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The Ubyssey Sep 30, 1965

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 Vol. XLVIII, No. 6    VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER, 30, 1965'
CA 4-3916
—powell hargrave photo*.
GOING TO THE BIRDS, engineers claim feathered friend is a hawk captured atop
their building. Little fellow flaps enthusiastically after drinking dropperful of hoaded
suds.  Engineers   plan  to  use their  new  mascot "to  hunt  sciencemen".
NOBODY TOLD GAGE
Pearson claims
loan fund hike
The federal government says it will increase the amount
of money available for student loans.
Prime Minister Lester Pear
son said in a release Sept. 24
the increase was caused by an
unexpected large demand for
student loans.
Walter Gage, dean of inter-
faculty and student affairs, said
Wednesday he has not yet been
notified of the increase in
funds.
The Canada Student Loans
Plan makes a government
guaranteed bank loan of up to
$1,000 a year available to
eligible students.
The statement said the provincial governments have been
notified that the federal government will recommend to
parliament that the provincial
allocations be enlarged to be
able to cope with these increases.
The loans plan, which went
into effect in September, 1964,
had issued loans to 42,500 Canadian students totalling $26.4
million by June 30.
Clubbers clog
armories  again
Clubs day '65 has something for everyone, from
mountain-climbing to girl-
chasing.
Sixty-eight UBC clubs will
be represented at noon today
in the armory, when the
campus groups compete for
new members.
Among the displays will
be the judo and dance clubs'
exhibit stages, a model cabin
from the varsity outdoor
club, aqua society's fish tank,
and a pre-dental club's exhibit of $4,200 worth of dental equipment.
Two new clubs have been
added this year: the Student
Committee for Ending War
in Viet Nam, and the Cuban
Friendship Club.
DIGNITARIES DIG
ANGUS, CENTRE
OPENINGS TODAY
George R. Pearkes,
lieutenant - general of
B.C., will officially open
the Henry Angus building today.
UBC chancellor Phyllis G. Ross will chair the
ceremonies at 11:30 a.m.
for the naming of the
fine arts centre and at
2:30 pjn. for the opening
of the Henry Angus
building.
The fine arts centre
consists of the Frederic
Wood theatre and the
Frederic Lasserre building.
Jean Martineau, chairman of the Canada Council, will officially name
the fine arts centre after
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie,
who retired in 1962 after
serving as UBC's president for 18 years.
The Henry Angus
building is named after
dean emeritus Henry Angus, a UBC faculty member from 1919 to 1956.
Get clubbed
noon today
at armory
(SEE STORY THIS PAGE)
Fee fighter
recruiting
drive opens
NO REPLY
By BILL GRAF
The  Alma  Mater  Society  today launches  an
for workers on its Educational Action Program.
EAP is a 17-point AMS-spon-
sored program to resist fee
increases.
Recruiting  begins   at   clubs
. .day, in the armory. EAP representatives will sit at a booth to
discuss the plan with students.
Five committees are to be
formed under EAP, AMS first
vice-president Peter Braund
said Wednesday.
The speakers' bureau committee will bring the fee increase question to the general
public. Members will contact
community leaders to disseminate EAP principles and question politicians at public meetings.
The seminar, or teach-in committee, earmarked for a $1,600
slice of the $3,800 EAP budget,
will organize a series of panel
discussions and lectures in January.
Topics will include the relationship of the student and the
university; education financing
in Europe and North America,
and the fee question.
The committee will also com-
| pose and distribute a series of
| briefs to high school student
councils.
Braund said a large number
of volunteers will be needed
for the national student day
committee.
This committee will plan the
EAP mass rally and march to
the Vancouver courthouse Oct.
27.
A brief, demanding universal
accessibility to higher education, will be presented to the
B.C. education department and
to the UBC Board of Governors.
A research committee,
formed mainly of post-graduate
students will consider higher
education and student finances,
prepare question - and - answer
sheets for use by the speaker's
bureau, and compose briefs for
the National Student Day Committee.
A residents' seminar committee, during the weeks of Oct.
4-8 and 11-15, will hold a series
of seminars in student residences.
Braund said the EAP has top
priority among AMS programs
this fall.
"This is a golden opportunity
for students to learn the issues
and place them before the public," said the vice-president.
"A total of 40 or more students for the various committees should make the EAP a
success," said Braund.
appeal
Marriage
put down
By GORDON McLAUGHLIN
Lack of response from the
administration has dampened
Alma Mater Society plans for
married students' housing at
UBC.
AMS president Byron Hender said Wednesday: "I wrote
president John Macdonald in
July asking that if students
would undertake to build married student residences at UBC,
would the land be available?
•    •    •
"I have received no reply
yet," said Hender.
He said it is obvious there is
a lack of married accommodation at UBC, and it is time the
situation was alleviated.
"The students could build a
100 unit complex for about $1.5
million. It would be on a breakeven basis, with rent held low,"
Hender said.
"We could finance it through
Central Mortgage and Housing,
or possibly a private donor.
But we do not want to solicit
for a donor and have the land
refused."
•    •    •
Acting-director of housing
Knute Buttedahl said as far as
he knows there are no plans
to provide married housing on
campus.
There are about 2,300 married students at UBC, but only
210 units for married students
on campus.
AMS first vice-president Bob
Cruise said, "UBC is moving
more and more toward becoming a graduate school. It is
obvious that the number of
married students will increase
rapidly. Provision must be
made for them now."
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Fi|iiiiiiiIP|j(ilif
liSNBKiilXiSKilii Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 30, 1965
SAYS TROTSKYITE
Viet war caused
by imperialists
By SUSAN GRANSBY
A young touring Toronto socialist Wednesday blamed
the Viet   Nam   war   on   "the   United   States'   imperialistic
policy".
Gordon  House
calls  for help
Gordon House, a subsidiary of Neighborhood House,
needs student volunteers.
Gordon House director,
Mrs. Joyce Fitzpatrick says
volunteers to counsel teenagers and conduct activities
for underprivililedged children on a part-time basis were
needed.
The house is at the corner
of Nelson and Jervis.
Kashmir row
scrubs trip
Twenty UBC students will
not be leaving for India — yet.
The India-Pakistan dispute
has forced the students ..Canadian University Service Overseas volunteers, to delay their
departures for two-year assignments in India.
If necessary, the volunteers
say, they'll wait until spring to
leave. They are hoping to depart this fall.
Three have returned to their
homes in Eastern Canada. The
other 17 are working at temporary jobs in B.C.
The students have taken
courses in teaching, community
development, languages, religion, politics, history and economy of their assigned areas.
NOW!
From San Francisco's
Jazz Workshop
FREDDIE REDD
QUARTET
Freddie Redd, Piano
Philly Joe Jones, Drums
Walter Benton, Tenor Sax
Bob Maize, Bass
"Redd is more than a 'promising' Jazz Pianist. He is an
assertive, exhilarating Jazzman." —Down Beat.
Open 9 p.m.
Thurs. $2.00 — Fri.-Sat. $2.50
BLUE
3625 W.BROADWAY   73W22J
Why pay $2.50 when you
need only pay $1.00. Available only to Oct. 10th are
Blue Horn subscriptions at
$5.00 for 6 months.
This will entitle the holder to a reduced admission
of $1.00 ANY NIGHT
Available at the Blue Horn
or The Jazz Soc. Booth on
Clubs Day.
BLUE HORN
3625 W.BROADW/W   731-6722
Ernie Tate, one of three
speakers here, said the U.S. is
an aggressive, expansionist
country looking for new markets and areas to conquer.
The Toronto speakers were
sponsored by the UBC Socialist club.
Tate, Harry Stone, and Bill
Laskov, representatives of the
Workers' Vanguard and the
League for Socialist Action
(both Trotskyite), are half-way
through a six-month speaking
tour across Canada.
Tate said the purpose of the
"roup is "not to solve the conflict, but to promote discussion
and thought on Vietnam."
He said: "China and Russia
have no imperialist interests,
as there is no necessity for
them to extend their frontiers."
Stone, talking of the protests going on in the U.S., said
campus committees are "putting forward the idea of educating the people and giving
them the other side of what I
call the truth."
Hayes tackles
NDP leader
By MIKE HUNTER
Burnaby — UBC's 1965
athlete of the year, Dick
Hayes, will tackle New
Democratic national
leader, Tommy Douglas,
in the Nov. 8 federal election.
Hayes, 25, was named
the liberal candidate for
Burnaby-Coquitlam at a
nomination meeting here
Wednesday night.
Law president on last
year's student council,
Hayes was captain of the
UBC rugby team last
vear and a member of
the B.C. Rep's side.
He is now working for
a Vancouver law firm.
Hayes' campaign committee is headed by last
year's AMS president,
Roger McAfee, Law II.
"We're not going after
the uncommitted votes
like the opposition is,"
said Hayes.
"We're going after the
whole damn thing."
SVEN LETH
Keep Fit Closs
Evenings
Gymnastics  for
Men & Women
Mornings
Women's Gymnastics
& Swimming
DANISH  ATHLETIC  CLUB
1155 W.  11th, Vancouver
733-0378 eves.
Faculty and Students
Are invited to
THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
ANNUAL FALL TEA
to welcome  new foreign students
on OCTOBER 3rd
Sunday  between 3:30 and  5:30 p.m.
at International House
Community   Members and   Friends  50c Students free
JOIN THE
SQUASH
CLUB
f K E t        Professional
Lessons to beginners
Equipment for members
West Point Grey
United Church
4595 W.  8th  (at  Tolmie)
Rev. Wilfred Fearn,
Minister
World-Wide   Communion
Sunday, October 3rd
Services   at   11   a.m.
and 7.30 p.m.
8.30 p.m. KAIROS
Young Adults Group
Speaker:
Mr. Howard C. Green, QC
i
I
FORMAL AMD
SEMI-FORMAL
B
Rental and Sales
TUXEDOS    —   WHITE    OINNEE
JACKETS - TAILS - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
STUDENT   RATES
McC
UISH fT£,w"
MON.-SAT.-9:Se to 5:30
2046 W. 41st
PH. 263-3610
Psych strike
stalls Laval
QUEBEC (CUP)—Seventy-
two psychology students at
Laval University went on
strike last week demanding
a separate school of psychology be formed at the university.
The   psychology   depart-.
ment is currently part of the
faculty of education.
Students are demanding
the department be given autonomy, and claim they have
the support of their professors in their fight with the
university administration.
They are using their time
for "study sessions" to keep
up with their courses.
Their colleagues in other
departments of the faculty of
education declare they will
not be "strike-breakers" with
respect to classes taken in
common.
THE WHEELERS
SALES AND   SERVICE
4368 W. 10th Ave. 224-1828
HONDA SPECIALISTS
SPECIALS:
RAIN SUITS . . . $2.99
HELMETS .... $10.95
10% Down and
24 Months to Pay
YOUNG MEN
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts   &   Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue Blazers
Directors'   Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
OVER 2300 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608 Granville (at 10th)   4691 Kingsway (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by Sears)   HE 5-1160
Frederic Wood  Theatre
Dept. of Theatre
Revival of Hit Musical Revue
IN THE ROUGH
Student Performance — Wed., Oct. 6, 8:30 p.m.
ALL TICKETS $1.00
Your only chance to see this widely acclaimed performance starring Roma Hearn, D. M. Hughes, James
Johnston and others.
BOX OFFICE ROOM 207, FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Dean's Welcomes Back
U.B.C. Students
TRY OUR TAKE HOME SERVICE
(Dsjcw'a tHsAJtawuxid and (Dininq foom
4544 West 10th Phone 2244919
RED  HOT" ONE WEEK SPECIAL
Oct. 1st-Oct. 7th
Konlshlroku of Japan (since
1876) have now produced a
fully automatic split-frame
camera of sufficiently high
quality to equal or better
many full frame 35 mm.
cameras. The 6 element fl.9
amber coated Hexanor^ lens
has the optical quality and
the special programmed
"Copal B" shutter to l/800th
of a second gives wide range
automatic exposure control.
When light is too low the
shutter locks and a red signal shows in the viewfinder. Also visable in the viewfinder are
symbol focus settings and shutter speed from l/30th to 1/SOOth.
Lever film wind, double exposure prevention, auto resetting counter,
etc. Complete wih hood case and straps; lists for 84.95.
"RED HOT"
SPECIAL
Including 1 free 40
exp. roll color film,
proc'd &  mounted.
$5988
Old A.S.A. 10 Meters
Good for experimenters, etc.,
meter movement photocells,
etc. COMPLETE   49c
Kerrisdale Cameras
2170 W. 41st     AM 6-2622
Honey's Cameras
2287 W. Bdwy. RE 8-5717 Thursday, September 30,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
QUEBEC QUERIES'
French save us
from U.S.—Jean
French-Canadian culture is Canada's protection against
the invasion of American  culture,  Quebec premier  Jean
Lesage told 2,200 students in the armory Tuesday.
"French-Canadians feel
PETITE LESLIE BIRD, P. E. I., proves you don't have to be a brute to excel in physical
fitness trials. Miss Bird, an accomplished gymnast, posted top marks last week in
women's   division   of   fitness   tests   required  of first-time   registrants at  UBC.
Fit UBC frosh faster
than American cousins
By LINDA  CHARLES
A Hong Kong badminton
gymnastic finalist topped the
results of compulsory fitness
tests at UBC.
Victor Yang, comm. I, stood
out in the men's division, and
Leslie Bird phys. ed. I, topped the women's division.
Yang, who arrived in Canada only two weeks ago, made
a standing broad jump of
eight feet three inches.
Albert Laithwaite, director
of the tests which are run by
the physical education department, described this jump as
well above the North American average.
Yang has represented Hong
Kong in international track
and field competition and won
that city's badminton championship.
Miss Bird's 19.8 seconds
was the fastest time in the
shuttle run and she managed
ten chin-ups — far above the
women's average.
She placed fifth in the national senior women's gymnastic competition last year.
More than 2,100 students
registering at UBC for the
first time took the tests.
Laithwaite said the results
appeared to be above the
North American norm.
Names of students who have
not participated in the tests
will be submitted to the registrar's office.
Laithwaite  also  said more
than 1,200 students had signed
up for ithe voluntary physical
education program.
"This    is    very    encouraging," said Laithwaite.
No ballots
for 35,000
Panty raiders meet
stony SF resistance
Engineers got stoned last weekend.
And Simon Fraser atop Burnaby mountain has added something new to its list of firsts.
Twenty engineers participated in the first panty raid at
SF's women's residence.
The girls blamed UBC engineers for the incident but the
engineers said Monday that if
the raid involved UBC engineers it was not official.
Observers said the raid took
place between 8 p.m. and 9
p.m. Friday.
One girl said she threw
stones at the intruders afte^
she lost some of her apparel.
She said the engineers finally left when all the girls joined
together in throwing stones.
Fund committee ended
with increased fees
The Alma Mater Society's fund drive committee has
ended its mission.
AMS first vice-president Bob Cruise said Wednesday,
"The committee has ceased to exist because of the fee
increase."
The committee was formed to raise money for the
Three-Universities Capital Fund Drive from students'
parents.
increase placed too heavy a burden on the students, who
frequently have to rely on parents for financing their university education."
"The management of the Three-Universities Capital
Fund Drive Committee did not plan their solicitation at
such a time when students were available," he said.
OTTAWA (CUP) — Almost
lalf of all Canadian students
eligible to vote in the Nov. 8
election may be disfranchised,
according to estimates released
today by the Canadian Union
of Students.
Of the 75,000 students of voting age, about 35,000 live more
than 25 miles from their parents' home, according to CUS
estimates based on figures from
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
Most of these students—more
than 24,000 — live-more than
100 miles from home, making
it quite difficult for them to
travel to their home constituency to vote if they do not
succeed in getting on the voting list in the university constituency.
These students "disfranchised by distance" represent
roughly one out of every 300
Canadian voters.
CUS man Malcolm Scott, who
released the figures, commented: "The student vote is
nearly as large as the armed
forces vote. Can you imagine
the fuss if one-third of the servicemen were disfranchised?"
they
have an important contribution
to make to all of Canada even
if it is only to wipe out the
threat of an invasion by American culture," he said.
He emphasized that Quebec
did not want to impose this
culture on the rest of the country.
He said this could be done
without the two cultures colliding.
"It is possible," he said amid
applause.
In reply to a student's charge
that English Canada was being
pushed around by outrageous
demands by Quebec, Lesage
said there would always be
extremists.
"And we will always attach
to them more importance than
they have," he said.
He cited a telephone call he
had received Monday on the
Jack Webster show. Said the
caller, "Why don't you go back
to France?"
"I am a 10th generation Ca-
nadien," said Lesage, "I would
not know where to go."
He said the Quebecois had
replaced the ultra-conservatism
of their past by a questioning
attitude.
"It was in this ultra-conservatism that many thought they
saw the true face of Quebec,"
he said.
The people of Quebec looked
upon provincial autonomy as a
living reality.
"They believe that sovereignty . . . or . . . autonomy
which is not made use of and
which is divided against itself
cannot survive for long," he
said.
In reply to a question, Lesage said the reduction of university tuition fees was impossible at the present.
"But we hope we will come
to the point where we can provide free education at all levels
including university level," he
said.
BOB CRUISE
. . . fed up
Camp food
drives Cruise
to action
Alma Mater Society first
vice-president Bob Cruise got
fed up with one meal at Fort
Camp Sept. 20.
As  a  result Cruise  volunteered    Monday    to     become
chairman of a committee to investigate food services.
"We won't be after anyone
in particular," he said, "what
we do intend to do is hold a
full investigation and find out
what can be done.
"There've been a lot of committees from residences designed to do something about
this, but nothing's ever come
out of them," he said.
"A survey has been held
which will be our first source
of information on how students
feel about residences.
"This survey has to be programmed, and after that's done,
we can work from there.
"Any student who's interest-
ad in this should see me,"
Cruise said.
■•'" ■-•   f'fi
ifiRa
GODDAM DIRT say Joe Workmen as they rumble around
behind Totem Park clearing site for new 3,000-seat
Thunderbird Stadium due for completion in a year. THtmsm
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage  in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, SEPT.  30,   1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blake.
Fifty Years
In the Fall of 1915 at the Fairview shacks where
the Vancouver General Hospital stands, UBC held its
first lecture.
And now, a half century later, a poster outside
Brock Hall announces a ceremony will be held in Brock
Friday to mark the anniversary of the event.
"Fifty years in action," the poster says.
"Is that last bit one word?" asked one interested
Ubyssey reporter.
The answer, of course, is "Hardly". Our extensive
campus, with a continuing construction boom in full
swing, is progress indeed.
But progress doesn't just happen. And Friday's milestone in the university's history is a good time to take
note of the fact.
The Great Trek, the building of the Armory, the
War Memorial Gymnasium, and contributions to the
construction of Sherwood Lett House in Lower Mall:
all these are parts of UBC's progress which students
have contributed.
In the Back Mac campaign of two years ago, students again fought hard to add their bit to the improvement of the university. The decision to go ahead with
the $4 million student union building is another example
of student action for the betterment of this campus.
But in each case the student body has acted because
of the refusal, or slowness, of proper authorities —
administration or governmental — to act.
All in all, the students at UBC have a superb record
in adding to their university. Over the last 50 years, they
have taken to heart the old chestnut on the university
crest.
Today, the student body at UBC is engaged in a
struggle to improve the university once more. We are
now fighting for what is called universal accessibility —
the right for any citizen of the province with ability
to have the opportunity to attend UBC.
To do so without facing any other barrier but the
limits of his intellect, or his willingness to raise a little
mental sweat.
And just as the student body of UBC treked, back
Mac-ed, and built the Armory, the gymnasium, a residence, and are planning a new SUB, so we will open
the doors of this university.
Once again, we are going to win.
MYGiaFRIENU
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NERVE
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Regarding your editorial of
Sept. 23 entitled "Humbly,
Proudly" I have this to say:
The nerve of some people's
children!
Phyllis  Pilecki
MANNERS
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The references made to
Dr. Macdonald as "mystery
man", the whole tone of the
editorial "Humbly, proudly"
were — to put it mildly —
in very poor taste, in fact
close to insult. At the same
time the article recited the
achievements of the "mystery main", proving that
these are by no means mysterious, but very tangible.
Just have a look around the
campus!
Dr. Macdonald has given
a very elaborate explanation
for the most important problem the students were concerned about. I did not hear
many boos and hisses.
And what was the result?
A quite condescending "perhaps adequate" from Mr.
Hender.
If that is the tone that the
best university paper can
use toward its own president, you have a lot to learn
about manners.
A  faculty   member
SIGNUS ACHE
Editor. The Ubyssey, Six:
This year's crop of red
painted notices is already beginning to show up on the
sidewalks.
Inspired by these signs I
have come up with a brilliant idea.
I suggest that a large slab
of concrete be placed in C
lot. All amateur sign painters on campus should then
be encouraged to leave samples of their art on this slab.
The benefits of such a plan
would be four-fold. First, we
would gain a new campus
monument (consider what
the same sort of thing did
for iBrauman's Chinese). Secondly, we would free potential artists from the humiliation of having to skulk
about in the wee hours in
order to practice their art.
Thirdly, the rest of the
campus would be spared the
signs    that    didn't     quite
measure up to standard.
Finally,    if    the    craze
caught on we might see the
day when "C" lot was paved.
Nicky   Phillips
Arts IV
GROUP ANYONE?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Since Dr. Immanuel Veli-
kovsky in 1950 published his
first book, Worlds in Collision, there has been considerable interest, both for and
against his theories, in scientific circles. With the appearance of his subsequent works,
Ages in Chaos, Earth in Upheaval and Oedipus and AJch-
naton, the arguments have
flowed freely, throughout the
continent. And as scientific
discoveries are made, more
and more of Velikovsky's
theories are being proved.
Accordingly, last January,
Professor H. H. Hess, Chairman of the Geology Department of Princeton University,
founded the "Cosmos and
Chronos Study Group" to
study and discuss Velikovsky's works.
Many other colleges have
followed Professor Hess' lead,
and have organized branch
groups, which are to be kept
in touch by means of a bulletin, soon to be released.
The founding of these study
groups marks a new era in
the history of education
The recent unrest among
student bodies indicates,
among other things, a dissatisfaction with outdated
theories and the rejection of
daring new ideas without
examination and trial. These
study groups are providing
direction for inquiring minds,
unhibited by dogma, and
striving for interdisciplinary
syntheses.
Over the past few years I
have collected correspondence with Dr. Velikovsky,
and articles referring to his
theories.
I would be happy to make
the data so collected available to any group of UBC
staff and/or students who
would like to form a Cosmos
and Chronos Study Group on
the UBC campus. If I can
help by providing such data,
and providing an introduction
to Professor Hess, please let
me know: CA 4-1247.
H. F. R. Adams,
BA. Sc, P. Eng.
Rocking Ian meets the White Coat
News	
Associate ._
City	
Photo	
Sports	
Ass't News
Asst City
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Ron Rlter
George Reamsbottom
    Richard   Blair
 Bert   MacKinnon
Ed  Clark
   Dan   Mullen
Janet  Matheson
Al   Donald
Page Prlday  John  Kelsey
Managing      Norm   Betts
Features  Mike Bolton
CUP     Don  Hull
Sue Gransby, Stu Gray, Ian
Cameron, Rosemary Hyman, Terri
Brown, Linda Charles, Bill Graf,
Gordon McLaughlin, Brent Cromie,
Paul Terry. Ann (Pills) Rate],
Mike Kvenich, Robin Russell,
Carol-Anne Baker, Pat Henshowy,
Petrina Gregson, Derek Blackie,
Kurt Hilger, Powell Hargrave,
Dennis Gans, Anne Bishop, Doug
Halverson, Marilyn Leese, Maxine
Seefrin, and last, but not least,
Fearon Whitney.
By IAN CAMERON
"Treat me like you did the
night befooore, treat me . . ."
Oh, hello there. Didn't see
you come in. I'm just trying
to remember some more of the
songs I heard last week, when
I went to three rock and roll
things in a row and "I want
you, I need you, I think I'm
. . ." Oh, hello there, I didn't
see you come in.
•     •     •
I saw Tom Northcott on
Thursday in the Brock and he
was singing Folk Rock and
"Go away from my window,
leave . . ." Oh, hello there, I
didn't see you come in.
I saw the Viceroys on Friday night at the Armory and
they played Beatle music and
"I didn't want to spoil the
party . . ." Oh, hello there, I
didn't see you come in.
You should see the people
that go to these things, they
all wear dirty jeans and have
long hair and high boots and
I think it's- just great.
I can still feel the beat and
I think I'll dance now or maybe I should sing instead "He's
the universal soldier and he's
. . ." Oh, hello there, I didn't
see you come in.
•      •      •
I think that the drummer
on Friday at the Armory
was real great, he sure worked up a hurricane and I can
hardly wait to hear them
again because that beat is
just great it really gets to you
and "Just give me loove . . ."
Oh, hello there, I didn't see
you come in.
On Saturday I went to the
Gym and saw the Chessmen
and   they   played   big   beat
music and I wasn't shy anymore and I joined in and
danced the frug and the
mashed potato and the bird
and the. cross and the co-ed
and ''Boom buddy boom
buddy bum bam doodle . . ."
Oh, hello there, I didn't see
you come in.
I can hardly wait for next
weekend to come. I hear
there's a real great dance on
Friday and another one on
Saturday, and there's a great
thing   on  Sunday  night   too.
*     •     •
"C'mon and twist again
like we did last summer . . ."
Oh, hello there, I didn't see
you come in.
And I hear there's a great
show on TV at 3:30 with some
other groups that I haven't
seen yet and it'll mean missing my 3:30s, but I don't care
if I can just hear that music:
I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm . . ." Oh, hello
there, I didn't see you come
in.
• • •
And yesterday I was walking down the corridor of the
Buchanan Building and I was
listening to my transistor and
I heard the Animals, and I
started to dance Bum. biddy
bom doodle bang bam . . ."
Oh, hello there, I didn't see
you come in.
If you want, I'll show you
how I was dancing, if you'll
just take this white thing off,
and "Please take it off, I'm
all right now.
"I won't be able to see Teen
Beat and I ain't gonna love
me do gum buddy love me
tonight the way we met in
Canada, he's fighting for
subterr . . ." Oh, hell, Thursday,  September  30,   1965
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
EAP to show student concern
'manifesto march no hay ride
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The fight for tuitionless
university education in British Columbia starts today.
After months of hard research by the AMS fee fight
committee and later by the
Education Action Committee,
UBC students will be able to
enlist today in the forces preparing for the protest actions
against spiralling education
costs.
EAP chairmen Bob Cruise
and Peter Braund have erected a booth in the clubs' day
display in the Armoury to
publicize and enlist help for
the fee fight. This is step one
in their massive program.
Climax of the program first
term will be a, student march
to the Vancouver Court House
on Oct. 27. ffhis will be
UBC's part in the Canada-
wide National Student Day
program.
The march will be preceded by a noon-hour chicken-
fry hosted by Home Economics and Agriculture students
Automation fear
probed in depth
Will automation replace
you?
This is one of the questions to be discussed at the
annual three-day Science
Symposium beginning Friday.
UBC students and faculty
will head down to Walla
Walla Biological Research
Station, Rosario, Wash., to
discuss probems posed by
modern scientific and technological developments.
Topics for discussion will
range from "Evolution of
Man" to "The Science of
Communication."
Cost for the weekend is
$6.50 and students can register at the AMS office.
in the main mall. The fry
will be followed by speeches
and folksinging.
Following the rally students will ride buses to Sunset Beach and then march in
faculties through the city.
After nailing a manifesto of
universal accessibility to post-
secondary education to the
door of the courthouse, the
students will march to the
Bayshore Inn, where university administrators will be attending the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
convention.
Vice-president Cruise hopes
a representative of the administrators will answer stu-
FOREGROUND will be a
semi - regular page-five feature intended to give an in-
depth look at campus news.
Today, Ubyssey council reporter Doug Halvenon presents some of the issues involved in the Education
Action Program.
dent question on university
finances.
Cruise said: "The prime
point of the National Student
Day is not that the students
are dissatisfied, but that they
are concerned over the present lack of opportunity for
post-secondary education for
everyone.
"The pressure of non-payment of second-term, fees was
to show the students' concern
about fees and to get the
board of governors to be
aware of it.
"We have had tremendous
response from the students
and the rumblings around
campus show they are with
us," he said.
FROSH BALL-
CORSAGE ? ?
Call Strathcona Floral
Co. Ltd.
5555 W. Blvd.
AM 1-7271
MAKE YOUR
WEEKEND
RESERVATION
EARLY
Type of  Car
24 Hour Day
Weekends
Acadian
Chevy II
$5.00 & 5c
$12.00 &  5c
Valiant
Comet
$6.00 & 5c
$14.00 & 5c
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
$8.00 & 5c
$18.00  & 5c
Save up to 40% on Special overnight rate. Any car in
our fleet — $5 & 5c per mile.
Make Your Reservations You Pay Only For
In Advance The Gas You Use
BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
Independent students on
campus have submitted a petition for a referendum to decide whether to withhold
second-term fees indefinitely.
Council has accepted the
referendum as a point of
EAP program. It will be held
Oct. 29 ,two days after the
march. The outcome will decide second-term projects in
the fight.
The EAP program has been
designed to reach the two
areas where interest should
be kindled in higher education problems, the students
and their administrators, and
the public.
With the march, the fight
will break out of the boundaries of the campus and the
public will become the centre
of the campaign.
Co-chairman Peter Braund
said: ''The whole purpose of
National Student Day all
across Canada is to get the
idea of universal accessability
across to the public.
"We are not making the
march a hayride," said
Cruise. **It will not be a
group of students out for the
afternoon.
"We want to change the
public's view of the student
as a child just out of puberty
who should take his problems
to his father."
MAC SPEECH CONTINUED:
WARD AGAINST REBELLION'
The Ubyssey presented in
this space last Friday excerpts of president John Macdonald's welcoming speech
to UBC students. This is the
second half of his remarks.
I turn now to another problem that confronts many universities all over the world,
but which, happily has never
yet been a serious problem at
UBC.
I choose to speak about this
problem because it is a danger
that is growing and one which
all students should seek to
guard against. I refer to a
growing tendency toward irresponsibility and a growing
incidence of lawlessness among
meaningless riots in which
students played a major role
in many United States centers
on the recent Fourth of July
holiday.
BAY
STARTS TOMORROW
PSYCHO
Anthony Perkins
Janet Leigh
Plus   BEDTIME   STORY
Marlon Brando. David Niven
Shirley Jones
DELTA
STARTS TOMORROW
THE PRIZE
Paul Newman, Elke Sommer
Edwbrd G. Robinson
THE  NEW   INTERNS
Michael Callan   ::   Barbara Eden
(Adult)
I cite a strike by students
over a 10 cent increase in
cafeteria charges.
In general, I sense a growing atmosphere of what in
its mildest form might be
called impatience with the
status quo. In its commonest
form I think it is rebellion
against the establishment. In
its most extreme form it includes outright lawlessness
and even violence.
The causes are complex
and I know of no full and
adequate explanation of what
is happening. Many students'
crusades are orderly and
within the law and many of
them are associated for high
purpose. A great deal of student activity in respect to
civil right for Negroes would
fall   into  this   category.
All too often, however,
the demonstrations are meaningless, without focus, and
represent rebellion for its
own sake.
New Location
1058 Alberni
Phone
6854)536
1
1945 - 20th Anniversary - 1965
STORE-WIDE
BOOK SALE
Up to 80% Off
All New Books
Starts Fri., Oct. 1 - Ends Sat., Oct. 16
Store Hours: 9 - 5:30 p.m., Friday 9-9 p.m.
Wide selection of —
Canadiana, Paperbacks, Children's, Art & Technical
Books. Records and Chinese Art Prints, and many
more!
Sample Bargains:
"COUNTDOWN TO GREY CUP" The Story of the
(B.C. Lions by Dave Skrien with Dick Beddoes.
Regular $4.95 — Sale price $3.50
"THE SCALPEL, THE SWORJD" The Story of Dr.
Norman Bethune. By Ted Allan and Sidney Gordon.
Paperback. Regular $1.65 — Sale price 85c
"AND QUIET FLOWS THE DON" A Novel in Four
Volumes. By M. Sholokhov. Clothbound. 2800 pages.
Reguar $5.95 — Sale price $3.95
"THE MARRIAGE ART" by J. E. Eichenlaub, M.D.
Paperback. Regular 60c — Sale price 40c
Limited number of each title in stock.
First come, first served.
All sales cash and final
CO-OP BOOK STORE
341 W. PENDER
MU 5-5836
CLAUDE: But it's the third time
in a week that I've lost an Indian
wrestling match.
BEA: It's remarkable how that
soft lambswool sweater can take
it. Still looks great for other kinds
of activities, too.
CLAUDE: I knew it would stand
up. It's famous British Byford
quality.
BEA: Oh, Byford! Designer,
Hardy Amies!
CLAUDE: Who's he?
BEA: He's an international designer known all over the world
for expert styling. He's from
England. The British really know
wool and how to handle it.
CLAUDE: What's an Indian
wrestling match when I have
you, and Byford, too!     „.,.„
this exclusive, made in England,
at better stores
everywhere.
BYFORD DESIGN CONSULTANT: HARDY AMIES Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 30,  1965
Some didn't
make it...
VANCOUVER
THE     MAGAZINE    ABOUT     VANCOUVER     PEOPLE
ABOUT TOWN
■*» Thursday, September 30,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
ROW, ROW, ROW, never say NO, is part of policy of hard work and dedication by head coach Wayne Pretty as he prepares UBC Thunderbird
Varsity Eight for World's Championship in September, next year. 'Birds objective this season is Western Sprints in San Francisco in May,. Canadian
Henley at St. Catherines in July and American National Championships in New York in August. Two famed UBC oarsmen Roger Jackson and George
Hungerford won gold medal for Canada in Tokyo Olympics last year, in p airs competition. Pretty welcomes all freshmen.
FOR THE BIRDS
By ROBERT BANNO
In his welcome speech,
UBC v president John Macdonald made several boasts
about the state of UBC athletics.
He said:
(1) "We have by far the largest acreage of playing
fields in Canada.
(2) "When present development ... is complete, we
will have the most [acres
of playing fields] in North
America.
(3) "We have the largest
number of sports in Canada."
•     •     •
Phooey!
Once again we are exposed
to the old drivel proclaiming
the advantages and moral
superiority of participation
sports over spectator sports.
It's a line used with monotonous regularity by UBC's
top brass as their main argument against the institution
of athletic scholarships.
The argument contains
several erroneous assumptions. It assumes a mutually
exclusive division between
participation and spectator
sports.
No blend of the two is even
considered.
It assumes, moreover, that
the institution of Big Time
spectator sports will have a
dampening effect on participation.
It would seem that, in ac-
Bird  Calls
sales drop
Sale of Bird Calls, the
student telephone book, are
down from last year.
Only 1,000 copies of the
book have been sold since
Sept. 13, compared to 1,200
during the same period last
year.
There are 5,500 copies
being printed, an increase of
500 over last year.
Pre-sale tickets can be
purchased for 75 cents at
noon from Phrateres girls in
Brock, Buchanan and in
front of the bookstore.
HELP WANTED
SECRETARY   RECEPTIONIST
FOR  CHAPLAINS'  OFFICE
Simon Fraser University
5 hours daily
Call Rev. Ian Hotter
Phone 431-2474
tuality, witnessing top-flight
athletics spurs young students
to great participation.
And not even considered is
the fact that spectator sports
will supply the revenue that
participation sports require.
•      •      •
SF Chancellor Gordon
Shrum, for one, sees nothing
even in athletic scholarships
and Big Time sports.
If his dreams come true,
1969 will see the small Burnaby school tackling Pacific
Coast giants like Washington
and California while major
college-size UBC will still be
beating the ignominous
Prairie bushes.
The pity of this lies not in
that SF is small, nor in that
it is new, with no tradition or
moneyed alumni.
It lies, rather, in the fact
that almost all of UBC's
coaches, many faculty members, alumni and a majority
of its students have for years
been drumming for the institution of athletic scholarships.
SF has succeeded in doing
what most UBCers have
wanted to do for years. And
it has succeeded, not because
of clamoring of students and
faculty, but because of the
foresight and drive of Chancellor Shrum.
It is not for want of desire
on the part of UBC students
or alumni that we are doomed
to athletic ignominy.
It's for want of desire on
the part of UBC's administrators.
IN VOLLEYBALL
Yanks, Russkies clash
The Hammer and Sickle will
flutter beside the Stars and
Stripes atop the War Memorial
Gym Oct. 16.
The Russian and U.S. men's
and women's national volleyball teams will battle in exhibition matches on the floors of
UBC's gym as they conclude
a 12-game tour of Canada.
The powerful Russian men's
team won the gold medal at the
the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, losing only five of 30 sets.
The U.S. men's squad placed
ninth.
The   Soviet   women's   team
Osborne  knocks
gym  mixer  mess
Robert Osborne, director
of physical education has
made an official complaint
concerning the condition of
Memorial Gym after the
frosh mixer Sept. 17.
In a letter to student council Monday, Osborne said,
"The mess in the washrooms
particularly due to vomiting
and excess drinking nearly
caused one janitor to quit."
He said the situation probably resulted from insuf*
ficient supervision.
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up  to Advanced
Level  -  Segovia Technigue
W. PARKER
Reeltalfst. 682.1096
GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED
STUDENT LOANS
For Full Information
See Our University Branch at
University Boulevard and
Western Parkway
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
OverlSOObranchestoeerveyou
captured the silver medal losing only to the Japanese gold
medallist squad.
The U.S. women were fifth.
The 1964 Olympic Games
was the first time volleyball
was included on the Olympic
program.
The   Canadian   tour,   begin
ning in Halifax, is being financed in part by a $21,000
grant from the Canadian
Health and Fitness Council.
Tickets for the UBC exhibitions are on sale at The Vancouver Ticket Centre and all
Eaton's stores for $3 and $2
reserved and $1 rush.
BEAT THE BUS
Make your   grades   better
by making it to your class on time.
Solve your transportation problems with a good car
Take advantage of our fall clearance sale and save
1959 Volvo $1000
1960 Volkswagen     800
1959 Volkswagen Window Van      800
1956 Austin A90 6-Cylinder       500
1959 Hillman   Convert.         800
1961 Vauxhall Station Wagon     850
1957 Dodge   Automatic        400
1957 Volkswagen      700
For the sporting set try these for size:
1963 Black TR4 in perfect condition   ..$1695
1964 Sunbeam Alpine with removable
hard top for only. $2150
There are many good buys in our used car dept. For
those who want to trade up to a new 1966 Volvo the best
deal in town is at:
VANCOUVER VOLVO SALES
1090 W. Georgia • MU 2-4708
and 1080 Marine Dr., N. Van. • 987-4458
"It never hurts when we put you in the driver's seat
U)anL fa Cw±
3-Judaif, TUghiA.?
The Thunderbird Curling Club has been organized to
promote curling as a social activity within the University
Community.
The Club will curl Friday nights at the U.B.C. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre from 8.30 to midnight.
Memberships are invited at $10.00- for the academic year,
and a game charge of 50c per game.
All applicants must be 21 years of age or over.
If you are interested, please mail applications or inquiries to:
Membership Committee, Thunderbird Curling Club,
c/o Box 53, Brock Hall.
I wish to become a member of the Thunderbird
Curling Club:
Name  „ _ „  	
Address  	
Home Telephone No t 	
Facility    -     Grad Student ...„ _.
Student _      Staff  _..„	
I hereby certify I am 21 years of age of over.
Signature Page 8
THE      U BYSSEY
Thursday, September 30, 1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
P.E. Day:
all thru
the night
Games, swimming, supper,
discussion, and dancing Saturday, Oct. 2 at 6 p.m. in the
Gym. All P.E. or Rec. majors
welcome to P.E. U.S. Orientation Day.
• •      •
THUNDERBIRD SKI CLUB
All interested in Ski Team,
come to Apparatus Room, Memorial Gym today 6:30 p.m., and
Sat., 1:30 p.m.
• •      •
WOMEN'S SKI TEAM
Work-out 6:30 tonite in Apparatus Gym. Everyone welcome.
• •      •
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
Practise today at 6:00 in
Women's Gym.
• •     •
FROSH RETREAT
Meeting noon today Bu. 100.
• •      •
FIGURE SKATING TEAM
Practice today at 6:15 in
Winter Sports Centre. Everyone welcome.
• •     •
TREASURE VAN
Meeting noon today Brock
Council Chamber.
BOWLING TEAM
All interested in UBC men's
bowling league bowl at noon
today.
f     •      •
ARTS U.S. NEWSPAPER
Meeting to discuss new Arts
U.S. paper, in Bu. 3203 today
at noon.
• '    •      •
THEATRE  DEPARTMENT
Auditions for Harold Pinter's
"The Collection" today from
1:30-2:30 Rm. 16, Freddy Wood
Theatre.
Docs turn  on
pressure
UBC surgeons have begun
work with a $150,000 high
pressure oxygen chamber at
Vancouver General Hospital.
Dr. W. G. Trapp, UBC's
clinical instructor of surgery,
is directing the experiments.
The chamber, called a hyperbaric research unit, is the
only one in Canada equipped
with automatic controls for
maintaining even pressure
inside the cylinder.
It will be used to test the
benefits of oxygen in treating heart disease, carbon
monoxide poisoning, gangrene infections and extreme
shock.
DUNCE
AT  TOTEM  PARK
Sat., Oct. 2   -9:00-1:00
Introducing the
Dartelles
50c with A.M.S. Cards
National entrance exam
approved In principle
FREDERICKTON (CUP)—A common entrance examination for universities was approved in principle this
week by Canada's provincial ministers of education.
There will be one exam for entrance to French-
language universities and one for English-language universities, according to H. G. Irwin, New Brunswick's
Minister of Education and spokesman for the other
ministers.
A Canadian university admission service representing
the provincial departments of education and the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada will prepare
the exams. All provinces have indicated they will
participate.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND—PARKER BALL. PEN with
initial.  Phone 224-9995,  Louise.
FOUND — VOIX DU SIECLE FRI.
Bu.  219. Phone  Pat at  FA 7-4071.
FOUND — EIGHT KEYS in Black
Leather Case, outside Gym, last
Thursday. Apply J. Wall, Ubyssey
Office.
LOST — IN BUCHANAN WASH-
room, T.V. 6 Watch, Leather
Bracelet. Reward. FA 7-5345.
LOST — BRIEFCASE, in vicinity of
Library. Urgently required. Return
to Ubyssey Office or phone 224-
7198.
BRIEFCASE TAKEN IN BUS STOP
Cafe 2.00 p.m. Tuesday. Please
return to 4188 W. 10th or to Cafe.
FOUND — WALLET containing
sum of money. Call Doug Keith,
224-9055.
LOST — K&E DECI-LON SLIDE
Rule around Physics 202. Name
and Phone on inside flap of Orange
Leather Case.  Please help!^    	
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
Special Notices
13
ONLY SEVEN MONTH TO GRADU-
ation. Next Tear's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now from AMS Business Office.
SPECIAL COLLEGE RATE SUB-
scription for Playboy Magazine,
1 yr. $6.50, 2 yrs. $12.00, 3 yrs.
$16.50. Call Fred RE 8-4504.	
ANYONE WISHING TO HELP
share car expenses to Calgary on
Thanksgiving weekend, phone Bob,
AM 6-8530, after 6 p.m.
WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE A
Wallbanger. See the Squash Club
on Clubs Day. 	
WHY DOES MR. PARKER SAY
that Radio Is a visual medium?
You will know  soon.	
HEAR THE NEW SOUND OF THE
Dartelles at Totem Park, Saturday,
October 2, 9.00-1.00. Admission 50c
with A.M.S. Card.
You thought the VICEROYS were
great? Wait'll you hear what's
happening Swingers on Sat. nite,
Oct. 16, in the Armouries. It'll be
where the action is!
Transportation
14
RIDERS WANTED — Monday to
Friday for 8.30 Lectures, and leave
campus at 5.30 along 16th Ave.
from Main Street. Phone 872-5306,
A. Ennik. 	
RIDE WANTED vicinity Renfrew
and Charles, 8.30 classes, Monday
thru Friday. Phone Vicki, AL 5-
0428. 	
NORTH BURNARY — RIDE wanted
Mon. Wed. Thurs. Fri., 8.30's.
Phone Gina. CY 8-8519.	
RIDERS WANTED from Richmond
8.30 classes, Mon. thru Sat. Phone
277-9338.
CAR POOL URGENTLY NEEDED.
Area of Dunbar and 32nd, 8.30
lectures. Phone AM 6-7258, ask for
.Tnhn.
RICHMOND — RIDE URGENTLY
needed, vicinity Westminster Hivv.
and No. 1. Phone BR 7-8876, ask
for Bev.
WANTED — CARPOOL FROM 22nd
and Marine, West Van. Phone
Sandy after  6.30,  WA  6-2254.
RIDE WAT^TED FROM CRESCENT
Bach.  Phone 531-2694 after 6 p.m.
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1952 PONTIAC FOR SALE — Excellent running condition, good
transportation — Phone 327-1822
after 6.
SALE — VAUXHALL 6-cylinder,
good condition. Call YU 7-6782 after
7  p.m.  $125.	
FOR SALE — 1953 CHEV, 2 Door,
Bel Air, in good condition. New
paint.  Best offer. Nick1, CA 4-1449
1964 PLYMOUTH SPORTS FURY,
Convertible, pb radio, bucket seats,
V-8 auto, Ontario car. Sacrifice,
call   224-4044.
A TRULY AMAZING SUNBEAM
Conv., perfect for Student. Best
offer.  Phone RE 1-6284.
MUST SELL '59 M.G.A. Best offer.
Phone  733-5380  after 6 p.m.
'53   FORD.    EVERYTHING   NEW—
after 5 p.m. RE 6-5171. 3643 W. 1st.
AUSTIN COOPER '62, 40,000 miles.
New everything. Many extras, inc.
Michelins, and snow tires. Phone
Mike,   581-5000, 7-11  p.m.      	
'62 M.G. MIDGET, top cond. New
tires, seats, windows, $1150. AM
6-7887.
1963 A.H. SPRITE — EXCELLENT
condition, only 18,000 miles. One
girl owner. Light blue. Phone CA
4-9585.
ATTENTION    RALLY    FANS!    160
Skoda   Sports   Convert.,    spotless,
new tires, brakes, clutch, etc. 1100
cc. Twin Carb. $500 or offer. BR
7-2012.
1957 FORD, STANDARD 6, Radio,
good mechanical condition — must
sell.  $195.  874-3630 evenings.	
'61 SPRITE, TSfew Clutch and Gen-
erator,  good condition. HE  3-1890.
MUST SELL 1950 CHEV. Dependable transp. Phone 431-2494. $95
or best  offer.   	
$900 OR BEST OFFER: 1959 Simca
Conv. Sports, pullmanized seats,
Michelin "X" tires. All trans,
radio. Cheap on gas. Phone 265-
4283 Mon.-Fri. after 7 p.m. All day
Sat. & Sun.
Motorcycles
27
1965   SUZUKI 50 cc,   $215.  224-9986:
Kappa  Sigma  House.
HONDA 90, NEAR NEW, 3900 M.
Need money to pay fees. Cheap.
922-6731.
1965 HONDA 90, 4% months old, 2
safety helmets. Contact Bruce,
Hut 6, Rm 12, Fort Camp. 224-9880
ONE   ONLY! 1965   80   cc.   SUZUKI
Motorcycle. Good   condition,   only
$235. Phone Earl, CA 4-1772, after
6.30.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS. $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
ESSAYS, BOOK REVIEWS AND
cases typed by qualified typist.
From 40c per page including paper, 1 carbon copy and binder.
Ardale Griffiths Ltd., 70th and
Granville.  Phone 263-4530.	
TYPING    (HOME).    ALL    KINDS.
Mrs. Wood.  Phone  985-5086.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
WANTED — 1st FLOOR HOUSE
"Mother" — Apply Sherwood Lett
House.   224-9014.	
BABY SITTER WANTED — FRI-
days, noon to five — Kerrisdale—
two children, ages 2-5. Call 261-
4766.
FEMALE STUDENT for light house
work and babysitting four hours
per week. Pref. Thurs. afternoon.
Phone CA 8-8434.
MALE OR FEMALE—PART TIME
work available in the Department
of Recreation or Physical Education with the BURNABY Y.M.C.A.
Call CY 9-6411.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
TUTORS WANTED FOR ZOOLOGY
422 Ethology and Psychology 100.
Please phone- 224-9776 in the evening and ask  for Judy,  Room  214.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
BIRD CALLS—the moBt useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents.	
BALLS & CHAIN! IDEAL FOR
Stags, etc. 15-45 lbs. From $7.50.
FA  1-1776  and AM 6-2869.
HIGH DENSITY & FLUORESCENT
Desk Lamps, $6.95 and $9.95. Cal-
vert-CraJt Hardware &t Gifts, 3209
West Broadway. Phone 738-2311.
(Opposite    Liquor    Store,    Peter's
 Ice Cream, and Super Valu).
FOR SALE — SET OF DRUMS,
Bass, Large and Small Tom-Toms,
Ludwig Super Classic Snare $250,
Cash. Call Joe, HE 1-0889, after 6.
FOR SALE — ONE 2ND-HAND
pair, Girl's regulation Grass-hockey
Shoes — excellent for climbing
walls. If interested phone Lynn at
224-7322.
COMING
ON
UBC^^
'Literally Speaking'—1:30 Tuesdays — Informative background on authors and selections
studied in English 100.
'Student's  Forum'—8:30 Mondays  — Openline focus on
campus opinion.
Love The Sound Of Your Own Voice?
U.B.C.  Radio needs members
You need U.B-C. Radio
COME AND JOIN
REGISTRATION
PHOTOS
Photos for AMS cards will be taken in
Brock Stage Room Monday, Oct. 4 and
Thursday, Oct- 7. Times - 12:30 p.m. \6
3:30 p.m. Students without AMS cards
must bring their ELIGIBILITY FORM.
Cards will be at the camera.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Games Room Supervisor
— One afternoon and evening per week, plus every
fifth Saturday afternoon.
— Honorarium: $225 per school year.
— Duties: general supervision and incidental maintenance in the Games Room.
Applicants reply to Secretary, Brock Management
Committee, Box 5, Brock Hall, stating name, phone
number and time available. Applications close Friday,
October 1.
Help Wanted
4 members needed for the Accident Benefit Fund
Committee — medical students or nurses preferred,
but representative sample of UBC students needed.
Apply in writing to the Secretary, AMS, Mailbox 54,
Brock Hall.
Student Court
Applications are open for: 1 judge of Student Court
1 clerk of Court
Applications should be sent to the Secretary, A.M.S.
Box 54, and should be sent before October 1st.
Homecoming Decorations Chairman
Needed to supervise the set up of Homecoming Dance
decorations in the Armouries and Field House; male
or female. Submit applications to Brock Hall, mailbox 81.
University Debating Team Tryouts
Apply in writing to Box 31, Brock Hall, or at the
Debating Union booth, Clubs Day. State telephone
number. Deadline 4:30 p.m., Ocl. ±o. All students
are eligible.

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