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The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1964

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Array Barry...
THE UBYSSEY
VOL. XLVII, No. 21
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1964
CA 4-3916
Engineers turn
Chivalry
thicker
than water
By LORNE MALLIN
The Engineers turned on
their own Wednesday.
And they turned on their
leader, no less—Steve White-
law, the evil genius of campus
tomfoolery.
Whitelaw learned, in the
murky depths of the library
pond, that you can't buck the
clan.
• •   •
Whitelaw's problem was that
he got chivalrous and his firm
grip on leadership faltered.
Whitelaw was a willing participant when the Engineers
kidnapped Frosh president
Kim Campbell from the Frosh
office to the EUS office where
she played bridge and drank
coffee.
At noon, the Engineers
dunked five other frosh in the
pond.
. And they hoisted Kim in a
large net hammock and strung
her 10 feet up between two
branches of a tree.
• •    •
The Engineers, Whitelaw
looking on, read a proclamation ruling Kim, an innocent
young high school girl who
should be protected from
dangerous and corrupting influences — namely Artsmen
and Sciencemen.
Kim sneered defiantly.
"I'll never give up," she
said. "I'll fight you on the
beaches and in the tree tops."
The Engineers just laughed
—all except Whitelaw who
saw the hammock ripping.
• •   •
Whitelaw  said  they  should
take Kim down.
The Engineers voted on
their leader's suggestion. They
decided to leave her in the
tree.
But Whitelaw climbed the
tree, loosened the rope and
Kim jumped out—into the willing hands of an education student.
The Engineers growled with
anger, grabbed Whitelaw and
tossed him in the pond.
Our empty office
waits for you
Mid-terms are here and
our reporters are there.
This is your chance to join
Canada's best university
paper.
Our door, like your mouth,
is open; come down and put
your foot in it.
If you can write, fine; if
you can't we'll teach you.
Sports writers will be especially welcome. We also
need typists and proof-readers.
The Ubyssey office is in
North Brock basement.
UBC fiddles
as stadium
deal burns
UBC is looking its stadium gift-horse in the mouth.
Vancouver   Parks   Board   has   recommended   Capilano
Stadium be used for UBC games, but campus athletic officials Wednesday were critical of the proposal,
director of
Egg-thrower
ducks student
court charge
STEVE AND KIM
—don hume photo.
damp music together
Bob Osborne
Physical Education said it
would be far better if the city
gave the stadium to UBC as a
gift.
Athletic director Bus Phillips slammed the idea.
"The Capilano field will not
stand up to constant play," he
said referring to the plan to
use it for city amateur sports
as well.
MONEY NEEDED
Student president Roger McAfee said the city would first
have to give details of the
money needed for renovation
and declare who could control
the stadium.
Parks commissioner George
Puil had suggested UBC and
the city combine resources to
renovate the now-unused stadium. UBC's present campus
stadium will be torn down this
fall, and won't be replaced until at least 1967.
ONLY TEMPORARY
"We must have our own
stadium on campus for intramurals and for developing student spirit," Phillips said.
He added UBC may have to
rely on Capilano Stadium
while the new stadium is being
built, but only as a temproray
measure.
McAfee agreed with Phillips
that Cap Stadium would not
be considered on a permanent
basis, but only as a stop-gap.
"The main purpose of a stadium is to provide facilities for
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: STADIUM
Student Court has charged
a student in the Screech Day
egg-throwing incident, but
court officers cannot find the
student.
Student Court has charged
Donald H. Mackay, 3197 Point
Grey Road, with conduct unbecoming to a student in the
incident.
"But he has gone into hiding
and we can't track him down,"
said discipline committee chairman Dick Hayes.
Hayes said the constitution
of student court requires
charges be handed directly to
accused persons.
"We have gone to his classes
and to his home, but we cafi't
find him."
He said the constitution
should be changed so charges
could be prosecuted after all
steps possible have been taken
to summon the accused.
"I have also written university president John Macdonald for a policy statement,"
said Hayes.
(President Macdonald is
chairman of the faculty discipline committee.)
"We hope in cases where accused students fail to co-operate with student court the administration will not let them
write final exams," he said.
Chicken thieves
Chickens too
Someone likes his eggs poached
By MIKE BOLTON
UBC has poultry poachers.
U to y s s e y staffers Carol
Anne Baker ancf Tom Way-
man witness the egg-pilferers
about 2 p.m. last Saturday.
A late-model car stopped in
C-lot near bushes by the poultry farm.
*    •    •
The car had no student
sticker.
Two children, about 10,
hopped out of the car and
darted into the bushes.
They emerged three minutes later, their shirts bulging
with eggs.
The man who waited in the
car then drove off with the
children and the plunder.
Poultry farm technician
Howard   Middleton   said
Terrified chickens huddle in barnyard
chickens sometimes escape
and lay eggs outside the
fence.
But he said the chickens
would not give up their eggs
without resistance.
"Poachers would likely
have a battle on their hands,"
he said.
Poultry farm foreman, H.
W. Alice, said poaching is
fairly common.
•   •   •
Alice said he thinks chickens are stolen more often
than eggs.
People crawl over the
fence to steal eggs or chickens.
"I guess people think they'll
(Continued  on  Page 2)
SEE:   POACHED Pag* 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5, 1964
DAVE BARRETT
. . . hits Red Feather
Appeal a
mockery,
says MLA
The Red Feather appeal is
a mockery of our society's
principles a New Democratic
MLA said here Wednesday.
Dave Barrett, MLA for
Dewdney, called the organizers of the Red Feather drive a
group of public relations men
pushing charity.
"The Red Feather Appeal is
a mockery of the basic philosophy of our society," he told
a meeting of the Pre-Med Society.
"There is a tacit understanding conveyed by the appeal
that without a charity a child
will go without necessary services," he said.
No person should be asked
to accept charity. Only if really
necessary, should people be
provided for by society, he
said.
"Large charity appeals such
as the Community Chest impair the growth of necessary
social welfare to which we are
committed," he said.
Barrett, who is trained as a
professional social worker,
also spoke on Medicare.
Barrett attacked the B.C.
Medical Association for continuing to oppose Medicare.
"Medicare is inevitable and
anyone who hopes it will not
come is blind," he said.
"It is the responsibility of
doctors to detail a satisfactory
plan to the government.
STADIUM
(Continued from Page 1)
teams   to   play,   not  to  draw
down town crowds," he said.
The Parks Board proposal
may never make it past city
council, however.
Nat Bailey, president of the
defunct Vancouver Mounties
baseball club and the former
occupiers of the stadium, said
there's a good chance the team
will be re-admitted to the Pacific Coast League next year.
That means no stadium for
UBC.
Bailey is attending the league's annual meeting this
weekend to pump for a new
franchise.
"There's a strong possibility
we'll be back in the league,"
he said.
City council's decision on the
Parks Board plan now await
Bailey's return.
Indians blend in better,
Fellowship loses members
By RICHARD BLAIR
Native Indians are assimilating into university life better
now than ever, says the Native
Canadian Fellowship.
And as a result, only half of
the approximately 30 Indians
on campus this year belong to
the NCF, an organization designed to help them assimilate.
•    •    •
Fellowship officials say this
is a much smaller proportion
than in the past.
Secretary Laverne Brown
said in an interview Wednesday that Indian students are
assimilating more quickly because integration of the Indian
is becoming more common in
Canadian society as a whole.
She said major factors in
this integration are that an increasing number of Indians are
moving off reservations and
that educational opportunities
for Indians are improving.
• •    •
NCF was established four
years ago to help the Indian
students as well as familiarize students with Indian culture, promote improvement of
Indian education in B.C. and
provide a social club for Indian students.
• •    •
NCF faculty advisor Dr.
Hugh Thurston, said Indian
students now have no more
educational problems than any
other, students.
Dr. Thurston is chairman for
the Committee for Native Canadian Indians, a faculty organization formed to help the
Native Indians.
40 exam papers
stolen from prof
Nearly 40 examination  papers have been   stolen  from
a professor's office in Arts 107.
The papers had been written
by Math. 120 students of Professor James Whittaker.
"I simply will not count the
exam," Professor Whittaker
said.
He said he would give
another test in a few weeks to
replace the one stolen.
Professor Whittaker said he
thought a student who had
done poorly on the exam stole
the papers.
Sir Ouvry Roberts, head of
security at UBC said entry was
gained by forcing open the
door.
POACHED
(Continued   from   Page  1)
get a cheap chicken dinner,
but they usually have to work
for it," he said.
Alice said thieves seldom
take anything other than
chickens and eggs.
"Once in a while some
clowns take a cow to a girls
dorm.
"It is difficult to determine
how many chickens were stolen," he said. "We have about
8,000 of them in all."
Profits from poultry sales
are the farm's major income
source.
Gals want
gold undies
Female student councillors
say plans to re-design UBC's
old blue-andgold school tie are
leaving the girls out in the
cold.
To warm them up, they want
council to make items of female apparel bearing UBC colors.
At Monday's council meeting, Frosh president Kim
Campbell suggested blue-and-
gold-striped underwear.
Rehabilitation M e di c i n e's
Judy Bain wants tasseled
stocking caps or gloves with
alternate blue and gold fingers.
Librarianship president Sally
Sargent suggested hats, ear-
muffs and kneesocks.
Student council has started
a competition to design a new
official tie. The old one has
been described as a bib.
Classical Guitar
Tuition to Advanced Level
Segovia Technique
W. Parker 682-1096
B.C. Hydro & Power Authority
requires
One Mechanical and up to 15 Electrical Engineers
for its expanding activities.
There are excellent opportunities for graduates
to obtain a variety of training and experience in
many locations throughout the Province, leading to
promotions and increased'salaries commensurate with
responsibility.
Please consult your bulletin board and our
brochure "Engineering the Future" for background
information and description of B.C. Hydro's diverse
activities and engineering career opportunities.
We will be on the Campus November 10, 12, 13
and 16. We are looking forward to discussing your
career plans with you and in exploring how your
interests and talents could be best utilized in this
rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an
appointment time through the Student Services Office.
Among programs offered to
help Indian students is an orientation program to introduce
high school Indian students to
university life.
•    •    •
Last year more than 12 students from the Lower Mainland were brought to UBC, taken to lectures and treated to
dinner with faculty members.
A similar program is planned for this year.
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
Is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Students Meal Tickets
Available
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MAKE YOUR
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OPEN   7:30 a.m. -  7:00  p.m.  Monday  •  Friday
8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
Available  at these Canaday  Dealers:
3031 W. Broadway
2159 W. 41st Ave.
Clothing    Stores 6495   Fraser  Street
Limited 4000 East Hastings
FINNS Thursday, November 5, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—don hume photo.
CREDITISTES CLUBBERS Guy Sobell and Real Caouette (back to camera) display new club
sweat shirt. Shirts are so far available only to UBC Creditiste Club members.
Surveys survey
A-G drops hopeful hints
Attorney-General Robert
Bonner's got UBC's hopes up.
Council vice-president Bob
Cruise said he thinks Bonner is
pleased with the AMS student
means survey and intends to
do something about it.
•   •   •
"Bonner casually remarked
the two-month housing grant
mentioned in the survey would
cost the government $750,000,"
said Cruise, a member of the
delegation which presented the
report to the government last
week.
"This was surprising and
encouraging, since no mention
of finances was made in the
brief," Cruise said.
"Bonner is apparently interested enough to take the
trouble to figure it out."
Other delegation members
were AMS president Roger McAfee, co-ordinator Graeme
Vance, and treasurer Kyle Mitchell.
"We were fortunate to have
Lands and Forests Minister
Ray Williston there," said Mitchell.
•   •   •
"He is from a rural constituency and has been quite active
in   working   on   problems   of
«
out-of-town students with Education Minister Les Peterson."
(One of the main conclusions
of the survey was that in most
Prejudice blamed
for wife hassle
Pro-Cuban   education   student   Bryan   Belfont  charged
Wednesday his wife is being persecuted by Canadian immigration authorities because of his political beliefs.
Belfont   said   he   has   re
ceived notification an appeal
made against deportation of
his German bride of a month
had been dismissed by officials.
His wife has been under
technical arrest since their
marriage Oct. 8.
Belfont, 34, said the fact he
is chairman of the UBC Student Committee on Cuban Affairs has affected the incident.
Students such as himself,
who have travelled to Cuba,
face the accusation they are
either Communists or Communist sympathizers, Belfont
said.
"But I am not, never have
been, and never intend to be a
member of a Communist
party."
Belfont met his wife Isolde,
24, in Cuba. They were married Oct. 8, and his wife was
placed under technical arrest
as they crossed the border
that afternoon.
Party split
threatens'
A Conservative member of
parliament said Wednesday the
Conservatives and Liberals are
in danger of splintering themselves into nothing.
Mrs. Jean Wadds, Tory MP
for Grenville - D u n d a s, said
Canadian Conservatives tend
toward regionalism practiced
by splinter groups in the
party.
"Both parties are in danger
of splintering themselves into
nothing. If they do the Canadian parliament will become a
shambles," she said.
Mrs. Wadds said Conservatives can overcome regionalism in the party by maintaining moderation.
cases, out-of-towners did not
make enough during the summer to finance their year at
UBC.)
"We also mentioned this
would be a first in Canada,"
Cruise added.
•   •   •
He said copies of the brief
were being run off for distribution to undergraduate societies and interested students.
Mitchell said the brief was
already producing some results: Several B.C. organizations had requested advice on
scholarships they were planning to present.
^S
fOORtss Baqpo
Clothe
Fins material and
painstaking crafts-
|lv« yo« a swlf of
H|MCUMf CWt Ml
tailing
NUN'S WIAR
74! GmNifc Street   *»-StK
Rally at noon
Book sales spur
protest meeting
Newly-formed B.C. Student Federation has organized a
protest rally on the Library lawn today at noon to air
bookstore sales methods.
The rally will not advocate
abolishing the administration's
bookstore, organizer Hardial
Bains said, but will discuss
alternatives to it such as a
co-op.
A co-op would handle text
books on a non-profit basis and
allow the present book store
to handle specialty books and
special orders. This would let
the book store increase their
selection and give better service, Bains said.
Bains said the rally will be
a forum for student opinion.
He said the AMS should be
proceeding more quickly on
this matter.
AMS President Roger McAfee told The Ubyssey a committee has already been organ
ized by the Faculty Association to study book co-ops.
The AMS has been invited
to send a member McAfee said.
The committee is now studying briefs from other universities with co-op bookstores.
"This idea must be approached carefully and on the basis
of facts," said McAfee.
EYE GLASSES
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All work rMrfwiMd by qadKfM
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GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville     MU 3-8921
Ckjcukmlx: (IctivltisA
and INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
In connection with Fall Symposium, the topic of
which is '''Between Man and Man", there will be a talk
on Friday, November 6th, at 12:30 in the Auditorium.
W.  H.  PARKER
Art director of the Royal Ontario Museum
will be speaking on
COMMUNICATION AND PERCEPTION
Admission is 25c.
There will be coffee available in International House
in the afternoon when students will 'be able to meet
Mir. Parker informally.
Mr. Parker is currently the art director of Royal
Ontario Museum in Toronto and has collaborated a great
deal of work with Marshal McCuken.
Buses leave for Fall Symposium at 5:30 p.m. in front
of Brock Hall. Bring your sleeping bags.
^ if your pi2za is PtnrecT
PEzaraMA
WE ARE NOW
Open for Lunch
with a special
LUNCHEON MENU
Low Prices - Quick Service
from 11:00 a.m.
2676 W. Bdwy. - RE 6-9019
SPECIAL EVENTS*
J* THEY ARE HERE!  V
*"      TODAY-GYM
*«r
YOU TOO CAN  SEE
THE  FABULOUS
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>  FOUR PREPS ■/
Hurry! The Entertainment Starts
Noon Today. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Bditoriai office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general,
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1964
UBC's tourists
"Beautiful British Columbia," the tourist brochure
reads, "Where the visitor can travel on miles of paved
highway through the world's most spectacular scenery."
Blah. Double Blah.
Especially when part of that paved highway and
spectacular scenery are just outside the university in
the form of Southwest Marine Drive.
So suggest to the highways department that much of
the congestion on the Drive in the morning could be
cleared up by making the traffic flow one-way into the
campus.
Blah, they say, there is a certain tourist value which
would be wrecked if such a plan were carried out.
Can't ruin the tourist trade, this is Beautiful British
Columbia.
Blah, you say, just what kind of a tourist would be
running around on Marine between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m.
And would we want that kind of tourist in Beautiful
British Columbia?
Boo, they say, this is the way it is.
The highways department would be well-advised to
undertake a study of Marine and the access problem for
students.
The department must be giving the matter some
thought as speeds have been re-adjusted "to smooth out
things."
Southwest Marine Drive has few access points from
Fotrty-first to its intersection with Agronomy Road.
It would seem almost ideal to adapt it to one-way
traffic between, say, 7 a.m. and 9 ajn.
Unlike other universities we do not have any really
pressing parking problems once cars are on campus.
The three major lots are easily accessible from
Marine Drive and we have the room in them to accommodate the 8,000-plus cars that stream on campus.
The engineering undergraduate society is conducting a survey on campus traffic patterns.
Here is an area where careful study and traffic
counts could provide a case for action.
A study of, say, tourists travelling against the projected one-way pattern suggested above might prove
invaluable.
A study of, say, disgruntled students waiting 45 minutes to squeeze on campus might be invaluable.
A study of, say, these students' comments about the
tourists would be further instructive.
Open letter to Goldwater
"Well, I guess it's back to writing hate literature."
Goldwater has gone —
But George is waiting
Excerpted  from
THE ROCKWELL REPORT
By
George L. Rockwell
Leader U.S. Nasi Party
It is for the year, 1968, that
I am planning every move we
make.
When the Red rats strike in
this year, we will be the only
group in America with trained
men ready to exploit the enraged masses the Communisis
are planning to pour forth into the streets.
We are consciously building the strong political images
necessary to win the ear of
the   masses,   and   then   their
hearts,   when   these   terrible
days of the Red revolution descend upon oui* beloved America, our Republic and our
Constitution.
In every country which has
ever CONQUERED COMMUNISM, the job has been
done NOT by the "nice"
groups, and the job has never
been led by Jews.
It has always been the work
of men who were hated and
reviled for being too "radical"
and "wild", but who forged
ahead and did the job nevertheless. In Italy it was Mussolini. In Spain, Franco. In
Germany, Hitler.
By Phil Lind
A discouraged conservative writes
LETTERS
Old ladies and beer
Editor, The Ubyssey:
What glory is there in winning the so-called "Boat
Race" at the Tea Cup game
when competitors don't have
to drink more than 50 per
cent of their beer?
The competition, as it
stands now, is so easy that I
can't understand why some
little old ladies' knitting
circle hasn't challenged the
victorious   engineeers.
What the sport needs is a
rule requiring each competitor to drink all his beer. This
rule could be easily enforced
by dressing the competitors
in clean white bibs so that
the smallest wastage would
be undeniably spotted.
BOB  PARSONS
Grad. Studies
«g»     4*     "P
Leave us alone!
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This Totem Park effort has
gone far enoughl
How would you like your
home picked at, ridiculed,
and (horrors!) examined?
It's a good thing we have
those walls around us, otherwise we'd probably look out
on a sea of faces looking in
at us.
The wall also cuts off the
view of the cars leaving B-lot,
bumper to bumper, for several hours every day.
As for the "high barred
gates" and the "blinding spotlights"—the gates are strictly
decorative (just think of the
fun one can have swinging
on them!). The spotlights
haven't blinded too many of
our residents (at least not so
that we can't find the Buzzerbox when we want to go in).
Why don't all these people
making such a fuss about us
and our buzzer-box just buzzer off and leave us in our
seclusion.
JUDY  SHARK
Arts IV
«^p     ap     mff
Mad hatter strikes
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I happened to attend a
convocation ceremony Oct.
24 at the University of Manitoba when UBC's Dr. Margaret Ormsby received an
honorary doctoral degree.
Dr. Ormsby was cited as
"scholar, teacher, woman and
owner of a fabulous collection of hats."
I don't think I am the only
UBC student, past or present,
who marvelled at Miss Orms-
by's hats so perhaps the citation is worth a line in your
paper.
ROBIN TAYLOR
Winnipeg Free Press
•f"    V    *r
As I look over the results of
what appears to be a crushing, devastating defeat of not
only you, but your party, I
am moved to write.
Phil Lind is a former president of the McGill Progressive Conservative Party and
is also a former Regional
Vice-president of the Progressive Conservative Student Federation.
To be honest, your cause
pi "-pealed more to me because
j'; ■ f emed to represent a mani-
'2 ■ 'ion of a new, evolution-
;r<   American Conservatism.
'; seemed to have a, great
: VPsal to many of us because
it espoused freedom over all.
Though I followed your
primary campaign I still remained an impartial observer.
I wanted to see if you would
divorce yourself from reaction, and if so, if you could
sell your goods.
You did neither.
• • •
Never-the-less , when you
were nominated, I decided to
give you a second look. After
all, I would never be able to
support Lyndon Johnson,
whom I regarded as a hypocritical, dishonest opportunist
owing his very existence to a
political hero—the late John
F. Kennedy.
Your campaign was a disappointment. You did not
speak clearly on the issues.
Your foreign policy was weak.
Your domestic policy clouded
by contradictions.
•    •    •
Your mention of immoral
conduct in high places was
acceptable—'but not to the
degree you pushed it.
Senate hopefuls Keating,
Taft and Scott have gone
down to defeat. So has
Charles Percy of Illinois.
Few have withstood the
tremendous opposition you
created against them.
The~~ and others, are good
men. They are good Republi
cans. They believe in the Republican party.
You claim to represent this
party. Have you? Have you
done a service to your party?
I think not.
Sir, in defeat you have my
sympathy. But it will be sympathy not held long if you intend to exercise complete
control over your party's ideological course.
•   •   •
The Conservative movement is not doomed by your
failure, nor is the Republican
pirty. Both, however, will be
aided considerably, Sir, if you
gracefully back out of the
political picture.
EDITOR: Mike Horsey
News    ~ Tim Padmore
City Tom Wayman
Art  Don Hume
Managing   Janet Matheson
Sports  ,  George Reamabottom
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts
Asst. City Lorraine Shore
Asst. News  Carole Munroe
Associate  Mike Hunter
Associate Ron Riter
Magazine     Dave Ablett
Look, you buy a Pour Preps record, you hear it over and over. You
go to a smelly gym, you can't hear
it once. And if you want to support
them, your money goes to the same
place anyway—the U.S. Government
in taxes. So come to the staff meeting, already. Skates—what? Jellybeans—why? Sex—Definitely? Then
go to Greydon Moore and Guy Sobell
for assistance. And for sweat: Paul
Terry, Bob Weiser, Wieser (scratch
one), Ed Clarke, Lynn Curtis, Al
Birnie, Carol Smith, Janet Currie,
Al Francis, John Dilday, Sheri Galen, Sharon Rodney, even John (boldface) Kelsey, Lome Mallin, Art Cas-
person, Carol Anne Baker, Joan
Godsell. Front Page, Ed Clarke,
Johnson  (firat). Thursday, November 5, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
AUTUMN LEAVES are keeping the men of Buildings and
Grounds busy. Hundreds of acres of campus boulevards,
lawns  and playing  fields are  subject of  annual   cleanup.
Cash cache
AMS stocks up
student coffers
—don hume photo
One of the most scenic areas on campus is pictured in
this view of the tree-lined boulevard between the Library and Buchanan building.
Ye Olde Charles
O'Hegarty
from Ye Olde London
Towne
"The Tang of Ale and the
Savor of fine Old Cheese"
—Raymond Hull
pluA
Ellen Baskett
Direct from "The Mews"
in Phoenix, Arizona
UBC's finest folksongstress
3607 West Broadway
(One Block East of Alma)
Doors 8:30; 1st Show 9:30
Reservations: RE 6-6011
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society
doesn't exactly play the stock
market with your money.
But by investing AMS fees
in short-term securities, at
least $5,000 is added to student
coffers.
• •    •
A major project for every
AMS treasurer is investing,
and re-investing the $450,000
in student money he handles
during the year, says this year's
treasurer Kyle Mitchell.
Weeks before registration,
Mitchell spent many hours in
meetings and phone calls investigating the short term loan
field with local bankers, brokers and financiers.
"We must be ready to invest
our money as soon as we get it
from the administration.
- "Any delay costs us $25 a
day in interest we could be collecting," said Mitchell.
•    •    •
"And because of fluctuations
in interest rates from company
to company and day to day it
pays to have a broad outlook
over the field.
"What we want are investments with a higher interest
rate than banks, but which
present negligible risks."
In the past two years the
AMS has invested money in
finance companies.
These included Laurentide,
Industrial Acceptance Corporation and Traders Finance.
• •   •
"We find we get at least one
per cent more from finance
companies than from banks.
Over the year this adds up to
$3,000 or $4,000," says Mitchell.
Investments this year should
net the students at least
$15,000, he said.
Re-investments are being
made constantly throughout
the year.
When   the   money  will  be
needed, how much revenue can
be expected from AMS activities, and how much cash to
keep on hand must be carefully considered, Mitchell said.
•    •    •
From this information he
determines the size and length
of time for the investfhent.
Because of a tight financial
situation this year, Mitchell
has added interest from the
money collected for the Student Union Building to general
revenue.
•    •    •
"I think we are justified in
giving the students who have
contributed $15 to SUB and
won't foe getting anything out
of it a little extra this year,"
he said.
(The building is not scheduled to be completed for at least
two years.)
"Anyhow, we need money
from somewhere."
HEP heads
get together
All HEP people are invited
to attend a meeting in the
public relations office in
Brock at noon Friday.
HEP, the Higher . Education Promotion Committee,
is looking for students interested in promoting the needs
of higher education in B.C.
AMS public relations officer Tony Hudz said the
committee aims to create an
increased awareness of the
benefits of higher education
to B.C.
Editors ask
for boycott
REGINA (CUP)—The Carillon, student newspaper of the
University of Saskatchewan,
has asked students to boycott
local merchants who refuse to
advertise in the paper.
The paper said in an editorial it needs about $2,000 in advertising this year.
The editorial said students
should support only merchants
whose advertisements appear
in the paper.
CbdtA 74. S. MaticeA
Applications are now being received for the Arts Representatives on the 1964-1965 Grad Class Committee. Any
fourth or fifth year students interested in being on this
committee should apply in Buchanan 115 as soon as
possible.
Arts U. S. announces a competition for the design of the
new Arts Crest. Deadline of submission is noon, November
tenth, to the Arts Office, Bu. 115. Prize for the winning
entry will be an Arts Sweater. This competition is open
to any U.B.C. student. Crests should be sweater size and
no more than three colours.
SEE   IT  TODAY!!
DEMONSTRATING THE FAMOUS
BRITISH   P-50
THURSDAY NOON, ot the STADIUM
The World's only Enclosed Scooter
• Low Economy — All Car Comfort
• Speeds up to 55 miles per hour
• 90 - 100 miles per gallon
• Heater, Defroster and Signals included
• Windshield Wipers and Washers
Campus Representative for Peel P-50 Distributors
BILL    HARVEY
AM 6-2297
OK   BRAKES
1st Ave. & Main St. Phone: 879-3014
* For all popular makes:—
Brake Shoes (4 wheels) $16.50
Wheel Kits (4 wheels) $10.00
Both Shoes and 	
Wheel Kits $25.00
* Special 5% Discount Before Xmas, for UBC Students
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR GRADUATES IN COMMERCE, BUSINESS
AND GENERAL ARTS
American-Hospital Supply—a leading supplier to Canada's expanding
health and hospital, market.
FOR GRADUATES IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Canadian Laboratory Supplies
Limited — a leading supplier to industrial, governmental, educational and
hospital laboratories.
fcanlabj
The above firms, already foremost in their fields, offer interesting positions with
on excellent future. Both organization! are owned by American Hospital Supply
Corporation, Evanston, Illinois, the world's largest company serving the rapidly
growing health and science markets.
Interviews Nov. 9th, 10th, 12th
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information
and interview appointment. , "■!■■■
Sft^g
'^8%.   ^^Wiii r "Hi This
engineer
has chosen
a new world
of opportunity
In the world of data processing many
new ideas start an expanding
progression of new technologies, new
systems, and new applications. This
evolution runs full circle in that it forms
the stimulus for even further data
processing creativity. Within this
expanding world, people at IBM are
building careers by meeting challenges
with imagination through their
knowledge and training. Through this
progression their achievements in turn
become the source of new concepts
in tomorrow's information systems
for business, industry, science, education
and government. The rapid growth and
development of the data processing
field thus present exceptional career
opportunities and the professional
stimulus that provide for individual
accomplishment.
Engrossing assignments lead to
satisfying careers. IBM engineers find
they are given all the responsibility
they are ready for. In fact, IBM
encourages each individual to tackle
progressively tougher problems by
providing the facilities, atmosphere
and educational opportunities that form
a sound basis for career growth.
We have a brochure describing career
openings. Consult your university
placement officer. He can also put you
in touch with our career representatives
when they visit your campus. But, if
you prefer, contact:
Mr. W. E. Redpath
1445 West Georgia Street
Vancouver 5, B.C.   682-5515
IBM
TRADE MARK
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5, 1964
BYRON HENDER
... a real steal
Trusting
students
aid crooks
Student council is helpless
to act on the recent outbreak
of thefts on campus, AMS second vice president Byron Hender says.
"All we can do is warn students, and hope they take
heed," he said.
"I think students are much
too trusting — I see purses and
briefcases lying unattended
everywhere."
Hender said items worth almost $1,000 have been reported stolen within the past two
weeks.
In other student council
news:
The university administra-
has no immediate plans to
move the University Blvd.
gates, reports Law president
Dick Hayes.
Hayes said traffic Czar Sir
Ouvry Roberts agrees with student council that the gates are
a hazard and should be moved.
But he says since the administration will not act he is powerless to do anything.
The gates' location is a perennial complaint of car-poolers,
who claim they seriously hamper vision of the 10th and
Blanca  intersection.
A two-man AMS committee
is looking into the possibilities
of moving the gates.
• •    •
UBC is in danger of losing
one of its express bus services.
Nursing president Wendy
Woodland said an express bus
to Forty-first and Oakridge
was not drawing enough passengers, probably because students don't know the route.
Hydro officials are threatening to discontinue service, she
said.
The buses leave the stadium
on East Mall at 2:30, 3:30, 4:30
and 5:30 p.m., go past Brock,
the Ponderosa and out Marine
Drive to Oakridge, she said.
• • •
Undergraduate society presidents will place a new notice
board in South Brock to give
students a clear view of what's
going on.
Purpose of the board is to
avoid major events being
scheduled at the same time,
and to let the general student
body know what goes on, said
Education president Dave
Lynn.
Engineering president Steve
Whitelaw will co-ordinate notices, pinning them up during
the week events come due.
So did the editor
Anti-Queen page
lands in basket
OTTAWA (CUP) —A French student newspaper editor
has been fired after trying to insert a special page in the
paper criticizing the Queen's visit to Canada,
former
Yvon Descouteaux,
editor of LaRotonde at the
University of Ottawa, was dismissed by the students' council for consulting with a member of university administration
rather than the students' council about publication of the
anti-queen insertion.
The motion calling for his
dismissal made no mention of
the content of the insertion.
Descouteaux had sought the
advice of a member of the university's administration about
the insertion on the evening
before it was to be published.
He was told the university
would impose sanctions against
the paper if anti-Queen material was published.
The editor and his staff then
resigned, asking the students'
Grand Council to assume responsibility for circulation of
the paper. Students' union
president Bob Campbell refused the resignations.
Descouteaux decided to publish the Oct. 1 edition of the
paper without the anti-Queen
insertion. But a few copies of
the insertion were distributed
on campus.
Richard Cleroux, associate
editor of the Fulcrum, the university's English-language student newspaper, said the insertion was definitely separatist propaganda and abusive to
English Canadians. It did not
bear the name LaRotonde, he
said.
Students' union president
Campbell described Descou-
teaux's action throughout the
affair as "childish and irresponsible."
National
entrance
exams eyed
EDMONTON (CUP) — National college entrance exams
were tentatively approved at
the National Conference of
Canadian Universities and Colleges in Ottawa.
Dr. Walter Johns, president
of the University of Alberta,
said the exams, similar to
those conducted by the U.S.
college entrance board, would
serve as a common means of
measuring students' ability.
However he didn't feel they
would replace provincial departmental examinations.
If national exams were instituted in Canada, they would
be compulsory only for students applying to universities
outside their home province.
They would probably be held
each March.
Lost councillors
make faint show
Social Work finally sent a
representative to student council Monday night, but it was
the public relations officer, not
the president.
Also lost is Architecture president John Roaf who has not
been heard from since before
summer.
GSA. NEWS
A limited amount of audio-visual equipment is
available for use in the Graduate Student
Centre. An operator's course must be taken
to ensure competence. The course for audio
equipment will be given on November 9 and
visual on November 12. Interested persons
should sign up at the G.S.C. office immediately.
GALA   SMASH
Integration is Here
The Barnacle Ball
has a new name and a new look.
The Campus Army, Navy & Airforce Contingents
present the first annual
Tri-Service Fall Ball
November 13, HMCS Discovery
(STANLEY PARK)
Refreshments 3 for $1.00
Excellent Dinner
DANCING 9 to 1 — SEMI-FORMAL
Tickets $3.75 at A.M.S., Armouries, or at the door
U.S. brass cracks down
on off-campus 'study pads
WALLA WALLA, Wash. (PSP)—Male students at Whitman College have been discouraged by the administration
from renting extra off campus apartments.
Students, who live in residences, say these apartments
are used for studying.
But the administration says such rentals are unnecessary
because library hours and studying facilities on campus
have been extended.
^^,TORNA^^B
L^Lm -a- ^^m
^■sORRENTOf^W
j           A TOUCH OF ITALY
'                   IN CUISINE
PIZZAS
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
Dining Lounge
Licensed Premises
823 Granville St.
^-jMrh^,
Phone 681-1634
CANADIAN PREMIERE
TONIGHT AT 8:00 P.M.
Sponsored by the English Speaking Union
Proceeds to Scholarship Funds and Travel Grants
or more than half a century, a
remarkable man has steadily
traced an indelible line
across the pages of history.
is story is so exciting, so dramatic,
so laced with humour, that it
will be told again, and again,
to each succeeding generation.
\omt who have lived through some of
these years of glory, sacrifice, and
history-making events, will find in this
{memorable film —
inspiration, and a sense of the destiny
you shared with him.
COLOR
A Production of LeVIEN FILMS
Based on the memoirs of
THE RT. HON. SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
Nantriby      Musk by       Screenplay by      Directed by     Produced by
ORSOt MOLES - RON GRAINER - VICTOR WOLFSON - PETER BAYLIS - JACK LeVIEN
Regular Engagement
Starts Friday
Doors 12 Noon - Shows at
12.05, 2.25, 4.45, 7.05. 9.25
No Reserved Seats
OiiecK
881
GRANVILLE
682-7468 Thursday, November 5, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page.?
DEAN OF GRADUATE Studies
Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan
speaks on The Requirements
of Objectives of Grad Studies at noon today in Hennings 200.
Ineptitudes
womb spawns
Federation
Frustrations with student
council bureaucratic ineptitude
led to the birth of a new student action group, its founder
said Wednesday.
Hardial Bains, a biochemistry graduate student, said the
B.C. Student Federation will
be kept non-bureaucratic by
active participation on all levels.
"The Federation is a nonpartisan political group working on problems such as cost
of text books, rising tuition
fees and lack of adequate low
cost housing," Bains said.
He said all high school, college or university students
should join the organization to
protect their interests.
Bains said that students cannot depend on their councils
for quick movement toward
constructive action because the
councils are too close to the
establishment.
"BCSF will use formal protests, pickets, demonstrations,
co-op book stores and student
service groups to bring public
attention to pressing student
problems," he said.
UBC aids plan
Canada builds
dorms overseas
By CAROL ANNE BAKER
The University of the West  Indies in Trinidad has  a
$700,000 residence paid for by the Canadian government.
That's just one of the pro
grams carried out by the External Aid Office since it was
set up four years ago.
This year, Canada will spend
more than $4 million for education in developing countries.
Under the plan foreign students are brought to Canada
for training. They then return
to their own countries to train
others in their field.
• •    •
Canadian money is also
building educational institutions staffed by Canadian
teachers. Foreign students
trained in Canada will replace
these Canadians.
This year 1,600 students
from 40 countries are involved
in the training program. Fel-
lowships and scholarships
cover their costs of transportation, living, books, tuition,
clothing, equipment, and medical treatment.
The scholarships may be extended annually up to six
years. Students are selected by
their own country on the basis
of their potential role in that
country's development.
Fellowships are given for
one year and involve a combination of formal academic
and practical work with industrial or commercial firms or
government departments.
• •    •
Funds to help finance these
programs are raised by selling
in the foreign countries goods
donated by Canada.
In 1961, UBC was asked to
act as Canada's agent in a five-
year program to establish
courses in accounting and business administration in the
Kuala Lumpur and Singapore
divisions of the University of
Malaya.
Ottawa provides the money
and UBC provides administrative staff for Malaya plus a
training program for Malayan
students at UBC.
The governments of Singapore and the Federation of
Malaysia provide basic operating facilities, board and lodging, and exemption from local
income tax and customs duties
for UBC staffers there.
There are 73 foreign students
at UBC under the current plan.
Prowlers facing
student police
HALIFAX (CUP) — A
campus police force will be
established at Dalhousie University to protect students
from prowlers and peeping
Toms.
The student council president said at least eight girls
have been accosted and
chased on campus in the last
year.
Science profs
lead seminar
Two science educators will
be guest speakers at the fifth
annual science symposium Friday and Saturday.
Dr. S. £. Williamson, chairman of science education at
Oregon State University, will
talk in the education auditorium on methods, nature and
philosophy of science related
to recent science curriculum
developments.
Dr. D. W. Stotler, supervisor
of science for Portland public
schools will speak on current
science curriculum studies and
projects.
The symposium, sponsored
by the Faculty of Education,
will deal with trends in secondary school science. Chairman will be W. B. Boldt, assistant professor of education.
Councillors rap
uneaten dinners
Tardy councillors who don't
show up for dinner in the future might have to pay for the
food they don't eat.
Eight places were empty this
week and several councillors,
notably Hayes and Whitelaw,
think at $1.13 a dinner this is
unncessary waste.
AN EVENING OF POETRY
Milton Acorn - Red Lane
, Dorothy Livesay
Judith Copithorne
Reading their own works.
Friday, November 6,8 pan.
1208  Granville Street
Sponsored by Vanguard Booka
All proceeds to go to the
Student's Non Violence
Co-ordinating Committee,
Missippi Freedom Project
Kiss censored
in Manitoba
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A 36-
minute film called "Kiss" was
banned by Manitoba provincial
censors before it could be
show nto a University of Manitoba audience.
The film has 12 three-minute sequences, each showing a
continuous shot of a couple
kissing. One shows two boys
kissing.
The film was shown at a
recent New York film festival.
STUDENTS
Come in for your
"DO IT YOURSELF"
PRODUCTS
We cut Plywood to size.
Car pay Building
Supplies
4415 West 10th Avenue
224-4545
Wherever you're heading after graduation, you'll find one of Royal's more than 1,100
branches there to look after you. Meanwhile, anything
we can do for you, here and now ? Drop in any time.
ROYAL BANK
FALL FAIR
SATURDAY — Armoury from 6:30 p.m. to 1a.m.
* DANCING TO CARIBBEAN STEEL BAND
* NATIONAL DISPLAYS
* INTERNATIONAL STAGE SHOW AT 8:30 P.M.
•DON CRAWFORD-MASTER OF CEREMONIES
* ORIENTAL FASHION SHOW
* TICKETS AT AMS, INTERNATIONAL HOUSE,
OR AT DOOR. $1.00 STUDENTS; $1.50 ADULTS Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5, 1964
—don hume photo.
IN THE   SWIM   for fall   term's  big   meet,   Thunderbird  swimmers   Bill  Campbell   and
Gordon Hughes (bottom) get the word from coach Jack Pomfret.
Aim tor fourth
Birds healthy
for key game
The Pacific Coast Soccer League has reached the first-
quarter mark of its schedule,
And UBC's Thunderbird soccer team is in fifth place in
the seven-team league — two
points out of the all-important
fourth spot which is the last
playoff position — and five
points behind league-leading
Columbus.
This Sunday, Birds play
New Westminster Royals, who
are tied for third with Vancouver Canadians. UBC can
move into at least a fourth-
place tie if they defeat Roytfb.
TIE FOB THIRD
If the Vancouver Canadians
also lose this weekend UBC
could find themselves in a tie
for third place.
But Birds will have to win
Sunday's game at Callister
Park before they can count
the two important points.
Coach Joe Johnson says his
Birds will have a clean bill of
health this weekend for the
first time this season and feels
he will be able to field, his
strongest possible team.
Forward   Bobby   Johnstone,
halfback   Walter   Hanik   and
goalie George Hrennicoff will
all be back in the lineup.
WORKING BACK
Hanik has been out three
weeks with a knee injury, and
Hrennicoff   has   been   slowly
Sports roundup
UBC hosts swimming relays
The Thunderbird Relays—
sponsored by the UBC swimming team—will be held at
Percy Norman pool, Sunday,
November 29th.
Last year some 400 individuals took part in the relays
representing twenty different
clubs  and  organizations  from
B.C. and the Pacific Northwest area.
In the senior events UBC
placed fourth out of the 14
clubs competing.
Thunderbird coach Jack
Pomfret expects an even larger turnout for this year's tournament   and   feels   UBC   will
Car nuts get
chance to bolt
Campus car enthusiasts get
a chance to sink their wheels
into a full-length rally this
weekend.
UBC Sports Car Club president Tom Burgess expects a
bumper crop of cars to enter
the annual Totem Rally, a 250-
mile tour of Fraser Valley
back roads, on Sunday.
He isn't quite sure how
many cars to expect—at the
Homecoming rally, the last
UBCSCC event, 116 cars and
a Honda showed up. Burgess
said that was a record entry
for a local rally.
Sunday's event, in contrast
to the noon-hour or afternoon
campus rallies, will be faster,
longer and a little rougher.
The route will include sev
eral new stretches of road in
the Fraser Valley, and competitors are advised to get a
copy of the Dominion map of
the area.
Since the noon-hour rallies
have been so popular, there are
classes for American sedans,
novices and ladies as well as
the overall and sports car categories.
Burgess said the rally has
been won several times by novices, and no elaborate calculating equipment is necessary.
Registration is at 8:30 a.m.
Sunday at Simpson-Sears parking lot, Burnaby. Entry fee is
$2.50 per car, with first car
away at 9 a.m.
The rally should take about
seven or eight hours.
again be able to make a strong
bid for the championship.
The nucleus of the best
swimmers from Pomfret's
squad last year are back with
this year's team.
Returning from last year's
team are Bill Campbell, Brian
Griffiths, Jim Pierce, Dave
Smith, Mike Stafford, Dave
Wingate, Gordon Auld, Steve
Lydiatt and Mike Powley.
The UBC team, which won
the western intercollegiate
swimming championship last
year, hope to repeat this year
and go to London, Ontario for
the national finals.
•    •    •
The UBC women's field
hockey team is travelling to
Corvallis, Oregon, next week
for the Pacific Northwest intercollegiate field hockey
championships.
Victoria College and 16 American schools will also be participating in the tournament
which will take place Nov 13
and 14.
In past years UBC has dominated the event, winning most
of the games in the modified
round-robin tournament.
Prominent members of the
UBC team which is coached by
Barbara Schrodt are Linda
Williams, Meredith Adshead,
Madelaine Gemmil and Liz
Philpot.
Olympians
get awards
AMS vice president Byron
Hender will present engraved
pewter mugs to 18 Olympic
athletes at the Four Preps concert in Memorial Gym.
Receiving the awards will be
pairs oarsmen George Hungerford and Roger Jackson, winners of a gold medal, and the
eights crew, John Larsen, Marc
Lemieux, Daryl Sturdy, Wayne
Pretty, Eldon Worobiegg, Dick
Bordewick, Max Wieczorek,
Tom Gray, Dave Overton and
coach Glen Mervyn.
Field hockey players Peter
Buckland, Vic Warren, John
Young and Lee Wright and
yachter Dave Miller will also
get mugs.
working his way back into the
lineup after an attack of mononucleosis.
In UBC's only other match
this season with Royals, they
were -defeated 5-1.
Westminster has the league's
second and third top scorers in
Metro Gerela (four goals) and
Don Wilson (three).
Leading UBC in goals with
two apiece are Harvey Thorn
and Johnstone.
Game time is 2 p.m.
SPOBTS
Editor:
GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Birds first games
November 21 and 22, the UBC
Thunderbirds will host the
Rossland Warriors of the Western International Hockey
League in their first exhibition
games of the season.
In
Finally-
Coffee House
DON
CRAWFORD
Nov. 5-14 only
at the
BUNKHOUSE
Coffee House
612 Davie
Reserve Now -   683-9790
... and remember
JAZZ   EVERY   SUNDAY
AFTERNOON 2-5 PM.
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 pjn. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 pjn.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Ticket! at Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205 Thursday, November 5, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
'Hit reputation
Publicity
man sticks
foot in it
OTTAWA (CUP)—The students' council at University of
Ottawa clashed this week with
the university's public relations officer over remarks he
made about the academic standing of a student.
The council demanded that
PRO Bill Boss retract a statement he made about Miss
Marie Chevrier, daughter of
Lionel Chevrier, Canadian
High Commissioner in London.
The controversy started in
London when Chevrier said on
a BBC radio interview that he
"was having some difficulty in
getting Marie into a proper
university" in Britain because
of the "higher standard of education in the United Kingdom."
Boss said the following day
that the 19-yestr-old MSss Chevrier was "having a hard time
holding her own" at the university of Ottawa.
He said Mr. Chevrier "would
seem at last to be learning that
parents no longer 'get' their
children into university; students must earn their right to
admission and to remain."
The students' council said in
its resolution that a students'
file is confidential information
and Boss had "greatly attacked
a student's reputation."
The council also charged
that Boss, by mentioning that
Chevrier was on the university's board of regents, had insinuated that Miss Chevrier
"owed her admission to the
University of Ottawa to the
part her father could play as
a university regent."
"The files do contain confidential information and that
confidence has been respected," Boss said Mlonday. "A file,
however, may be described
generally as being that of a
good, poor or indifferent student and that was done in reply
to questions on that point."
Small V machine
has Coke shook up
MONTREAL (CUP)—Mo-
Gill University's student
newspaper is in trouble with
Coca-Cola company.
The Daily ran a story on
what they termed a coke machine—small c.
The paper received a polite but firm letter from the
Coca-Cila company to kindly
capitalize the "c" in all future references to their product.
What Really Killed
Marilyn Monroe?
Today, more than two yeans
after her death, Marilyn
Monroe's millions of fans all
over the world still wonder
what drove her to take her
own life. Read Clare Boothe
Luce's searching and intimate study of the fatal forces
she had struggled against
since childhood. This revealing article is in November
Reader's Digest, now on sale.
EATON'S
Lot yfe F&K \$a -F^l^ovi,
Colour Your Rainy Day
Wardrobe Bright in Rainwear
by Brittany Bay . . .
Slim . . . trim . . . prim little toppers of
showerproof Poplin ... as smart to look at
as they are fun to wear! We've a host of
gay new styles . . . scaled to your junior
figure . . . and to your love of sophisticated
fashion!
Illustrated: a classic coat with novel pocket
detail and a spark of brass buttons for trim.
Navy of course in sizes 3 to 15 — 25.00
EATON'S Young Flair Shop . . All Four Stores Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5, 1964
'tween classes
Mike, Preps vie for crowd
Take your pick today at
noon: in the Auditorium, Mr.
Pearson, the film that caused
a ruckus between the CBC
and Parliament; and in War
Memorial Gym, the Four
Preps.
Both shows have 50 cents
admission charges.
• •    •
FOLK SONG SOC
General meeting today noon
Bu. 100: Members' concert. All
welcome.
• •    *
NDP
Colin Cameron, veteran MP
and long-time socialist speaks
Friday noon. Bu. 216.
Second World War film,
Divide and Conquer, today
noon, Bu. 102. Admission 25
cents.
• •    •
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Last minute tickets for Sergio Franchi and Desire Under
the Elms, available from Special Events office.
flfrnpSi
AMERICAN GEOLOGIST  Dr.
Dan Feray, of Texas Christian, will speak tonight at
8 p.m. in Rm. 100, Forest
and Geology.
VOC
Mountaineering school. Lecture and slides noon today.
Chem. 150. Everyone welcome.
Liquor, language
bring crackdown
LONDON (CUP)—Recent rowdy behavior and use of foul
language has moved the students' council of the University
of Western Ontario to declare all-out war on student drinking at university football games.
The council  said   it  has in
structed the student police to
refuse admission to students
carrying beer, liquor, wine or
any alcoholic beverage to football games.
According to the council
statement, bottles were dropped through seats on other
fans below during a football
game in London last month;
drinks were thrown at spectators; abusive language was
common throughout the -student section in the stands; and
a general lack of self-restraint
was exhibited by students.
The council said drunkeness,
swearing and general rowdi-
ness will not be tolerated.
In future student police will
stop students carrying bulging
paper bags, brief cases or
purses into games.
Students caught with liquor
will be asked to dispose of it
before being admitted to the
stands.
Students caught drinking in
the stands will be arrested by
city police and charged under
the provincial liquor regulations.
The crackdown on drinking
at football games was pushed
through council by commissioner of justice Ron Gunning,
who insisted:
"Two and a half hours isn't
much to ask of a student's
drinking day."
PHYSICS SOC
Meet the solid state, physical electronics and biophysics
research groups to discuss
graduate opportunities and research work. Henn. 204. Noon
today.
• •    •
VCF
John Eaton, District Attorney, North Bend, Oregon,
speaks on Alcoholism. Bu. 106,
Friday noon.
• •    •
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
World Union. Talk by the
Canadian representative of
World Union. Today noon. Bu.
221.
• •    •
COTC-RUS-UNTD
Tri-Service Fall Ball. Dining
and dancing, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
Friday the 13th at HMCS Discovery. Drinks three for $1.
• •    •
PHOTO SOC
Dr. A. Siemens of the Geography Dept., to speak on Salon
Printing in Bu. 204. Noon today.
• •    •
INTER-FACULTY   BAND
New members needed. Band
meets at noon in Hut 0-16.
• •    •
sec
Film: Operation Overlord,
story of Gen. Hans Spiedel,
from the Nazis to NATO. Today noon, Bu. 106. Admission
25 cents.
• •   •
WRITERS' WORKSHOP
Meeting tonight 4439 West
Fourth Ave., at 8 p.m. Copies
of play and two poems are
ready to be picked up at Bu.
171.
• •    •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Totem Rally, 250 mi., starts
8:15 a.m. Sunday at Simpson-
Sears, Burnaby. Entry $2.
• •    *
PUBLICITY COMMITTEES
Any event you want publicized over C-FUN Radio. Address particulars to Bill
Thompson, AMS Box 152.
Piques in a good humor
— to get some good humor
Pique is looking for manuscripts.
The magazine—product of the Young Bourgeoise Artists and Authors Association is going to replace last year's
production, Ledpharttes, as campus humor magazine.
"Pique will be far better than Ledpharttes," said editor
Wayne Nyberg. "For one thing the magazine this year will
be printed—not mimeographed like last year. For another
it will he strictly humor and satire, nothing else."
Manuscripts can he left at YBAAAA meetings, in the
creative writing office, or AMS box nine in Brock.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST. Pair of dark framed lady's
glasses in Wesbrook. Finder call
Pat,  CA 4-3621 after 10 p.m.
LOST—Ladies' ring, amber & silver
setting. Ponderosa washroom. Reward offered. Phone RE 8-9259.
LOST—Plaid jacket between Totem
Park and C-Lot. Contact Cal John-
son. CA 4-9906,  6-11 p.m.	
ANYONE who found a Parker 61
fountain pen Monday morning, vie.
of Buchanan please phone 228-8001,
$3.00 reward. Thanks.	
LOST—Tuesday, Parker 61 red pen.
Gold cap. Please call Rene, CA
4-1063.	
LOST—From South Brock, umbrella
stand, one black auto, umbrella
with black grained leather handle,
white stitching. Call Mike, CA 4-
7471.
LOST — Large round silver broach
vicinity of Fraternity Houses, Sat.
Oct. 24. Sentimental value. Lee.
AM 1-6008.
LOST—Tues. evening between Aufli-
torium & Buchanan, small blue
copy of King John. Valued for
notes. Please return to L. & F., or
phone CA 4-5204.	
FOUND—Man's watch on Thursday
in Buchanan. Phone Brian at RE
1-7363 after 5:30.
FOUND—Commerce  281,  case  book.
Phone RE 3-0164, ask for Larry.
FOUND—Lady's gold wrist watch
with a silver band in Buchanan.
Contact   Diana,   434-5473.
FOUND—Ring, steps Fine Arts
Bldg., Nov. 2. Apply Publications
A.M.S.
Special Notices
13
BIRD CALLS. Will those holding
pre sale tickets please apply for
their directory at the Publications
Office as soon as possible.
BORN—To Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Shel-
bourn, a son, Michael Andrew
Blakeston on Oct. 29 at V.G.H.
8 lbs.,  7oz.
Special Notices—conf d
13
IT'S     WHAT'S     BEHIND     THAT
counts (behind the curtain that is).
DESPERATE—Witnesses to small
accident involving Austin Cambridge & Hillman on C Lot Saturday, Oct. 31 at 12:45 noon. No involvement. Please phone Jim 224-
7865. 	
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE. 1960 Morris 1000 2-dr.
Very good cond. $695. Days, TR-
2-1666. Eves.  596-5610.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
HELP  STAMP OUT  FRIDAY  THE
13th. 	
ELECTRIC GUITAR PLAYER with
own equipment to play in small
combo. Phone John AM 1-7510
after 6 p.m.	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SQUIRREL monkey, male. Cage also available.  Phone  FA 7-6532.
WHY HIKE? Buy bike. Phone Mike
CA 4-3648.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now  at   the
AMS office.
RENTALS   &   REAL   ESTATE
Rooms
81
BED sitting room in apartment at
19th & Dunbar. Kitchen & home
privileges.  Phone after 6 731-8654.
QUIET 3rd or 4th year male student
to share room with same—private
entrance, bathroom, phone. Near
Blanca on 14th Ave. $30.00. CA
4-3648 on week-end.   ...
Room & Board
82
A VACANCY exists in the PSI Upsilon Fraternity House, 2260 Wesbrook, for some lucky guy—call
CA  4-9052  for details.
PRIVATE room with desk. Good
carpool location & study facilities.
Available DEC. 1. Mrs. Garnett,
AM  1-6405.
... conihovsMicd doamanhvuf film
\\
MR. PEARSON
rr
TODAY!
UBC AUDITORIUM
12:30, 3:30 and 8:00 p.m.
all for the ridiculously low price of 50c

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