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The Ubyssey Feb 20, 1975

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Array 'UBC bursar breaks rules'
Vol. LVI, No. 52     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1975
48
228-2301
—kini mcdonald
MYSTERIOUS ENGLISH FOG crept on to campus Wednesday and shrouded bell tower in its invisible
blanket. UBC administration denied it was symbol of enlightenment of university but students in other
quarters had different opinion. Despite English-like scene, fish and chips in food services were still bad.
By MARK BUCKSHON
UBC's bursar and deputy president's release of UBC budget requests
Feb. 7 was a breach of a board of governors confidence, a board
member said Wednesday.
Svend Robinson said Bill White didn't have the board's authorization
when he released figures showing the administration wants a total of
$117.5 million in operating and capital grants for next year.
White declined when he released the figures to discuss exactly what
the university wants the money for, saying he would break a board
confidence by providing any detailed breakdown of the requests.
White repeated his statements in
an interview Wednesday. "I had
given as much as I was at liberty to
give," he said.
But Robinson said White's
decision to provide the general
figures, which show the administration wants a $99.5 million
operating grant and $18 million
capital grant, was also without the
board's authorization.
Robinson's statements were
brought to White's attention in a
second interview Wednesday.
White declined comment about his
disclosures except to say: "I'm not
going to talk to you. I'm going to
talk it (disclosures) over with the
board first."
An agitated administration
public relations officer Wednesday
denied involvement in White's
disclosure. "They (reporters) got
it all from White," he said. "He
gave him (a reporter) the figures,"
he said.
Robinson said he and other new
board members were given the
information when they joined the
board in January but were explicitly instructed not to release
any figures.
He said he was surprised to read
White's disclosure in a newspaper.
"He sure as hell didn't speak to me
to get permission," said Robinson.
Several board members interviewed Wednesday said they
see little reason to keep details
about UBC's budget requests
secret and would approve
disclosure at the next board
meeting in March.
"I can't see any reason (for not
disclosing the requests) only it
should not come out only by
myself," said Robinson.
"The only possible thing that
could cause a problem in the
(budget) submissions is for salary
negotiations," he said.
"The staff and so on should be
entitled to any information the
board gets, but there is a difference between the ideal and
reality."
Robinson said he thinks some
high paid faculty and union employees could use budget information to set unrealistic
demands and the university would
have serious problems meeting
them if,, as usual, the budget
requests are greater than actual
grants.
Board member Ken Andrews
partly agreed with Robinson, even
though he is also president of and
negotiator for UBC's Canadian
Union of Public Employees local.
"The disclosure of the figures
would not affect CUPE's
negotiations," he said. "I do agree
in part that they could, but they
would not."
Robinson and Andrews said
wage negotiations would not affect
capital budget requests but
declined to release them until the
board meets next month.
Board chairman Thomas Dohm
disagreed with Robinson and
Andrews that any figures should be
released. Dohm said secrecy has
"always been the practice as long
as I've been on the board at UBC."
He said premature disclosure
might embarrass the government
which would be in an awkward
position if it wanted to trim the
budget to a large extent. He said
the premier and cabinet "might
get their back up" and decide to
cut extra money from university
budgets.
Dohm said he would be extremely annoyed at any board
member who released figures
without the board's approval but
said White's disclosures didn't do
"so much harm" and could be
justified.
9
LG strike to escalate
Striking CKLG workers will ask
Friday for B.C. Federation of
Labor assistance to escalate their
strike in light of "specious"
management proposals made in
recent "behind the scenes" talks, a
union spokesman said Wednesday.
Ed Mitchell, Canadian Union of
Public Employees local 686
president, declined to specify the
proposals but admitted a
federation "hot" declaration of the
station is a possibility.
Mitchell said recent negotiations
between CUPE lawyer Ray
Mercer and management representatives produced CKLG
proposals for lower wages, an open
Passed credits count in faiied year
By SUE VOHANKA
Senate voted Wednesday to grant
credit for any course successfully
completed even if students pass
only one course.
The resolution will apply to the
science and arts faculties beginning within the current session and
will be applicable to earlier
sessions on appeal to the dean.
Senate asked other faculties to
inform senate of the advisability of
applying the same principle to
them.
Previously, credit for courses
passed in a failed year has been
denied. A failed year is one where a
student has taken a program of
more than six units and passed less
than 60 per cent of courses, or
taken six or fewer units and passed
in less than 50 per cent.
Fail   standing   will   still   be
assigned prohibiting students from
returning to the university the
following year unless granted
special permission.
Senate also approved a
recommendation allowing individual faculties to decide
whether or not students have an
adequate command of written
English.
The decision also requires
students entering UBC for their
first year to write a diagnostic
English composition test, but
exempts transfer students from
other universities from the test.
In its January meeting senate
approved a non-credit English
composition workshop in the arts
faculty, compulsory for all
students failing the diagnostic test.
The two hour per week workshop
must be taken consecutively with,
and successfully completed, before
credit is granted for English 100.
Currently, English 100 students
failing the diagnostic test given at
the beginning of the academic
term take a special English 100
section which does not entail extra
class hours.
However, the arts faculty
wanted to administer the test to all
students entering UBC for the first
time even if they have received
credit for the equivalent of English
100 elsewhere.   -
Senate's admissions committee
instead recommended students
transferring to a faculty or school
other than the arts faculty having
completed the equivalent of
English 100 elsewhere not be
examined by the arts faculty.
The committee suggested these
students could be required to enrol
in the composition workshop if
their own faculties find them to
have an inadequate command of
English.
But the committee did not
specify how individual faculties
will determine the competency of
students in written English.
"I think it's necessary to have
this and support the action the
See page 2: ENGLISH
shop and a company sick leave
plan financed by workers.
He said the union offered to go
along with the company's sick
leave plan provided it paid the full
cost. This counterproposal was
rejected by the company Wednesday.
Mitchell also said station
manager Don Hamilton appears to
have been left out of the
negotiations.
"The word (rejecting the CUPE
proposal) came from Moffat board
chairman Ron Mitchell," he said.
Moffat Broadcasting is the
Toronto-based corporation which
owns CKLG and a number of other
radio stations.
"They really want to stop it
(unionization)," he said. "It's all
part of their stalling plan.
Mitchell said Moffat is worried
that if the CKLG workers win a
first contract, workers at other
stations will soon follow.
And Moffat is right, he said. "If
this station goes, we (CUPE) will
start on another tomorrow."
The federation has stated it will
not take any action against CKLG
unless requested to do so by the
strikers.
Scarcity not issue
The world food crisis is perpetrated by blackmarket profiteering,
government ineptitude, multinational corporate rip-offs and affluent
western nations' arrogance and ignorance.
But not necessarily scarcity of food.
So finds Ubyssey reporter Terry Donaldson in the first of a four-part
series on the world food crisis. The series begins today on page 12. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 20, 1975
By 5-foof fence
Data centre outlined
By RALPH MAURER
A five-foot-high fence outlining
the proposed library processing
centre site has been erected in an
effort to mobilize student opposition to the plan.
The fence closes off access to two
walkways leading from SUB and
the parking area behind Brock Hall
to the southwest corner of Brock,
forcing people to walk around the
proposed building site.
Ron Walls, science rep on Alma
Mater Society council and member
of the planning and co-ordinating
committee for the building, said
Wednesday the fence was the last
chance to get input into the matter
from students.
Walls has opposed building the
centre at the proposed site south of
Brock Hall.
The site was approved by the
planning and co-ordinating
committee in October, but senate
told the committee to study
alternatives  after  receiving a
letter from AMS council criticizing
the method by which the decision
was reached.
Walls said the matter of the site
would have been settled then if the
AMS hadn't sent the letter.
Alternatives being studied by the
committee are: moving the site
closer to Brock, moving it east of
Brock, renovating Brock, building
an addition to the main library,
renovating the main library and
building a combined processing
centre and bookstore on SUB
property between SUB and the
main library.
Walls said committee members
agreed building the centre outside
of the university's core area was
out of the question because of
prohibitive costs.
The committee is currently
studying these alternatives with 17
criteria in mind, including
proximity to ' the main library,
suitability for use, location relative
English declines
From page 1
faculty of arts has taken,"
academic planning director Robert
Clark said. "The quality of English
in students coming to the
university has declined."
Economics professor Gideon
Rosenbluth said: "What's at stake
here in the conflict of policies is the
autonomy of faculties."
Rosenbluth said the recommendation gives each faculty the
freedom to tolerate illiteracy on
the part of its students. "I don't
think that's a freedom we want to
give to professional faculties," he
said.
English professor Ian Ross said
the general point of the recommendation is to emphasize the
problems of illiteracy.
Ross said he didn't think the
university should be in the position
of suspecting standards at other
institutions, and it's only sensible
for    faculties    to    recommend
Council
cancelled
Wednesday night's Alma Mater
Society council meeting was
cancelled when less than the 21
councillors required for a quorum
attended.
Only 16 council members showed
up.
I —
students take the composition
course.
However, commerce dean Noel
Hall said: "There's something
wrong here. Someone is falling
down on the job and it must be the
faculty of arts and the English
department."
Hall said he would not want his
faculty to decide a student's
competence in writing English.
"The standard must surely be
applied by the appropriate
faculty," he said.
English professor Kay
Stockholder said she thinks it's a
bad idea for the workshop to be
compulsory in the first place. She
said the diagnostic exam is a good
idea but is not 100 per cent reliable.
Stockholder said if the workshop
was optional "attitudes would be
much more positive and students
much more likely to learn
something. I very much object to it
being required," she said.
In other business, senate heard a
report from its ad-hoc committee
on extracurricular activities.
Committee chairwoman Carole
Soong said the committee has met
almost 30 times since January,
1973.
The committee report contained
several recommendations, including a proposal that senate
establish a standing committee on
extracurricular activities.
Senate voted to table the report
until its March meeting.
LECTURE
"DECISIONS WITHOUT GUILT"
Well-known Author and Lecturer
DR. ABE LEVITSKY
Discusses how to meet and solve conflict between actual demands
of your present situation and your past training. Dr. Levitsky,
who co-authored a book with Fritz Perls ("The Rules and Games
of Gestalt Therapy"), is currently involved with integrating
gestalt and hypnosis.
February 21, 1975 8:00 P.M.
COLD MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE
684-5355
COLLINS RACQUET INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMME
OFFERS
FREE TENNIS LESSONS
Sat. March 1 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Sun. March 9 - 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Sat. March 15 - 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
IN THE ARMOURY
For Further Information 228-2767
to buildings and thoroughfares,
technical feasibility, conformity
with building codes, obstruction of
traffic, campus politics,
displacement of occupants and
student opinion.
Walls said a sub-committee has
been appointed to decide the
relative weight each criterion
should have in reaching a final
decision on a site.
He said the purpose of the fence
is to determine students' opinions
on the centre.
"If students don't mind it, don't
mind walking around the fence, I
can no longer go to that committee
and say student opposition has to
be a major consideration, as I have
been," he said.
He said it was important that
people don't simply grumble at
having to walk the extra distance
around the structure, but they
should complain to physical plant
head Neville Smith.
"It's not hard," he said. "All you
have to do is write your complaint
down and send it to Neville Smith,
physical plant. You don't even
have to buy a stamp, just address it
and throw it in the campus mail."
He said student feedback is
important because "in terms of
virtually everything else, that's the
ideal site."
frWff^Wre^W^H^^^a^^aa^
GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Call for Nominations:
PRESIDENT
2 AMS GRAD REPS
ASSEMBLY COORDINATOR
SECRETARY
Nominations Close at Graduate Student
Centre Office, 5 p.m. Friday 28th Feb.
Election will be held Friday, March 7.
'-:.2«Z i'Z^^^f^
*•:-;$?'
Something io"cheers"abouf:
Now the glorious beer of Copenhagen is brewed right here in Canada.
It comes to you fresh from the brewery. So it tastes even better than ever.
And Carlsberg is sold at regular prices.
So let's hear it, Carlsberg lovers. "One, two, three ... Cheers!" Thursday, February 20,  1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Food aid won't feed starving
By CHRIS GAINOR
Developed nations face a "moral
dilemma" about how to aid
developing nations fight starvation, agriculture dean Michael
Shaw said Wednesday.
Speaking at a panel discussion in
SUB, Shaw said in increase in food
aid will result in still more mouths
to' feed, but the only alternative
would be population reduction
through starvation.
Today's food crisis has resulted
from dramatic rises in population,
changing world climatic patterns,
the high standard of living in
developed nations and the oil
crisis, he said.
The great increase in demand for
agricultural products coupled with
a steep rise in the cost of "inputs"
such as oil for fuel and fertilizer
"have decreased grain reserves to
a dangerous low," Shaw said.
There must be an increased
emphasis placed on sending experts from developed nations out
into the field to assist underdeveloped nations improve
their agricultural outputs, he
added.
"There is no point in giving
direct food aid."
Shaw said Third World countries
"have not given the priority to
agriculture they should have"
because they were too intent on
raising their standards of living.
Canada cannot feed the world
because Canada produces only
four per cent of world grain
production, he said.
"I believe the answer to this
problem is thorough education,
technology and an increased
emphasis on agriculture."
Education dean John Andrews
said the billions of dollars of aid
spend on education in the past was
misdirected.
"That was a mistake," he said.
"Education by itself cannot solve
the problem."
Andrews  said  educational  in
stitutions set up in Third World
countries did not work because
they were not geared toward local
conditions.
At present there is a "coordinate approach" of educating
illiterate populations and increasing industrial development in
underdeveloped areas, he said.
There are many difficulties
standing in the way for those in the
university community who want to
help Third World countries, Andrews said.
"The university cannot muster
its resources and apply them
directly."
He said all aid projects must be
approved by the appropriate
authorities in both Canada and
recipient nations.
Andrews added that because of
the great difficulties involved in
combatting the problems of the
Third World, "10 efforts fail for
every effort that succeeds."
Medicine professor Dr. Peter
Hahn said universities have one
role, which is to "impart
knowledge."
Universities should not get in
volved  with  the  community  in
other ways, he said.
Hahn criticized the "missionary
attitude" of aid programs in the
past. He said knowledge brought
into Third World countries from
the developed nations has created
more problems than it has solved.
"What is the next mistake we are
going to make?"
Universities can best help the
underdeveloped countries by
sticking to their function of
educating people and increasing
knowledge, he said.
3 disputes to arbitration
The Association of University
and College Employees served
notice of arbitration on three union
grievances Tuesday after a
meeting with UBC administration
representatives.
The AUCE contract grievance
procedure demands the
grievances, all concerning employee job reclassification, go to
arbitration since a 14-day
negotiation period has expired.
The university and AUCE must
agree on independent arbitrators
who will make a binding decision
about reclassfication of the three
employees wishing to change their
job category.
AUCE grievance committee
member Fairliegh Funston said
Wednesday arbitration could cost
the university and the union $500 a
day each and perhaps more if they
hire lawyers.
Funston said she thinks arbitration will cost the university
more than the wage hikes it would
have to pay if it had agreed to
reclassify the employees in
question.
Wes Clark, personnel and labor
relations assistant director, said
Wednesday his department has not
investigated the cost of arbitration.
AUCE and the university
reached a "compromise" on one of
the reclassification grievances at
the Tuesday meeting and Funston
said this shows labor relations
between the two parties has improved.
"Before, we were just
negotiating with Wes Clark but
now we are dealing with a committee of university representatives and they are much more
open minded," she said.
Clark declined comment about
both the grievance resolved
Tuesday and the grievances now
going to arbitration.
AUCE has sent a letter to personnel head John McLean
requesting union members be
given time off for an emergency
meeting of all union members to
discuss the newly negotiated
university policy about (employee
reclassification.
McLean said Wednesday he has
not received the request but Clark
said he sees no barriers to granting
time off to the employees.
"The university hasn't restricted
this kind of thing in the past,"
Clark said.
UBC CUPE leader unhappy
with contract talks
The president of the UBC local of
the Canadian Union of Public
employees says he is not happy
with the progress achieved so far
in contract negotiations with the
UBC administration.
Ken Andrews said in an interview Thursday that negotiations
between his union, which
represents most of the staff at
UBC, and the UBC administration
"have reached the critical stage."
Despite the fact he is not happy
with the progress achieved so far,
Andrews said "we have never
reached this stage in negotiations
so quickly."
He said the major issue in the
negotiations which began Nov. 25 is
wages. Andrews declined to spell
out his union's wage demands but
said they were "substantial".
Another major issue is a cost of
living clause in the new contract.
Andrews declined to speculate on
the possibility of strike action. The
current contract expires March 31.
He said the union has passed a "no
contract-no work" resolution.
"Whatever action this union
takes will be positive," he said.
The two sides will have what
Andrews describes as a "real hard
session" Feb. 25 and 26.
The lowest wage earned by union
members at present is $3.39 per
hour or $554 per. month for food
services general workers. The
highest wage earned is $1,271 per
month for electrical trades
workers.
Andrews added he thinks the
university is negotiating in good
faith.
NUS wants aid voice
—f. stop fitzgerald photo
MOON SHINES over the theological building at night. The building will be the site of the weekend fast, held
for the Bread for the World conference to dramatize the sensation of hunger. Fast starts at 7:30 p.m. Friday
in the theological building and in St. Mark's College. Bread for the World events continue through this week.
OTTAWA (CUP) — The National
Union of Students (NUS) has sent a
formal request to the Council of
Education Ministers (CEM)
asking for student representation'
on the federal-provincial task force
investigating student aid.
The council, consisting of the 10
provincial education ministers, set
up the task force last fall to review
and recommend changes in
student aid programs in Canada.
NUS's formal request, dated
Feb. 13 and sent to council
chairman Thomas Wells of Ontario, comes as a result of a
meeting between NUS representatives and the task force chairman
in Ottawa last week.
Task force chairmen R. J.
Lachapelle and G. M. Davies told
NUS that the task force had no
authority to seat students as
members or observers. They said
they had no objection to student
participation and advised that
students   take   the   matter  up
directly with CEM, which is
responsible for the task force.
NUS research secretary Hilda
Creswick said in the letter to Wells
that student representation on the
taskforce "is feasible" and has not
been opposed by any of the
provincial delegates.
She said that since NUS and the
task force have ongoing studies of
student aid in progress, and have
the same concerns about student
aid policies, student representation
on the task force through NUS
"would be of utmost value to
both."
The letter urges Wells to contact
CEM members about the matter in
order to "come to a decision at the
earliest date possible."
The CEM is not scheduled to
meet again until late June, but a
CEM spokesman in Toronto said
the request can be decided on the
basis of consultation and
discussion between the provinces
without a formal meeting. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 20, 1975
Starving kids
"Eat everything off your plate. Remember the starving
children in India."
How many of us were brought up with that chant
echoing in our ears from mothers with useless sympathies..
And how many of us attempt to atone in more recent
years not necessarily by 'cleaning up' our plates, but by
giving $1 to the UNESCO canvasser?
It's alJ very easy to feel sorry for the starving children,
not only in India but in most of the rest of the world as well,
and to make some token gesture in response. But perhaps
reporter Terry Donaldson's series of articles, beginning today
on the back page, will help people understand the mockery
of such gestures.
"Cleaning up' one's plate is perhaps the greatest irony of
all, for it is because North Americans and other developed
countries control and consume in such a disproportionate
amount of the world's food resources that people of
non-developed countries starve.
Because of that, and because of the internal structure of
so many of the world's countries which allows the rich and
the black marketers to consume the food.
So read the articles and stop those ridiculous gestures of
token support. Instead demand, through your MPs, an end to
programs which pay Canadian farmers not to grow food.
Demand money go those countries for development of
transportation and agriculture. And stop looking with horror
on those 'radical' overseas movements which demand
redistribution of land.
It's everyone's world, not just ours, the rich landlords
and the profiteers.
Because if people don't, baby, the others are in the
majority and they're damn well going to take it anyway.
Only with a little less sympathy.
News item: insufficient security for
SUB's $100,000 "Art" collection.
Letters
Clarification
offered
A number of items in your article
"Working class university wanted" require clarification and
explanation.
The proposal of the ad-hoc
committee contains three major
features in addition to the one
stressed in your article and emphasized in the headline (namely,
that social justice demands the
availability of serious university
education for the working class
and the poor).
(1) Community development
and control: The establishment of
the university will decidedly not be
by a process of "extending" UBC
or SFU into working class neighborhoods; the new university is not
going to float in from Burnaby
Mountain, Point Grey or the moon.
One of the most exciting things
about our proposal is the
possibility for the community
which the university will serve
itself to design the new institution.
At this moment we are asking for
about $300,000 to fund the work of a
community development team
over a two-year period. Consisting
of academics, community
workers, and community people,
this team will create the new
university.
The details of our proposal, put
forth as a "thought experiment,"
can serve as guidelines and as a
starting point for the work of the
team.
Finally, we suggest that the
integrity of this process be
maintained in the administration
of the new university: it should be
run by an elected community
board, similar to the community
resource boards now being
established throughout the
province.
(2) Scholastic quality and
academic integrity: This will not
be a second-class university for
people that couldn't make it to
UBC. The new university's
curriculum will be serious,
scholastically oriented, and
disciplined — to many it would
appear very "straight"; through
part-time terminal contracts and
regular appointments it will be
able to hire exceptionally able,
qualified and experienced faculty;
the graduates will be able to enter
any and all professional schools or
vocations for which their education
and training prepares them.
Nor, contrary to the implied
insults of many critics, does
"community control" imply lower
standards.
People in these communities are
fully aware of the relationship
between discipline, hard work and
success. With this goes a clearer
recognition of academic authority
when it is legitimate than can be
found among more affluent
parents or in most proposals for
education reform brought in by
academics themselves.
(3) Work-study program: All
full-time students would be
required to alternate periods of
classroom study with periods of
work which would be in the public
and private sectors of the economy
and in various parts of the country.
Valuable relations between the
university and the employers of its
students (and faculty!) could be
built up.
In various systematic and
disciplined ways, the university
will try to undermine the distinction between what we do in the
world   (our   vocations)   and   the
study that comprises a continuing
education and our cultural and
intellectual life.
People who are already fully at
work could also enter the new
university's programs if timetabling is done with this in mind,
and negotiations with employers
might free workers for study. The
new university would be the first
Canadian university with a fully
implemented program of cooperative education.
In short, the proposal not only
speaks to social justice; it also
speaks to a need in our society and
in our region for greater variety
and flexibility in post-secondary
educational opportunities.
There are a number of things
that the existing provincial
universities and colleges do and do
well — these they should continue
and improve. There are also a
number of things that they do not
do at all and probably cannot do by
virtue of structures and commitments (which they should
keep) already established.
The university proposed in our
report could be a model for
educational development
throughout our province, in factory
towns, farming communities and
larger cities.
To ask that we demonstrate
there is truly a need for new and
THE UBYSSEY
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20.1975
Published   Tuesdays,   Thursdays   and   Fridays   throughout  the
university year by the Atma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Lesley Krueger
As the LSD began to take its effect, Lesley Krueger sat down next to
her typewriter. And ate it. Meanwhile, Gary Coull and Doug Rushton
tripped the light fantastic with visions of Berton Woodward, Kini
McDonald, Mark Buckshon and Ralph Maurer rolling through a Goss higher
on ether. Sue Vohanka and Chris Gainor held Terry Donaldson down while
Marcus Gee injected double strength "window pane" into his pulsating
veins. Tom Barnes and Cedric Tetzei tried to hook Carl Vesterback on junk
but gave up when an ounce of pure speed fell out of his vest pocket. Stu
-Lyster sat in a corner and snorted coke. Bruce Woodburn freaked out.
diversified education such as the
new university "would provide is
rather like asking Thomas Edison
"to go back to the community and
prove there is a need for light bulbs
— he would find, of course, that
there isn't.
Fortunately for Edison and some
of us, those with capital saw that
the light bulb facilitated the extension of the working day for
people and chickens.
Many great inventors like
Edison or Henry Ford also invented the "need" which their
innovations served. We would like
to argue that the need for a decent
education is not quite as artificial;
it was created when God made
human beings, and we are not
meeting that need justly or well
enough.
Stephen Straker
history professor
New U
The proposal by Fred
Stockholder and Steve Straker,
regarding the working class
university, deserves comment.
There is no doubt that the ideas and
objectives which led to the
proposal are both valid and
desirable. Post-secondary
education has been inaccessible to
a considerable section of the
community, primarily for socioeconomic, academic or geographic
reasons.
However, it is difficult to believe
that a "working class university"
could achieve a greater
democratization of post-secondary
education than that which is
provided by the community college
system in general, and Vancouver
Community College in particular.
Vancouver Community College
offers the first two years of most
university degrees, in addition to
an extensive array of career-
technical programs.
It functions on an "open door"
admission policy, offers a flexible
timetable, allowing for both day
and evening attendance and
requires tuition fees considerably
below those charged at the
universities. (It may be argued,
with some validity, that any fees
are unreasonable).
At present the college enrols
approximately 2,180 full-time and
1,600 part-time university transfer
students and 980 full-time and 200
part-time "career" program
students. (These figures refer only
to the Langara campus. Three
other main campuses, Vancouver
Vocation Institute, Vancouver
School of Art and Special
Programs-King Edward, are part
of Vancouver Community
College).
The college also offers courses at
a number of decentralized'
locations in the Vancouver area,
including the East End.
A considerable amount of
evidence is available which indicates that the college is attracting a far broader segment of
the community, in socio-economic
terms, than that which is attending
the universities.
It is true that it is not possible to
complete a four-year degree at the
community college. However, it
would seem logical that both Simon
Fraser and UBC offer certain
third- and fourth-year courses on
the college campus, in a day and
evening format, for those wishing
to complete a degree.
In the long run, a co-operative
arrangement between colleges and
universities, such as described
above, would be a more
economical operation than yet
another university.
John D. Dennison,
education professor
Why move?
After reading the Feb. 11 edition
of The Ubyssey, I was perplexed to
read that the 40-hour fast being
held in conjunction with the bread
for t,he world conference had been
moved. Last week the fast was
reported to be held in Gage
Towers. Why the change to the
Vancouver school of theology?
Dave Jiles
arts l
Convenience—Staff.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241 K. Thursday, February 20,  1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Says former agent Agee
U.S. big business is
protected by the CIA
TORONTO (CUP) — A former
Central Intelligence Agency spy
says that next to foreign military
espionage the most important
function of the super secret police
force is to protect the economic
interests of U.S. multinational
corporations.
Philip Agee, a Latin American
specialist with the CI A from 1956 to
1969, told about 300 people at a
University of Toronto forum that
CIA activities are directed against
"groups who would oppose U.S.
capital penetration of their
countries."
CIA activities must always be
seen within the context of the
prevailing economic realities,
Agee cautioned. "The real
argument is not with the CIA, but
with the system of .economic exploitation. The CIA is just the
enforcing mechanism."
Agee broke with the agency in
1969 when he decided to publish
and expose the agency to the whole
world. His book Inside the Company: CIA Diary, published this
year, outlines his progression from
agent to revolutionary and contains lengthy descriptions of the
CIA's methods of intelligence-
gathering and clandestine
operations.
Agee was still a student at Notre
Dame University in Indiana when
the CIA first contacted him in the
spring of 1956. During the first few
years with the "Company" he
readily accepted the official explanation that the CIA exists to
preserve American values and
warn against any surprise attacks.
All revolutionary socialist
movements were regarded as
examples of Soviet expansionism,
he said, and by defeating them the
CIA claimed to be "buying time for
the local liberal reformers."
But his service in Ecuador and
Uruguay in the early '60s led him to
see "contradictions between
liberal reforms and true social
justice."
The promised reforms never
affected the critical problem of
land ownership and, "I saw that
the more we succeeded in propping
up the existing regimes, the further away went the hopes for real
reform since there was no longer
any pressure upon the governments to act."
Agee now describes himself as a
revolutionary socialist.
Drawing partially . from
examples in his own career, Agee
mentioned numerous examples of
CIA covert activities in Latin
America and elsewhere:
• the CIA staged the 1954 rightist
coup in Guatemala to protect the
investment of the powerful United
Fruit Company
• the 1965 invasion of the
Dominican Republic was
necessary to protect the interests
of U.S. sugar companies.
• in Brazil the CIA spent over $20
million to manipulate the 1962
general election, then supported
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — Labor
strife continued to trouble the puce
blorg government as the union of
uncivilized servants, the only union
in this tiny island kingdom
demanded sex breaks in addition to
a 367 per cent wage hike with a
cost-of-living escalator clause.
"We won't stand for anything
less," union leader Rake Slam and
Bang said in the midst of the picket
lines that dominate the landscape
of the island kingdom.
Slam and Bang said the sex
break is necessary to relieve labor
tensions among the uncivilized
servants.
Puce blorg government
negotiatiors opposed the union's
demands on the grounds that
workers would attain parity with
management.
the 1964 army coup and later
helped train the secret police
agency which currently runs a
brutal police state with many
"unspeakable tortures."
• after Salvador Allende almost
won the presidency of Chile in 1958,
the CIA co-operated with the First
National City Bank to finance the
successful campaign of rightist
Eduardo Frei in 1964 and of course
helped engineer the 1973 coup in
which Allende was murdered.
• elsewhere the CIA is active in
Laos, Zaire, Ecuador, Iran and
South Korea, where it supports the
local secret police whom Agee
termed "one of the most terrible
forces of repression in the world."
"Vietnam was a higher level of
the same type of repression," Agee
said, adding that the U.S. decision
to commit hundreds of thousands
of regular troops was an admission
that the CIA's traditional covert
tactics were a total failure.
The main factor governing U.S.
policy in Vietnam is "the flexible
requirement for complete
solidarity in preserving appropriate conditions for foreign
investment by U.S. companies,"
Agee said.
Although his activities were
directed almost entirely at Latin
America, Agee suggested the CIA
is undoubtedly active today in
Canada.
"Since Canada poses such a
minimal threat to U.S. economic
interests," he said, "the CIA will
likely have only a monitoring
function, keeping its finger on the
political pulse."
He said it pays special attention
to groups advocating economic
nationalism and likely reports
regularly to other U.S. government
agencies.
Despite the aura of mystery
surrounding it, the CIA is not all
powerful and can be defeated,
Agee said.
As one technique, he announced
the formation of a group in
Washington that will begin "a
campaign of'solidarity" involving
progressive groups in countries
where the CIA operates.
"We will collect information on
CIA agents and then forward it to
national organizations fighting for
liberation, who will then take
appropriate action to neutralize
the CIA activity in their country,"
he explained.
Recently the group supplied
sympathetic Mexican
organizations with information
concerning 37 of the 49 known CIA
agents operating in that country.
The information was widely
publicized in the Mexican press
and, said Agee, "within two days
the two top CIA officers were withdrawn from Mexico."
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Lectures, Seminars and Singing
— A Time to Learn
— A Time to Meet Others
— A Time to think about your Response
to World Hunger
Bring your own sleeping bag and toothbrush Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 20, 1975
UVic profs
agree to
settlement!
VICTORIA (CUP) — The
University of Victoria faculty
association has voted unanimously
to accept the proposed settlement
between themselves and the
Canadian Association of University Teachers.
Dr. Charles Tolman, head of the
UVic Faculty Association, said the
motion was put, the question called
and the vote unanimous.
"It went as quickly as that," he
said, "I didn't even have time to
answer any of the questions I had
anticipated would be asked, even
though I had the answers ready."
Tolman said it was now up to
CAUT and he said he expected a
favorable response from them.
CAUT will meet in May.
The dispute arose in 1970-71 when
the university refused to renew the
contracts of three professors.
CAUT placed a censure on the
university which in effect tells all
other Canadian university
teachers not to seek employment
there.
Dr. William Goede, one of the
fired professors, said the settlement as he understood it would
be acceptable to him. He said he
understood that the procedures
which started the original dispute
had been changed to conform with
CAUT's wishes.
"If it is still possible for a faculty
member to be turned down for
tenure by the dean or the
president, after the department
has supported him, as the result of
a secret letter sent by the department head, then to hell with it. But
if that's been stopped and the
terms of the financial settlement
are acceptable to me then I accept
the settlement," Goede said.
The University will contribute
$12,400 and the CAUT $2,600 to a
fund to be established by CAUT,
"to assist those individuals whose
academic careers may have been
damaged" during the controversy.
Carleton
profs to
unionize
OTTAWA (CUP) — Faculty
members at Carleton University
have voted 292-44 to apply for
certification as a bargaining unit.
Carleton faculty voted recently
to amend their faculty association
constitution to allow for collective
bargaining with the university.
The vote received the two-thirds
majority required for the change
and clears the way for the
executive to begin signing up
faculty for a certification vote
under the provincial labor
relations act.
Association president Jill
Vickers says the next step, getting
faculty to sign union cards, will
probably be completed in the next
week. The association will then
appear before the labor board for
recognition and certification.
Although this action makes
Carleton faculty the first in the
province to unionize, certification
of faculty unions in other provinces
will likely mean that the Ontario
board will not require extensive
hearings to approve the union.
Talks Of forming a union began
at Carleton early last fall after
faculty learned that an unspecified
number of professors might be laid
off due to financial cutbacks at the
provincial level.
Unionization, according to the
organizers, will give faculty
greater clout in dealing with the
administration and will force the
university to open its financial
records at contract negotiation.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Uganda spokesman accuses
reporters of being spies
OTTAWA (CUP) - The Uganda
High Commission has accused
foreign journalists of being spies,
and threatens the safety of
relatives of Ugandans abroard who
say bad things about the
motherland to the press.
The official statement, bearing
no date and which quotes an
unidentified military spokesman,
states: "It is sad to note that most
of the western newsmen who come
to Uganda in most cases to seek an
interview with His Excellency the
president normally come with the
intention of spying on behalf of
their imperialist masters,
especially the British."
Said the military spokesman:
"This must stop."
He also commented on an interview given by Mr. Wakhweya,
Uganda's former finance minister,
who recently fled the country. The
spokesman took issue with a
statement  made by  Wakhweya,
Unkind story cited for
newspaper staff eviction
CALGARY (CUP) - Police
evicted student newspaper
workers from their offices at
Mount Royal College here last
week, alleging they were breaking
university rules by staying later
than 11 p.m.
But staffers on the Reflector
speculated the real reason for the
eviction, which had never beforr
occured in several years of
newspaper production, was a
recent uncomplementary article
run by the paper about campus
security forces.
The fortnightly paper had
recently run an article alleging,
satirically, that campus security
forces head Jim Cowan was  a
"purple-plant-eating psychopath."
Cowan issued the eviction order.
Paper editor Nick Burton said
staffers doing technical production
work on the newspaper at about 10
p.m. when campus cops arrived
and told them they had to leave by
11 p.m.
Burton said production could
only be finished by midnight at the
earliest. The cops repeated their
order and Burton phoned security
head Cowan, who said it was in
accordance with campus
regulations.
He also later said campus
security claims that the campus
was completely closed after 11
p.m. "must be an oversight."
He said anyone can stay on
campus after that time with proper
authorization.
However, at 11 p.m. the campus
security forces reappeared and
demanded the staffers leave. Some
decided to comply but six others
stayed on to finish the paper.
At about 11:40 p.m., downtown
police arrived and demanded
identification. When asked by the
staffers what charges were to be
laid, one policeman, who identified
himself as Constable Lust, said
"I'll find someone and I'll make it
as rough as possible."
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that Uganda had received no
foreign currency payments since
last November and was nearing
the state of bankruptcy.
The spokesman refuted the
charge by asking: "How could a
country like Uganda with not a
single dollar in foreign currency go
to the extent of ordering more than
three hundred lorries at the cost of
three hundred thousand five
hundred shillings each?"
As for Wakhweya, the
spokesman said that he "is
becoming Uganda's enemy
number one."
He accused the former minister
of having "smuggled a lot of the
Ugandan taxpayers money
abroad" during his four year term,
and said he is now "trying to cover
up his evil deeds."
According to the release, the
military spokesman made it
"categorically clear that the
relatives of such exiles will be the
sufferers if such propaganda is not
stopped."
The military spokesman ended
his statement with a stern warn-
ning that "These people have to
pull up their socks. They have to
wake up. This is the last warning to
Wakhweya and his collaborators.
The same last warning also goes to
those international newsmen who
seek interviews with His Excellency the president of Uganda."
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JUL 29
61
MAR 26
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31
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Room 1MB S.U.B., University of B. C. 224-0111 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 20, 1975
Hot flashes
Twinkle foes
fefeffiofi
They don't shoot horses, they
dance. Until they drop,
A marathon dance will be held
Saturday as part of the UBC
Telethon drive. Dancers will dance
in the Pit until there is but one
couple left standing.
However, this won't happen
unless there's someone to do the
dancing and collapsing.
Winners of the danceathon will
appear on TV as part of the
Variety Club Telethon Sunday.
They also get to spend three days
at the 108 Mile ranch.
The gears are also getting into
the act. They will be stopping cars
today and Friday and demanding
money. If they miss you (which is
likely as they have to keep
consulting diagrams to find out
what to do), why not send a
donation to the education building, room 1. Make cheques payable to the UBC Telethon Drive.
Food
The Bread for the World
conference continues today with
political science prof Harold
Bronson speaking on the paradox
of abundance, scarcity, world
hunger and its cause.
Bronson's talks are at noon in
the SUB auditorium and at 8 p.m.
in SUB 117.
Mark Rose, former NDP MP
and current UBC education prof,
will head a seminar on the politics
Tween classes
of aid today. His seminar takes
place at 8 p.m. along with
Bronson's talk.
Racism
The International Committee
Against Racism is sponsoring a
forum on racism in Canada and
UBC Friday.
Former Vancouver alderman
Setty Pendakur and Marg Cantryn
from The Vancouver Indian Centre will be speakers.
The forum happens at noon in
International House.
Levi speaks
Norman Levi, NDP minister of
human resources, will talk about
the federal-provincial conference
held recently in Ottawa, noon,
Friday in Buchanan 106.
The event is sponsored by the
campus NDP club.
TODAY
UBC LIBERALS
Liberal party executive director
speaking noon, SUB 119. Consideration of important resolutions, 1:30
p.m. in SUB 119.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Commerce faculty member Boyle
on women's pensions — when does
it pay not to remarry. Noon in
Angus 104.
PRO-LIFE
Marnie de Varnet speaks on abortion noon SUB 111.
BREAD FOR THE WORLD
Films — the Desert is Dying, Faith
of Hunger, on drought in North
America, noon SUB 205. University
of Saskatchewan prof Harold Bronson speaks on the paradox of
abundance and scarcity noon SUB
auditorium. Former NDP MP Mark
Rose speaks on the politics of aid, 8
p.m. in SUB 117.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film La Vie Heureuse de Leopold Z
noon Buch. 104.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Stephen Knight from AFC noon
SUB 205.
FRIDAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Fellowship meeting 7:30 p.m. Dr.
Ross' residence.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
What's behind the energy crisis.
Speaker Ed Livingstone, geological
engineer and NDP activist, 8 p.m.
1208 Granville.
LDSSA
Len Hansen speaking on the organization of the Mormon Church noon
Angus 412.
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Grad recital, Jane Cassie, flute,
music building recital hall 8:15 p.m.
NDP CLUB
Human Resources minister Norm
(The Foreman) Levi back from
federal-provincial conference in
Ottawa speaks noon in Buch. 106.
BREAD FOR THE WORLD
Conference on government foreign
policy noon SUB 207-209. Film
When the People Awake, on Chile,
noon in SUB auditorium. Weekend
fast starts 7:30 p.m. and continues
for 40 hours at the Vancouver
School of Theology and St. Marks.
INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE
AGAINST RACISM
Forum on racism with former
alderman Setty Pendakur and Marg
Cantryn noon International House
upper lounge.
CLASSICS
R. Sullivan on Commagene on the
Euphrates, which stacks up to quite
an evening 8 p.m. in the Buchanan
penthouse. Who says Malcolm ain't
got pull?
ECKANKAR
Discussion group noon SUB 224.
Gonick
Cy Gonick of the University of
Manitoba will give a public lecture
on crises in capitalist economies.
The lecture will be given noon,
Friday, Feb. 28, in Buchanan 204.
Accidents
Students injured in intramural
sports or having their glasses and
contaet lenses damaged can apply
x for reimbursement to the Alma
Mater Society accident benefit
fund.
The fund generally pays half
the amount any repairs cost.
Applications can go through
AMS treasurer Dave Theessen's
office in the executive wing,
second floor SUB.
2525 Willow St.  874-6221
THE CHQM
GREAT COMPOSER
SERIES
with the
Vancouver symphony orchestra
CONCERT 2
Wednesday, february 26 at 8:30 p.m.
thursday, february 27 at 7:30 p.m.
queen elizabeth theatre
loRANd
TOtT
"a violinist who can hold
' an audience spellbound" (Ciuderay)
'   plays the infectious Dvorak Violin  Concerto
SIMON STREATFEILD conducts
Berlioz Corsair Overture
Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6 (Pathetique)
Tickets NOW at all Vancouver Ticket Centre outlets. Charge to your Eaton account by calling
683-3255.
$6.50, $5.50, $4.50 or $3.50
STUDENTS: $2 off the top two prices
This series is sponsored by CHQM
CHCOM
Hillel House Presents
FREE LUNCH
For Hillel Members and Guests
(With the Best Wishes of
the B'nai B'rith Women)
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20
12:30 - 1:30 PM.
(HILLEL HOUSE LOCATED DIRECTLY
BEHIND BROCK HALL) /
WS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional fines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
DR. PHELIM BOYLE, Faculty of Commerce, "When Does It Pay You Not
To Remarry?" Discussion of women's
pensions. Today, 12.30, Henry Angus
Room   104.
KATHY STOREY, assistant professor of
sociology, University of Saskatchewan,
presents some sociological perspectives
of campus life from a Christian
standpoint. 7:30 p.m. tonight. Lutheran Campus Centre. Sponsor: charismatic  Christian Fellowship.
10 —For Sale — Commercial
NEW
TEXAS   INSTRUMENTS
SR-51   —   $275.00
HEWLETT   PACKARD
HP-55  —  $472.00
TEXAS   INSTRUMENTS
SR-16   —   $104.95
CO-OP   BOOKSTORE
S.U.B.   Basement   or   call   325-4161
40 — Messages
LONELY Young African Gent wishes
to meet lady companion and friend
for outings. Reply to Box 40 "The
Ubyssey", Rm.  241 S.U.B.
WOULD ANYONE who witnessed the
accident at Wesbrook Crescent and
10th Ave. Monday, February 17, at 4
p.m., please phone 228-0951. Ask for
Greg.
I   KNOW  a  young £irl named ANN
Who belongs to the CORMACK clan;
It's her birthday today,
And   I'd just   like   to   say
That ol' Gunga sends his regards.
65 — Scandals
C   &   C   SPORTS
ANNIVERSARY SALE  NOW ON
20%  Off Everything
Big  Savings On  Ice   Skates,
Hockey Equipment, Racquets.
Gym Strip, Etc.
Open 4 p.m.-e p.m. Mon.-Wed.
4 p.m.-9 p.m.  Thurs.  & Fri.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.   Saturday
3616 W. 4th Ave.
AT 4406 W. 10th VARSITY FURNITURE
Best prices paid for furniture and all
miscellaneous items. 224-7313.
11 -
For Sale —
Private
1967 VW MICROBUS—66,000
condition,   $1600   or  best
8677 evenings .
miles,
offer.
good
261-
15-
Found
25-
Instruction
SPRING YOGA CLASSES
i Starting March 3rd
YOGA FITNESS INSTITUTE
3630 West Broadway
Phone: 731-6320
Dr. Bina Nelson — Dir.
30 — Jobs
TENNIS PROFESSIONAL
REQUIRED
To   teach,   supervise   courts,   assist
in operation of Pro Shop from May
through August. Club with 6 Lay-co
lighted courts, new clubhouse,  over
400  members.   Apply  by  April  1st,
with  qualifications,   references,   experience and salary expected to:
M.  R.  HANNA, President
Lethbridge  Tennis  Club
913—21st Street South
Lethbridge, Alberta
PART TIME employment offered to
imaginative physicist to research and
co-ordinate work on an Anti-Gravity
Machine. Phone 433-7415.
WOMEN from Penticton area wanted
for employment in Proposed Women's
Center of OFY Project. Phone 731-
4808.
70 — Services
SOUND RESEARCH
Thousands of   Research  Papers.
Custom   Research
Student Resume Services
1969  W.  Broadway,  Vancouver,  B.C.
Phone:  730-3714
Office hours: 1:00-5:00 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
80 — Tutoring
GRAD STUDENT will tutor math. Any
undergrad course, only $3-50/hr. Ph
Ian 926-7269.
85 — Typing
STUDENT DISCOUNTS on typewriter
rentals. Manual, portable, electric,
call now. Seymour Disco Rentals.
689-7237.
EXPERT CORRECTING IBM Selectric
Typist. Experienced Technical and
Thesis Typing. Reasonable Rates
Mrs.   Ellis 321-3838.
FAST EFFICIENT TYPING (near 41st
and  Marine  Drive).   266-5053.
THESIS TYPING. IBM Executive. $.60
per  page.   Phone   736-5324 eves.
TYPING DONE in North Vancouver
home. Reliable service, reasonable
rates on your essays, etc. 988-7228.
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING.     My
home. Essays, Thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates. 263-
5317.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST available. Typing -of any kind. Margo McFee, 304—
1965 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver. Phone
731-1095.
90 - Wanted
SECOND HAND CLOTHING — Girls,
could you use a little extra cash?
We are interested in everything from
long dresses to leather coats. Phone
874-3613.
99 — Miscellaneous
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, February 20,  1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
For Western Canada
Ed students union hinted
VICTORIA (CUP) — Any union
of western education students
should, among other things,
promote improved teacher
training at the local, provincial and
interprovincial levels to better
equip graduating students.
That is one of the findings of a
report by University of Victoria
and UBC education students
associations looking into the
feasibility of an alliance between
various education students
societies in Western Canada.
Two representatives from
UVic's education students society
will present the report at a conference in Calgary Feb. 21 to
discuss setting up a western
students union.
The report discussed what UVic
and UBC education students think
any union should be doing and
makes six specific points:
The six points are:
• to work with the education
faculties  to  make  the  desires,
needs and expectations of
education students known to improve the students' curriculum
requirements for entry into
education programs and school
experience.
• to develop a file of information
about the type of schools,
programs and teaching opportunities in each school district.
• to increase communication
between faculties through external
affairs and other positions.
• to define transferable credits
and outline what is further
required and seek recognition by
each faculty of such credits and
student programs.
• to actively seek membership
and student input into the policy
formation and other activities of
the federation. The student
membership will include the
following: insurance, credit union
membership, free legal aid,
counsel and assistance from officers, participating membership
faculties  to  make  the  desires,L ficers, participating membership
Disney sues porno makers
for using Mouse song
DTSNRVT.AND    (ZIMS-PTTTM    _   ritfhrs " The lawvprs alsi
DISNEYLAND (ZNS-CUP)
Walt Disney Productions filed suit
in court last week to stop the use of
the Mickey Mouse Club Song in the
sound-track of a movie depicting
an orgy.
Lawyers for Disney Productions
complained that the familiar
"Mickey Mouse March" was used
as background music in a scene of
"The Life and Times of a Happy
Hooker."
The suit stated, in part, that the
orgy scene constituted "substantial and irreparable injury,
loss  and  damage  of  ownership
rights." The lawyers also pointed
out three of the four participants in
the orgy were wearing
mouseketeer ears.
Disney Productions is seeking a
preliminary injunction against the
showing of the film and punitive
damages for copyright infringement.
After hearing an argument,
Judge Kevin Duffy reserved
judgment until this week, when he
will see a special showing of the
film and two segments of the
Mickey Mouse Club television
program.
TUXEDO
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Formal Wear Rentals
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Men's Room Westwood Mall 941-2541
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1420 Lonsdale, N. Van. 988-7620
3048 Edgemount Blvd., N.V. 987-5121
1586 Marine, W. Van. 936-1813
1527 Lonsdale, N. Van. 985-4312
Fraser's Surrey Place 588-7323
Werners Lougheed Mall 936-7222
Friesens Guildford Centre 581-8722
Kennedy McDonald, Park Royal 922-6421
Fraser's Park Royal North 926-1916
* 10% discount to U.B.C. students
IF
Great reading from the
feooksbeLF
at ABC
Climb & trail guides,
tales of expeditions,
books on ski touring,
snowshoeing, mountaineering, hiking,
trip foods, and more!
ABC Recreational
Equipment
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687-7885
557
RICHARDS ST
THE SPORT OF
MY MAD MOTHER
by Ann Jelicoe
Directed by Jane Heyman
FEBRUARY 26 —
MARCH 1   8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $2.50
Students: $1.75
Tickets: Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
at annual BCTF conventions,,
representation at the local levels.
The report says tha*t to create a
professional teacher and to ensure
a learning environment for all
school children certain questions
have to be answered, such as what
we want teachers to teach; how to
ensure learning is meaningful; and
how to train teachers to teach in a
meaningful manner.
The report called for a strong
liaison with the faculty of
education, local school boards,
provincial governments, and the
universities.
FOR THE ABSOLUTE LATEST
IN EYEWEAR
LOOK TO . . .
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Because — when you look good
So do we . . .
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If so ... why not drop in and
tell us about it?
We can provide expert
diagnosis, quality workmanship
and reasonable rates.
9
DAYS LEFT!
To Renew Your
Government authorized agent
HI, I'M GORD BUNTAIN a fellow student
reminding you there are just nine days left to
renew. So avoid the lineups. See us today.
2 LOCATIONS
17th and Dunbar                                     41st and Granville
3308 Dunbar
5731 Granville
736-8104
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and it has a lot to do with
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LET US LOOK AT YOUR HAIR AND BONE STRUCTURE
AND BRING THE BEST OUT OF YOU
Ask us about our protein body waves and any information on how to take care of your hair and skin. We also
retail the very best products on the market for the needs of your skin and hair.
We are located on the U.B.C. Campus. Come and see us. By appointment only —
call 224-5540.
2144 WESTERN PARKWAY, UNIVERSITY SQ. (The Village)
Nobs Parkins Frenqais
~UY)£. 0*^   j
mrws Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Hoop 'Birds split two,
Thunderettes take first
Thursday, February 20, 1975
By CARL VESTERBACK
The basketball 'Birds find
themselves hanging by their
fingernails after a weekend split in
two games against Calgary here at
UBC. And two sharp kicks by
potential villains Alberta or
Calgary this weekend could break
their grasp and send them
plunging into obscurity.
According to coach Peter
Mullins, the 'Birds went into this
weekend's series with the
Dinosaurs with an absolute
necessity to win both games. They
split, yet find themselves with an
opportunity still to make the
playoffs, depending on the outcome
of action this Friday and Saturday.
But it looked Friday night as
though the season was as good as
over. Leading 50-40 with four
minutes left, the 'Birds went into a
stall, a device which has never
failed yet to get them into trouble.
Sure enough, as with UVic the
previous weekend, the 'Birds lost
their cool and blew the lead and the
game, losing 53-50.
"We just couldn't get unpacked," said Mullins. "Calgary's
1-3-1 trap zone had us a bit
disorganized."
That sad fact was amply
illustrated in the 'Birds' execrable
shooting. UBC managed only 30
per cent from the field, their worst
performance of the year. Steve
Pettifer found himself surrounded
in the corner whenever he got the
ball, and the pressure caused his
average to drop to an anemic 24
per cent.
Despite all this, UBC still held a
10 point lead with just over four
minutes left. Calgary, shooting
only 39 per cent, did what they
could to allow the 'Birds the victory, but couldn't cope with the
'Birds sudden lapse into complete
Passport, Visa,
Application Photos
UBC SPECIAL $1.95
Regular $2.95
Show Your AMS Card
(Negative Free)
CANDID STUDIOS
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
international
women's
year
atubc
DR. PHELIM BOYLE
talks about women's pensions:
how women are discriminated
against and how that situation
could change.
WHEN DOES IT PAY YOU
NOT TO REMARRY?
Today - Feb. 20
at 12:30 p.m.
Room 104
ANGUS BUILDING
sponsored by the Faculty of
Commerce and Business
Administration and the Dean of
Women's Office.
ineptitude. Over that final four
minutes, Calgary outscored UBC
13-0 to win 53-50.
Saturday's game showcased the
'Birds as they should be. UBC
improved to 57 per cent on field
goal tries, coasting to an easy 79-61
win. Pettifer hit for 18 points, and
Mike McKay, in a fine seond half
performance, netted 15.
The Thunderettes, meanwhile,
swept their two games over the
Dinettes, winning 64-46 and 80-33 to
advance to the national championships.
"We played our best game ever
on Saturday," said coach Sue
Evans.
The Thunderettes didn't appear
to  miss  leading  scorer  Carol
Turney, away at the Canada
Winter Games, Louisa Zerbe, Judi
Kent and Rose Sebellin picked up
the scoring slack. Zerbe had 29
points for the two games, Kent had
26, and Sebellin potted 15 in Saturday's game.
"Playing without Carol really
helped our confidence," said
Evans. "We were a bit confused in
the first game, but played exceptionally well Saturday. It's a
good sign for the national championships — we appear to be
peaking at just the right time."
With Turney back for the New
Brunswick showdown, the
Thunderettes appear to be well
positioned to take their fourth
national title in four years.
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Rugby and wrestling
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds
continued their domination of the
Pacific Northwest Intercollegiate
Rugby Football Union as they
clobbered the Oregon State
Beavers 34-4 Saturday, then
lambasted the University of
Oregon Ducks 54-0 Monday.
Terry White gave the Beavers a
short lived 4-0 lead when he went
over for a try five minutes into the
game. But the 'Birds stormed back
with two tries from Will McKenzie,
and singles from Paul Watson, Rob
Google and John Billingsley.
Billingsley added a drop goal and
Preston Wiley booted two converts
and a penalty kick to round out the
UBC scoring.
Monday against the Ducks it was
Billingsley who led the 'Birds
again, bulling over for three tries
and kicking a drop goal. Wiley
kicked five converts and a penalty
kick. Rob Jenkins scored two tries,
Ro Hindson collected a try and a
convert, and Frank Carson, Larry
Chung, and Google each got one
try.
•    •    *
In Seattle Saturday the wrestling
team was upset by the University
of Puget Sound, 22-17.
"It was a match of if's and
should ofs", said coach Bob
Laycoe. "Mike Richey should have
won but didn't, if a bad call hadn't
been made against Gus
Romanelli he would have won, if
Phillipe Markon or John Davison
had been there they probably
would have won. Any one of those
things would have given us the win.
But they didn't and we didn't."
Davison was at the Canada
Winter Games where he picked up
a silver medal in the 114 pound
division.
ON NATIONAL TOUR
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25th  through
SATURDAY, MARCH 1st
NOW PLAYING TO FRIDAY
THE FABULOUS
 JERRY LEE LEWIS
For Information Call 682-3677 or
Pick Up Tickets
At 626 Hornby St.
ISN'T THAT NICE/
THE BOYS ON THE
FOOTBALL TEA/V\
CAME TO WATCH/
1 THINK  I NEED
AN OU> STVLBI Thursday, February 20,  1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
—kini mcaonaia pnoto
UBC DEFENCEMAN Brian Penrose digs for puck in hectic action around Japanese period when they outshot the Japanese 20-3 but still failed to score. Japan won Tuesday
Nationals' net. Similar frustrations were common for the 'Birds, especially in the third     game 3-2 to end Canadian tour with a 4-2 won-loss record.
Japanese Nat team beats UBC 3-2
By STUART LYSTER
A well-disciplined Japanese
National team completed a successful Canadian tour by out-
skating the UBC Thunderbirds 3-2
Tuesday night at Kerrisdale
Arena.
After skating rings around
themselves in the first period, the
Japanese team got back on track in
the second in time to skate rings
around UBC.
The 'Birds led 2-0 after the first
on a pair of goals by Bill Ennos.
Bob Sperling drew assists on both
goals with Gerry Bond assisting on
the first.
The Japanese Nationals
displayed their skating superiority
during the first period, hemming
the 'Birds in their own end for
minutes at a time.
But their gruelling schedule of
six games in eight days took its toll
as they failed to hold on to the puck
for more than a couple of seconds
at a time.
The Nationals started to click in
the second as the 'Birds were
relaxing.
Using their tremendous speed
and quickness to overwhelm the
'Birds, they scored two straight
power-play   goals   early   in   the
second period to win the game.
Their first goal came at 5:52 as
the result of some bad clearing by
UBC. YasushinTanaka slammed it
in from Takao Hikigi and Koji
Iwamoto.
Their second came on a two on
one break with Osamu
Wakabayashi sliding the puck
under a sprawling John Jordan to
former Thunderbird . Yoshio
Hohino. Danny Peck was serving a
tripping penalty at the time.
Little Tsutomu Hanzawa (5'3"-
136 pounds) got the winner at 12:40
following very disciplined passing
by linemate Yoshio Hoshino and
Wakabayashi. Keith Tindle was in
the penalty box ^t the time and
UBC penalty killers couldn't
handle the stop-on-a-dime agility of
the Japanese.
But the 'Birds bounced back
from their second period
humiliation, not on the scoreboard,
but for pride's sake. It was
National goalie Minoru Misawa
turning back shot after shot as the
'Birds pressed. The Japanese team
seemed content with freezing the
puck in their own end to protect
their lead.
Misawa robbed Brian DeBiasio
three or four times in the closing
Puck 'Birds defeat Dinos for playoff spot
CALGARY — The University of
Calgary Dinosaurs were playing
for their lives on the weekend,
needing to win both games to edge
the 'Birds out forthe last CWUAA
playoff spot.
With that in mind they came out
like gangbusters Friday night.
They outhustled the 'Birds, beat
them to the puck and had most of
the play in the UBC end of the rink.
They outshot the 'Birds 58-28
including a 27-9 difference in the
first period.
They did everything but win.
They were held to a 1-1 score at
the end of 20 minutes, thanks to
UBC goalie Dave Andrews who
mixed incredible skill with some
good old fashioned blind luck in
kicking out 26 shots.
Calgary badly outclassed the
visiting Thunderbirds in that
period. Jim Lawrence and Jim
Setters were the marksmen.
And if the Dinosaurs were
unlucky in the UBC end of the rink
in the first period, they met
disaster in their own end in the
second.
UBC scored six times on 10 shots
that period to salt the game away,
finally winning 8-3.
It was a makeshift fourth line
that coach Bob Hindmarch threw
out for UBC that turned the game
around. Utility men Jim
Lawrence, Keith Tindle and Steve
Davis formed the line which accounted for three of the eight goals
UBC managed to score.
Brian Penrose scored twice in
the second with Tindle, Davis,
Sean Boyd and Brian DeBiasio
adding singles.
Even with the score 7-1 in favor
of UBC, Calgary came out playing
to win, knowing they needed six
goals to avoid an early return to
the books.
Wayne Forsey and Shane Tarves
finished the Dinosaur scoring with
Bob Sperling finalizing it for the
'Birds.
On Saturday night with nothing
at stake but pride, the Dinosaurs
clipped the 'Birds 3-2.
Jim Setters, Tom Yates and Ron
Gerlitz scored for Calgary with
Peter Moyls and Keith Tindle
replying for the 'Birds.
The weekend split, along with
Alberta's sweep over Saskatchewan, finalizes the standings
with Alberta in first place at 20-4,
UBC in second at 12-11-1, Calgary
in third at 11-12-1 and Saskatchewan in the basement with a 4-20
record.
UBC travels to Edmonton this
weekend for the best of three
CWUAA championships against
the Golden Bears. The winner
advances to the Western Canada
final against the Great Plains
finalist the following week in
Vancouver.
Jock shorts
On the track and field scene, the
UBC track team competed in the
B.C. championships last weekend
at Jericho.
In the men's section, Chris White
and John Currie came in second
and third respectively in the 3,000
metres while teammate Rick
Cuttell took the high jump title with
a leap of six feet eight inches.
Over in the women's section, the
UBC girls came up with a superb
showing in the 800 metres event
with Sheila Currie coming in
second, closely followed by
teammate Carolyn van de Poll in
third place. Van de Poll was in turn
pursued by Leslie Stubbs who
finished fourth and Linda Rossetti
who took sixth place.
* * *
In the volleyball scene, the UBC
women dropped the semi-finals to
University of Alberta. The
Thunderettes finished their season
with third place in the Canada
West league.
* * *
The soccer team stretched its
gameless streak to two months as
their game originally scheduled for
Sat. was cancelled because of five
inches of snow in the Thunderbird
Stadium.
minutes as DeBiasio got off a
couple of his patented slap shots.
And with the Nationals a man
short for the last minute and thirty-
five seconds, Dave Andrews came
out of the nets in favour of an extra
attacker.
It was all for naught as the
Japanese utilized their speed to
cover the two extra UBC men very
effectively.
The Canadian tour was very
successful for the Japanese as they
took four out of six games. They
are favoured to win the B division
in the 1976 hockey championships
in Sapporo, Japan.
Swimmers
advance
The UBC swim team came back
from Edmonton last weekend with
what looks like a large number of
qualifiers for the national championships in two weeks.
Paul Hughes, Sarah MacFayden,
Pat Gilmore and Jean Jensen all
qualified by virtue of their individual wins.
The rest of the team: Steve
Norbury, Robert Kell, Rick
Gustavson, Paul Sabiston, Brenda
McBride, Sue Barnett, Cathy Boale
and Bonnie Smith should have
qualified by their timings in each
event, according to UBC coach
Jack Pomfret, but they will have to
wait until next week before the
official results will be out.
The UBC men's relay team
established a new record for the
400 yards medley. Paul Hughes set
a new mark for the 400 yards individual medley, and teammate
Sarah MacFayden set a new
standard for the women's 400
freestyle. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 20, 1975
Inefficient use ef feed stuff
worsens the world shortage
By TERRY DONALDSON
According to a conservative estimate
made by officials at the United Nations
World Food Conference, 460 million people
suffer from chronic hunger and
malnutrition. Of these people, between two
and five million will die of hunger related
causes in the next three months. Why is one-
eighth of the world hungry?
To some, the answer is that there are
simply too many mouths and too little food.
Agriculture science dean Michael Shaw,
says the solution, which will be "a long, slow
haul" will consist of curtailing population
growth and increasing agricultural
education.
Others insist it is not a matter of scarcity
at all. Harold Bronson, an economist from
University of Saskatchewan and a participant in this week's Bread for the World
Conference, speaks of the absurdity "of
starvation in a world of plenty. The problem
as he sees it is not one of scarcity, but one of
power.
In any case hunger is not a new problem.
Man has always had to struggle for food and
many have died in the process. However
since the Second World War, advances have
been made in the area of food production.
High yield strains of wheat and rice
produced under grants from the Rockefeller
and Ford foundations and the 'Green
Revolution' helped grain production in the
developing countries to increase 80 per cent
since 1950. Bumper crops produced food
surpluses in the west. By the late '60s, there
was optimism man had solved his food
supply problsms.
However, these gains have been wiped out
in the last few years. Bad weather resulted
in poor crops in 1972 and drought produced
famine in India and the African Sahel area.
The world's hungry nations were hardest hit
by the sharp increase in energy costs in 1973.
In particular, the cost of fertilizer, which
is derived from petroleum, more than
doubled. This drastically reduced the effect
of the Green Revolution, as the miracle
grains need great amounts of fertilizer.
World food reserves dropped to the lowest
level in 20 years and the spectre of mass
starvation grew.
The causes of the current crisis are
complex. Behind these short-term causes of
crop failure and energy crunch, are other
factors. Many in the west would agree with
Robert McNamara, president of the World
Bank, that "the greatest single obstacle to
the economic and social advancing of the
majority of peoples in the underdeveloped
world is rampant population growth".
The statistics are alarming. The world's
population is growing by 75 milion people a
year. At this rate, our population will double
to 7 billion by the year 2000.
However, it is not clear that McNamara's
analysis is correct. Despite the spending of
massive amounts of money by many
countries, particularly the U.S., birth
control programs have had little effect.
John Hodges, a UBC agriculturalist recently
returned from India, says that though every
village has its red triangle-marked birth
control centre, large families are still the
rule because children are still valued as an
economic asset, as security against economic uncertainties.
This suggests overpopulation is a symptom, rather than a cause, of economic insecurity. Barry Morrison, of UBC's Institute
for Asian Research, agrees, claiming that a
decline in the death rate will bring about a
decline in the birth rate.
"When parents believe that their children
will survive, they will reduce the number of
children that they have," he says. He cites
the situation in Sri Lanka where a death rate
approximately equivalent to Canada's is
resulting in a birth rate of 29 per thousand, a
rate which has decreased from the high
30s.
Third World delegates at the World
Population Conference in Bucharest insisted
the cause of overpopulation was social injustice and that population control is a
smokescreen issue put forward by the West
to protect its affluence.
There are many other underlying causes
found within less developed countries.
Geoffrey Hainsworth, working in
development economics at UBC, points out
that since most industrialized countries are
in temperate zones, little research is being
done in tropical agriculture.
Of the current projects, many, like the
miracle grains, are complicated projects
that are difficult and costly to maintain
after the aiding country's part is over. For
example, in Niger, a Chinese-funded
irrigation system stands idle for lack of
trained technicians.
However, as George Winter, a UBC
agricultural economist, insists, this does not
mean we should be encouraging simple
subsidence farming instead, but rather that
much more thought should be given to the
transference problems of technical
breakthroughs like the Green Revolution.
One factor that stands in the way of increased agricultural production in poor
countries is the need for radical land
redistribution. For example, in the fertile
Bahar plain along the Ganges River in India, an entrenched feudal system means the
land produces enough to keep the rich
landlords happy, but only one-tenth of what
it could be producing.
The black market in India also helps to
divert food from those who need it. Last
year, enough food to feed 13 million people
was sold illegally to the highest bidder
'rather than the fixed government price.
This ensured its cost would be beyond the
reach of those who really needed it.
Others point to external causes, the
world's food supply system has not built in
mechanisms to provide security against
crop failures. The Food Conference in Rome
failed in its attempt to set up a world food
bank as a security measure.
"We could plan a mauch better fall-back
position. But because Rome failed, the
world will continue to be at the mercy of the
weather," says Winter.
The world will also continue to be at the
mercy of the commodity market. As U.S.
senator George McGovern says: "The
mechanism of the marketplace is geared to
scarcity, not to reserves. If prices begin to
decline, food is witheld to produce an artificial scarcity, and inflate prices."
This manipulation is made possible,
James McHale, Pennsylvania's agriculture
secretary charges, by the fact that 95 percent of the world's grain reserves are in the
hands of six multinational agribusiness
concerns.
The affluence of the west is another external factor. Americans spread enough
fertilizer on their lawns and golf courses to
feed 65 million people in less developed
countries. Also, according to Harvard
nutritionists Jean Mayer, the amount of food
consumed by 210 million Americans would
feed 1.5 billion Chinese on an average
Chinese diet. And Canadian eating patterns
are no different.
We eat our food in very inefficient forms.
For example, North American grain-fed
cattle consume eight pounds of corn for
every pound of beef they produce. The
advantage of raising cattle for food is that
they are 'ruminants:' capable because of
their digestive system to eat things like
grass and straw that otherwise would not
enter the human food chain.
This advantage is nullified by feeding
them grain, and it means they are competing with humans for food. In the less
developed countries, a person eats an
average of 400 pounds of grain a year, most
of it consumed directly. The average North
American eats the equivalent of one ton of
grain annually. However, only 200 pounds is
consumed directly; the other 1,800 pounds is
consumed in the less efficient forms of
meat, eggs, and milk.
A document prepared for the World Food
Conference shows the developed countries
used more grain for livestock feed in 1970
than "the total human consumption of China
and India."
This discussion of the causes underlying
the current food problem suggests that the
basic issues are moral and systemic.
Hainsworth says the problem is "mainly
that rich people — both inside and outside
the less developed countries — haven't
concerned themselves with the problems of
the poor."
This is reflected in patterns of unequal
distribution. Winter says the world "hasn't
developed the institutions to grow food and
distribute it fairly."
He denies the problem is one of scarcity.
"North America can produce so much corn
that you practically have to give it away,"
he says. A less consumptive lifestyle, such
as that advocated by the church groups who
have signed the the Shakertown Pledge,
might have an important symbolic value.
But as Winter explains, this does not feed
the hungry. "Grain-fed beef is produced
because there is a demand based on our
North American lifestyle.
"If we cut back on the amount of meat
that we eat it doesn't mean that there will be
more grain available for Bangladesh; there
will be less grain production. We saw this in
the LIFT program in 1971 when the
Canadian government encouraged farmers
to grow less grain because we had a surplus
the year before."
Winter goes on to say in order for corn to
get from Saskatchewan to Bangladesh,
someone has to pay. Under the current
world system, this means aid from the industrial countries, or an increase in
development in Bangladesh so it will have
something to trade for food.
And yet, current aid and trade policies
tend to keep the less developed countries
dependent and hungry. The rich minority
can command more than their fair share
from the market while others starve.
The only other solution, says Winter, "is
an alternative world view that says that
they should be fed anyway. But I don't see
this happening in my lifetime."
The food crisis is not the problem of the
less developed countries; it is our problem.
The world has the resources to support
many more people than it does at present,
but not at North American standards.
The problem is not one of shortage, but of
sharing. We have to be prepared to make the
sacrifices and to work to build a just world
system that will guarantee everyone their
fair share.

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