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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1988

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Array THEUBYSSEY
UBC abortions debated
Condominium on Campus
and
Granville Mall dispute
See page 3
By Deanne Fisher
Abortion services at UBC
could soon be accessible to students as a result of the Supreme
Court of Canada's January 28
ruling decriminalizing non-therapeutic abortions.
"We could seriously consider
doing our own (abortions)? at
UBC if free-standing clinics are
legalized, said Percival Smith,
JDirector of Student Health Services.
"The ideal would be that a
student could have an abortion at
UBC. That's my personal opinion
and not the opinion of the university? Smith said.
The fifty to sixty students per
year requesting abortions through
student health services have been
referred to Vancouver General or
Shaughnessy hospitals.
An abortion service was considered in 1980, Smith said, but
"we (student health) were told 'no'"
by the hospital administration.
Smith said he doesn't expect
any changes in the next three
months. "There would be a period
of time required for training ourselves? he said.
The pro-choice movement
supports the establishment of
abortion services at UBC.
"I don't think women from
UBC should have to go to VGH or
Shaughnessy. UBC is a community in itself. You should be able to
get care in your own community?
said Pat Brighouse, spokesperson
for Concerned Citizens for Choice
on Abortion.
"Ideally, (physicians at UBC
Student Health) should be trained
in Dr. Morgentaler's method? said
Brighouse. "It is the safest method
and does not require general anesthetic."
Lynn Percival, spokesperson
Dueck refuses to
abort health policy
by Mike Gordon and Justine Hunter
Canadian University Press
VICTORIA (CUP) — Provincial opposition leader Mike Harcourt called for Health Minister
Peter Dueck's resignation yesterday, in the wake of angry criticism
over the B.C. government's decision to restrict payments for abortions.
The call for Dueck's resignation comes after the Supreme
Court of Canada struck down a 19
year-old section of the Criminal
Code requiring all abortions be
approved by a hospital therapeutic abortion committee.
Dueck, who says abortion on
demand is "morally wrong," said
the government will only pay doctors for abortions approved by a
hospital's therapeutic abortion
committee, despite Chief Justice
Brian Dickson's ruling the
committees are "often unfair and
arbitrary? and thus unconstitutional.
"We feel the taxpayer is not
willing to pay for abortions on
demand? said Dueck. He said he
intends to stand firm to the
government's policy of only paying
through the Medical Services Plan
for procedures which are "medically required?
"We  haven't  changed  (our
position)? he said, "(abortion) was
always a medically required procedure. Now, if it's going to be wide
open, with no restrictions at all, we
are going to stick by the status
quo."
NDP Member of Parliament,
'Svend Robinson, said the Social
Credit government is trying to
make an "end-run" around the
Supreme Court ruling to impose
their personal anti-choice beliefs.
"Dueck has displayed contempt for the fundamental principles in the Charter of Rights, as
enunciated by the Supreme Court
in its ruling," said the federal justice critic.
Robinson, who fully supports
the call for Dueck's resignation,
says therapeutic abortion committees no longer have any legal
status.
"He is effectively condemning
poor women to further delays and
risk of further complications?
Robinson said.
Dueck's stand on abortion
funding contradicts statements he
made late last year that the government would refuse to pay doctors for "discretionary" medical
treatments, such as cosmetic surgery. At the time, he said heart
surgery for the elderly and abor-
see 'Dueck' page 8
Election race results **j$
A whopping six per cent of
the student population exercised thenr democratacrightlast
week as an exciting AMSelee*
tam rocked the campus?
In a staggering victory,
fjm Bird (no relation to Big)
flew past the ever-present
threat of the 'No' faction, 966*
271>to become your new AMS
president.
The AMS vice-president
position was filled by Carolyn
Egan in a 1096-224 win owe**her
opponent, the defiant *No' candidate. The loser was negative
and offered no comment.
In a neck and neck race,
Leanne Jacobs outdistanced
Carey Wong 762-63? down the
homestretch to win the coveted
director of sdjnloistrafeian trophy at the wire*
To control the purse-
strings of Use AMS> Mike Fahy
finished two lengths ahead of
Andrew Hicks, 923*4*. 3, totals,
the director of finance crown.
Lisa Eckman galloped past
•No-voteon the ballot'll„M82
In an easy victory for her place
in the external affairs wirmerV
circle.
Though defeated, ^No-vote
on the ballot* is ingesting steroids, eating oats, training hard
in Bluegrass country and intends to return to next year's
run for the AMS roses.
for UBC Health Sciences and
Shaughnessy Hospitals, said it
was too soon to answer if Student
Health could get abortion facilities.
"At this point there's so much
uncertainty we're not sure of any
of the answers? she said.
Darlene Marzari, New Democrat MLA for Point Grey, said she
would support the establishment
of abortion services at UBC.
"I'm in support of good health
services for women • safe and financially accessible services,"
Marzari said.
Both Marzar. and Brighouse
said the services should be free.
As students, "you are part of
the most vulnerable group in
terms of income? said Brighouse.
"Doctors should be funded by the
province not by women who can't
afford to pay."
But B.C.'s Medical Services
Plan will not cover abortions not
deemed medically required by a
hospital therapeulac abortion
committee.
"For the time Ixsing we are
asking hospitals to set up a structure to determine whether a procedure is medically required? said
B.C. Health Minister Peter Dueck.
"Someone's going to have to
challenge (the policies set by
Dueck)? Marzari said. That challenge could come in the form of
"class action, on behalf of women
in general."
"The personal and religious
views of a small minority and the
personal views of an individual
minister cannot be inflicted on
public trust and the oublic's right
to medical treatment." said
Marzari.
Vancouver Synmphony Orchestra blown away
Silenced symphony jeopardizes
UBC music students' education
By Tim McGrady
The quality of education at
the UBC School of Music is in
jeopardy following the shut down
of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra last week.
"(The shut down) may directly
affect you, because you may not
have a teacher? VSO trombonist'
Greg Cox told students gathered
at an information and strategy
session hosted by the music students' society.
The Vancouver symphony
ceased operations last week
amidst allegations of management improprieties and a staggering debt load.
Cox, also a sessional lecturer
at UBC, encouraged students to
mount a letter-writing campaign
and to "make it dear that the
education you've received or are
receiving is possible because ofthe
presence of a major symphony
orchestra here?
"It is very important that the
politicians be made aware of the
community and educational aspects" ofthe VSO, said Cox.
Music society ombudsperson
Peter Wenzek said, "if the VSO is
not able to bring itself back on its
feet it will have drastic effects on
the quality of education here."
The UBC School of Music
employs "sixteen part time lecturers  (from  amongst  VSO  musi
cians) who are engaged on a year
by year basis? said Music School
head William Benjamin.
Brian G'Proerer, a part-time
lecturer said, "the University can
afford to hire sessional faculty but
can't afford to hire full-time faculty" and so, in effect, the "VSO
subsidizes this institution?
"It is true we can't afford to
hire full time members on every
instrument ...it would be too expensive, too wasteful? said Benjamin. "For many instruments,
the best available teachers are
members of the VSO."
Benjamin downplayed predictions of disaster for the School
of Music should the Orchestra fail
to come back to life. He called the
problems facing the orchestra
members "a scandal, a human
tragedy" but that "the worst thing
we could do is provoke hysteria?
"The Orchestra and the
School are all trying to develop a
musical life" in the city, but the
School can continue without the
Orchestra just as "people do survive without an arm? said Benjamin.
He believes, however, that
"there is going to be a VSO; there is
no question about it."
Benjamin said, "I think we
should be extremely worried not
as a School of Music but as citizens
of the community."
At the Friday meeting
GTroerer stressed that the community as a whole will also feel the
after effects of the shutdown. He
cited statistics which suggested
that "for every dollar spent on the
symphony, two dollars and fifty
cents comes back" by the time it
trickles through the economy by
what he called "the multiplier effect?
Noting that "we can't have a
real musical life without the Symphony, Benjamin said, "I wouldn't
want to live here without a symphony orchestra?
The possibility remains that
the Orchestra will be able to resurrect itself. John Rudolph, a VSO
principal percussionist and one of
the four sessional faculty at the
meeting, said, "The media has
made some hay about (musicians)
leaving ...(but) we are committed
to Vancouver? "We don't want
to leave; we want to make this
orchestra work? he said.
As far as offering support to
the VSO, Benjamin said there is
"not a whole lot we can do (financially) as a School except to offer
moral support?
But, he said, "Faculty may do
benefit performances and we will
certainly offer our facilities for
meetings. The students may help
with the publicity end."
VOLUME 70, Number 35
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 2,1988 Classifieds
05 - COMING EVENTS
MASTERPIECES OF FILMS - Prof. Joanne
Yamaguchi of the Theatre Dept. will be
presenting Blue Velvet on Thursday, Feb. 4
at 8:00 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre. Everyone is welcome. Free. Large
screen monitor. For information call 228-
3203.
GRAD VALENTINE DANCE
Chemistry grads, the Free Radicals, will
shake you up on Friday, Feb. 12th, 8:00-
12:00 p.m. at the Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre. Everyone is welcome. No cover
charge. For information call 228-3203.
GRAD SOCIETY BRIDGE
Everyone is welcome to Wed. 6 p.m. informal
drop-in sessions at the Fireside Lounge,
Grad Centre. Free. Forinformatjon call 228-
3203 or Marlene Huggins at 737-7474.
JAZZ LIVE! Jazz pianist Ron Johnston and
bassist Rene Worst will be appearing Wed.,
Feb. 3, 5:30-8:00 p.m. at the Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre. Ron Johnston played
with Paul Horn for several years and was
pianist with Vancouver-based Pacific Salt.
Rene Worst is a member of Skywalk. Everyone is welcome. Free. For information call
228-3203.
TRAVEL DAYS '88
- Airlines
- Tour companies
PLUS
- A FREE Draw for a trip to
EUROPE!
Wed. February 10th
SUB CONCOURSE
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
•68 VW VAN 1600CC Eng. rblt. new clutch,
new shocks, gd. running cond. $600. Call
228-0881.
NEW & USED ENCYCLOPEDIAS FOR
SALE - will accept trade-ins. 277-5089.
20 - HOUSING	
TO SHARE LARGE 1 -BDRM. APT. for Fnh.
or Mar. - Fem/NS/Nondrinker, $215/mo.
877-1421 after 9 p.m. or Mess. 228-6765
(Lyla).	
BEDROOM & DEN AVAILABLE to share-
with 1 other in clean, quiet 3 bdr. East Side
home, laundry facilities. Ideal for mature, n/
s grad student $325 includes util. 251 -1002.
For Feb. or March 1st.
30 - JOBS
BABYSITTER REQUIRED, P/T Mandarin
speaking preferred. Call 228-1302 after 4:00
p.m.
P/T THURSDAY AND/OR FRIDAY (7 a.m.-
7 p.m.), employment available for young
persons willing to work alone cleaning care
etc. Must be clean, courteous, hard working,
and have a valid driver's license. Apply in
person only to Discount U-Drive, 1317 SW
Marine Dr., Van. Tuesday, Feb. 2,10 a.m.-3
p.m. Please bring a resume.
DRIVEROF VAN OR SMALL TRUCK with
abilities in: horticulture, architectural design, and public service needed for exciting
decorating firm. Apply in writing to 8235
Cartier St., Van., B.C. V6P 4T6.
P/T CARE OF 2 CHILDREN near UBC, 10
hrsywk. Tuesday, Wednesday a.m. Call 224-
2480.
40 - MESSAGES
LOVE FOR
CHEAP!
Don't forgeN^gssfrd
your message mihe
Ubyssey's special
VALENTINE'S ISSUE,
$3.00 for 3
s available
an. 266. Dead-
10th.
CONGRATULATIONS. Nice stunt. I hope
you took the motor out so that WiH won't try
and drive it off the roof.
70 - SERVICES	
START YOUR OWN BUSINESS on campus. For details send S A.S.E. to: 1215 Davie
St., #393, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 1N4.
NEW AGE CHANNELLER - Psychic Advisor - ESP/UFO Research & Investigation -
Daniel 683-0864.
HEY VALENTINE!
Got that special someone on your mind?
Learn how to write a surefire love letter.
Send $3 and your address: The Write Stuff,
Box 165 - 1215 Davie St, Van., V6E 1N4.
YOU COULD SPEND NEXT
SUMMER WORKING IN:
BRITAIN, IRELAND, NEW
ZEALAND, AUSTRALIA... OR
JAPAN!
ASK TRAVEL CUTS ABOUT
THE STUDENT WORK
ABROAD PROGRAMME
"WE'RE ON CAMPUS IN THE
S.U.B." 224-2344
TRAVEL CUTS is...
Going Your Way !!
♦Student Flights*
♦Cultural Exchanges*
*Adventure Tours*
*And much more*
Visit the Student Travel ex
perts on Campus
S.U.B. 224-2344
75 ■ WANTED
WANTED BABYSITTER HOUSEKEEPER
2-3 afternoons/wk. Must have own car. N/S.
Call Betsy 224-4742.
SHEET MUSIC & BOOKS in reasonable
condition   buy/sell/trade;   Secondo   Music
BEAUTY STUDIO  #S
2546 Kingsway,  Vancouver, B.C.   V5R 5H2
-London Trained Designers Quality Work-
Sue Shin, a graduate of Sulci's Advanced Styling School and trained in
the Vidal Sasoon system of cutting and styling; Stella, trained in London
and formerly of the Monita Salon in Hong Kong; Regina, a European
trained aesthetician; Jeanna, recently returned from advancing her
aesthetics training in Hong Kong have joined our team of professionals
at BM Chan.
Call us today for a free consultation!
Operated by Monita, Graduate of Vidal Sassoon. Jingles and Pivot
Point Academy, trained in United States and London.
20%
HAIR AND MAKE UP BY MONITA
PHOTO BY BEN CHAN
|    *__.U /O OFF    |
j       (Mon.-Fri.)      j
|    regular perm,   |
eyelash perm
I     and facials.     I
I   UPON PRESENTATION  I
I      OF THIS COUPON     I
By appointment only
437-3109 Open Sundays
2546 Kingsway, Vancouver
Store, 2744 W. 4th Ave. (atMacdonald). 734-
2339.
BABYSITTER WANTED for 5-mth. old
baby. Tues. & Thurs. mornings & occasional
eves. Ph. 224-4718.
80 - TUTORING
YOU CANNOT AFFORD to lose marks on
essays. Let me help you with the grammar,
punctuation, and layout of your term paper.
Rate: $15/hr. 222-2505.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
Word Proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
write, we type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essay.. Days, eves., wknds., 736-1208.
WORD-PROCESSING $2.00/page, IBM or
Apple, DTP also. ComputerSmiths, 3732
West Broadway (at Alma) 224-5242.
FAST! Word Processing $1.50/pg. daisy
wheel, draft copy provided, overnight orders
welcome. 737-8981.
WORD WEAVERS - 41st bus line, upstairs
at 101-2258 W. 41st Ave. Faculty and student rates for quality, custom word processing. FAX. Translation and transcription in
major languages. Thesis specialists on multilingual terminals. Specialite en francais.
Japanese & Chinese document preparation
available.
MacINTOSH WORDPROCESSING: Experienced editing, reason, rates. Call Jack -
224-0486.
KER-WORD PROCESSING SERVICE.
Using IBM-XT with WordPerfect #202-1515
E. 5th Ave. Call Kerry 253-8444.
TYPING - NO NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays, theses (low price), resumes. Editing &
Research assistance. 327-0425 (before 10
p.m.).
WORD PROCESSING: A & Y Manuscript
Masters. Incomparable quality. Essays,
term papers, theses, manuscripts. Spelling,
grammar, style con*. References. 253-0899.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: Student
discounts. Letter quality printers. 10th &
Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist, 3206
W. 38th Ave., 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING.Term papers, manuscripts, resumes, etc. Whatever you need.
Quality products. Rapid service available.
738-2492 anytime.
YEAR-ROUND EXPERT ESSAY, theses,
typing from legible work, spell/gram. corr.
738-6829 10-9. King Ed. bus route.
ATTN: CLUBS, FRATS
UNDERGRAD SOCIETIES.
SORORITIES & PHRATERES
* BASED ON ORDERS OF 50 PCS
INCLUDES 1 COLOUR PRINT
GARMENTS, PRINTING & ARTWORK
(604) 876-0828
KENNETH OYE DESIGN
UHWJddfll
CLASSES
TODAY
Sailing Club
Spring cruise: info and sign up
at SUB 58 - deposit due Friday
Feb. 5. Office hours and lunch.
Ballet UBC Jazz
Beginner  Ballet.   $3  drop-in.
Noon, Plaza South.
Maranatha Christian Club
A look at the issues that involve
us. Enjoy your lunch while listening to a relevant and informative talk. Everyone welcome.
Noon, SUB 205.
UBC Personal Computer Club
IBM Meeting: "The art of striptease? Noon, SUB 211.
AMIGA Meeting: "We're gonna
party." Noon, SUB 111.
Mac Meeting: "Calling all Commodore members? Noon, Hebb
10.
• ATARI Meeting: "The Bits and
Bytes   of an   ATARI."   Noon,
Scarfe 1021.
Association for Baha'i Studies
Open Discussion and study of
different aspects of the Baha'i
faith. Noon, SUB 125.
UBC Film Society
Classic   SUBFilms:  "Othello?
starring   Laurence   Olivier.
12:40, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. SUB
Theatre, SUB.
Lutheran Student Movement
Co-op Supper. 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Environmental Interest Group
Our Common Future - lecture
series: Geoff Hainsworth, "The
Role ofthe International Economy in Global Environmental
Issues." 7:30 p.m., Woodward
Rm. 2.
WEDNESDAY
UBC New Democrats
Speaker:   Moe   Sihota,   MLA,
NDP Justice Critic. Noon, SUB
207-209.
UBC Circle K Club
Come meet our members and
find out about our upcoming
service projects.Noon, SUB 111.
Sailing Club
Spring Cruise/sign-up at office/
deposit due this week. Noon,
SUB 58.
UBC Pugwash
Panel Discussion. Noon, SUB
211.
FREE
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
•For Grad Photography That is Different*
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection of colour previews without cost or obligation.
This offer is valid to all 1988 UBC graduating students. Phone
now for an appointment.
•UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1988•
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
2111 West 16th Ave.
VANCOUVER, B.C
736-7281 or 731-1412
>
o.
cn
CX
o
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Gallery Night. 3:30 p.m., Gallery
Lounge.
Graduate Student Society
Jazz Live
With Ron Johnston (keyboard)
and Rene Worst (bass). 5:30-8
p.m.,   Fireside   Lounge,   Grad
Centre.
ALSO: Bridge, 6 p.m., Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre. Beginners
welcome.
Maranatha Christian Club
Bible study and discussion. 7
p.m., 1868 Knox Rd., UBC.
THURSDAY
Sailing Club
Spring Cruise info and sign-up:
deposits due Friday. Noon, SUB
58.
Pre-Dental Society
Dr. Christiansen gives an interesting lecture on the "psychology" of dentistry. Noon, Wood 5.
Environmental Interest Group
Letter writing session: Stein
Valley, Pocket Wildernesses,
Khutzymateen and others - envelopes and addresses provided.
Noon, Geography Rm. 239.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship
Rev. Norman Archer begins a 3-
week expositional teaching on
Romans. Noon, Chem 250.
International Ascended Masters
Class
Video showing: "Thomas H.
Krebs on 'Tsar Wars'." Admission $1. Noon, Wood 3, Instructional Resources Centre.
UBC Personal Computer Club
APPLE   Meeting:   "Wine   and
Dine with William." Noon, SUB
211.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Noon-hour speaker from Coalition  for  Responsible   Health.
Topic: Bill #34. Noon, SUB 125.
Jewish  Students'  Association/
Hillel
Hebrew  classes.   Noon,   Hillel
House.
Canadian Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War
Talk and slide presentation:
"Living and Working in
Tashkent, USSR: A US
Physician's Personal Expri-
ence? With Dr. Roy and Leigh
Farrell. Dr. Farrell isone of three
Seattle traumatologists who,
with their families, worked and
shared their lives for a month
with their Soviet counterparts.
Graduate Student Society
Masterpieces of Film
With Prof. Joanne Yamaguchi:
"Blue  Velvet" (1986).  8  p.m.,
Fireside Lounge, Grad Centre.
Canadian Professors for Peace in
the Middle East
Lecture: "The New Anti-Semitism in Canada" by Prof Irving
Abella, York University. Noon,
Buchanan A203.
FRIDAY
UBC Sailing Club
Spring Cruise/Deposit due today. Noon, SUB 58.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Brown Bag social: Bring your
lunch; coffee and tea provided.
Noon, SUB 237B.
Muslim Students' Association
Friday   lectures   and   prayers.
Abdel    Latif   Alshafei,    Imam.
Noon, International Mouse.
2/THE UBYSSEY
February 2. 1988 Phallic symbol may soon dominate UBC skyline
wnest colllns architect
UBC to erect
mondo condo
By Katherine Monk
A twenty acre condominium
!   project   may   be   built   on
:   Wesbrook and 16th avenue fol-
!   lowing a board of governors decision to form a UBC owned real
estate company.
The first phase ofthe devel-
I opment calls for the construc-
■ tion of two high rise towers, to be
! followed by a series of town
house complexes, built by the
UBC Real Estate Corporation.
'. The projected development
i would be restricted to non-stu-
I dent, non-faculty housing, said
I   Bruce Gellatly, vice-president of
administration and finance.
i The project will not take
j away from the academic pur-
I poses of the university, Gellatly
|   added.
j Two ways of developing the
: condominium project are under
consideration by the board of
governors.
The first plan would grant
the total control of the development to UBC Real Estate Corporation which would absorb all
the risk as well as profit.
The second plan would involve lower risk long-term leasing of the land to different private developers.
The board has not yet decided which plan to accept, said
Gellatly.
"This (project) is just another thrust for fund-raising?
said Gellatly.
"The funds will go into the
capital and operations of the
university? said Gellatly.
But the original plan called
for the profits to be diverted to
student housing, Mary Flores,
director of student housing,
said.
"As it stands now, I know of
no present plans (for the project)
to subsidize student housing?
said Flores.
"We want to pattern it for
UBC, with student housing
right next door. The development will not be on the Endowment Lands? said Bob Lee,
board of governors appointee,
and president of Prospero International Realty.
Land owners petition
to widen Granville Mall
By Jeff Silverstein
A petition to clean up Granville mall by widening the street
between the 700-900 block will be
submitted to city council tomorrow by a downtown business association.
Wider streets will increase
the value of the land and bring new
development opportunities to
Granville Mall, Peter Busby,
president ofthe Downtown Granville Business Association, said.
"There are plenty of businesses I'd like to drive out. All
survive because of the poor economic health of the street? said
Busby.
But UBC business professor
Michael Goldberg said the problems are economic in nature, and
not with the narrow design of the
street.
Commissioned by the business association back in 1986 to
carry out a study ofthe Granville
street area, Goldberg still stands
by his report opposing the widening ofthe street.
"I can't see any reason in the
world to widen...the mall didn't
create the difficulties that etre
there? said Goldberg.
The mall failed because
Granville street had no anchors of
activity said Goldberg. "All it had
was Pacific Centre Mall in the
centre sucking people off the street
into the mall."
Goldberg said the economic
problems may be changing with
the extension of Pacific Centre
Mall and the new activity starting
up at the south end.
Vancouver city council member Frank Baker also critici zed the
proposal.
"Whether you (widen) or not,
will have a minor impact on the
viability of the street...business
will be about the same, it will
improve access a bit but is it worth
spending $1.5 million dollars?
said Baker.
Baker said traffic has been
allowed in the mall at night to see
if business would pick up. Merchants however, have said business has not improved with the
increased traffic, according to
Baker.
Baker believes the burden of
proof should be on those in favor of
widening. "They may be right but
I just don't see any evidence for it."
George Puil, a council member in favor ofthe proposed widening, thinks the mall has been a
problem since it's conception.
"I've been involved with the
mall for some time and the best
solution is a restoration to it's
original width, a change in the
zoning to allow greater densities,
and a relaxing of height restrictions."
Puil said Baker's support of
the mall may be because Baker
worked for the department of social planning at the time the mall
was built and does not want to be
seen as being part of a failure.
Some merchants have criticized the proposal to remove the
mall saying narrow sidewalks
may create safety hazards.
"The paramount reason not to
widen the street and reduce sidewalk space is to ensure pedestrian
safety during peak hours? said
mall merchant Bob Cole.
The 800 block of Granville
Mall is probably the most congested theatre block in Canada
and sidewalk space is at a premium on many evenings between
7 p.m. and 10 p.m.
It's estimated that up to 8,000
people converge on the area on a
busy night.
But when the vote goes to
council February 3, Busby said by
presenting the petition to council
his group hopes to encourage city
council members to support their
motion.
"We're going to sway the vote
by putting it (the local improvement bylaw) before them?he said.
To qualify for the local improvement petition at least two-
thirds of landowners repesenting
50 per cent of the assessed land
value are required.
City council has carried out
the requests of all local improvement petitions.
"I suspect that right now it's
evenly split...all Cope members
are likely opposed,the swing vote
would be up to (Alderman) Baker
and (Mayor) Campbell? says
Busby.
Baker said he "and the mayor
have taken the position we'd
rather see it the way it is?
"There's no reason a landowner should be able to dictate
what it does to its streets? said
Baker.
10 UBC bus demonstrates affection for narrow Granville Mall street
mandal ngan photo
Public protest routs offending Dragons
The controversial Double Dragon video
machines were removed from SUB Monday
morning after someone protested to the AMS.
A One complaint was received and High
Tech Investment Corp., owner of the machines, decided to remove the machines, said
AMS business manager Charles Redden.
"They were high revenue generators but
there are other popular machines which don't
promote violence against women? said Tim Bird,
AMS director of administration.
"After The Ubyssey article Friday, I thought
that it would be coming before council soon so I
spoke to Charles Redden about it," said Bird;
The offending machines; which depict a
woman being assaulted, were also removed from
BCIT last week after protest by students and
womens groups.
February 2, 1988
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Roundballers   split
with Golden Bears
By Victor Chew Wong
This weekend, Sport B.C.'s
newly honored coach of the year
and the UBC basketball team escaped from Edmonton with a loss
and a win.
UBC head coach Bruce Enns,
who was named coach of the year
Saturday night at the annual B.C.
athlete-of-the year awards, and
the Thunderbirds dropped
Friday's game 83-74 to the Univer-
sity of Alberta, then took
Saturday's thriller, 78-74.
Friday's ioss to the Golden
Bears is most easily explained in
statistical terms: UBC shot a respectable 47 per cent from the field
as a team while the Bears shot an
incredible 68 per cent.
"Other than UVic (two weekends ago) I've never seen anyone
play so wei 1 against us? Enns said.
"They're the best 5-9 team I've
seen in a long time."
UBC's Mike Clarke led all
scorers with a 21 point performance while Alberta's 6'9" rookie
sensation Rick Stanley led the
Bears with 20.
If" Friday was an exercise in
frustration for the 'Birds then
Saturday was an exercise in
perseverence.
Down by a margin of 18-2
early in the game, UBC came back
to take a 41 -39 lead at the half.
With a minute and a half left
in the second half, UBC's Perrie
Scarlett took the reins and guided
the 'Birds down the home stretch.
With the game tied at 72,
Scarlett drove to the basket and
was fouled; he then sank both
bonus free-throws to give the
"Birds a 74-72'lead.
Scarlett then forced a turnover on the next Alberta possession, dribbled the thirty second
clock down to five and drove to the
basket against three defenders to
sink a ten foot jumper.
Scarlett finished the game
with 17 points, while teammate
J.D. Jackson led all scorers with
19.
"It was a tough series and it
was a great win? Enns said.
The 7-5 'Birds host the University of Alberta this weekend at
War Memorial Gym in a game that
■will also be broadcast on CITR.
'JS&'
UBC rugby 'Birds tie-up Vancouver Reps
By Jody Woodland
The Thunderbird rugby team
added a tie to its McKecknie Cup
results Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium, drawing nine-all with
the Vancouver Rugby Union rep
side.
The game was not a spectator
favourite as poor ball handling
and an abundance of kicking left
little to excite the crowd. In ahard,
scrappy game, the 'Birds showed
tremendous heart to hold off a late
Vancouver dri ve and come back to
tie the game
Vancouver scored first on a
penaixv goal by winger Steve Nicol
of th* Kats, Two minutes later,
UBC's .Tohr' Graf missed the first
of six goal kicks that the 'Birds
would miss on the afternoon. The
second miss resulted in UBC's
first points
UBC Atoie the ball from a
Vancouver   'ineout   and   Graf
pushed a drop goal attempt wide to
the right. Evan Scholnick chased
the ball to the back ofthe end zone,
running past a sleeping Vancouver back to touch down for the try.
Graf added the convert and the
"Birds led 6-3 at the half.
Early in the second half, a
UBC penalty gave Vancouver a
scrum close to the UBC line.
Vancouver's huge pack gave
scrum-half Ian Stuart a pushover
try. Nicol tacked on the convert.
The game degenerated into a
schoolyard scrap for the next 30
minutes. Repetitive kicking,
sloppy handling and a barrage of
whistles dragged play to a crawl.
The 'Birds made up for earlier
transgressions with a four minute
goal-line stand at the end of the
game. After clearing the ball, UBC
pushed up the field and earned a
penalty kick from Vancouver's 22.
Graf hit on this one to give UBC
the tie.
The 'Birds nearly scored
again when Roy Radu, UBC's top
player ofthe game, blocked a drop
goal attempt, recovered the ball,
ran upfield and kicked into the end
zone where a Vancouver player
recovered the ball.
"The key to the game was
controlling Stuart (a World Cup
scrum half), and we did a fabulous
job," said coach Barry Legh. "I still
think the 'Birds are a better side
and we can win next week."
The UBC Braves went down
21-13 to the Vancouver Under-23
team while the UBC Frosh lost 21 -
0 to the Vancouver Under-19 side.
The UBC teams complete
their home and away series with
Vancouver next Saturday. The
'Birds play at 2:30 at Brockton
Oval in Stanley Park.
Ski 'Birds finish first
This weekend the UBC ski
team continued to dominate the
slopes. Highlights included wins
by Anne Taciuk in the women's
giant slalom and by Sean Jaegli in
the men's giant slalom.
Both Taciuk and Jaegli finished first in the regional point
standings and helped their respective teams finish with a number
one ranking for the region.
UBC also dominated the nordic events with Terry Delong taking the 15 kilometre open. The
men's team captured the overall
nordic title.
'Birds split four
In men's volleyball action this
weekend at the University of Leth -
bridge, UBC won two games and
dropped a pair.
The 'Birds defeated both Lethbridge and the University of Alberta by the same 3-0 margin.
UBC lost to the University of Saskatchewan by that same 3-0 score
and to the University of Calgary in
five games, 3-2.
After the weekend competition the 3-5 'Birds sit in fourth
place in the Canada West stand
ings behind Saskatchewan, Calgary, and the University of Victoria.
Hoopsters lose two
This weekend the UBC
women's basketball team dropped
two games to the University of
Alberta in Edmonton.
The 'Birds lost a hard-fought
battle Friday night, 55-54, then
were thumped 74-45 on Saturday.
The pair of losses drops UBC's
record to 2-12. In order to qualify
for the Canada West play-offs
UBC must win four of their six
remaining games.
OMBUDSOFFICE
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4/THE UBYSSEY
February 2, 1988 Volley-Birds third
Women's team wins two and loses two
By Franka C-von Specht
The women's UBC volleyball
team finished third with a two
win, two loss record at a Canada
West tournament hosted by the
University of Lethbridge this
weekend.
The Thunderbirds, ranked
eighth nationally, opened the
weekend against the University of
Saskatchewan losing a hard
fought battle, 12-15,12-15,15-12,
15-8,17-15.
"It was a dog fight to the end
(with) a much improved Saskatchewan team? UBC head
coach Donna Baydock said.
"We don't have the big gunners like the other teams. Our
game depends on our fast offensive
and when the games go to five,
fatigue sets in and we lose some
vertical (in jumping)? she added.
In Friday's second game the
Thunderbirds found winning form
against the University of Lethbridge downing them in four games,
15-1,10-15,15-6,15-1.
Anne Taciuk showing winning form at White Pass, Washington, in Ski 'Birds action this weekend.
Ice 'Birds nip Cougars
By Sean McLaughlin
The UBC ice hockey team dug
their talons into the Regina Cougars in Regina last weekend and
returned to their Point Grey nest
with a win and a tie.
The "Birds won by a beak, 7-5
Friday and played the Cougars to
a 4-4 draw Saturday Both games
were settled m overtime.
In CIAU regular season play
tie games are settled by a 10 minute overtime period which excludes sudden death
In Friday's 7-5 victory the
'Birds fell behind 3-0?but rallied to
tie the game 5-5 before the green
light indicated ;he end of regulation time.
Scott Fearns was the hero
Friday as he snapped in the over
time winner and added a late insurance goal into an empty Regina
net.
The 'Birds power play connected on 2 of 5 opportunities Friday and went 1 for 5 Saturday.
"We work on our power play
three times a week? said coach
Terry O'Malley. "It has been clicking about 30 per cent of the time
lately?
A power play percentage of 30
is better than the success rate of
most NHL teams.
In Saturday's rematch the
bellicose "Birds battled their way
to an early 3-1 lead before the
Cougars bounced back to tie the
score late in the second stanza.
The two teams exchanged
goals in the third period setting
the stage for overtime.
O'Malley's 'Birds dominated
the extra period outshooting Regina 8-2, but the Cougars goalkeeper stymied the 'Birds.
Goalscorers for the 'Birds
were Toshi Sakai, Kevin Griffen,
Charles Cooper and Grsint Del-
court.
The 'Birds remain 9 points
behind the Manitoba Bisons in the
race for the last play-off spot in the
Canada West division. Both
teams have 6 games left in their
regular season schedules.
"We played good tight checking hockey with some exciting end
to end play as well? said O'Malley.
The 'Birds are at home to the
Lethbridge Pronghorns this Saturday and Sunday.
UBC carried their momentum to Saturday morning in a five
game victory over the University
of Alberta, 15-4,16-14,13-15,14-
16,15-7.
But UBC suffered a disappointing straight games (15-1,15-
12,15-11) loss against the seventh
ranked University of Calgary.
The 'Birds tied with Saskatchewan for third place behind
first place University of Victoria
and second place Calgary.
Leading the team with her
consistency this weekend was
'Birds power hitter Sonya
Wachowski with 39 kills, 18 stuff-
blocks and five service aces.
UBC power hitter Mikki Mallette collected 46 kills and middle
hitter Trina Hewlett also had
strong games as she struck for 40
kills and posted 13 stuff-blocks.
The Thunderbirds return to
action next weekend on the road
against Saskatchewan and Alberta.
POSTERS
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FOR   YOUR
VALENTINE!
ffllgyg AWARDS
WILLIAM G. BLACK
MEMORIAL PRIZE
William G. Black Memorial Prize - a prize in the amount of approximately $1,600 has
been made available by the late Dr. William G. Black. The topic for the essay will be
designed to attract students from all disciplines. The competition is open to students
who are enrolled in undergraduate programs and who do not already possess a graduate
degree.   A single topic of general nature related to Canadian citizenship will be
presented to students at the time ofthe competition. Duration ofthe competition will
be two hours. Candidates should bring their student card forid.ntification.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1988
10:00 A.M. -12 NOON        BUCHANAN 104
-y    Awards & Financial Aid » Rm 50 Gen. Services Admin. Bldg. Ph. 228-5111     _>
LoAffrX ****/
3:30 foAK-
sub mtk
Oooooops!
In the Ubyssey's election coverage, director of finance candidate Mike Fahy was incorrectly
quoted as saying "decisions over
$8,000 have to go through council". Fahy was referring to 20 per
cent of the AMS budget —
roughly $800,000. Fahy was
also misquoted as saying he was
not in favour ofthe AMS being in
charge of intramurals. The person responsible ha;, been hired
by the National Enquire1*.
GOING FOR AN MBA YOU CAN BANK ON?
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all part of our commitment to the education
and development of the young business
people who will shape our country's future.
Scotiabank awards two scholarships
annually at both Dalhousie and McGill
Universities. Each Scotiabank Scholar will
receive $12,500 per year and will also
be offered a position of employment with
Scotiabank between academic years.
Applicants should be under 28 years
of age on September 1st, 1988. anc! must
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Students must also complete an application
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For more information, w; ,'ic -o your
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February 2, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 _?§SK
Fee increases
favour the rich
Something is seriously wrong with UBC's
education system. Tuition fees have risen 312 per
cent since 1980. In 1980,15 units of arts courses
cost $630. Engineering courses cost $792 in the
same year. Today the same education costs $1,400
and $1,785 respectively.
Our administrators, president Strangway,
and director of awards and financial aid Byron
Hender, keep telling the students that accessibility is not a problem. Look at how many students
want to enter the university, they say, so obviously the loan programmes and bursaries are
working.
What shit! BC is full of students who want to
come to UBC straight from high school. These
people face student loan restrictions, have summer jobs paying $6 an hour and for the most part
are expected to travel from the interior to the
mainland and consequently cannot live at home.
These are the students who will never be.
These are the students who have better than
average marks, but trapped by lack of funds are
denied higher education. Here at UBC we are
pricing ourselves out of the education
marketplace. Slowly but surely, UBC is becoming a place for the lower mainland's rich kids.
The loss, of course, will be society's. We who
pride ourselves on living in a "democratic" society
fail to see the connection between knowledge and
power. Knowledge means each person having the
tools to decide what is right for themselves and the
world they live in.
Denying the right to higher education means
we want a world where no one asks questions,
where those who control the strings will continue
to hold sway, feathering their nest at the expense
of others. Those who are cut off from higher education will be cut off from the means to change this
system. The cycle of rich parents, educated offspring, rich parents will continue.
Obviously this is the type of society UBC's
administrators want. President Strangway's
comment, "it is up to society to decide what costs
students will pay (for their education)" is an insult
and a cop-out. He, more than most, knows the
value of a higher education. He knows that society
as well as the individual benefits from every dollar
spent on higher education. Instead of fighting for
increased funding, Strangway buries his head in
the sand and hopes someone else will take responsibility for the lack of quality education in this
province. What shit!
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 19,1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily
those ofthe university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University
Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe Student
Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-
2301/228-2305;  advertising, 228-3977.
Laura Busheikin lounged listlesly on the couch. With elections
over, what theme might there be for a meaningful masthead?
"Alliteration and assonance aren't appealling anymore," she
wailed. "How about noses?" suggested Franka Cordua Von Specht.
"Can a nose be new6?" asked Peter Francis sceptically. "Who
knows?" shrugged R.D. Shore. "NOH! What you need is not a facial
c*rgan, especially one with two orifices," said Victor Chew Wong.
"What you need," said Alex Johnson, "is a master plan, an overwhelming idea, a grand, organizing theme." "Yeah, like a kind of
zen of masthead writing," enthused Steve Chan. He joined hands
with Jody Woodland, Elynn Richter and Sean Jaegli and they
began chanting: "masty-headna, masty-headna, headna-masty,
headna-masty, headna-mast-mast, masty-headna..." Chris Wies-
inger kicked them all aside. "Kill the poor and feed them to the
hungry," he growled hungrily. Sean McLaughlin muzzled Chris
and tied him to Corinne Bjorge's desk. Deanne Fisher and
Katherine Monk, in the meantime, were howling at the moon from
the balcony. They howled out their pain, they howled out their
dreams, they howled out their fears .they howled out their demons,
they howled so long and so loud that Jeff Silverstein ran outside
and threatened them with a rolled up newspaper. "Cool it," said
Derek Craig, "Laura's trying to write a masthead, and she's trying
to 6ay something meaningful." "Meaning???" cried Mandel Ngan
and Steve Scrimshaw, "Don't you know that 'meaning' is only a
crutch for the cowardly imagination?" Ross McLaren gasped; took
a deep breath and jumped into the whirling void of meaningless-
ness, never to be seen again.
city desk:
feature*:
entertainment:
■porta:
Corinne Bjorge
Ross McLaren
Laura Busheikin
Victor Chew Wong
CQNAom-AnEZicM ffEurnoAJs-'
Letters
Cruise critics
critiqued
When D.J. O'Donnell
complains that sovereignty
is not formal, she must explain what formality is and
why she opposes it. So far, a
formal concept is simply one
that is clear and allows relevant distinctions. Rejecting
formality is rejecting clarity.
Whether people "don't
want those missiles" is irrelevant to any concept of
sovereignty, formal or not.
In general, arguments resting on public opinion are
always vulnerable to change
in public opinion. Will she
embrace missile tests if the
fickle public does so?
Her own view of sovereignty is so broad as to prevent relevant distinctions.
All countries, not just Canada, will lack sovereignty,
since all countries will find
"crucial questions" left in
"the hands of the Pentagon
and Kremlin generals." Her
concept is worse than formal: it proves too much. On
her concept, no one has had
sovereignty since the late
1940's. Why worry?
If Dave Osborne imagines a difference between
political sovereignty and
constitutional pseudo-sovereignty, he too must explain. I see no relevant difference. What else can political sovereignty be but
legal sovereignty? My
simple test applies to both.
Dave can't decide on his
criticisms. First, for no reason, he doubts the cruise
missile's "supposed capability". But then he describes
that very capability. Itis, he
says, "easy to produce" and
"accurate within a few
metres? Exactly. What
more capability can he
want?
Ironically, his description of American cruise missiles makes them look exactly like Soviet cruise missiles, which provoke him to
now cry that they too are
"destabilizing". Why are
only American weapons
always described this way?
But, since judgements of
what is destabilizing are
always made ad hoc, his cry
is, as he says, "not necessarily convincing."
The rhetorical questions Dave piles up are
worse than arguable; each is
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300
words in length. Content which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not
be published. Please be concise. Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey
policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring them, with
identification, to SUB 241k.  Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
University's weakening force
endangers democracy
What an age we live
in. HBO, Mac Tonight,
fashion trends to follow,
individual expression
through the democratic
process - who could ask
for more? Certainly our
personal responsibility
extends no further than
fulfilling all of our potential within this tightly
knit circle of plenty.
Talking with a friend the
other night, we came to
the conclusion that
Mother Theresa represents a modern day ideal.
The university, as an
intellectual centre, can
and should do something
to live up to this ideal.
The food bank would be a
good start (a note for Mr.
Bird).
With some organization, the three universities could wield a lot
more power at the provincial level than they
presently do. You just
don't look at university
administrators as fearless leaders. They are
'the man'just as much as
any institutional repre
sentative alive today. Arguably, the university has
the knowledge (God knows
it should have the incentive!) to affect positive
change in this society.
Don't get me wrong, we are
still getting 'educated', but
the 'product* turned out
today is of a somewhat
strange cast(e). As the university, as an autonomous
intellectual force, is slowly,
inexorably quashed under
the heel of ever-tightening
administrative policy, itself the toady of government/big business interests, we shall find the nature of higher education
radically changed.
Damn right it should
be changed. More autonomy! More respect for the
one institution that has any
chance of leading society
out ofthe morass in which it
is embedded. Be critical
folks. All too soon you'll be
sucking Big Brother's butt
or you'll be shipped elsewhere.
W. Douglas Willoughby
Philosophy 4
wrong on the facts. Thus,
Russian obsession with invasion is not "historically
justified". Since the invasions of Finland, Estonia,
Latvia, Lithania, Poland
and Bulgaria, Russia has
been the world's greatest
land-grabber. In World
War One, Russia was first
to declare general mobilization and struck first
against Austria.
In Paul Dayson's subjective opinion, there is a
difference between defensive weapons and first-
strike   weapons.      Paul's
forced distinction is as artificial as Dave's. All weapons
are first strike: in appropriate circumstances, all weapons can be used first. Likewise, all weapons are second-
strike: in other circumstances, all weapons can be
used second. The purely defensive weapon, the only
kind he approves, is a chimera. Whether a weapon is
first-stike depends entirely
on human choice, never on
design of inanimate machinery.
Greg Lanning
Lawl
Anonymous reader rags on rag
iS Bush.
iTisiEaQijAia^r
l£IS poor
ENTERTAINMENT
WW
3 An. BHNG. 8B0nCHMiGm
Abortion decision dismays
In applauding the recent decision by the Supreme Court of Canada in
favour of private abortion
clinics, "pro-choice" proponents are making one vital
mistake in logic. You
write, "women have been
denied the freedom to
choose what happens to
their bodies" (Jan. 29 editorial). This is not so.
Women have the ultimate
freedom to choose what
happens to their bodies -
they have the choice never
; to get pregnant. Whether
they do this by refraining
from sex or with birth control, it is still their choice.
If, however, in their
pursuit of pleasure, they
are careless and negligent,
they must suffer the consequences. Once conceived,
the child too has the right
to life. The mother and
father must bear the consequences of their irresponsibility, not the child. If they
do not want, or cannot afford, to keep the child,
there are thousands of
people waiting to adopt
children.
It is a thing to be regretted that the Supreme
Court has decided that a
woman's pursuit of pleasure i s more important than
her child's fife, especially
when she can avoid the
conception so easily if she
takes the proper precautions. By freeing the process of abortion, irresponsibility ofthe individual has
been sanctioned as well as
the killing of innocent fetuses.
Pamela Taylor
Graduate Studies
Our reasoning has
been met with stopped ears
and willfully perverted attitudes. When persecuted
with the "legal" sanction to
destroy, crowds throb with
the kneejerk pleasure of
unfettered expediency.
The law conveys naught
but popular consensus, in
this case the lowest common denominator of societal conviction. Ifthislawis
intended to delight women
or Canadians generally, I
am ashamed to be either.
Anya Hageman
Campus Pro-life
YOU need to aMM npyy or fold.
yoill* content is of   No ma to
Mainstream school COMMamTy
AMS
censorship
blasted
Congratulations to the
AMS for finally doing something important. Theyhave
struck the first blow to destroying society's primitive
views of women. Removing
Double Dragon from SUB
should be seen as the first
brave step.
May I also suggest that
the AMS censorship
committee now examine the
contents of UBC libraries. I
am sure it contains many
books which portray not
only women in a poor manner, but also Jews, Blacks,
children, natives, and many
other groups.
I know that I would
sleep much better if the
University population were
not exposed to that sort of
information. After all, we
are obviously not mature
enough to decide for ourselves.
Kevin Kriese
Forestry 4
6/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1988 Proletariat might not mind
cruise, suggests reader
In her "Protest Cruise" letter,
where she so eloquently expounded the evils of the cruise
missile, Dorothy-Jean O'Donnel
has once again dredged up the
outworn cliches of the far left.
She claims that the U.S. Air
Force is testing the cruise in Canada "despite the people's opposition." If this is so, then where are
these people? From personal experience, I know that her "traditional" anti-cruise protests, organized by the People's Front and the
Marxist-Leninists at Robson
Square, usually attract about 50
people, at best, and I had to look
very hard to count seven in the
picture on the front of Friday's
Ubyssey. Why is this so?
Well, it could be that the
people of the Lower Mainland (of
whom there are 1 million, give or
take a few) are too exhausted to
turn out for a protest rally on a
Saturday after a hard week of
having their labour exploited by
their capitalist oppressors, or perhaps it is because they don't think
that testing the cruise missile in
Canada is such a bad idea.
I would guess the latter more
likely to be the case.
K. Robert Blazek
Applied Science 3
Objectivist objects to attitude
that objectivity is 'myth'
"It's been pretty well proven
that there is no such thing as objectivity—only different patterns of subjectivism? said a
speaker to a receptive American
convention of newspaper editors. The Ubyssey version of
this was "objectivity is the first
myth of journalism."
These ideas are regurgitated by journalists when required to ward off the demands
of still common-sensed readers.
There is no way to argue
against the possibility of objectivity. The idea that objectivity
is impossible, were it true,
would become a mere subjective
feeling. All argument and proof
presupposes something to relie
these on—an objective reality
independent of the perceiver's
consciousness. The task of any
observer is to discern what the
facts are; this is not an easy
task—which is why objectivity
is often despised.
Those who sneer at objectivity are nakedly confessing
their inability (or unwillingness) to focus on and choose
among facts. Assaults on objectivity are a scapegoats for the
clash between the randomly
chosen contents of one's mind
and the facts which it avoids discovering.
Being objective must mean
being dispassionate or disinterested about that which one observes, some claim; why? Because they cannot conceive of
knowledge and values as being
objective. To be biased is to have
knowledge and convictions,
they imply. Since only a baby or
a mindless monster could be
objective in that sense, they
conclude that objectivity is a
myth.
What is then offered to replace the method of objectivity?
The method of being "fair." How
is one then to judge fairness? By
the standard of egalitarianism
of biases. If the "commercial"
press is biased for "free trade" or
big businness, as is claimed,
then that sets the task of alternative press: to be biased
against them. When their feelings clash with prevalent ones,
they become spokesmen for "the
voices which mainstream ignores" — as an end in itself.
What is the alternative to
all of this? Judge and be prepared to be judged. Base your
judgements on facts, as interpreted by your convictions derived from other facts.
Stephan Weaver
Engineering 4
Ayn Rand Club
Longley demands action of AMS
The in-coming AMS executive
should be openly asked whether a
motion that has been passed by
students council will continue to
be vetoed. This motion was passed
onNovermber27th, 1985. Itread,
"That AMS student council endorse the contributors choice concept and set up a committee to help
promote this programme?
This motion was never acted
on, but it's having been ignored by
old executives, after having been
passed by the AMS student council, does not justify new members
of the AMS executive continuing
to ignore this resolution.
I will briefly review the progress that has been made on this
idea in order to indicate why it is
important for AMS executives to
implement. In 1985, 1986 and
1987,1 created my own bursaries.
Rather than pay my tuition fees
directly, I gave the money to my
mother, who then donated the
money to a registered political
party, which then, as the party,
paid my fees to UBC. My mother
was then able to claim a $500 federal political contribution tax
credit, which she generously
shared with me.
Each one of these steps is
pefectly legal, and therefore the
entire transaction is completely
legal. Elections Canada agrees
that there is no law against this
arrangement, and Revenue Canada, fully informed of all the facts,
has not challenged it.
If I can get away with making
my own bursaries, then other students can too! This is the programme that the AMS voted to set
up a committee to help promote.
This is the programme that a few
members of the AMS executive
had ignored, and thereby kept
thousands of UBC students ignorant of their opportunity.
Since 98 per cent of tax payers
ordinarily do not contribute to any
political parties, and since there is
an equal $500 provincial tax credit
for political contributions, by
making tuition fee payment into a
registered political activity, the
vast majority of students could in
fact create their own $1,000 bursary for every, or from every, person amongst their friends or family members who have a taxable
income. After having successfully
done this for myself for three years
in a row, no one has the right to tell
me it can not be done!
I ask the AMS executive,
which is currently going to be
elected, will you finally respect
and implement coucil's motion to
endorse and promote the
contributor's choice concept? Will
you do everything in your power to
help students make more of their
own bursaries?
Will the new AMS executive
pay attention? Will it act?
Blair T. Longley
APPLICATION FOR
GRADUATION
Application for graduation cards have been mailed to students registered in the graduating year of the degree programs: B.A., B.F. A., B.Mus., B.Comm., B.Ed., B.P.E., B.R.E.
and B.Sc. All students who expect to graduate this MAY (spring), should complete and
return both cards to the Registrar's Office NO LATER THAN FEBRUARY 15. 1988.
Students in the graduating year of these programs who have not received cards in the mail
should check with the Registrar's Office (by phone at 228-4455) that his/her local mailing
address is correct.
Students in Applied Science, Graduate Studies or diploma programs should obtain
"Application for Graduation" cards from their departments, while those in the remaining
degree programs should obtain applications from the Dean's or Director's Office of their
Faculty or School. Applications are also available in the Office of the Registrar.
PLEASE NOTE: EVERY STUDENT WHO EXPECTS TO GRADUATE MUST
MAKE APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION, ANY STUDENT
WHO DOES NOT APPLY IS INELIGIBLE TO GRADUATE.
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Hens not in stock may be purchased at sale price if paid in full on Staedtler Day.
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BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
February 2, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 Funding parity urged
Women's group wants fair play in athletic budget
By Ross McLaren
UBC administration should
address unequal funding for men's
and women's athletics according
to a newly formed women's ad hoc
alliance on campus.
Women's athletics should get
"equitable" funding because "students pay equal sums (to athletics)
and there is almost as many
women as men students? said
Jean Elder, chair of Status of
Women.
Presently, $173,085 is given
to the women's athletics program,
while the men's program receives
$321,600, notincluding staff costs.
Hockey and football account for
about $86,900 and $72,300 respectively of the men's athletics fund.
Thelma Sharp-Cook, chair of
the women's athletic committee,
said there has "clearly not been
equity (in funding) in the last ten
years?
"If you remove football and
hockey, the expensive sports, the
other sports are almost at an equal
funding level. But women do not
participate (in varsity hockey and
football)? Cook said.
But Joanne Jones, UBC's
women's athletic director, said
women's athletics is not being discriminated against.
"There appears to be an inequity but you have to look at all the
factors. There is not a lot of women
coaches at UBC because coaches
are usually involved as players
and then move up (to coaching)?
Jones said. "Since soccer is a new
sport for women, there is not a lot
of players to draw on."
The operational budgets (of
men's and women's athletics) are
the same except the men have a
football and hockey team, Jones
said.
Jones said male coaches earn
more than female coaches but said
the difference can be attributed to
experience.
"Women coaches are new positions at university. There is a
difference in salaries because
male coaches might have more
years of experience? Jones said.
People who think women's
athletics is discriminated against
may not be looking deeply at the
question, she said.
"I'm not saying it is a false
concern but these people are not
educated in what our concerns
are? Jones said.
K.D. Srivastava, chair of this
summer's athletic review committee, said as demand for women's
programs increases, funding
should increase as well.
But Srivastava said the university should decide whether to
separate hockey and football from
general funds.
Dueck defends Socred stand
from page 1
tions would not be included.
A coalition of pro-choice
groups aims to open a free-standing abortion clinic in Vancouver,
"as soon as the building is ready
and the staff are in place? according to spokesperson, Pat Brighouse.
The B.C. Coalition for Abortion Clinics intends to challenge
the Socred government in the
Supreme Court if they deny payment for abortion services by a
doctor with a billing number under the Medical Services Plan.
On Jan. 28, Brighouse said
the coalition "gives (Dueck) 24
hours to reverse the decision or
resign."
"Their personal and religious
views have interfered with their
ability to act as competent legislators? she told a press conference.
Attorney   General   Brian
Smith denied accusations his government is trying to work around
the Supreme Court decision.
"We are not trying to get
around the (ruling)? he said at a
press conference January 28 with
Dueck, "it's using spending power
instead of criminal law, and it's
very up front."
Dueck said he will leave it to
existing hospital therapeutic
abortion committees to devise a
structure to approve "medically
required" abortions covered under
the MSP.
A doctor can now bill the
health ministry $106 for an abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy, and $175 for one after 14
weeks.
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By-toe end of the semester, Mayn*rcte
dirty laundry had +aken on a life of its own.
Ubyssey staffers: voting for
Production Editor is taking
place today through Thursday. Results of screenings
are posted in the office.
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8/THE UBYSSEY
February 2.1988

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