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The Ubyssey Feb 10, 1987

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Vol. LXIX, No. 36
THE UBYSSEY
i     V ■ r jn?:       i    r. i"    ChjftV ,.
(, No. 36 Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 10?198aL ®<^gp&c-
■J- '   ■   ' ■ -*-   . I "/'" '■ ■    ' i      '     "fi ■ " '   -
228-2301
Mining Arctic should spur debate
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
A recent proposal to put anti-
submarines mines in Canada's arctic waters should stimulate debate
on the nation's role in the western
alliance, two leading political
analysts said Feb. 4.
Military historian and journalist
Gwynne Dyer said the proposal is
"marvelous" because it highlights
Canada's critical strategic relationship with the two superpowers.
"I'm not really crazy about mining our arctic waters, but I think it's
a lovely idea," he said.
Earlier that evening, Dyer advocated Canada's withdrawal from
NATO, in a debate with Doug
Ross, a UBC political science pro
fessor.
Dyer said the major argument
against using Captor mines to assert
control over the far north, was the
possibility of computer error, as the
weapons are programmed to
distinguish between "friendly" and
"unfriendly" ships and submarines.
The  proposal   was   made  in  a
report by David Cox, research
director at the Canadian Instutute
for International Peace and Security in Ottawa.
Cox argued the mines would
detor both Soviet and U.S. submarines and "signal Canadian
determination to refuse to passively
accept the militarization of the
Canadian Arctic."
Defence minister Perrin Beatty
responded quickly saying the idea
was not an option, but Ross
disagreed.
"That's the kind of proposal we
have to be looking at rather than
automatically saying submarines
are the answer and nothing else will
do," he said.
Although Ross made a similar
proposal at a May 1986 conference
in Toronto, he said a better way was
to assert sovereignty for civil, environmental or military purposes
would be a limited number of northern bases and aircraft.
During the earlier debate on
NATO membership, which drew
about 450 people to Woodward
IRC2, Ross argued there is little
Canadian influence currently within
the alliance because other members
perceive Canada as a "free rider,"
unwilling to contribute its full
financial share.
While Canada spent 2.1 per cent
of its GNP on defence in 193, the
United Kingdom, for example,
spent 5.5 per cent, and Frence 4.2
per cent.
"Canada does not say anything
about security relationships, about
the big issues of the day," said Ross
referring to cruise missile testing,
Star Wars and the Soviet proposals
for arms reductions at Reykavik.
"This is a by-product of not
spending enough on defence. We
need to combat the American commitment to nuclear war fighting
strategies, which people in Ottawa
do not want to touch with a ten foot
pole," said Ross.
He said one of NATO's functions
should be to moderate paranoid
and isolationist trends within U.S.
strategic thinking.
Calling NATO a second-best
alternative to the U.N., Ross
argued that alliance systems promoted stability, especially in the
context of nuclear proliferations.
But Dyer, a veteran of three
western navies argued Canada
should leave NATO and become
neutral, a view presented in his new
film, Harder Than It Looks, co-
produced with filmmaker Tina Vil-
joen.
Citing the example of Finland's
relationship with the U.S.S.R.,
Dyer said a neutral Canada would
be responsible for securing its own
airspace and oceans, and reassuring
the U.S. that the Soviets could not
use Canadian territory to attack.
Assumptions that neutrality
signified a possible isolationist or
cost-saving approach to defence
were false, said Dyer.
"There is a lot we could do in
terms of demilitarizing the northern
zone between the superpowers,"
said Dyer, who pointed to the
possibility of creating a neutral arctic buffer zone with countries like
Finland and Sweden.
Dyer said the alliance system increased the likelihood of nuclear
Sec page 2: DETERRENCE
-dan andrews photo
YOU'D THINK THAT these runners are helping Rick Hansen by participating in yesterday's Boulevard Road Run,
but theyre actually chasing after our photograper. They heard he can make them internationally famous athletes if
he takes their picture for the Ubyssey.
SFU student enrolment on rise
Group to petition
By SARAH MOSELY
Spring term enrolment at Simon
Fraser University has soared to
record levels this year, and the Burnaby School will have to turn
students away.
"SFU does not want to create an
inferior pedagogy through overuse
of its present resources but does not
have the funds to add more
classes," said Evan Alderson,
associate dean of arts at SFU.
Alderson said the increase in admissions — a leap of six per cent
since last January — means SFU
will "have to make some institutional decisions," but did not say
what they would be.
And as SFU's student population
continues to climb, the number of
students in arts programs has shot
up by 10.6 per cent this year. Aider-
son said since enrolment ceilings
were placed on programs such as
criminology and business administration, the arts continues to
attract high numbers of students.
Alderson attributes the growth
partly to demographics.
Municipalities east of Burnaby are
experiencing a growth in population
which is spilling over into SFU, he
said. He also said enrolment in
Vancouver colleges is on the rise,
resulting in more transfer students
to SFU.
Walter Wattemaniuk, SFU's
director of analytical studies, is
conducting a study to determine
reasons for the enrolment increase.
He said the number of returning
students this year may have affected
the increase.
Enrolment at UBC, meanwhile,
decreased from 25,314 in 1985 to
24,934 in 1986. UBC president
David Strangway said UBC turns
away one out over every two applicants in order to maintain "high
standards."
He was not surprised by the in
crease in enrolment at SFU, saying
it has become a nation-wide
phenomenon.
Strangway said the increase in
popularity in arts courses reflects
the choices students make as they
perceive the changing job market.
"They are keeping their options
open by getting a general
education," he said.
By EVELYN JACOB
Students will get a second
chance to give president David
Strangway the outcry he wanted on
tuition increases next week.
Brian Bain, a member of The
Coalition for Accessible Education,
said Monday a petition will be circulated on campus early next week
to allow students to voice their
disapproval of the high cost of
education at UBC, and to press the
provincial government for better
funding for universities in B.C.
"We won't be happy until education is completely accessible," said
Bain, one of 30 students who protested against UBC's four per cent
Students should choose priorities
By ROSS McLAREN
It is up to students to choose the
administration and management
priorities of the athletic department, said UBC's Vice-president of
Student Services and Academics.
Dr. K. D. Srivastava, chair of the
newly formed President's Review
Committee on Athletics, said current difficulties in athletics exist
because "the way priorities have
been set is not clear."
"We can't have a full range of
activities in varsity sports and intramurals. We have to make
choices, that is the students must
make the choices," he said.
Srivastava said he has no "pre-set
plans," as to whether varsity sports
or intramurals are more important
to the university.
"We want to run good athletics
at UBC. There has to be both, varsity sports and intramurals, but it is
the level of these activities that is in
question," he said.
The task force, established last
week to investigate the administration and management structures of
UBC athletics, has eight members
including the chair. Two student
reps, AMS president elect Rebecca
Nevraumont and outgoing AMS
director of administration Martin
Cocking are on the committee.
Nevraumont said she favours
"more emphasis on intramurals".
We don't have the financial
resources to have more than one or
two excellent varsity teams," she
said.
Nevraumont said the athletic's
administration and management
structures "need to be revised, and
need a business manager or comptroller."
Nevraumont said, "I would like
to see coaches have more input into
their budgets. They know how
much money they will need, they
should have some say in how they
should spend the money".
Nevraumont also said she is not
in favour of a fee increase at the
present time.
"I'd like to see money spent more
responsibly in athletics before a fee
levy is instituted?' she said.
Cocking said, "I'm against fees
going up. We have to insure that we
are getting something out of it (a fee
increase), and I can't see any increase in services over the last two
years".
Cocking said "the committee will
get accomplished what the University Athletic Committee should have
done two years ago, "a complete
review of athletics, management,
budget and administration".
Cocking also said both intramurals and varsity athletics are
important to the university.
"I imagine students view varsity
athletics as elitist but they are great
for PR."
increase in tuition fees inside the
board of governors meeting on Jan.
29.
The group is hoping to get 5,000
students to sign the petition, which
will be presented to president
Strangway. Bain said the number
was chosen in direct response to
remarks made by Strangway in an
open forum with the students last
week in which he stated: "If 5,000
students were here today it would
have helped (spur) an outcry on
funding issues."
Bain expects Strangway will be
sympathetic to the petition. But he
said the public, not Strangway, will
be the deciding factor in whether or
not to fund education.
"We want to make this a public
issue," said Bain. "Not everyone
realizes how bad the situation really
is."
Tuition fees have more than
doubled at UBC in the last 10 years,
and are now among the highest in
the nation.
The coalition's work will be
focused mainly on tuition fees and
student aid because Bain says they
are the most "blatant" problems
and because reliable statistics pointing to their deficiencies are easily
attainable.
The 30-member group has been
working in conjunction with The
Canadian Federation of Students
through which it hopes to elicit support from post-secondary institutions in B.C. if the government
doesn't come up with a means by
which to eliminate the "gross injustices" of post-secondary funding
inadequacies, said Bain. It will also
be soliciting input from high school
students on the problems of accessibility. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 10,1987
Deference
high priee
From page 1
war and criticized deterrence as
"brutal."
"If deterrence ever gets tested
and fails, then we lose the northern
hemisphere, and that's a pretty high
price to pay for a strategy like
that," he said.
Dyer referred to North American
troops in Europe as "hostages,"
present only to guarantee participation in any war between
western and eastern Europe. He
further charged that Europe was
getting a subsidized defence.
"What happens essentially is
western Europe gets a free ride, or
at least a very cheap ride, in the
sense it has at least as large a
population as the Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe, but does not attempt to match the Soviet forces in
conventional terms," said Dyer.
In this current state of affairs, the
U.S. agrees to defend Europe with
nuclear weapons and receives the
psychological gratification of "being
the leader of the free world," Dyer
said.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) Hairy
Puce Blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom babbled incoherently.
Deep Throat informed intrepid
Ubyssmal reporter Damned Android of scandle in the very halls of
grovelling.
The information leaked: Pecker
Nevermounted had commanded
Chard Redented to redecorate the
presidential throne room before
presidential hopeful Flair Motley
had been battered down into submission. It was further alleged that
Nevermounted was writing grafitti
on presidential stationary without
proper authority or attention to
spelling and grammar. "I am totally
shocked, gag me with the print
tongs," Malcontented Beersong
was heard to mumble between sips
of Hypo-clear, "Here I am playing
in the dark with no control over my
water and she's having all the fun."
The last in believed to be a
reference to the dance Never-
mounted had with Careless Meddler. Sterile Prigg upon learning
that she had been dumped by Meddler before being shown all the
ropes remarked that Nevermounted
was the "bitch in the red hot
leather."
Peter Boretski as^siK,** v
EINSTEIN^
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Gabriel Emanuel
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laced with humour" —TORONTO STAR
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Moore condemns culture erosion
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
"Canada is in the front lines of a
universal battle between super-
cultures and small cultures," said
one of Canada's foremost culture
critics Monday.
Mavor Moore, the well-known
Canadian playwright, critic, and
Globe and Mail columnist told 50
people at the Robson Square Media
Centre, that Canadians must promote their culture, "or others will
do if for us." "Culture abhors a
vacuum," he said.
Moore said the Canadian government must recognize the danger of
American cultural dominance and
take political steps to curb
American influence. He said
government action, or chosen inaction, will determine our future.
"There is no way in which
governments today can get out of
the cultural field," he said.
Moore said the current free trade
talks   between   Canada   and   the
United States represent the natural
growth of the American super-
culture.
"The government of a country
producing a superculture will use
every means available to facilitate
the spread of products," he said.
Moore said Canada's current
government fails to assume the
responsibility for its culture.
"To the rest of the world, we are
seen as timid, insecure, and unwilling to take the initiative to protect
us," he said.
Part of the Canadian initiative
must be to change its approach to
education, said Moore.
"It's no use shifting our emphasis in education to 'vocationally
relevent' forms of study, when
those activities can't even get off
the ground without the cultural
development they depend on."
Moore said he recognizes the difficulty with which the government
is faced.
"They must promote Canadian
culture, allow enough of the super-
culture to satisfy the citizens, and
stay in office."
It is often the awareness of a
threat that spurs people to action,
he said.
"The heavier the down-pour, the
more people will be inclined to take
shelter."
Moore sees his own role, in
writing and speaking of the threat,
as part of everyone's responsibility
to see that Canadians are made
aware.
But he said awareness and subsequent political action will not alone
maintain Canadian culture. Canadians must want to support their
culture, he said. "A chance is all we
can buy, a house is not a home."
Pay for homework
By DAVID FERMAN
A group of six Vancouver
housewives has published a report
calling for houseworkers to receive
wages and a pension.
It's Time Housework Was
Recognized and Paid, details the
financial and emotional problems
faced by housewives, and examines
the benefits which would result for
women, in particular, and Canadian society in general, if
housework received wages.
"Fifty-five per cent of women in
this country live on incomes of less
than $10,000," said Ellen
Woodsworth, project manager of
Housewives in Training and
Research, the group who researched
and wrote the report.
The group spoke to 1,200
households over nearly nine months, and found 81 per cent of those
surveyed were in favor of
houseworkers receiving salaries, an
average of $60 a day.
The report found the biggest problem faced by houseworkers was a
lack of money. Families that live on
one income have a difficult time
financially, and invariably the partner who stays at home is the woman
— 91 per cent of the time, according to the survey.
When women find themselves
supporting a family on their own —
when they do housework in addition to working outside the home —
they earn, on average, 64 cents to
each dollar a man earns.
The second worse problem faced
by houseworkers was a "lack of
recognition." According to It's
Time, many "women feel the label
'housewife' carries a stigma because
housework is not paid." In an age
LIKE, "FLOWER POWER" makes a, like, comeback at the Ubyssey as photo grapher takes wild picture of of   "equal   opportunity"    the
Mother and Child statue. You dig, man? It's, like, a psychadelic picture, man. It makes this dude feel sooo, like, houseworker is expected to carry
"with it, you know." They call me melllowww yelllowwwww " her financial weight or she is seen as
"living  off"  the income  of her
spouse, says the report.
Another complaint of
homeworkers is the lack of benefits.
Homeworkers do not receive sick
leave, pension, workers compensation, medical plans, or overtime
because they are not perceived as
working at a real job. And holiday
SFU group attacks TV miniseries
By RICK HIEBERT
A group of SFU students are denouncing the CTV television network for its plans to air the controversial American mini-series
Amerika next week.
The SFU Media Group has written an open letter to CTV television
asking the network to air
disclaimers after each commercial
break labelling the mini-series
' 'political propaganda.''
The film (Amerika) quite clearly
serves as the American extreme
right's agenda," said Jeff Buttle of
the SFU Media Group.
Buttle said the group was concerned that the network wasn't
abiding by Canadian Broadcasting
Act requirements for fairness when
discussing controversial issues.
The $35 million, WA hour mini-
series which begins Feb. 15, depicts
life in the United States 10 years
after a Soviet takeover.
"It's political propaganda
disguised as entertainment," said
Robert Hackett of the SFU communications faculty.
Hackett said the Media Group,
assuming they have the final version
of the script, has five main criticisms of the mini-series:
• that it presents a paranoid view
of the Soviet Union as wanting to
control the world
• it claims that liberal political and
social values undermine the
Americans will to resist communism
• a generally negative portrayal of
women in stereotype roles (including one rape scene where,
Hackett says, the woman seems to
enjoy it)
• a portrayal of the United Nations
as " a mere tool of Russia"
• an ignorance of the historical
U.S. record of interference in other
nations and support for brutal dictatorships
The group has also asked CTV to
either buy or finance a film pointing
out the dangers to world peace posed by American militarism, the
positive contribution to world peace
provided by the U.N., and a film
portraying women in a more
positive fashion.
The group, said Buttle, has suggested that individuals consider
boycotting the products of the companies advertising Amerika, if CTV
"stonewalls" on their criticisms.
time, says the report, usually means
even more work for houseworkers.
The most agonizing finding of
the report was the isolation felt by
many houseworkers. Half of those
surveyed said they felt isolated. The
most painful effect of the loneliness
of being "stuck at home" is depression. Many women, says the report,
blame themselves for feeling unfulfilled in what they believe is their
"natural role" and turn to alcohol
or eagerly prescribed antidepressant drugs.
According to Woodsworth,
women who manage to escape
housework are also paying the price
of those who work for free.
"Seventy-seven per cent of working women work in the "pink collar
ghetto," either in secretarial jobs or
on the floor at Eaton's. Women,
especially those who are in school,
have to realize that women working
for free in the home determine the
low wage of those outside the
home," said Woodsworth.
Because housework is unpaid,
jobs similar to housework are also
seen to have little value.
It's Time describes the positive
consequences of paying
houseworkers an adequate income
as:
• pride and confidence for the
houseworkers
• giving houseworkers the means to
hire support workers
• improving houseworkers quality
of life and increase their independence
• enabling women to leave abusive
relationships
• creating 6.5 million jobs and
stimulate the economy
• improving the quality of life of
children
• giving houseworkers valid "work
experience" when they apply for
outside jobs
• enabling men to do housework,
emotionally and financially.
It's Time also makes recommendations to the federal government
to pay a pension to houseworkers
and to include housework in the
Gross National Product of Canada.
Gay medical rights won at Acadia
WOLFVILLE (CUP) — Two gay
professors at Acadia University
have won a two-year struggle with
the administration to receive
medical benefits for their partners.
The partners of music professor
Matt Hughes and classics professor
Bert Verstrate became eligible for
medical benefits Feb. 1, after
Acadia's insurance company,
Maritme Medical Care, extended
benefits to partners of the same sex.
Hughes and Verstrate launched
and later withdrew a grievance
against the administration because
it would not provide medical
benefits for their partners. The administration said it had to defer to
Maritime Medical Care's policy of
not providing coverage for partners
of the same sex.
Maritime Medical Care extended
coverage to the partners of gay professors after receiving a written request by Professor Steven Enman,
head of Acadia's grievance committee.
Tony Yue, a Maritime Medical
Care representative, said the insurance company refused earlier requests to change its discriminatory
policy, but Hughes and Verstrate
contend the administration only
made a few enquiries and did not
press the company to change its
policy.
Hughes says the university "was
not honourable in negotiating the
matter." Maritime Medical Care's
response to Enman's letter indicated that the company would
have changed its policy earlier if the
university had specifically requested
it.
Acadia president James Perkin
refused to comment.
Although he is not pleased about
his two-year wait, Hughes said the
decision is "a precedent-setting step
for universities and insurance companies."
Hughes said several gay professors at Acadia are interested in
applying for the new benefits.
However, he said untenured professors may not claim the benefits
because they fear dismissal if their
sexual orientation becomes known.
Hughes and Verstrate also won
the right to receive tuition benefits
for their partners in Sept. 1985. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 10, 1987
Poltroons
The federally funded Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security advocated mines be placed in the Arctic archipelago.
The Institute's unusual request was prompted by
fear that Canada's claim to Arctic sovereignty was
jeopardized by American military activity in the area.
Mines, as a deterent, the Institute argued, would be inexpensive compared to attack submarines, aerial or
space surveillance, or $500 million icebreakers.
Although the government vetoed the idea, the Institute's report raises questions of how Canada should
defend its sovereignty. Should Canada respond
militarily against unwanted intruders in our waters?
One argument for a Canadian military force in the
Arctic is it would stabilize relations between Americans
and Russians. Effective control of the Arctic would
discourage either superpower from dominating the
region; Americans and Russians would bury their differences, safe in the knowledge that the other side was
unable to penetrate Canadian defences.
Against this argument is the belief that all things
military should go the way of the Great Auk.
Canadian weapons would not stabilize the region but
only cause confusion, and create a dangerous situation.
Where the priorities of America and Russian politicians are concerned, Canadian interests rank slightly
ahead of East Timor's' consequently, our weapons
would not solve anything.
Of course, all these arguments are meaningless.
Successive Prime Ministers have exhibited the will
power of political poltroons where the Arctic is concerned.
Jean Cretien's near cabinet revolt forced Trudeau to
action when the American tanker Manhattan sailed
through Arctic waters in the early 1970s. A marine antipollution law was the outcome of that debacle.
Recently, Brian Mulroney's promise to build a class 8
icebreaker has remained a ... a promise.
Canadians want our sovereignty asserted in the Artie. It is the government's responsibility to assert that
will. It is time for action, whatever form that action will
take.
Letters
Geers more sensible than AMS
Well, wonders never cease. I've
been at UBC off and on since 1978,
but last week was my most eye-
opening yet. It saw the Engineers
finally take responsibility for their
position, and the AMS Council
totally forfeit responsibility for
theirs.
After many years of protests, the
EUS finally got their act together
and realized that the Lady Godiva
Ride, in its classic form, is about as
funny to some people as a slap in
the face. They got rid of the campus
strip-show and put clothes on the
stripper that rode the horse.
Yes, it's still childish, obnoxious,
and sexist, but it no longer has that
deliberately provocative quality
that makes protests inevitable.
If the Engineers keep this up in
future years, they might really turn
the public perception of the Ride
around. Instead of a flaunting of
aggressive male sexuality, it could,
become a celebration of the free
and independent thinker that Lady
Godiva really was. I commend
Doug Martin, Jim Wickens, and the
rest of the EUS executive and
members for using responsibly their
position as a popular, powerful
campus group.
The AMS Council is another
matter, though. They were given a
chance, by me, other members of
last year's Coalition Against Sexism
on Campus, and other non-CASC
people, to create a Committee on
Sexist Practices to study complaints
of sexism and advise them on how
to deal with those complaints —
and they blew it.
The classic response of a
bureaucracy like the AMS, when
faced with a problem, is to create a
committee to study the problem. In
this case, the AMS didn't have to
draw up the mandate of the committee, shell out any money for it,
or even contribute to it if they
didn't want to; we were sincere in
our efforts to do all that in a fair
manner.
We were sincere, and we were
obstructed. Council debated long
on it, made several amendments. . .
and then overwhelmingly rejected
it. Sure, that's the democratic process; but why did they do it?
Maybe they thought sexism
didn't exist anymore, even though
when the women on council
graduate, their male counterparts
will still have great advantages over
them in the job market.
Maybe they thought that didn't
have anything to do with this committee, even though officially sanctioned sexism is almost nonexistent
these days, and the major reasons
for continued inequality are the
stereotyping influences we are bombarded with everyday.
Maybe they thought the proposed makeup of the committee was
biased, even though none of them
lifted a finger to join it and even out
the balance, as was their perfect
right. Maybe they thought
everything could be solved by
throwing more money at the Ombudsoffice. Who knows? Council
moves in mysterious ways.
One council member even
brought up the spectre of censorship, that new boogeyman of the
laissez-faire Right. Censorship? The
committee was supposed to take
complaints, collate statements on
them, and make recommendations
to council, which council could act
on as they saw fit. Ooh, scary stuff,
kids!
And all this, from the very same
council which yelled more stridently than CASC when they thought
the Administration was usurping
their power last year in dealing with
the very same problems. I think
they have shown that on the whole,
they couldn't handle that power.
As my friend horacio, the anarchist,  says,   "you  have  to  be  in
THE UBYSSEY
February 10, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
Rick Hiebert surveyed the teeming masses of people down at the printers and spoke, "Uh, guys, you
know how you sometimes have a tendency to use naughty words? Well, Mom, Doug, Grandpa and my
buddy Phil Laird (the football star), object so I bought this machine that you see here from the CBC.
Now every time you swear, it will be replaced by a (bleep) just like on TV."
"No (bleep)," said Vic Wong and Steve Chan in unison. "Who gives a (bleep) about swearing?" said
Sarah Mosely to Jennifer Lyall. "What are these (bleep) bleeps for?"'asked Svetozar Kontic — "I'm city god now and no (bleep) gomer will stop me from (bleep) swearing if I don't (bleep) want to!"
James Young walked into the printers and banged his head on the ceiling. "Oh Golly," he said to
Ross McLaren, who was telling Katherine Monk not to write such long and involved news stories. Dan
Andrews said, "When the (bleep) am I going to be in the masthead? Remember the football!"
David Ferman said, "Be (bleep) sure to include Louise Panziera, Kristi Blocker, Don Wells, Chew
Wong and Steve Neufetd or they said they'll give you a piledriver off the top rope!"
Michael Groberman looked at the bleeper as it lay smouldeing on the floor, overheated from
overuse. "This looks like a useless piece of (and the bleeper gave off a last feeble bleeeeeep)." And
Evelyn Jacob, on reading the masthead, said to herself, "I'll laugh and say it's great, though I really
want to say "stuff this up your (bleep)."
power to keep things as they are."
In this case, I tend to agree with
him. Most of this council didn't
display concern; they displayed
high-powered apathy covered over
with a veneer of libertarian catch-
phrases to keep it looking good.
Their apathy was all the more
discouraging for being so
hypocritical.
But this council is going out, and
the issue will have to be brought to
a new council, which I hope will be
more aware of the responsibilities
of its position. I've trudged through
the knee-deep molasses of the AMS
bureaucracy for months, and I personally would like to take a break
from it if I can.
All I've gotten from the experience so far is a lot of respect for
Iolanda Weisz, the AMS archivist,
and the council members like Carol
Pedlar, Kurt Preinsperg, and Phil
Ross who were really concerned. I
also respect Blair Mercer, Andrew
Cheng, and the few other opponents of the committee who
could at least talk about it without
giggling.
I don't know. I thought having
an Engineer as the new Vice-
president might be bad, but I'm not
so sure anymore. Considering how
much better the EUS dealt with
their problems than the AMS,
maybe we should make them all
Engineers.
Jamie Andrews
science 9
Future lies in education
The future of any society lies in
its knowledge and its education. A
poorly educated society cannot be a
productive society. Is there a future
for education in British Columbia?
The Board of Governors of the
University of British Columbia has
authorized another tuition fee increase. This time the increase
amounted to four per cent. Unfortunately this is one more in a series
of fee increases that have plagued
UBC students and prospective
students. This latest increase makes
tuition fees 58 per cent higher than
those of 1983. These increases are
made with no consideration for the
contrast between the earning
capacity and the expenses of a
university or college student in
British Columbia.
We believe it is time students
raise their voices against an education   policy   that   discriminates
against poor students. We believe
that students can and must create
an education policy that will serve
their needs and aspirations as well
as those of the province. We believe
that the provincial government
should help with financial problems
with bursaries, not only as help to
students but as an investment in the
future of British Columbia.
We invite you to participate in
the formation of a province-wide
coalition through which we can coordinate our ideas and actions.
Come   and  join   our  organizational meeting that will take place
Thursday, February 12, 12:30 in the
garden room of the Grad Centre.
Tracy Bassam
arts 2
Vanessa Geary
arts 2
horacio de la cueva
graduate studies
OraVs heavenly "free enterprise
99
By LORI EWERT
God must be a shrewd
businessman. How else can I explain that every Sunday when I was
a kid, I put 50 cents into the collection basket, when my weekly
allowance was only a dollar? He got
50 cents of my hard earned money.
Clear profit for him. Even now, the
feds don't take quite that much.
That's why the message He sent
to Oral Roberts, the TV evangelist,
doesn't surprise me in the least.
Roberts said that God told him he
had to raise US $8 million for a
scholarship fund for students at the
Oral Roberts University medical
school. If Roberts is not able to do
it by March of this year, God is going to "call (him) home."
This ultimatum might seem a bit
harsh to some.. Hard-nosed. Cutthroat. But, business is business.
And unless he measures up, Roberts
might be forced to climb that corporate ladder to the sky. But wait.
God is fair and just. He first informed Roberts of his plan in
March 1986. At that time, Roberts
was given a full year to come
through with the money.
High praise should be given to
Oral Roberts, an obviously self-
reliant and hardworking man. He
and his closest followers struggled
for ten months on their own to raise
the money. He selflessly kept his
death threat a secret. And during
those ten months, almost half of the
But the battle is not over.
WUSA-TV in Washington is refusing to air Roberts' plea for help.
The station sees it as nothing more
than 30 minutes of hardsell
fundraising. Sandra Butler, director
of broadcast operations states,
"It's not religion, it's basically an
pers
money needed was raised. But, feeling a bit pressed for time, Roberts
decided to go public.
In the ten days following the
January 4 announcement on his TV
program, Expect A Miracle, he
received $1.6 million in cash and
pledges. In my calculations, that
averages out to be $160,000 per
day. At this rate, he should have hit
the target figure of $8 million by the
first week of February. Any accountant would be pleased: ahead
of schedule and a probable increase
in profits. But what's more, God
will be placated. And Oral Roberts'
life will be'spared and he will be
able to continue his crusade here on
earth. Hallelujah!
appeal for money." Television stations in Dallas and Okalhoma City
are also threatening to censor God's
message.
It's funny, you know, how when
I was a youngster, God never said
to me, "Lori, I need 50 cents from
you every week or I'm going to call
you home." I wonder what would
have happened if I would have
missed a payment? I guess I was just
lucky. Or maybe God didn't have
his MBA back then.
Lori Ewert is an extremely persistent woman who likes to hold onto
her money. Tuesday, February 10,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Prolife propaganda evades the rational senses
It disturbs me greatly when I consider articles presented by prolife
supporters who feel they must conjure images of 'ripped apart',
'mangled little babies' in an attempt
to further their position against
abortion. It disappoints me more so
when such articles are written by
university students.
Most people have an idea of what
an actual abortion procedure entails; Yet, detailed accounts of 'a
little child' with its 'tiny, beating
heart' enduring grotesque surgical
procedures still persist at the focal
point of much prolife propaganda.
This sort of approach appeals to
our emotions and evades our ra
tional senses — where an issue of
this much importance should
reside.
The question of abortion is a
moral one. It does not dispute
whether a fetus is alive, nor that it is
a human being — these are irrefutable facts that few would
argue. What confronts the issue is
Not good enough friend to stand by
After reading Ms. Soper's letter
in last Tuesday's Ubyssey criticizing
Muriel Hiebert's inability to condone the procurement of an abortion, I would like to make a few
comments.
She begins her letter by stating
that a true friend "would not cry
murder, but let that person know
you are there to care for them."
Well, I must confess that I, like
Miss Hiebert, am not a "good
enough" friend as to stand by one's
side as she slaughters an unborn
baby.
Ms. Soper then goes on to say
that "not having a child may be
responsible for some." Yes, the
right to have a child should rest
with the couple involved. But once
a human life has been created, it has
rights just like you and I (even Ms.
Soper) and shouldn't be terminated
merely for the sake of convenience.
Ms. Soper tells us to not sit in
judgement, and to look at our
lovers, mothers, sisters and grandmothers, since, "someone you love
has probably had an abortion."
Well, Ms. Soper, I am thinking of
the people I love and I thank God
that their parents believed in the
sanctity of human life and did not
murder for the sake of an "inconvenient pregnancy." For these people
pro-choice means not termination
of the unborn, but allowing a child
to live and to make choices of his or
her own.
I don't know, call it a minor
character flaw, but I just can't be
sympathetic or understanding to a
person who kills an innocent child.
I ask Ms. Soper, if the women who
have abortions so strongly believe
that they have done the thing that
they are so justly entitled to, why do
they feel so guilty and confused?
Possibly because they know deep
down that real choice means allowing an innocent baby the right to
life and make her own choices. I
suppose infanticide will always be
something hard to get over. And
finally a message to Ms. Hiebert,
the woman who couldn't condone
her friend having an abortion.
Thank-you for showing us what
true friendship is all about.
Chris Seppelt
arts 3
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
VALENTINE'S DANCE
SATURDAY, FEB. 14th
8 p.m.
<9
SUB BALLROOM
No Minors
t>
»
Tickets: $5
AMS Box Office
War Mem. Gym 301
f\e'
o*c
^
vi°l
The Pit Pub welcomes you to
ST.
VALENTINE'S DAY
MASSACRE
SAT., FEB. 14th
BRING THE GANG &
GET SLA UGHTERED!
WE'LL MAKE YOU AN OFFER YOU CAN'T REFUSE:
* PROHIBITION PUNCH
* COSTUME PRIZES
* SPOT DANCES
* DOOR PRIZES
PROCEEDS TO . . .
VARIETY CLUB
TELETHON
So
'rin,
$1.00
Cover
$2.00 Non-Students
'C*fun
w.
cJT^i,
"IQ/
SUBSTANTIAL REWARD OFFERED
for the return of the above
oil painting — 19"x23"-
No questions asked
Call: Gay — 228-3472
presents a
UBC COMEDY
SPECIAL
starring
MARTY
POLLIO
from L.A.
featured on Johnny Carson & David Letterman
with special guests
BARRY KENNEDY
&
DAVE CAMERON
THURSDAY
FEB. 26
8 P.M.
ADVANCE
SUB TIX: $3.50
BALLROOM AMS Box Office
the question of individual rights.
The conflicting rights of the woman
and those of the fetus she supports
should be the central focus of
debate — not the details of surgery.
Autonomy is the fundamental inherent right of persons in our social
system (that is, the right to self
governance so long as it does not
impinge on the autonomy of
another person.) Free will of this
definition is of paramount concern
to our moral code. Abortion
presents a conflict between the
autonomous will of a woman and
the protected autonomy of the fetus
she bears. Because autonomy is the
inherent right of all persons, the
issue then becomes centered around
what it means to be (considered) a
person. By definition, our society
deems personhood to those individuals who are self aware, conscious   moral  agents,   capable   of
autonomous control. A fetus, by
these criteria, seem at best only a
potential person.
Should we consider the protected
rights of a potential person above
those rights of a truly autonomous
person? This is where our debate
should be focussed and resolved.
It is unlikely that abortion will
ever be adopted as a widely used
method of birth control. Until we
can offer woman a safe, one hundred percent effective alternative,
abortion must remain a legal option
if we are to preserve the right to individual autonomy in our society.
Kim Langmead
science 4
A man who has never gone to school may
steal from a freight car; but if he has a university
education, he may steal the whole railroad.
- Theodore Roosevelt
GOT A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Peer Counselling Centre
Confidential Anonymous
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB CONCOURSE
228-3700
FREE m
*
VALENTINE'S
SPECIAL
IP
FOR U.B.C. STUDENTS AND STAFF
FEBRUARY 12 TO 18th ONLY
2 FOR 1 SALE
FOR EVERY 2 ROLLS OF 110, 126 OR 135 COLOR FILM YOU
BRING IN FOR PROCESSING WE WILL DO ONE OF THEM
FREE!
f       HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY from i
J-tib FAMILY PHOTO \
4 ^-.^^ Vour Friendly One-Hour Photo Stop 4
p 3522 W. 41st Ave. — Across from Safeway 9
1                                266-3755 I
5 Open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. except Sunday 8
APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate in May or November 1987 are requested to submit "Application for Graduation" cards to the Registrar's Office, (Mrs. Donna
Anderson) by February 16, 1987 for graduation in May and August 15, 1987 for
graduation in November. This includes students who are registered in a year not normally considered to be a graduating year but who are expecting to complete a degree
or diploma program this year.
PLEASE NOTE: Every student who expects to graduate must make application for
graduation. Any student who does not apply is ineligible to
graduate. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 10, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lunch, 12:00-2:00 p.m., Hillel House.
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
Counselling and information about stress, anxiety, study skills and much more, 11:30-1:30 p.m.,
SUB main concourse.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
ABSCC general meeting, topic — Thunderbird
rally presentation, 7:00 p.m.. Room 213, SUB.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in practice, everyone welcome, 7:00 p.m.,
UBC Aquatic Centre.
QAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker, David Watmouugh at Lesbian and Gay
Pride Week, noon, SUB 119.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists are meeting to make
plans for conquering the computer world. Election also on agenda, 12:30, SUB 111.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM followers meeting. Entertainment provided
by Warren, the one-man show. Election also taking place, 12:30, SUB 125.
WEDNESDAY
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES TRAVEL SERVICE-
TRAVEL CUTS
Information meeting for SWAP (Students Work
Abroad Programme) — questions and answers,
12:30 p.m., SUB Plaza North.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Andre's Atari Achievers re-group in unison to defend the computer land from hackers. Election
also taking place, 4:30 p.m., SUB 212A.
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study and fellowship, noon, SUB 119.
CINEMA 16
"The Magician," directed by Ingmar Bergman,
7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
PRE-DENTAL CLUB
Office tour of Dr. Johnston's office (prosthodon-
tics), 7:30 p.m.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Information about the club and its activities,
12:00 p.m., SUB main concourse next to
Speakeasy.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Meeting to discuss proposed debate on feminist
and Real Women, noon. Room 130 SUB.
ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
What is Ventre Capitalism — with Dan Nixon,
noon, Angus 425.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden: Lesbian and Gay Pride Week,
4:00-7:00 p.m., SUB 207/209.
THURSDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buchanan 301.
NEWMAN CLUB
"Who is Cardinal Newman Anyhow?", noon, St.
Mark's College, music room.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
S. Ravindran speaks about human rights violations in Sri Lanka, noon, SUB 211.
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN CLUB
"Thursday Nooner," with Bob Birch from Burnaby Fellowship, noon, Chem. 250.
STAMP CLUB
General meeting, noon, International Boardroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon, International House.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Apple core meeting. See William demonstrate
gravity when an Apple II is dropped on his head.
Election also taking place, 12:30 p.m., SUB 213.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General meeting and talk, "Walking in the Power
of the Holy Spirit," noon, Wood. IRC #4.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Free lunch, in honor of TU B'SHVAT, noon,
Hillel House.
COALITION FOR ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
General meeting, all students encouraged to attend, noon, Graduate Student Center, garden
room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Club meeting, noon, Brock 304.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Rm. 125 SUB.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Open House: Gay Pride Week, SUB 237B.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Speaker series presents Japanese physicist and
Peace Activist Hiro Omobayashi, "Japan Today:
The Nuclear Question, The Politics, of Peace and
Re-militarizing, noon, Asian Centre Auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore members meet to discuss the far-
reaching capabilities of Donald's 64K RAM. Also
elections take place, 12:30 p.m., BUCH. B319.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Presentation of new work: songs, drama, prose,
multi-media, poetry, 7 p.m., Dorothy Som-
merset Theatre, reception at BUCH. Penthouse,
9 p.m.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Hear Robb Powell speak on dealing with resentment   and   bitterness   in   "The   Freedom   of
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
CARDS
AND
GIFTS
FOR  YOUR
VALENTINE!
Forgiveness," noon, SUB 206.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP (CCF)
Discussion concerning Christian dating,  12:30.
p.m., Scarfe 209.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Talk given by Dale Miranda, "True Alignment
Between the Sexes: Mind, Body and Emotions
Over Matter," noon, BUCH. 225.
FRIDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Fourth year and Prof. Social, 12:30 p.m., Kenny
Atrium.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Wes presents "Sports Nite" with badminton and
volleyball. Members and friends invited to this
gala event, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Osbourne Gym A.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Meeting, noon, UBC NDP office (SUB).
CIRCLE K CLUB
"A Cookie or Flower for Your Love," provided
by Circle K Club, 12:00 p.m., SUB Main Concourse, next to Speakeasy.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Vancouver   councillor   Libby   Davies:   "Making
B.C. Nuclear Weapons Free," SUB 205.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker: Svend Robinson, M.P. Burnaby
South: Lesbian and Gay Pride Week, noon, SUB
215. Also, Blue Jeans Day: wear your jeans if
you're proud to be lesbian or gay, all day, all
places.
hot flash
Wear your blue jeans this week in
order to celebrate "Gay Pride
Week," all this week at UBC.
E
DISCUSSION WITH A BITE
EVERYTHING YOU
ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW
ABOUT CHRISTIANITY
with special guest LLOYD GASTON, Professor at
Vancouver School of Theology
Dinner: 5:30 p.m.
Discussion: 6:00 p.m.	
CELEBRATE THE
NEW YEAR OF TREES
TU B'SHVAT
FREE LUNCH
In exchange for a small donation to the
Jewish National Fund. Proceeds used to
plant trees in Israel.
Thursday, Feb. 12, 12:30 p.m.
*. h ,\>- r < Whiskey is represented in Canada by FBM Distillery Ltd . Brampton. Ontario
LYNCHBURG, TENNESSEE (population 361) is
where we make Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey,
and where we make lots of Canadian friends.
Folks come from all over to see how we make
our whiskey. Then, as often as not, they
remark as how they wish they could get
Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey at home.
Truth is, it's easier to get our whiskey
in Canada than it is here in Lynchburg.
You see, we're in Moore County
and that's a dry county. So we just
tell everyone to look for Jack Daniel's
Tennessee Whiskey back home. It's
real easy to find, and real easy to
enjoy, especially with friends.
JACK DANIEL'S TENNESSEE WHISKEY
If you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniels Whiskey, write us here in Lynchburg, Tennessee, 37352 U.S.A.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
| RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional]
lines. 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi-|
tional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
ICIassified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day \
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
ATTENTION ALL NEW
APPLICANTS TO
STUDENT HOUSING FOR
1967/88 WINTER SESSION
Application forms & brochures for
the Sept. '87 Winter Session for
Student Housing are available from
Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall. First return date is Mar. 2,
1987. Office hrs: 8:30 a.m.-4:00
p.m. weekdays.
NOTE: Current residents will receive
their reapplication forms & information sheets in their mailboxes.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
BINOCULARS. Bushnell Banner, 7x35,
wide-field, newly serviced (have Bushnell
receipt), $125. 253-3669.
MaclNTOSH 512K with external drive and
printer, $2000 obo. 734-7991.
15 - FOUND
ONE RING on East Mall on Friday, Feb. 6.
Phone 261-6880 evenings.
20 - HOUSING
ROOM ONLY AND ROOM/BOARD available for immediate occupation in the Single
Student Residences: Fairview Crescent,
Walter Gage, Place Vanier 6- Totem Park.
Contact Student Housing Office at 2071
West Mall, 228-2811, 8:30-4:00 p.m.
weekdays.
ROOMS FOR RENT $200/month (no utilities). 1 blk. from campus. Available Feb.
15th & Mar. 1. 224-2662, 732-0529.
4th & DUNBAR. 1 BR apt., lots of room.
Very conveniently located in a well managed building. $480. 222-0801.
30 - JOBS
ESTABLISHED IMPORTER looking for
student with exceptional sales & networking skills to sell on commission their fine line
of sterling silver, tri-gold & fashion
jewellery. Excellent split. Good opportunity
for in-residence person. Advancement
potential in company. Call SUN-GOLD International Korean Imports, 926-6222.
WANTED: 1 early riser (m/f) to work five
mornings/week in AMS storeroom. Must
be able to work from 6:30 to approx. 9:30
a.m. Mon.-Fri. Some lifting involved. Apply
at AMS Business Office, SUB Rm. 266.
35 - LOST
LOST BLACK address & calendar book on
Jan. 14. If found, please phone 327-2573.
Reward offered.
LOST: Very special gold chain with two
charms attached. War Memorial Gym,
Thurs., Feb. 5th. Reward. Kevin 274-7469.
DESPERATELY SEEKING keys from pocket
of It. blue Levi's jacket, lost Fri. at E. 33rd
Party. Call Kathy 222-0150.
LOST IN WESBROOK 100 Wed., Feb. 4, a
box of Dysan computer discs. If found
please call Roger 732-7547.
40 - MESSAGES
VALENTINES FROM Theatre at Large.
Costumed Cyranos will deliver sonnet and
rose to your Valentine. 222-0908.
OUR EYES met at "Stand By Me": Early
show Friday night. I was sitting in the middle section, you were sitting with two
friends on the right-hand side. You had
long wavy dark hair, a large necklace with
red stones, and shoes with silver tips. You
really fascinate me and I would like to get to
know you. Andrew, 736-9031.
65 - SCANDALS
LAST CHANCE!  LAST CHANCE!  to get
your Valentine message into our special
issue Feb. 13th. $2.75/3 lines. Forms avail.
SUB Rm266.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 56 228-5496
NUTRITIOUS GOODIES at Agora Food
CoOp! Fresh fruit, vegetables, bulk goods,
plus a full variety of grocery items. Check
us out at 17th & Dunbar or call 228-9115.
EXCELLENT   EDITING    SERVICES.    Pro
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70 - SERVICES
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15
DR. HUGH DEMPSTER
Personal Reflections
on Science & Faith
For transport from student residences call
224-2568, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Everyone is We/come
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University Blvd.
75 - WANTED
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league. Sun. mornings, 10 a.m., $30 per
game. Call Todd or Brent at 437-9290.
HAVE YOU OR A FRIEND experienced any
unwanted sexual contact while dating or in
a relationship with a boyfriend? We would
appreciate being able to talk with you. We
are researching this area, & hope to create
resources for women in dating relationships. Please call the SFU Criminology
Research Centre at 291-4127 between
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TELEPHONE interview with either Karen or
Cindy. All interviews will be kept strictly
confidential.
80 - TUTORING
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ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
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WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
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USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, February 10, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC skiers rule the slopes
By DON WELLS
Downhill ski racing is one of the
most spectacular and dangerous
disciplines known to modern sport.
The recent crash of Canadian national team downhiller Todd
Brooker in Kitzbuhel, Austria is a
chilling case in point. While all ski
racing demands strength and
courage, downhill requires extra
measures of both.
Two members of the UBC ski
team are familiar with the additional physical and mental committments required of downhill racers.
As members of the B.C. ski team
Stu Gairns and Wendy Morrison
were downhill specialists. Both
trained with Canada's national
team and both have raced at the international level. And now both are
winning races in the North West
Collegiate Conference Series.
Together they lead a talented and
dedicated UBC ski team which is
currently enjoying another highly
successful season. Along with teammates Sean Jaegli and Dave (Buck
Ford) Buckley, Gairns has consistently had top three results in
NWCC men's races. Last weekend
in White Pass, Washington Gairns
et al dominated both the slalom and
giant slalom events. In the women's
division Morrison, skiing on an
ankle injured in training, managed
a third and second place respectively to lead the women's team to a
r—
i
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JUST ADD WATER.
Next time your mouth
waters for an envelope, think
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kinkcs
GREAT COPIES GREAT PLOPLL
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8 9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
narrow defeat over their rivals from
SFU.
Last year Morrison, 23, a fourth
year political science student won
all four of the regional giant slalom
races and then won the regional
giant slalom title. The switch in
concentration from downhill to the
so-called "technical disciplines"
presented her with few problems,
attesting to her all-around strength
as a ski racer. As a member of the
B.C. team she won two Pontiac
Cup overall titles and trained with
the national team in Europe in the
summer and fall of 1982.
That season she competed in
both Canadian FIS and NOR-AM
races as well as the Europa Cup
downhills. When bad weather forced the cancellation of some of the
Europa Cup races, Wendy was
selected by National Team coaches
to compete in two World Cup
downhills in Megeves, France as
well as Sarajevo, Yugoslavia and
Copper Mountain, Colorado.
A virus prevented her from competing in the final World Cup
downhill at Mont Tremblant,
Quebec. It was also a factor in her
disappointing result at the Canadian Championships that year.
Following poor World Cup
results and a season plagued by illness, Wendy had to make a decision whether to prepare for another
stab at international competition or
attend university. She admits that
some aspects of national team life
and coaches were not to her liking.
"I had some bad psychological
problems with ski racing that
year." Fortunately for the UBC
team she decided to attend school
and race in the NWCC series.
10% OFF
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12 Exp   $4.95
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Stu Gairns, 25, is a third year
engineering student from Prince
George. Now in his fourth year on
the UBC team, Stu shares coaching
duties with Tom Stewart. In his first
year, the men's team won the
NCSA national title in Steamboat
Springs, Colorado and placed two
out of five racers on the NCSA Ail-
American team. Last year he earned
an individual spot in the national
finals but fell in both races.
So far this season Gairns has won
four of the six slalom and giant
slalom races. Gairns admits that the
switch from downhill to slalom was
relatively easy, but that it took time
to earn good results in giant slalom.
"When I was on the B.C. team I
had good results in downhill and
slalom, but giant slalom is a different kind of racing. It requires
just the right touch.  I think my
^CAMPUS-WIDE"
VALENTINE'S DAY
CARNATION SALE
$2.00/CARNATION
Order in SUB Concourse
February 9th to 12th
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Delivered February 12th and 13th
y     anywhere on campus
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BRAND NAME SOFT CONTACT LKNSES
Daily Wear
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79.95
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RICK HANSEN WEEK
COMING SOON
MARCH 23-28
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
to help organize
First meeting: Wed., Feb. 11th
at 5 p.m., SUB Rm. 206
giant slalom skiing has improved     The  fall  resulted  in  a  fractured
since I came to university." femur.
While on the B.C. team, Gairns
was coached by present national
team head coach Glen Wurtle. He
was selected to train on the National Development team and
subsequently travelled to downhills
in Europe, Australia and New
Zealand. In the 1981 Shell Cup
downhill at Lake Louise Gairns
crashed 100 meters from the finish.
Gairns and the UBC men's team
are heavy favorites to clinch the
regional title and a trip to the national final. Meanwhile the
women's division of the NWCC remains a tough three way fight between UBC, SFU and the College of
Idaho. UBC's success will depend
largely on the condition of Morrison's ankle.
03
>
o
DO YOU HAVE ASTHMA?
If you have asthma, you might be interested in
volunteering for a research study on the effect
of a new oral bronchodilator (medication to
open breathing tubes) in asthma.
The study involves coming to V.G.H. for
about 1 hour for breathing tests on 5 separate
days over 4-6 weeks. Volunteers will be compensated $25.00 for each visit.
If interested, call V.G.H. Lung Function Lab,
875-4830 (and ask for Nancy Gibson) for further information.
FREE
TUDIO
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
• For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1987
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
• UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1987 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
2111 West 16th Ave.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736-7281 or 731-1412.
TUDIO
O
PP
<
C6
UBC
triathlon!
Saturday, February 14
HOME ECONOMICS BUILDING
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
"DIARY OF A MAD TRIATHLETE"
GUEST TRI ATHLETES: CHRIS BROWN
PAUL QUINN
ROB HASEWAGA
Join us for some valuable and humourous information on
how to survive & succeed in the Triathlon.
COFFEE a BAKING COMPLIMENTS OF YOUR HOSTS
l4dC /mmimfli.../m, good sports
f
A group ride will be organized from UBC following the
Clinic. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 10, 1987
Basket Birds clinch playoff spot
By CHEW WONG
In Canada West men's basketball
play this weekend UBC managed
two wins over their Albertan rivals.
The 'Birds stole an 82-81 victory
from the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs on Friday night, and
then pounded the University of
Lethbridge Pronghorns 110-73
Saturday evening.
Although co-captain Paul
Johansson finished high man in the
'Birds scoring column against
Calgary with 22 points, it was the
efforts of a freshman and a
sophomore that pushed UBC over
the top. Johansson fouled out with
eight minutes still remaining in
regulation time.
It was first year guard Alan
Lalonde who stepped in to step-up
the UBC defence. His sharp-
shooting, rebounding, and four
steals put the 'Birds back into the
game.
"Al (Lalonde) was definitely the
MVP of the game," said UBC head
coach Bruce Enns.
While Lalonds brought the 'Birds
back, it was sophomore forward
Aaron Point who finished off the
Dinosaurs.
Down by two points with less
than 40 seconds left in regulation
time, Point tipped in team-mate
Eric Kristiansen's errant shot to tie
the game at 73.
Point dominated the overtime
period with five rebounds and two
clutch free-throws.
With four seconds left in overtime Calgary had the lead, 82-81,
and possession of the ball following
a UBC field goal. Calgary elected to
fire a court length pass. UBC's ace
point guard Kevin Hanson intercepted. Hanson then passed the
ball to Point at centre court where
mvp*:
- steve chan photo
KILL THAT VOLLEYBALL man!! Just blast it right through the floor of War Memorial right down to those legendary rotting joists.
UBC pucksters  ice  Pronghorns
By NEIL PHILIP
In Lethbridge on the weekend
three UBC hockey players acted as
scoring catalysts and led the
Thunderbirds to two victories over
the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns.
On Friday the 'Birds trounced the
Horns 10-5. Saturday's game was
much closer, ending 4-3 in UBC's
favor. After the weekend games
UBC is in fifth place in the Canada
West Conference with a 9-13-2
record. Lethbridge's 4-20-0 record
leaves them in eighth place.
UBC head coach Terry O'Malley
said his team's good offence was a
major factor in the games.
"We were much more balanced
on the attack than we have been in
past games. All three lines played
very well."
Mark Trotzuk led the 'Birds with
four goals and one assist over the
weekend, while Fred Ledlin had
two goals and two assists and Mitch
Evanish had four assists. Carl Repp
was a standout performer in goal.
On Friday UBC out shot
Lethbridge 51-25, had a 7-2 lead at
the end of the second period, and
eventually won 10-5. On Saturday
the shots-on-goal were 41-33.
UBC's 3-1 lead going into the third
period dissolved into a 3-3 tie
before Keith Abbott scored the winner, his second of the night, with
five minutes left.
Rough play characterized both
matches, but UBC's young team
was better able to direct the flow of
the games.
"Both were rugged games," said
O'Malley. "Lethbridge has a hard
hitting team, but our 12 new players
are getting more confidence in their
ability to control the games."
With four regular season games
left, and the University of Alberta
opting out of the playoffs to represent Canada in the World Student
Games in Czechoslovakia, UBC is
fighting a close battle for the fourth
playoff spot.
"Every game is a playoff game
now," O'Malley said. "It's a matter of getting control of a game and
making sure you make no key errors."
Next weekend the 'Birds play two
games in Brandon against the Brandon University Bobcats.
he was fouled with no time on the
clock.
With wild palaeozoic fans ranting, Point stepped up to the free-
throw line and snapped the net on
the first attempt of a one-and-one
to tie the game at 82. Then he promptly nailed the second free-throw
to secure the 83-82 UBC victory.
Saturday's contest against the
University of Lethbridge had none
of the drama of the previous evening's game. The 110-73 UBC victory was their most lopsided win of
the season.
After a slow start where
Lethbridge was ahead 14 to six, the
'Birds turned up the intensity a
notch or four. UBC led 54-38 at the
end of the first half.
"We just sort of broke loose,"
said coach Enns.
UBC opened the second half with
a 16 point tear and never looked
back.
UBC's scoring statistics read like
a Hollywood script. Johansson
played 29 minutes and scored 29
points. Hanson played 23 minutes
and dished out 17 assists. Lalonds
had a perfect game — hitting seven
of seven field goals plus seven of
seven free-throws. J.D. Jackson
dipsy-doodled through a Swiss
cheese Lethbridge zone defence and
managed no fewer than three point
plays — one was a dunk.
Behind the two wins the 'Birds
are now the tenth ranked team in
the nation in this week's poll.
However, more significant is the
fact that their five and three record
has secured UBC a playoff spot in
the Canada West conference — the
toughest basketball conference in
the land, according to Bruce Enns.
UBC plays their final home
games of the season this weekend
against number one ranked University of Alberta and the number four
ranked University of Saskatchewan. Saturday night's game will
mark the final appearance of senior
guards Kevin Hanson and Paul
Johansson in Thunderbird
uniforms.
Birds paste Dinos
By KRISTI BLOCKER
Our men's volleyball team
recorded two overwhelming home
victories on the weekend. On Friday
night in their most crucial game of
the season the 'Birds avenged
earlier defeats by pasting the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
three to zero (16-4, 15-8, 15-10).
With a potential CIAU National
tournament wild card berth on the
line, the 'Birds dominated the
Dinos at the net with 17 team stuff
blocks and 67 kills.
"Both teams came out strong and
the first game was a titanic
struggle," said 'Birds coach Dale
Ohman.
Injury-plagued middle blocker
Kelly Bukowski returned to the
'Birds line-up with vengeance.
"His game point mega-roof
block to end the first game probably turned the whole match
around," said Ohman.
As the 'Bird's player of the game,
Bukowski recorded a season high 13
kills along with three stuff blocks
and two digs.
Half way through the second
game the Dinos ran up the white
flag when they substituted for their
hitting ace Randy Gingera who
could not hit by the 'Birds wall. In
game three the 'Birds raced to an
11-2 lead before relaxing and cruising to a three set victory. Ace attackers Greg Williscroft and Phil
Bolden continued to carry the offensive load for the 'Birds with 18
and 16 kills respectively.
Coach Ohman was very pleased
with the play of play-set hitter
Shane Bellman and setter Rick
Kaufman. Bellman has been suffering from severe knee tendonitis for
the past month but still responded
with nine kills and a team high 11
digs.
"I felt Kaufmann had one of his
more consistent matches this season
and I know this victory means a lot
to him," said Ohman.
The Dinos were led by Art
O'Dwyer with 12 kills and three
stuff blocks.
On Saturday the 'Birds relaxed as
they toyed with an inexperienced
Lethbridge Pronghorn team. They
easily swept the match in three
straight games (15-3, 15-7, 15-7).
The 'Birds were led by player of the
match Kevin Hooge with six kills
and two stuff blocks.
The 'Birds bench got some much
deserved playing time with
freshman Rob Hill scoring five
kills. Brian Snelling and Doug Penner also chipped in with five and
four kills respectively.
Hill and 'Birds coach leave on
Wednesday for Sydney, Nova
Scotia where they will represent
B.C. at the Canada Winter Games
from February 14-21.
The 'Birds' next action will be
Thursday night in Victoria followed
by a return match at War Memorial
Gym on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. This
match will be seniors day as co-
captains Shane Bellman and Walter
Janzen play their last UBC home
match of their careers.
Volley Birds split matches
By LOUISE PANZIERA
Apart from this weekend's upcoming match against UVic, the
women's volleyball season is over
after a loss to Calgary last weekend.
The match was important to both
teams and it wasn't until the sixteenth point of the fourth game that
the match was decided.
Calgary and UBC were involved
UBC ruggers down Richmond brutes
The UBC Thunderbirds rugby
squad returned to regular season
play this past weekend after a hard
fought and injury riddled
McKechnie Cup series.
All four UBC teams emerged victorious whh the key win coming
from a varsity team 21-18 victory
over Richmond in a controversial
match. Refereeing was the issue.
Foul and unsportsmanlike play was
the problem.
After an early jump into the lead
the 'Birds found themselves knocked off their game strategy by an
overly aggressive and pugnacious
Richmond crew. The Richmond
team used some chippy tactics and
brute size and strength to obtain
two pushover trys.
UBC, however, was able to adjust and controlled the last 10
minutes with a change in tactics.
UBC trys were scored by John
Disturnal, Pat Hamilton and Garry
Vine, but it was Pierre Duey's drop
goal kick in the last five minutes
that broke the tie and sealed Richmond's fate.
Coach Barry Legh expects some
of his nine injured starters to return
for this weekend's game against
Douglas College on Saturday.
They're a very physical team and
we need to be healthy for a good
showing," said Legh. Game time is
2:30 p.m.
in some long rallies and both teams
kept them going with great saves.
Calgary won the match (15-9,
11-15, 15-13 and 16-14). Sheila
Jones had a total of 30 kills and two
ace serves, Rhonda Sampson had 26
kills with three aces. Trina Hewlett
was also strong in the match with a
total of 12 blocks. Heather
Olafsson had eight and player of
the game Vikki Lalari had six.
UBC displayed tough serves
throughout the match, but their service mistakes came at critical times.
Power hitter Rhonda Sampson
came through for UBC at important points in the game by putting
the ball exactly where she wanted.
Sheila Jones was aggressive during
the entire match — just ask
Calgary's setter.
On Saturday, Lethbridge proved
to be no match for UBC as the
Thunderbirds won easily (15-6,
15-7, 15-4). UBC's Pam Walker
was named player of the game and
Jacquie Capewell played well with
six digs and nine kills. UBC coach
Donna Baydock added that Kim
Bauer and Amy Ku also had strong
performances for UBC.
UBC had some additional help
this weekend from their fans. The
'Birds had an enthusiastic audience
behind them all of the way, and
members from the football team,
track team and physical education
department just to name a few, outshone any cheerleading squad UBC
has heard.
On Sunday UBC will take on the
Canada West leading University of
Victoria. It has been four months
since the two teams faced each
other across the net and both teams
have experienced a lot of competition since then. Because UBC lies
fourth in the Canada West standings, a win over UVic wouldn't
make their chances of a playoff
spot any better, but it would certainly hurt UVic's.

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