people are losing the ability (and
desire) to contribute to others.
Postman is more critical of television reformers than of the people
who churn out demographically-
designed programming. A case in
point: he agrees Sesame Street, the
wunderkind of children's program
ming, is educational, but argues
that what the show really teaches
children is not so much how to
learn, but how to love television.
And, Postman argues, the television industry is adept at maintaining a child's addiction by maintaining a satisfactory level of child-like
television for lifetime consumption.
In other words, television hasn't
grown up, and probably can't.
Postman is also a teacher's
teacher; he is passionately concerned about education, and his
arguments seem to carry more
weight because of his commitment
to the quality of learning in our
schools. While calling on teachers
to not use television as a teaching
tool, he also advises everyone to
remember the importance of
reading in the learning process, and
the importance of the printed
medium in our culture.
Perfectly Simple. Simply Perfect.
Three calculators from Texas Instruments.
They're easy to use and there's one
to make your everyday calculating tasks
simple.
Each one features a sophisticated solar
power system. That means you're not going
to be let down by batteries when you can
least afford it
In a nutshell, the three calculators you
see here reflect what we believe calculators
are all about: they're fast, they're efficient,
they're reliable and they're easy to use
We're sure there's one for you.
To start with there's the TI-31 SLR which
performs the 63 most used scientific and
statistical functions, including the algebraic
operating system.
But if you're into more advanced math,
statistics or computer sciences, you
should be looking at the TI-36 SLR, or the
TI-37 Galaxy.
The TI-36 gives you a total of 89 functions. It can convert figures from one
base to another and performs mixed calculations. It also has a 10 digit/2-exponent
display that shows 13 mode or status
calculations. The TI-37 Galaxy has all this
plus it can handle integer or fraction
calculations. And it comes with a hard
plastic carrying case.
So if you're looking for a calculator that's
simple to operate and perfect for what
you want it to do, think two letters, T. I. -
and visit your Texas Instruments dealer
What could be simpler?
Texas **
Instruments Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 16, 1986
UBC pounds Calgary, takes first
By PATRICIA DUNN
The UBC Thunderbird football
team crushed the Calgary
Dinosaurs 18-3 Saturday night in
Thunderbird Stadium to remain
undefeated after three games this
season.
"It was a special victory because
we were both tied for first place
before this game," said team captain Dwayne Derban.
The match was touted as a classic
confrontation between UBC and
the defending Vanier Cup champions Calgary Dino's. And it was a
classic — for UBC anyhow.
The extinction of the Dinosaurs
was not due to a feeble Calgary,
team, but rather to an outstanding
UBC squad.
Starting quarterback Jordan
Gagner said,   "When we click it's
just going to be amazing."
Head Coach Frank Smith was
equally pleased, "It was a good
team effort. Calgary has a very
comparable team to last year. Offensively they're better; defensively
not quite as strong. I think our
coaches had a good defensive plan,
and the players played well defensively.
T-birds    Mark    Norman    and
rookie Mark Petros were defensive
and offensive players of the game,
respectively. Norman, the only
T-bird named an All-Canadian last
year, grabbed two interceptions, including one for 65 yards in the second quarter for a touchdown.
The exploits of veteran tight end
Rob Ros included a touchdown
pass, and two other catches which
enabled the offence to score.
— rory alien photo
UBC'S KAREN BROWN goes to the attack gainst opposition netminder in this weekend's action. The rookie laden squad faired well in the Early
Bird tournament showing promise for the upcoming season.
Champt ready to defend title
Soccer 'Birds Smash Americans, lose locally
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC women's soccer team
split a couple of games this weekend
at home against a local Fraser
Valley team and Pacific Lutheran
University.
On Saturday the 'Birds,
three time defending CIAU champions, defeated Lutheran 4-1 in an
exhibition game at O.J. Todd Field.
Wendy Pease led the team with two
goals while Carole St. Arnaud and
Kathy Bockhold, the team captain,
added singles.
Head coach Brian Thompson
said he was satisfied with the team's
overall performance. "It was our
second game and we made a lot of
switches trying to search out the
right combinations," he said.
UBC lost its first exhibition game
last weekend 2-0 against the University of Western Washington.
UBC trailed Lutheran one to
nothing at the half but exploded for
three goals in the second half. "We
had quite a lot of the territorial play
but just couldn't put the ball in the
net. Meanwhile they capitalized on
the one scoring chance they had,"
said Thompson.
In the second game on Sunday
UBC lost four-two to Fraser Valley,
ofthe Metro Women's League in its
opening regular season game. UBC
fills out its short Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union season
by also competing year round in the
Metro soccer league.
Captain Kathy Bockhold and
Mitch Ring each added goals for the
'Birds in a losing cause.
"We lost the game because of a
lack of defence. We have two new
people playing fullback and its
tough for them to work their way
into the system," said Thompson.
The T-Birds will have five new
starters on the squad this year. "It
creates difficulties for us because
the other Metro teams have been
together for years and are always
tough. Fraser Valley finished second in the province last year so I
was not displeased with the outcome," said Thompson.
Last year UBC finished third in
both the premier division and the
province. Considering UBC's
record in the CIAU as defending
champions one gets a good idea of
how tough  the  Metro league is.
Mitch Ring made the Women's
national soccer team while Zaleen
Kammoh-Amed, Nancy Sutherland
and Angie Norman made the B.C.
selects team.
Kammoh-Amed, Ring and Norman are all mid-fielders so the
T-'Birds  will   feature  a  powerful
center-half game this year.
"Most people that see Women's
soccer for the first time are quite
surprised. They think it is just some
girls playing a man's game. But
these are high quality athletes,"
said Thompson.
Birds finish third
Hey Punkleslll We still really need people to write
sports for The Ubyssey. If you are at all Interested
come in and rescue the beleaguered sports editor
with your brilliant and Imaginative prose. Come on
In and visit us. Don't be shy.
By PETER BERLIN
With almost half her squad made
up of rookies — Gail Wilson the
UBC women's field hockey coach
did not expect miracles in the Early
Bird tournament this weekend, her
team's first outing of the year.
The 'Birds, who were hosts,
finished third equal in the eight-
team tournament, better than
Wilson expected, she told the
Ubyssey.
UBC opened with two wins on
Saturday morning when they beat
Vancouver Jokers 3-1 and the
Meralomas 4-0. On Saturday afternoon they clinched first in their
pool with a lacklustre 0-0 tie against
SFU. On Sunday morning they lost
2-1 to the University of Victoria in
their semi-final before drawing the
third-place playoff 1-0 with the
Jokers. UVic tied Vancouver Doves
in the final.
This year only one Western team
instead of the traditional two will
go to the Canadian Collegiate finals
in Ontario. The tournament was
originally scheduled for Victoria
but was switched for financial
reasons and no-one at the CIAU
thought through the implications:
there will be three Ontario teams at
the finals.
So UBC and UVic the two
western powers will have to battle
each other for the only place.
Wilson was pleased with the
result of the first skirmish on Sunday. "I didn't expect us to be so
competitive so soon," she said.
Heather Quamme, a rookie from
Penticton, scored the 'Birds goal in
that match. She also scored against
the Jokers.
All the rest of the UBC goals
came from two of their veterans.
Jody Blaxland, who won a World
Championship silver playing for
Canada in Holland this summer
scored five goals on the weekend.
The other two goals came from
Melanie Slade, who also had an
adventurous summer. Slade, a central defender, toured Europe with
the Canadian under 21 team which
drew with West Germany for the
first time. UBC were doubly
represented on that team. Wilson
was the coach.
UBC travel to Calgary Friday for
their first Western Collegiate tournament of the season.
Jack Beestra, a WIFL All-Star
and last year's Most Valuable-
Player, caught an interception in
the second quarter which helped
rally the defence to play a strong
game.
Both Calgary and UBC boasted
perfect records entering the game.
Now UBC is 3-0, Calgary 2-1.
Calgary failed to score a touchdown
against the powerful UBC defence.
"We slowed down Calgary's offence. They could get down the
field, but they couldn't get into the
end zone," said Smith.
UBC compiled a total net offence
of 346 yards compared to Calgary's
meagre 180. The Dinosaurs
floundered particularly with their
passing, obtaining a mere 24 yards
compared to UBC's 168.
And the 'Bird's finest is yet to
come. They haven't hit their full
potential yet.
"I think right now we're
operating at three-quarter speed,"
said Dwayne Derban. "It's a matter
of executing the plays, both offensively and defensively, a little more
crisply."
Next week UBC travel to
Spokane to take on Eastern
Washington on their turf - an
NCAA, Division 1, Double A team.
"The game will be a real test for us
They are the best opponent UBC
has ever played in football
history," said Smith.
UBC is ranked number one in the
nation in the latest football poll
with Western Ontario and Calgary
following.
(SPORTS^
Football Standings
Team
GP    W
L
T
UBC
3    3
0
0
Calgary
3    2
1
0
Sask
2    0
2
0
Manitoba
2    0
2
0
Soccer men
gearing up
With the coming of autumn,
Dick Moesher and his UBC soccer
team are ready for another outstanding season.
Moesher takes over the head
coaching duties from the legendary
Joe Johnstone who coached the
'Birds for twenty years, including
their last two consecutive Canadian
Inter-university Athletic Union
titles in 1985 and 1986.
"Joe has done an excellent job
for twenty years, especially with all
the success he has had, so his shoes
will definitely be hard to fill," said
Moesher.
Moesher said the toughest opponents UBC will face this year are
the University of Victoria, Calgary
and Alberta.
"We've been gearing up — practicing for six weeks so we'll be ready
for the season," said Moesher.
UBC plays its first games of the
season next week on the road
against Saskatoon on Friday and
Alberta on Saturday. Outstanding
returnees for the T-Birds are CIAU
first team all-stars Gregor Young,
playing mid-field and Brian Kennedy in goal.
Impressive newcomers for the
'Birds include Steve Burns, Joe
Pesht, Byron Baylor, Kevin Col-
bow, Andrew Mardon and Mike
Allina:, "The team will be strong
again said Moesher.
Moesher has been coaching Vancouver select teams for the past two
years. There is also a new assistant
coach, David Partridge, from
England.

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