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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1967

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Array Gooood day.
Vol. XLVII, No. 59
THE UBYSSEY
lBFtA
/»
Sunshine-baby
MARI2 0 1967     .
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  FRIDAY,   MARCH   17,   1967
OP npmstt
f^O^/224-3916
TAS FIRED: DEAN QUITS
—kurt hilger photo
"GOOD GRIEF? THEY'VE SAVED ONE," gasps C. Brown,
engineering 3, as bystanders for once foil the menace to
all youngsters, the dreaded, kite-eating tree.
MAC CRITICIZED
Reactions to UBC president
John Macdonald's speech
Tuesday to the alumni-student banquet were mixed.
Asked about Macdonald's
famous remark, "... university is not an instrument of
social reform," Arthur Link,
religious studies professor,
said, Thursday, "I don't see
why not.
"I should think that the
university, as a part of society would be as interested
in social reform as any other
part of society."
"On  that point   I   agree,"
said   Cyril   Belshaw,   a   professor of sociology.
He said the university indirectly could be an agent of
social reform but not directly.
AMS president elect Shaun
Sullivan said, "It seems to
me some students are more
interested in other things
than ingesting and digesting
what professors have to say.
"I object most strongly
when he implied that students have no say in the
academics of the university."
REVOLT SI, FEES NO
More than 400 students massed in front of the library
Thursday ostensibly to discuss the role of the Alma Mater
Society in the university.
Instead, all speakers but two talked about revolution in a
schizophrenic society.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said afterward, "I wanted
to talk about the society and the $3 fee hike, and that's what
I thought the meeting was about. But it didn't turn out that
way."
The radsoc sound-car microphones were hogged by speakers
Bob Cruise, words editor Gabor Mate and Rod Wilczak, and,
searching questions from the crowd.
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey News Editor
Simon Fraser University Board of Governors Thursday dismissed five teaching
assistants for their part in disturbances at
Templeton High School earlier this week.
Immediately the dismissals were announced, SFU Dean of Arts T. B. Bottomore
resigned in protest.
SFU president Patrick McTaggart-Cowan-
told The Ubyssey the faculty council has instructed him to meet with heads of departments within the next few days to determine
whether the TA's — John Edmond, Chris
Huxley, Martin Loney, Geoff Mercer, and
Philip Stanworth — will be allowed to remain as students.
Loney is currently in jail without bail
following arrests Monday and Tuesday at
Templeton charged with disturbing the peace.
A statement issued following the iboard
meeting said in part:
Protest action you can join: at 11:30 a.m.
today, a student council sponsored rally on
the main mall of Simon Fraser. Professors
speak out, 11:30 to 12:30.
At 12:30, while the profs retire for an
emergency meeting of the faculty association,
student speak.
Said SFU activities co-ordinator Dennis
Yandle late Thursday, "UBC students are invited to come to show their solidarity with
Simon Fraser students against the board's
oppressive actions."
AMS president Peter Braund, dragged
from his bed late Thursday night, said he
urged all UBC students to attend the Simon
Fraser rally to support Bottomore and the
teaching assistants.
"The five TA's signed their names to an
open letter distributed at the school which
advised students towards conduct in negation
of the democratic process.
"They recommended contempt for the
law, and these actions brought discredit on
the university."
McTaggart-Cowan said the letter recommended to students that they strike over the
suspension of Templeton student Peter Haines
for publishing a booklet criticizing a teacher
at the school.
"This letter was distributed to students
at the school, many of whom are under 16,
and required by law to attend classes," he
said.
Bottomore, appointed Dean of Arts at the
beginning of last term, said his resignation
was a direct result of the board's action.
"I have resigned because of the decision
of the board concerning the TA's — as Dean
I was involved in discussions over the matter
and I did not think I could continue in the
position, thus appearing to support the
action," he told The Ubyssey.
Bottomore said he will have a written
statement to release to the press today which
will explain his position in detail.
He will continue as head of the Political
Science - Sociology - Anthropology department, however.
Contacted earlier in the day for comment
on UBC president John Macdonald's remark
in a speech Tuesday that "the university is
not an instrument of social reform" Bottomore said:
"I definitely do not agree with Macdonald.
"The university is to educate people, give
them ideas, and teach them. The university
must therefore be an instrument of reform
because reform comes from ideas. It can't
be anything else.
"It's an institute of teaching, investigating
matters of fact.
"I worry when a university turns away
from teaching. But professors and students
have a right, and a responsibility, to engage
in political activity if they do it sensibly,
and sensibly means the action is not the most
important thing — teaching is."
McTaggart-Cowan said he had no knowledge of Bottomore's resignation.
"I suggest we close the affair and students
go back to good scholarship and good learning," he concluded.
Earlier in the day more than 300 SFU
students massed to discuss the fate of Loney.
Loney will appear in magistrate's court in
Vancouver today on two charges of causing
a disturbance. He was first arrested Monday
when he was involved in a mob of 700 students near Templeton discussing the expulsion of Haines.
He was arrested again as he walked down
the sidewalk near Templeton Tuesday, 90
minutes after being released on bail.
Plavsics pueblos
provide 800 units
Architect Vladimir Plavsic is looking
for two things in his novel plans for UBC
cliff-dwellings — a sea-view for all students  and  privacy from  the  university.
Plavsic, at his downtown office Thursday said his three proposals are now
being considered by UBC planning authorities.
The housing development — to replace dilapidated Fort Camp — will contain 800 units, both doubles and singles.
The plan was revealed by The Ubyssey
Wednesday.
Plavsic's plans are for either a low
rise development in place of the present
barracks, a high rise apartment building,
or a pueblo-style cliff dwelling over
Wreck Beach.
"The cliff dwelling is the most exciting of the schemes," said Plavsic,  "but
we still have to check it financially and
with an engineer to see whether it will
work."
Preliminary drawings show the cliff
dwelling to be a retaining-type building
rising  at  45   degrees  from  the  beach.
The Wreck Beach cliff has been a
problem for years because of sea erosion
at the base and rain erosion at the top.
The cliff dwellings also feature four
central funiculars, or cables cars, and
kitchens and lounges on the top of the
cliff.
A bridge or tunnel is also proposed
for students crossing the highway.
"All three plans should cost about the
same," said Plavsic, "but the cliff development would give more room for play
TO PAGE 2
See: STUDENTS Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  March   17,   1967
FROM PAGE 1
Students in 'Monk-cells'
fields and expansion."
Feasibility studies are now underway,
he said.
Judah Shumiatcher, architectural advisor to AMS housing, said Thursday the
cliff dwelling scheme is a "monk cell
idea", very dramatic, but valid only for
a certain number of students.
He said the alternate housing development plans of Reno Negrin encouraged
the idea of student involvement in university life.
"Planning-wise both these schemes
are a step in the right direction," he said,
"There is room for both."
Negrin's scheme has a great variety
of forms and groupings, flexible to the
needs of different sorts of people, said
Shumiatcher.
"Negrin's plans are a result of student participation in the early stages," he
said. "The students had a good relationship with Negrin and results were to
everyone's satisfaction."
Student government officials all
agreed Thursday the behind Brock site
for any new residences is preferable to
the Fort Camp pueblo plan.
Alma Mater Society housing co-ordinator Ray Larsen, said the pressing need
on campus is for a senior student residence constructed so that a community
could develop within it. "Negrin's plan
— high and low rise housing clusters —
does this," Larsen said.
First vice-president elect Don Munton,
who lives in Totem Park, and purports
to represent residence students on council, said the whole question of whether
a pueblo-type dwelling could hold up the
crumbling Fort cliffs has not been
studied.
"Our priorities remain a senior student residence with limited regulations,
near the campus centre, built in small,
community clusters like Negrin's scheme."
He said Plasic's pueblo looked "really
great, and would be written up in all the
journals, but I don't think it would solve
the campus housing needs." Munton has
not seen Plavsic's plans.
Last fall, when it became known the
board commissioned architects to submit
preliminary sketches, Larsen sought permission to meet with the architects to
present a student viewpoint. He was
allowed to see Negrin but was not told
Plavsic had also been retained.
Wednesday, board of governors chairman Nathan Nemetz expressed enthusiasm for the Plavsic plan.
Thursday, Larsen suggested no further
publicity  be   given  to  Plavsic's  pueblos.
"You're playing right into their hands,
he said.
"Somebody on the board of governors
who likes the drama of his plan has
obviously taken him aside and suggested
he get out and sell it to students. That's
why he's been asking the housing office
and residences to book him for speeches
on campus.
"Plavsic hasn't ever talked to students
or surveyed actual campus residence
needs,"  Larsen  said.
He said Plavsic would now be able
to use conversations with The Ubyssey
to show he had talked to students. (Plavsic did not allow photographers close
enough to the drawings Thursday to
produce more  than a smudge.)
Plavsic was contacted Thursday by
Nemetz and asked to release details of
his plan. Nemetz said he would also contact Negrin, but Negrin Thursday said he
could not detail his Brock site plan until
he received permission. Attempts to get
permission ended at university bursar
William White, who refused to speak to
The Ubyssey until Friday.
University director of information
services Ralph Daly said he had no authority to release any details of either proposal, and the university housing office
said administrator Leslie Rohringer, who
becomes housing head July 1, cannot
speak to the press without permission
from classics head Dr. Malcolm McGregor.
UBC grads given
$5,000 awards
Four UBC students have received $5,000
each for three years in succession, plus tuition fees and travelling expenses for studying in science and engineering.
The scholarships are awarded to students
graduating this year and going on to doctorate work.
They are Russell Boyd, chemistry; Dale
Cherchas, physics; Arthur Warburton, mathematics, and Ingar Moen, physics.
The awards are given by the national research council in order to encourage students
to stay in Canada. Students are required to
take graduate work at a Canadian university
other than the university granting their first
degree.
Another eight UBC students planning
university teaching careers have been awarded fellowships by the Woodrow Wilson
Foundation of Princeton, New Jersey.
These awards offer $2,000 and payment
of all tuition fees during the student's first
year of graduate studies.
Winners at UBC are: John Butterfield,
history; Omar Bolli, political science; John
Kervin, sociology; Mike Kliffer, linguistics;
Dennis Krebs, psychology; William Sharp,
philosophy of science; Pat Kennedy, history,
and Garry Pyne, anthropology.
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
Joan Baez
"NON-VIOLENCE IN
A VIOLENT SOCIETY
Friday March 17   1967
12:30-50c
COMING
COUNTRY JOE &
THE FISH
From San Francisco
and
The United Empire Loyalists
Brock - March 22
12:30 -4:00 p.m. -75c
GREEN GREMLINS?
By TOM WAYMAN
Ubyssey Ex-Editor
If you look sharp on campus today, you might catch a
glimpse of a bearded little man wearing dirty clothes tripping
lightly  over the  library  lawn.
Chances are, he'll be spouting some unintelligible gibberish—perhaps obscene poetry—and he'll be holding a green
plant of some sort clenched between his teeth.
Ask him what he wants, and he'll probably tell you he's
looking for "pot" at the end of some multi-colored light in
the sky.
By all this, of course, you'll know him as one of those
untypical student "crusaders" Pres. John Macdonald spoke of.
You know, one who supports that ol' antithesis of the
university—social reform.
Appearances, after all, maketh the reformer.
But wait. That gibberish. Could it be Gaelic, instead of
rhetoric?
That green plant—is that a shamrock instead of a Marijuana tree?
And reform — could it be he .wants the snakes out of
Ireland, instead of the snakes-in-the-grass out of society?
Take another cube of acid and look again. Sure, it's a
wee lepruchan. Crusaders, you'll remember, are the ones
with the big "C" on their chests.
And any new crusaders who were asking what they
could do at Thursday's think-in can join all the goblins on
Burnaby Mountain today to protest the firings of four teaching
assistants for  political activity in the community.
^A -Diamond with (SonfuUnce
Special   10% Discount to all  UBC Students
on   Diamond   Engagement   Rings
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— al harvey photo
LATEST GEAR for the trout-stream fisher-
woman   seen   at   the   Fine   Arts   Gallery
Thursday nqon, as leggy model   tip-toes
petulantly from rock to rock.
STUDENTS NEED
READING  AID
By JOHN ROGERS
A possible 30 per cent of students entering university need reading help, an education professor said Wednesday.
"There is a great need for a reading and
study course at UBC," Harry Coleville, chairman of the reading division of the education
faculty, told The Ubyssey.
Coleville explained that many students
fail unnecessarily or are generally one class
below their ability because of poor reading
and study habits.
Simon Fraser Academy, B.C. Institute of
Technology, and Vancouver College all have
reading and study courses.
Coleville cites SFA's course, consisting
of a one-hour lecture and two hours of reading laboratory work each week, as "typical".
The course uses such aids as film strips,
shadow scopes, programmed work-books and
mimeograph materials—all aimed at correcting the student's individual weaknesses.
"In my opinion our course at UBC should
be voluntary and directed at freshmen," he
said.
"It will teach them how to study effectively, how to listen and take good notes, and
how to adjust their reading speed to different
subjects.
Smugglers trip
Enough marijuana to make more than
20,000 joints was coming across the Canadian-
American border Wednesday evening until
the three bringers, one a student, got caught.
Charles Haynes, a 19-year-old Simon
Fraser Academy student was one of three
arrainged in Aldergrove magistrate's court
for possession of 22 pounds of marijuana.
The others are Brian Foyer and Dexter
Howell.
They were all charged with possession
and will appear in Burnaby magistrate's
court Thursday.
The marijuana, largest amount ever
confiscated in Canada, is worth about
$2,800 on the hippie market, contrary to
downtown press reports of $25,000.
Sex study, SFAIcoholicly
EAST VANCOUVER (UNS) — Simon
Fraser Academy is proving its superiority
in Canadian campuses again, this time surveying the sex habits of the alniphagus
aspercollis.
Every week until the end of the coming
summer, SFA prof John (Borden will head
into the local mountain regions with axe,
knife, forceps, and two vials of alcohol to
spy on the creature.
ArtsUS builds;
boxes selves in
There is no arts undergraduate office
and there hasn't been one all year, so
artsmen are beginning to move.
"We're building an office in Buchanan
lounge on  Friday," said arts vice-president Harley Rothstein.
"It Will be a simple wooden structure
filled in with- stiff card- ,;,
board and designed  by p***"^^
Lyn   Scraggs,   engineer.
The office  will not be
attached   to   any   part
of    Buchanan    so    will
cause no harm.
"We hope authorities
won't take action to
tear it down. If they do
we will probably build
a more permanent one
in the Buchanan quadrangle," said Rothstein.
"We are trying to get Joan Baez to
open   the office on  Friday   afternoon."
Any artsy artsmen willing to help put
up the structure should assemble in
Buchanan lounge today.
ROTHSTEIN
Also every week, Borden checks 17 fallen
trees on Burnaby mountain to see if they
have been attacked by the thing.
From all reliable sources, the creature is
supposed to have sexual relations on downed
trees, and even sometimes, on healthy trees.
The particular tree used for the love act is
called the "host tree".
Apparently in the act, the things cause
millions of dollars damage to timber stands
in North American forests.
Borden joined SFA last fall after he left
Berkeley with a PhD.
The forceps were explained as a surgical
instrument important in work with the creatures. The alcohol's importance is also important in tromping through the local forests.
The axe and knife are supposedly used
for exposing the things.
The alniphagus aspercollis is an alder
bark beetle.
Report rereport
The UBC administration is proving once
again that bureaucacy can study the reports
of committees which have studied the reports of committees which have studied the
reports . . . etc.
The latest in the infinite chain is a board
of governors' committee established to do
the natural, study the reports of committees.
The various reports concern the composition and roles of the board of governors and
senate.
The staff committee of the board will
look into the Duff-Berdahl report, the Faculty association report, the AMS report, and
the reports when published of the Alumni
association and special senate committee,
which deals specifically with the senate.
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WE PUT THE CARIBBEAN
BREEZE IN A BOTTLE.
OLD SPICE UNE FOR MEN
It's wild ! Who'd believe how
much difference a little lime
makes! Old Spice Lime is
available as after shave,
cologne, talc, shower soap,
deodorant stick, hair gel,
aerosol deodorant, and
gift sets. $1.65 to $6.50. by shulton THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not' of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
MARCH 17, 1967
'Academic
The harshest and most positive reaction to UBC's
President John B. Macdonald's inane claim that a university has nothing to do with social reform has come
from the top of Burnaby Mountain.
The resignation of SFU arts Dean T. B. Bottomore
in protest against the suspending of five socially concerned SFU teaching assistants is an admirable nose-
thumb at the combination ivory-tower/service-station
that Macdonald sees as the modern university's role.
The civil disobedience in support of free speech at
Templeton as advocated by the SFU TAs was termed
"a. negation of the democratic process by SFA's Board
of Governors, and no doubt Macdonald would agree.
It is pointless to continue to remind these men
that what freedoms society — and the university —
enjoy were only won through a long process involving
educated men standing up for those freedoms against
the "laws" of regimes of tyranny.
Whether the tyranny of a minority or a majority.
Bottomore's decisive action in support of the TAs
strikes directly as well at the compromisers and the
mealy-mouths of UBC's own facutly who agreed "in
principle" with Macdonald's recent inanities.
Perhaps these professors considered the question
purely an "academic" one. And the connotations that
word now carries surely shows what statements like
Macdonald's   and UBC's acquiescent faculties lead to.
But not the response of scholars like Bottomore.
Our hats are off to him.
—T.W.
Cliffhanger
Faced with the possibility of a UBC housing development in an architectural style that is neither early shack-
town nor late Sing-Sing, student leaders reacted Thursday  with a stunned gurgle.
Housing co-ordinator Ray Larsen said Vladimir
Plavsic's plan for student cells on the cliff over Wreck
Beach is only "dramatic" — it doesn't fit in with UBC
needs. And AMS vice-president-elect Don Munton, who
has not seen the plans, was worried about crumbling
cliffs.
Even AMS architectural advisor Judah Shumiatcher
was a bit shook up — he said sending students to bed
down a cliff was "a step in the right direction." fie's
right. Plavsic is the first planner to consider taking
advantage of UBC's unique ocean setting. UBC needs his
plan — even if it is dramatic.
—D.   S.
Dark continent
In the water south of Europe there is a continent.
Quite a big one, some think. It is called, according
to books in the library, Africa. These books say Africa
has 225 million people. The people are called Africans.
One of them, Herbert Chitepo, spoke at UBC recently
and told of the coming revolution in his country
Zimbabwe (temporarily known as Rhodesia). Chitepo
is one of many nationist leaders who are busy radically
altering the political and social face of Africa—in the last
generation they have created 32 new states.
Africa is now a major force in world affairs — but
you wouldn't know it from a look at UBC's calendar.
The calendar shows no course in African anthropology, art, linguistics, economics, or geography. Except
for a survey course on colonialism, UBC historians are
unaware of Africa's history. And the department of
political science offers nothing to help students through
the maze of African politics.
Maybe UBC's treatment of Africa as something
unknown and mysterious stimulated the interest of two
UBC grads who have since become important Africa
experts — Patrick Keatley, a. Manchester Guardian
writer, and Thomas Franck, a professor at New York
University. Both have written books on African problems
and both are frequently consulted by  African leaders.
But there_are better ways of stimulating interest—
basic courses in African history and politics would do
for a start.
—D. S.
and (ahem) I trust  that my work  here will  be  further carried
out in the manner (ahem) that I (ahem) ..."
Miff BS TD Wi  £0I10#
'Not  senile
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Contrary to "popular"
(read as Ubyssey) opinion, I
am not a senile, blathering
old-age pensioner. At worst,
I am a senile, blathering 23-
year-old law student.
Also contrary to the facts
is your statement that I am
entering my ninth year on
campus, although I appreciate the inference that my intellectual prowess is such
that I entered this august institution a the tender age of
14 or 15.
Nevertheless, the heart of
your article on page eight,
Thursday, betrays your true
feelings toward me. The
statement that "Coleman's
sanity is doubted by responsible authorities" is a high
compliment, coming from The
Ubyssey; for I think we all
know The Ubyssey's opinion
of   "responsible   authorities."
If your facts had been
checked out more thoroughly,
the story deserved frontpage prominence. You could
have had great fun lambasting the unnamed "responsible" authorities who would
have the unmitigated gall to
question my sanity, which
The Ubyssey would, no
doubt, defend to its collective
penultimate breath.
MIKE   COLEMAN
Law 2
'Cruise  right
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
What Bob Cruise said at
Thursday's teach-in about
the division or shizophrenia
in the person reflected in the
society is an important point.
This psychological a p -
proach to political and social
questions should be pursued
further.
What is  regrettable  is  the
fact that somebody making
some relevant remarks on a
vital problem is continually
forced, through unintelligent
questions and remarks, to
speak about the symptoms of
the disease which he is trying
to analyse.
Those people who reacted
volubly against most of what
was said should realize that
their 'behavior (making Irrelevant comments, throwing
things) is a false front they
are putting up.
Last Friday, Dr. Jules
Henry talked about shams
and the masks which we
wear when we are uneasy or
afraid. The behavior displayed by a section of the students at the sit-in betrays
their unwillingness to think.
To think about statements
which are important but
which would force them to
change their way of thinking.
Why don't those who refuse to listen, who never
have the intention of changing their minds, stay away.
Let them continue to sleep.
Let them remain the Oil in
the machinery of our society.
Also regrettable is the apathy of faculty who never appear at such rallies.
RUDY  KRAUSE
Ag. 3
'Cruise  wrong
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Bob Cruise says "why do
people applaud this rhetoric
and pat-answer type speech?"
I ask: why does The Ubyssey
print Cruise's rhetoric and
pat-answer anti-speech?
MICHAEL   SCHAM.
Grad Studies
'Barf,  barf
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In my short career as an
education    student    I    have
noticed that the average student in education has some
very imporant primary objectives .These objectives are
broken down into two categories: the first category belongs to the female student —
to get a husband. The second
category — short hours — belongs to the male student. He
wants an easy road to a degree, a secure position, and
short hours.
I have also noticed that
many of the courses are designed to help these students
fulfill these aims. In my former, naive days I was under
the impression that education
students wished to become
teachers. Since this was my
objective in going into education I was rather shocked
when someone suggested to me
that these things could be possible.
"Nay, nay," says I, "we are
all ambitious energetic, creative, concerned, idealistic,
hardworking students, whose
sole aim is the betterment of
the Canadian people and
enough conceit to think that
we may do it."
What do I say now? Barf,
barf.
FRED SPENCER
ed. 2
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City     Danny Stoffman
News  .'..-. Al Blrnte
Photo  Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  Claudia Gwinn
Sports   Sua Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus  Kris Emmott
Ass't News Al Donald
Ass't City  Tom Morris
CUP  Bort Hill
As St. Patrick prepared for the
green-last-dying fits of shamrock to herald the second coming
of Samathack and her 12,700
snails on the plains of Phyzores,
these people tried to put out a
clean paper with Censor, the new
all-in-one-step addative to purify
dirty copy: Charlotte Haire, Val
Thorn, John Kelsey (defuncto edi-
toralius), John Rogers, Norman
Gidney, Dave Cursons, Mary Ussner.
Kurt Hilger, Al Harvey and
Don Kydd played in the dark
room with Mary, without Censor. FRbAY
Play
tells
'em
how
By KEITH FRASER
In the final act of Paul
St. Pierre's How to Run
the Country, the cowboy
candidate (Walter Marsh)
from Chilcotin constituency loosens his larynx at
the Liberal rally, and effectively hog ties his
party's chances to gain
power in B.C. Only the
grand old Senator (Don
Crawford) is apparently
satisfied that the Liberals
will finally sweep this
rancher's riding which
they have not held since
the days of John Oliver.
Walter Marsh, familiar
to some as Ken Larsen in
the CBC "Cariboo Country" series, has again reined in his favorite horse
and dismounted to become
one of three believable
characters in this play.
Open-mouthed and bent
at the knees, he is both
friendly and course
enough (anyone who
annoys him can go "pee
up a rope") to become
the Great Imposter of the
Nachako set.
St. Pierre's play suffers
most through portrayals
of the Senator and Jeffer-
ies (Terence Kelly), fastidious young assistant to
Jamieson.
I could only feel that
Kelly was miscast, and
that Patrick Rose also
miscast as a cowboy
might more persuasively
have played Jefferies.
Although both these
young actors have shown
a tendency to overact in
the past, Rose, who has
indicated a flair for comedy, would probably have
stressed less enunciation
and more diffidence necessary to portray the young
executive.
Crawford often loses
control of the Senator's
voice which is, at best, incompatible with the character's age and feebleness.
When the elderly gentleman falls on his face in
act two, we are far from
convinced that the accident is anything more
than acting, and instead of
extending sympathy we
are left to suppress mirth.
It appears we are treated to a running of the
stage as well as the country. Charles Evans has
succeeded in fusing the
author's ubiquitous dialogue into a steady source
of audience involvement.
Although his lighting is
occasionally imperfect, he
effectively utilizes tapes,
actors in the balcony, and
even an onstage truck.
Like the truck, the play
can start up and run the
country when the actor
turns the key.
I
Q
Friday, March 17, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5 "!?**«* ~-£S* >sM
From Russia with surprise
An intimate look at life in Moscow university by WUS
scholarship student Maureen Sager.
This term I am attending a course
in Soviet Literature. I also attend a
seminar on stylistic analysis of Soviet
prose works. These lectures I find
very interesting and stimulating. Most
of the lecturers are very good, surprisingly well-informed on western
literature and have much to say that
is very thought-provoking. They are
not nearly as dogmatic as I had expected and most seem to really enjoy
lecturing.
I am using the Lenin Library for
most of my research work. We are
very fortunate to receive a card for
the First Reading Room there, which
is the one reserved for members of
the Academy of Sciences, professors
and foreign students. Having a card to
this reading room entitles one to many
privileges, not the least of which is
being able to hang your coat without
standing in line. That particular lineup is at times an hour long.
• • •
It is disturbing to have to report
that I am not going to be able to see
any of the the archival material concerning my research project. Apparently all the material concering
Sergeev-Tsensky has been removed
from the archives for "processing"
('obrabotka') and won't Ibe available
until the first quarter of 1968. No
further explanation has been given
and I have none to offer. It may be
that a complete collected edition of
his works is being planned or special
editions for the 10th anniversary of
his death next year, of his unpublished works are in the offing.
There is, of course, an inexhaustible supply of research material available to me in the Lenin Library so
time will not hang heavy on my hands.
Undergraduate students in the
dormitory live from 2 to 4 in a room
depending on which year of their
course they are enrolled in. Graduate
students have single rooms. Undergraduate students in the humanities
faculties receive a stipend of 35 roubles a month. If they have very high
marks they receive bonuses. They pay
2 roubles 60 kopeks for their room;
transportation costs to and from their
faculties in town amount to about 7
roubles a month. With the rest of the
money they must feed and clothe
themselves.
I couldn't believe that their stipends were so low and asked one of
the girls how she could possibly live
on that amount. She replied: "I can't",
and. said that her parents send her
money. She said that students whose
parents can't afford to help them
simply don't come to university or
else they work part time at very low
pay. I hesrd of one student in the law
faculty here who works an 8-
hour day while being enrolled as a
regular student. The economics faculty has organized a job-finding bureau to help students find part-tme
work. Both these faculties, incidentally, are included in the humanities
classification.
It should be noted also that if the
salary of all members of a family average 50 roubles a month, then a student
is not eligible to receive any stipend
at all except for the bonuses for high
marks. Students in the sciences receive slightly higher stipends but not
considerably more. Graduate students
receive from 90 to 120 roubles a
month depending on which year of
their course they are enrolled in.
It is my impression that students
here don't work any harder than at
home, or, to be more truthful, I think
we work a lot harder, in our undergraduate years, anyway. The undergraduate period is five years of study
with the last year being devoted mainly to writing a graduating dissertation.
Each year, except the last, they take
several lecture courses and one seminar or "special course". The lecture
courses entail no essay-writing at all.
The students simply (supposedly) attend the lectures and have a fifteen
minute to half-hour oral examination.
In the seminar or "special course"
they must write one long essay. One
student told me that if you are clever
you select your dissertation topic in
first year and then select your seminars to coincide with the field of your
disseration and each year write your
essay on one or another facet of your
dissertation subject. By fifth year your
dissertation is written and you have
only to tack it all together and add a
bit to it.
•        • •
I was astounded when I first started attending lectures at the conduct
of students during lectures. They talk,
knit, write letters, sleep, in a word,
do anything except listen to the lecturer. And the lecturers don't seem to
mind at all. To be fair, I should add
that in one of the courses I attended,
the students didn't talk at all but that
lecturer was particularly interesting.
The students are more attentive in the
seminar courses tout the classes are
much smaller and the students are
expected to participate in discussion.
During examination time I asked
one student how her exam that day
had been. She admitted that she had
been rather frightened since she hadn't
attended a single lecture all year. I
had attended the course and found
the lecturer particularly interesting,
so I asked her why she hadn't gone to
lectures. She said that none of her
friends had — they were simply lazy
and besides attendance was taken in
that class by the class "starosta", one
of the students, who marked everyone
present anyway.
•        •        •
She said that they did the reading
at home but when they got to the
exam and found the professor there
they were a bit frightened because
he always asks questions on the material he has lectured on. However,
another professor questioned her —
the exam was only ten minutes long—
and she received a "B". The educational system here isn't quite as strict
as we tend to think it is at home.
The dormitories here are co-educational, that is, men and women live
on the same floors and there are no
regulations about men in women's
rooms or vice versa. There is a very
free and easy atmosphere here which
leads to many impromtu parties and
get-togethers. Not infrequently on Saturday nights a tape recorder will appear on the central desk at midnight
and students will be twisting in the
halls to the music of the Beatles until
one or two in the morning.. A "house
mother" will appear and turn off all
the lights in an attempt to damp the
enthusiasm tout as soon as she has disappeared, the tape recorder re-appears
and the fun continues in more romantic circumstances of half darkness.
It's not unusual to find a group of
students singing to the music of a guitar in the hall at two or three in the
morning. And it's not unusual to see
students sleepily emerging from their
rooms at twelve noon, dressed in bathrobes, tea kettle in hand on their way
to the kitchen to prepare breakfast.
One finds that the best defense is to
simply adjust to the tempo of life in
the dormitories and not plan to go to
bed before 2 or get up before 10. None
of my lectures have started before
four in the afternoon except my language classes and all the seminars
take place at 6 in the evening.
All things Western are very attractive to students here. Over and over
I go to parties and listen all evening
to western jazz and western music in
general. No one here would think of
playing a balalaika, except a professional folk musician. They play guitars.
A surprising amount of western
modern literature has been translated
and published; the rest has been translated and circulates under the table.
Among the most popular unofficially
translated authors are Saul Bellow
and Edward Albee (the latter has been
translated officially, and one play, The
Death of Bessie Smith, has been presented on television). Currently running in Moscow are almost all of
Brecht's plays, Peter Weiss' The Investigator opened last month, Two for
the Seesaw is popular, and a play by
Eugene O'Neill translated as The Soul
of a Poet is opening soon. Ionesco has
been translated in the journal Foreign
Literature tout to date hasn't been presented on the stage. Waiting for Godot
has ibeen translated in the same journal.
Not too many western movies are
shown here except at private clubs —
i.e. the Writers', Journalists' or Artists'
clubs. Some Like it Hot is popular
as is To Kill a Mockingbird. A Mad,
Mad World has been shown as well
as Judgement at Nurenberg; Spar-
tacus has just opened and people are
lining up for tickets. Other than these
movies and a few very old ones, not
many American movies are available
for the general putolio in Moscow. The
only movie of Fellini which has been
presented publicly is Night of Cabiria
even though 8V& won the prize at the
Moscow Film Festival several years
ago. True, during film festivals most
of Fellini's and other western film
makers' films have been shown, but
it is absolutely impossible for the gen-
earl puiblic to get tickets to these
showings. Only people with "connect-
tions" get them.
In art, Surrealism is the most popular official style. At official exhibits of young artists one sees many
paintings in Primitivistic style. Abstract paintings are confusing to most
people here although interest in Kan-
dinsky is very great and prints of
M^levich are passed eagerly from
hand to hand.
I hesitate to make any statements
about life here, about the present of
this society or its future. One is constantly bombarded with impressions
and contradictions; with every new
acquaintance and discussion, new
opinions and viewpionts are presented.
The best one can manage is to try
and keep an open mind and hope to
sort out the contradictions later.
Pf
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
MARCH 17, 1967
ON THE COVER:
David Sloan's conception
of the leprechaun in
Victoria.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistant: judy bing
Sutherland sizzles in opera classic
pf 2wo
By TIM OLDHOYD
Saturday night saw the
first of three Centennial
productions to be staged
this year by the Vancouver
Opera Association. World
famous Joan Sutherland
headed an excellent cast in
Donizetti's opera Luciadi
Lammermoor. The ecstatic
audience had bought out
every seat two weeks prior
to opening night.
This was easily the best
production that has been
seen here, both musically
and visually. Richard Bony-
nge  conducted  with all the
Page 6
finesse that one has come to
expect from him in such
works.
If he did not always have
the orchestra under complete
control, he nevertheless kept
the music moving at a good
speed. There were a few
passages   during  which'  the
orchestra drowned out the
soloists and there were
problems of rhythm, particularly with the mens' chorus.
The costumes were excellent and the sets were solid
enough that one did not expect them to fall over at the
slightest gust of wind. The
outdoor   scenes  evoked   the
THE     UBYSSEY
misty atmosphere of Lammermoor Castle while the
ballroom set lacked nothing
in grandeur.
What can be said of Joan
Sutherland that has not already been told over and
over again in the annals of
opera history ? She has made
the name "Lucia" synonymous with her own and Saturday night she sang with
all the brilliance that has
made critics proclaim hers
to be a voice in one hundred
years. She left the audience
gasping during the famous
"Mad Scene" in which, while
running all  over  the stage,
she tossed off dazzling runs
and trills with apparent
ease.
Her leading man was John
Alexander of the Metropolitan, one of the finest
lyric tenors in North America today. His voice is rich
in quality and has an exceptional ring to it. It is particularly gratifying to hear
a tenor who does not bellow
and shows no sign of strain
in the upper passages. The
ease with which he sang was
matched by his professional
manner on stage. He moved
easily and showed himself
to be a convincing actor.
Friday, March 17,  1967 v? < VS  '*'it- *-"
Hippies hop
to acid shop
By KRIS EMMOTT
Love street.
As you steep inside Doug
Hawthorne's Psyched e 1 i c
Shop that poster greets you
from the bulletin board. It
typifies the attitude of
many  so-called  "hippies".
Long hair, sandals,
beards, weird clothes, weird
poetry^ Mlarxism, drugs.
And the love message. It's
all part of a stereotype.
Far from making a conscious attempt to be weird,
Vancouver hippies take
what to them is the only
reasonable course.
"It's the hypocrisy in society, more than anything
else, that they are rejecting,"    says Kruz.
In the Psychedelic Shop,
long-haired, casually dressed young people browse
over acid-style cosmographs,
New Design posters from
San Francisco, leather sandals and belts, poetry collections, far-out jewelry,
records of Ravi Shankar
and County Joe and the
Fish.
There are newspapers:
Los Angeles Free Press,
Berkeley Barb, sometimes
the San Francisco Oracle.
San Francisco is the root
of the hippie movement on
this continent.
"People are streaming
into S.F. from all over the
States," says Hawthorne.
The Haight-Ashbury district
is home to several thousand
of the "love hippies", according to UBC geography
prof W. C. Hardwick.
Hardwick sees modern
cities as a collection of
ghetto subcultures.
"Old neighborhoods are
undergoing readjustment;
they are picked up by these
emerging subcultures. Hippies moved into Haight and
Ashbury streets because of
the low rents and so on,"
says Hardwick.
"According to the insights
of Professor John Nystun
in San Francisco, there are
five groups there.
"There are the angries.
They    wear    beards,    look
Friday, March 17, 1967
fierce, they're against everything, protest all the time.
They're an outgrowth of
the anarchist and communist movements that have
been around Berkeley
since the 20's.
"There are the Cynical
Beats — remnants of the
Kerouac generation—around
North Beach.
"There are the queers, all
kinds and varieties.
"In Oakland are the remnants of the Hell's Angels.
In some ways these toughs
are the opt-out group of
the lower middle class.
"Finally, there are the
love hippies — the largest
bunch. About a third are
pure philosophers, the rest
are phonies."
Love hippies believe in
the power of love to eradicate all unhappiness and
war. They work at loving
cops, LBJ, everybody. They
want everybody to share
the fruits of society. Vancouver has plenty of them.
"You sense in Haight-
Ashbury a combination of
Indian mysticism and 1st-
century Christian charity,"
says Hardwick.
"Love hippies want to
eliminate the great dualities
that cause friction. They accept everyone at face value.
They see themselves as
apart from the angries."
John Nyston whimsically
noted that when love hippies
wear beards, they tend to
look rather Christlike.
Angries wear Lenin and
Marx beards. Other hippies
are withdrawn, monastic,
aesthetic, and they wear distinctive beards, too.
Vancouver hippies live in
Kitsilano and the west end,
the low-rent districts. Some
are capitalists, like Hawthorne. Some live on welfare, never working till the
food runs out, living in
cheap rooms or co-ops.
All of them set themselves aside in some way or
another and most do it in
a way that angers society.
Police, for instance, react    violently    to   weird
people. "Cops think all hippies are scum," commented
Hawthorne.
"This Don Bellamy, head
of the youth department of
the Vancouver police, who
said all hippies live like
animals. He's very offensive when he comes down to
Fourth. Looks on us with
utter disgust.
"Hippies are continually
harassed by cops. They raid
the Afterthought three or
four times a night. They
pester any place that becomes a hangout.
"They'll arrest you for
vagrancy sometimes. They
stopped me outside my
house and asked for identification. I pointed to my
house, my car, my shop, my
wife and child, told them I
was no vagrant. They ordered me to have I.D. with
me the next time they saw
me or I'd be arrested."
When Hawthorne was running the Blind Owl leather
shop, police ordered him to
cut his hair or they'd do it
for him.
"I ignored them," said
Hawthorne. "What else can
you do? San Francisco hippies retaliate by loving the
cops. They refuse to become
hostile in any way. This
trust thing really shatters
the cops."
Kruz resents the harassment.
"They bother my brother
every single week about his
license at the Afterthought,"
he said.
"They fuss about age limits— nobody under 18 is
allowed in — and look for
drugs. One night they burst
in, turned off the strobe
lights, turned on all the
lights, locked the doors,
stopped the band, searched
everybody, and took away
six underage girls in a
paddy wagon. They also
turned away over 100 customers waiting to get in,
and so we lost about $200."
It's the drug thing that
worries local cops. "Most of
our stuff is influenced by
psychedelics," Hawthorne
says of his shop. The local
hippies post petitions
asking that marijuana be
legalized and LSD be kept
legal.
Hippies, with little fear
of the unknown, don't hesi-
take to use these two drugs.
"It's the biggest thing since
Christianity," says one. All
agree that legislation won't
stop acid, only drive it
underground.
"They say it's evil to
take drugs and you've got
to be protected against
yourself so they'll lock you
up," said Kruz. "There's all
this uninformed hysteria—
garbage sensationalism. I've
never seen any MLA get as
excited as Pat McGeer did
during his attack on LSD."
Most hippies will agree
that young kids and people
who don't know what LSD
is shouldn't take  it.
They support some form
of control, but whether medical supervision, licensing
or what they cannot say.
Nearly all want marijuana
legalized.
"Drugs aren't just a hippie thing," says Hawthorne.
"I know half a dozen over
thirty with perfectly ordinary jobs who turn on. Acid-
heads aren't only looking
for kicks. They're finding
something."
Many   hippies   are   crea
tive,    especially    in   poetry
and art.
Anthologies of local poets
sell well. Bill Bissett is a
favorite.
Acid doesn't have much
to do with creativity. "I
haven't been impressed with
anything I've seen that was
one   under   the   influence,"
said  Hawthorne.
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PIERRE      /
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Preface and
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these pages...This is a book worthy
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As I sit down to write,
the Vancouver Sun's third
straight headline about LSD
lies on my desk.,
The ostensible reason for
the urgency of legislation is
the possibility of a suicidal
reaction or major psychosis
being precipitated by the
drug (although innate prejudice against the ingestion
of any chemical for self-enlightenment is in fact the
primary source of urgency).
Concern is usually expressed for teenagers in particular, and hardnosed narcotics-
type legislation is advocated.
But how many MLA's will
ask: "Why, specifically, did
those persons who suffered
major psychosis originally
take the drug?" the sparse
information available indi
cates that many of these
youngest victims took LSD
as an act of rebellion,
against parents in particular
and society as a whole, or
merely to gain status with a
crowd of rebellious friends.
The paradox is that this type
of motivation will only be
increased by making LSD
illegal. Statistics of this kind
should be relatively easy to
assemble, but has any legislature made the effort?
The reporting of the downtown press has been directed more to increasing circulation  than informing.  The
overwhelming bulk of LSD
coverag^lhaa been vehemently one-sided (or so fantastically pro-LSD as scarcely
to be taken seriously). Columns, editorials, and banner headline articles contain
distortions or outright errors which are difficult to
correct, since letters attempting to do so are not often
printed.
For example, when a local
police officer makes intolerant and inaccurate remarks about LSD and advocates harsh legislation,
the Vancouver Sun gives him
considerable front page
space. When no less a per
son than Health Minister
Allan MacEachern is quoted
a few days later as saying
that such legislation would
be "trying to stuff a statute
book in a vacuum that can
only be filled by the exercise of personal responsibil-
iy," he is given two inches
on page 28.
Moreover, when educators
of the stature of Dr. John B.
Macdonald and Dr. Patrick
McTaggart-Cowan decline to
comment on MLA Pat McGeer's call for an academic
reign of terror — the firing
and expulsion of all professors and students caught
taking or favoring the use
of LSD — it is clear that the
achievement of a rational
law will be long in coming
and very costly.
Other questions which
need to be answered include: how does the casualty rate compare with such
other adventurous pursuits
as automobile racing, skiing, or mountain  climbing?
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Page 8
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THE    UBYSSEY
HI ALL-YUWEN'
Monday, March 20 - Tuesday March 21
9:00 a.m. - 12:00    —    1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
STUDENT
PLACEMENT  OFFICE
Elementary and  Secondary Vacancies
We principals would like to have a chat with you
ELEMENTARY   PRINCIPALS     SECONDARY PRINCIPALS
Fred Cudlipp
Bob McCubbin
Al Angrignon
Ron Drice
John McTaggart
Roy Mountain
Don Handson
Bryan Winter
Primary Supervisor Mr. Inez Robertson
Superintendent of Schools, Harold D. Stafford
School District 35 (Langley)
P.O. BOX 40, MURRAYVILLE, B.C.
TOLL FREE FROM VANCOUVER, PHONE 596-7184
Friday, March 17,  1967 for sanity
How does it compare with
that connected to the use of
alcohol or cigarettes? Are
there precautions which
might be taken to reduce
the hazards, and are these
precautions more likely or
less likely to be followed
when a severe law is imposed? Will the psychological
hazards to a person using
LSD be increased by the
negative pressures such a
law will create?
And there is still the obvious question of civil liberties of the large majority of
citizens over 21 who can
and do use LSD without
harm, and who (in their own
estimation) gain sufficient
benefit from it to offset the
risks. Is there really less
risk of trouble in an experience supervised by professional researchers than, say,
where well informed persons take it in the company
of trusted friends? Finally,
will not the proposed law
discourage young persons,
who might find themselves
in trouble with LSD, from
seeking the help they need?
All these questions will go
undebated, as fearful MLA's
hurry to pass the anti-LSD
bill, just as they have gone
unmentioned in the prolific
newspaper coverage of recent weeks.
The legislators will be undaunted by the failure of
the present narcotics law
(the severity of which already borders on the psychopathic) to suppress the spread
of marijuana.
They will no be able to
withstand the frantic pressure from people like Pat
McGeer, and they will not
wait to study the results of
similar legislation recently
passed in such places as
California.
They will not allocate funds
to study the above questions, but will make the
answers completely unobtainable by pushing LSD
further underground, and
they will allocate sizable
funds to pay for the courtroom and prison facilities
needed to enforce the law.
What will the results of
such a law be? It is already
illegal to sell LSD. Current
police attitudes being what
they are, the scarcity of convictions must be due to a
lack of evidence rather than
any weakness of law. For
reasons already mentioned,
it seems unlikely that the
new law will slow either
the growing sales or use of
LSD, any more than has
been the case for marijuana. The major difference will be the criminalization of young people using the drug. In other
words, far from stopping
LSD, this new law will
primarily hurt those persons
it is supposed to protect.
It is hard to believe that
MLA Pat McGeer, the city
police, or anyone else seriously expects the LSD
crisis to be alleviated by
this  law. It is  normal for
police to assume that greater police powers are the
answer to any social evil.
But as for the rest, I am
forced to the sad conclusion
that they are not particularly interested in solving
the problem, or in helping
the young people of Canada
to find their way. They
seem rather to want to forget the problem, and the
easiest way is to label those
who get involved with LSD
as criminals, since that obscures their status as human
beings in need of help.
To avoid being entirely
negative, it might be well
to suggest an outline for
rational legislation. First of
all, a commission of doctors,
psychiatrists, and researchers must be established to
determine what sort of
standards would b e adequate for reasonable safety
in taking LSD.
These standards must include the majority of citizens (since the large majority experience no serious
difficulties), without prejudice as to age (over 21),
income, sex, race, etc. Then
the manufacture of LSD in
a recognizable form could
begin, and the drug would
be available on prescription
from any doctor, psycholo-
gist, psychiatrist, or 1 i-
censed LSD researcher. The
prescription might stipulate
conditions to be met at the
time of administration of
the drug.
The costs should be low
enough to make the risks of
using the black market unprofitable.
An alternative method
might involve something
like the driver licensing
process, although this is
likely to be unnecessarily
complicated. Informa tion
should accumulate quite
quickly, once such a system
is instituted, and it should
not be long before the commission would have a fairly
dependable set of working
standards. The law might
prohibit driving under the
influence of LSD, and reserve the harshest penalties
for giving the drug to anyone without their knowledge or consent. Such a law
would immediately control
LSD instead of pushing it
further out of control, as
will the present purely prohibitive proposals, and
would protect the drug
from control by undesirable
elements.
If the law is reasonable,
young people, who are offered the drug illegally, will
be far more willing to accept the advice of their elders. And, knowing that such
an Offer will not be the last
chance they will ever have
to try it, they will be much
more willing to wait until
they are older and wiser.
I 5ive
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedo, tails, whit* dinner
jackets, morninf coats.
Formal and informal business wear — complete
size range.
MCCUISH   FORSWEAR
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 4st - Ph. 263-3610
DUTHIE
BOOKS
10th Annual
BOOK
SALE
STARTS
MARCH 30
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
ADDRESS
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
«* CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011    I
Film Society Presents
007
Dr. No &
From Russia
With  Love
TODAY
Auditorium 50c
12:30 continuous
EUROPE $396?i
Unbelievable, but truell This is return
fare and accommodation for 21 days.
Ideal if you have to work this summer,
but want a break for a few weeks.
Full details on request—limited space
only.
HAGEN S
■   736-5651
Hasan's Travel Sorviee ltd. 2996 W. Broadway.
Teaching Positions Available
on Vancouver Island
Education students interested in teaching positions —
primary, intermediate or secondary — in School District
No. 62 (Sooke) or Belmont Park S.D. may interview District
Supt. Mr. E. Hyndman in the Bayshore Inn, Monday,
March 27th from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
THE   DAY  YOU   BUY  A   DIAMOND
You   are  buying   for  the future
as   well   at   the   present   .   .   .
SEE US FOR YOUR DIAMOND TODAY
Varsity Jewellers
4517 West 10th
224-4432
JANSEN'S
CUSTOM TAILORS
& MEN'S WEAR
STUDENTS ONLY:
10% DISCOUNT ON
THE LATEST SPRING
MERCHANDISE
• HABERDASHERY
• SUITS
• SPORT CLOTHING
ONE  YEAR  FREE ALTERATIONS
WITH CLOTHING PURCHASED HERE
Phone 684-6018      1051 Granville St.
finery has flair at EATON'S
Friday, March 17, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 This Diamond Ring Is Worth
All Of $1,000,000/
(To The Girl Who Wears It.)
And 10% discount to the young man who
gives it. Which explains why most students
consult Grassies on Seymour before buying important items like jewellery. Or anything else
for that matter. Because Grassies' 10%
Student Preferential Discount Policy covers all
their merchandise. An invaluable factor . . .
whatever   the  amount   you   wish   to  spend.
• $200: Retail Voloe/$180: To Yew.
566   SEYMOUR
685-2271
*PS!£>
U.B.C. CHORAL SOCIETY
PRESENTS
n
FRIDAY,   MARCH   17TH,   1967       BROCK  HALL
8  P.M. ADULTS $1.00
STUDENTS  75  CENTS
JAMES BOND
double bill
Dr. No &
From Russia
With   Love
TODAY
Auditorium 50c
12:30 continuous
A Film Society Presentation
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE    DINNER    JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE    COSTUMES
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
CA 4-0034  4397 W. 10th
PENN OVERLAND TOUR
England   -   India   -   Australia
Two month overland journey: England, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Italy,
Yugoslavia, Greece, Turkey, Syria, Lebonon, Jordan, Iraq, Persia, Pakistan
and India, Australia and New Zealand.
London   —   Bombay/Calcutta
$445.00 Can.
5700  University Blvd. 224-4391
Representing American  Express
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
lew frame can do wonders
for the  disposition.
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL
(United)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
11a.m. Sacrament of
Holy Communion
"Is It Nothing To Your'
ST. ANSELM'S (Anglican)
Palm Sunday
8:00; 9:30 & 11  a.m.
Holy Communion
"Atonement — Sounds Cruel"
7:30 p.m. Passion Music and Lessons
St.  Helen's Anglican Church
HAROLD MacKAY JIM McKIBBON
New  life   policy  backed   by   Stocks
National Life plan provides
hedge against inflation!
Always a pioneer in the life insurance industry, National Life is proud
to report the introduction of the
National Equity Life Insurance Policy which makes available, for the
first time in Canada, a life policy
partly based on common stock investment.
Why common stock? There is a
tendency over the long haul for the
:ost of living to move in the same
direction as the stock market. The
equity element incorporated in the
design of this policy provides buyers with a substantial hedge against
decline in dollar values.
The Equity Policy is basically an ordinary life participating policy with
the same premium rate and regular
dividend scale as for a regular ordinary life policy. Where it is different is that the assets held to
back up the policy are divided and
an amount equal to one-half of the
policy reserve is invested in common stocks.
Over the long term common stocks
have shown a higher rate of return,
inclusive of capital appreciation,
than fixed income investments such
as bonds and mortgages.
To the extent that the yield from
the common stock investments exceeds the regular net interest earnings of the Company plus 25% for
investment  expense  an   extra   divi
dend is credited to the policyholder.
This extra, together with the regular dividend, is used to purchase
additional paid-up insurance. Should
the market value of the stocks decrease, the extra dividend could be
negative. If this negative amount is
greater than the regular dividend,
the amount of insurance will decline.
Tables prepared to show how an
Equity Policy would have worked
out had it been issued at various
times in the past demonstrate that
despite wars and stock market collapses the Equity Policy would, over
the long term, have produced an
amount of  protection  which  would
have compensated for increases in
the cost of living. In only two
years — at the bottom of the depression — of the forty covered
would the amount of insurance
have fallen below the original face
amount. When compared against
the performance of a regular ordinary life plan with dividends also
used to purchase paid-up insurance
additions the Equity Policy would
have provided more insurance in
36 of 40 years studied.
Complete information on this spectacular new policy, including the
performance tables mentioned
above, may be obtained, without
any obligation, by telephoning Mr.
Dick Penn at MU 5-7231.
NATIONAL LIFE
OF CANADA
VANCOUVER BRANCH
1131  MELVILLE ST., VANCOUVER 5 - MU. 5-7231
□
Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  17,   1967 Friday, March 17, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
3ra$AS7ZR! THE BRITISH
■^ VfFlGHIANDTHE BLORGS WON
No money;
no buildings
Biologists and engineers at
UBC will be without quarters unless more money is
forthcoming from the provincial government.
The board of governors has
received working drawings
for a major biological sciences building but tenders
cannot be called until additional building money is committed to UBC.
"Neither can we proceed
on three engineering blocks,"
says UBC president John
Macdonald.
"The university advised the
government that an additional $16.5 million is needed to
complete the program," Macdonald said.
He said if the university
receives assurance this money will be supplied by 1969
it can go ahead with the
program on short term borrowing.
The anticipated $30 million
has been cut by an estimated
$3.4 million because public
contributions to the three
universities fund fell short of
the $28 million objective, according to Macdonald.
He also said the preliminary building estimates have
risen $4.3 million since 1963
because of sharp rises in construction costs.
THE
FRIAR
STATEMENT    OF    POLICY   I
PRICE   VS   QUALITY    AND
QUANTITY
Food   portioning   and   costing
ia essential  to  any
successful   restaurant
operation.   In   addition
each  operation  must
decide it's markup on food cost.
This will depend on the
class  of restaurant  and
the   services   offered.   Once
the  markup   is  decided
the food  pricing  is
determined by the
size and quality ot the
portion.   The   friar   places   it's
stress   on   quality   first,
quantity  second and
price  third.
For example  —  one
Bacon   and   Tomato
sandwich   can   very   as
follows — two to
four  slices,
varied thickness and great
variation in quality of
Bacon;   variation   in   dressing
such   as   Margarine,    Butter,   or
Mayonaisse.   The   extremes
can   cause   one
sandwich to be worth
3  to 4  times   more than
another.  Needless  to
say   the
Friar gives  you  a
Quality  Sandwich.
1 MEAN YOl/REREALLYONTHEWAY,
BUDDY80V1 ALL THOSE IDEAS YOU'VE
BEEN HITTING ME WITH \ WOWS YOUR
OtAKICE ! WHAT COULD BE GREATER?
ANEW SCOOTER.
AND WHAT COULD BE CLASSIER.
THAN SAYING'TM WITH &ENERAL
TELEPHONE&FLECTRONICSVTHATS
STATU9! WHATCOULDTOPTHAT?
A NEW SCOOTER
YOLiVE GOT ITACED! WORKING WITH
THE REAL PROS... THE GUYS WHO
KWOW WHATfe HAPPENING- IN RESEARCH
EXOTIC METAL4 AND ADVANCED
TECHNOLOGY. WHAT COULD BEAT IT?
A NEW SCOOTER.
AND THE MONEV !  VOULL BE r?OLLING-
IN BREAD! WHAT'S G-Oim TO BE YOUR.
FIBST MAJOR PURCHASE YOU BRIGHT-
TALENTED-YOUNG EXECUTIVE YOU?
SIX NEW SCOOTERS.
At General Telephone & Electronics, we
want people who have learned how to think.
We help teach them to think bigger.
GEE
GENERAL TELEPHONE OPERATING COMPANIES • GENERAL TELEPHONE DIRECTORY COMPANY • AUTOMATIC
ELECTRIC • LENKURTELECTRIC • SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS • GT&E LABORATORIES • GT&E INTERNATIONAL Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  17,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Psychiatrists  psyched
INTERNATIONALISTS
Dr.  Conrad  Schwarz discusses  the role
of  the  psychiatrist in   society,   tonight,   8
p.m.,  lower mall common  lounge.
SQUASH CLUB
Election meeting, today, noon, hut B-5.
VCF
Dr.  C.  P.  S.  Taylor discusses  Science
is Faith, today, noon, Ang. 110.
NISEI VARSITY
Meeting tonight, 9:30, Brock ext.
NISEI VARSITY
Dance to the sounds of the New Sounds,
tonight,   9:30,    Brock    lounge.    Admission
cheap.
CLASSICS CLUB
Election meeting tonight,  8 p.m.,  2915
West  30 avenue.
FILM SOCIETY
Dr.   No   and   From   Russia   with   Love,
today, noon to  midnight,  auditorium. Admission 50 cents.
EL CIRCULO
Discussion with slides of Mexican mural
art,   presented by  Valerie   Turner,   today,
noon, Bu. 204.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Joan Baez and Ira  Sandperl  speak on
Non-violence   in a  Violent   Society,  today,
noon, Brock lounge. Admission 50 cents.
SAILING CLUB
Anyone wishing to go sailing this weekend, sign up in clutoroom.
GAMMA DELTA
Fireside   meeting  with   Hillel   students,
Sunday, 7 a.m., Lutheran campus center.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Trade  unionist  Sidney  Lens speaks on
Vietnam,   Saturday,  8   p.m.,   King   George
High   school   auditorium.   Admission   50
cents.
PHOTO SOC
Opening and awards for the salon of
photography, Monday noon, Lass, second
floor. Color slide section will be shown:
Tuesday noon, Lass. 104; Wednesday and
Thursday, noon, Lass. 102; Thursday, 8
p.m., Lass. 102.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Meeting for   election   and   selection   of
delegates   to   leadership   convention,   Monday, noon, Bu. 214.
KARATE
Those  interested   in forming   a  karate
club for  September, meet Tuesday,  noon,
chem. 250.
CURLING CLUB
Election meeting Tuesday, noon, Bu.
100.
SPORTS EVENTS
Saturday: Track and Field — Spring
Mixer Relays at 1 p.m. in Varsity Stadium.
Saturday: Girls Field Hockey — City
Finals against Kitsilano at 2:30 on Trafalgar Park.
Saturday: Rugby — Birds play Victoria
in McKechnie Cup consolation round—1:15
at Brockton Point; Braves vs Kats at 2:30
at Balaclava Park; Tepees vs All Blacks
at 1:15 at Wolfson Field.
Sunday: Soccer—Birds vs Columbus at
2p.m. at Callister Park.
KRAPP'S LAST TAPE
By Samuel Beckett
Author   of  "Waiting   For. Godot"
With DERMOT HENNELLY   -   Directed  by ROB GRAHAM
Thurs., March 16 — 12:30 p.m.
Friday, March 17 - 12:30 p.m.
25 CENTS
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Budget Expenditures
(EXCERPTS)
Canadian Union of Students
B.C. Association  of Students
Undergraduate Society
Special   Events
Conference  Grants
University  Clubs Committee
Publications
Intramural   Fund
Seminars & Academic Programs
Public Education
Housing Action
Present
Budget
$10,075
8,755
4,600
6,000
5,000
18,575
2,500
400
500
with cuts
to balance
next year*
$ 5,000\
1,000 J
7,755
3,100
5,000
3,500
14,575
with $3
increase
$10,000
13,000
5,500
9,000
6,000
18,000
3,500
5,000
7,000
4,000
*These cuts total $13,000, to balance the deficit we face if we are
to maintain our programme next year. The CUS fee cannot be
cut initially, but even if we negotiate a $5,000 cut over the summer, we will have to divert some of this ($1,000) to a B.C.
Association.
A 'T*oor" Government Cm Give
RARE   (like really rare--you know
like special or unique - or e\ier> just
nicely different). ThaVs  RARE  —
clever clothes, clothes with ideas ard
imagination. And most r*re - not too
expensive.
BABE  boutique   438 Richards St.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost te Found
11   Scandals
ONE PAIR MEN'S GLASSES
woodlike frames. Phone BUI, 224-
1631.
FOUND ONE PAIR MEN'S GLAS-
ses wooden frames thick lenses.
Left in car by hitch-hiker, Open
House weekend (Sat.) CaU 224-
9269  after   six.
WOULD THE PERSON RESPON-
sible for removing my Russ 200
text and notes from Brock on
Wed. morning please return them
to the Publications Office or
phone   Vicki  at   224-9766.
FOUND: MAN'S WATCH IN AN-
gus 114 Mar. 10. Claim in Publications  Office.
LOST PSYCH. 308 NOTES NEED-
ed desperately. Please phone Vicky
at  263-4170 after 5 p.m.
12A
Coming Dances
GERMAN CLUB PRESENTS POL-
ka party, Saturday, March 18,
International House, 8:30 -12:30.
Bavarian Band, $1.00 per person.
Alle Wilkommen.
EX-MAGEE   '67
COMMODORE
March   18      —      9:00 -1:00
$4.50   cpl. 263-3320
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INS.UR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — 3121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other jewelry,   $1   up.       	
OAMP: FIFTH ANNUAL DANCE
Club Competitions, Vancouver
Technical School. March 18, 8
p.m. Dancers, displays, refreshments.   Tickets:  AMS,  Door.
FAITH FOLK. Experimental
Christian Unity Movement. Share
ideas. This Saturday. 2646 W.
10th,  Van.   7 p.m.    736-4782.
W1ANTED: CHAIRMAN FOR ACA-
demic Symposium 1968. For those
interested please submit your own
ideas and principles on Symposia.
Apply Box 2 AMS before April.
Transportation
14
DESPERATE — CARPOOL WANT-
ed in Caulfeild, West Van. Mon.-
Fri. — Phone 926-1581. Will drive.
8:30 mornings.
GIRLS WANT RIDE TO KELOW-
na March 22. Phone 224-9746. Rm.
469.	
WANTED: RIDE TO PENTICTON
Wednesday 22. Share cost. Call
224-6801  Heather or Barbara.
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO   CHARTER   MAY  6-14;   FOR
information  ph.   224-6734.	
CALGARY BOUND AT EASTER.
Leave March 22,  Return Mar.   27.
Will  take   riders.   Call  Jerry 731-
6059.
AUTOMOTIVE   fc  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1954 ZEPHYR IN GOOD CONDI-
tion. Licenced, $106. Phone Bernie
224-9064.
PROFESSOR LEAVING CANADA
selling 1963 Buick Special Convert.
33,000 miles, 1 owner, std. trans.
Best   offer.   688-1653,   after   6.
1966 TRIUMPH TR 4-A, IRS, Excellent cond., must sell leaving
country. Phone 521-1427.
Motorcycles
27
1964 SUZUKI, 80c.c, like new, $200
firm, call Dave, after 5 p.m., 224-
7484.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 60 percent on finest quality,
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39-A
HURRY — EXPO EXCURSION. —
Only $154.00. Accommodation,
Breakfast, Travel by Train, Insurance, Expo Pass. Reserve now.
Phone  224-3242,   Loc.   33.
PREVIOUS EXAMS REVISED
for relevance. Exams for sale,
20c. Bookstore, College Shop.
Canteens Ed. Smokeshop 1st yr.
Maths, Physics, His., Eng. 200,
EC.   200.
39A
THIS SUMMER LIVE AT PSI-U
Fraternity House. Special arrangements available. Information phone Duncan 224-9665 6-7
p.m.
ARE    YOU    HIDING    A    TALENT
under a bushel? Let us help you—
a haircut while you wait.
CAMPUS BARBER SHOP
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8684   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 2(3-4110
ESSAY   AND   THESIS.  ELECTRIC.
Call  Joan,   228-8384.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
ESSAYS,       THESES      EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone   733-7819.	
TYPING — MANUSCRIPTS, ETC
Rates on request, Mrs. E. McCartney, Box 939, Squamish, B.C.
892-3798.
EXPERIENCED,   FAST TYPIST —
AM 6-5031 or MU 3-4757.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
BI
WOMAN   WANTED !
Faculty,   fourth   year   or  grad.   Interested   indoing   interviews   on
CBUT 7 o'clock Show, please contact Hilda Wilson 684-0246. Good
looks definite advantage brains
not a  handicap.
INSTRUCTION—SCHOOLS
Music
63
PARia AMERICAN ACADEMY OF
Music, July 1 to August 12. All
disciplines of music. No age limit.
Course of study - Paris - Music
Festivals - French Riviera. For
information: 25, rue Saint-Didier
(write air mail) Paris 16e, France.
Instruction-Tutoring
•4
ALL  FIRST  AND   SECOND  YEAR
subjects by  excellent  tutors:   Sol-
ences and arts. 736-6923.
March   Registration
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
Experienced    tutoring   in
University
Secondary
Elementary   courses
Educational   Consultation
in Industry
THE HUBERMAN  EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE
B.C. Owned & Licensed
263-4808        2168    W.   12th        732-653S
TUTORING IN UNIVERSITY
maths — first two years by excellent experienced tutor. No con-
tracts.   Reasonable   736-6923.
FOR GRADE 6 BLIND BOY. MID
April through August. Rooms,
breakfasts, exchange or terms.
733-9416.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
ROOM FOR SENIOR MALE STU-
dent for March through August.
Shower, private entrance, light
hskeeping facilities, $50 month.
Phone CA 8-8814.
WANTED: FEMALE STUDENT TO
share Apt. own bedroom, Jana
733-7982.
Room & Board §3
IN NICE DISTRICT, ONE BLOCK
off Arbutus bus line. Serving a
lovely variety in meals, Saturday
and Sunday as well, 738-9989.
ROOM & BOARD AND REMUNER-
ation in exchange for mother's
help, including full time summer
employment.   AM   3-6523,   876-0414.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
SUBLET FOR SUMMER! 1 B.R.,
West End suite. Modern Hi-rise
block. Pay rent for unfurnished
suite, furniture free. Avialable
end of exams to Sept. 15th. 685-
1830.
WANTED MALE TO SHARE 2
Bdrm. suite with naval architect,
Granville and 16th area. CaU 733-
3847.

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