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The Ubyssey Nov 14, 1984

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 19
Vancouver, B.C. Wednesday, November 14, 1984
«*%>'-"*■ 48 228-2301
Okanagan cuts transfer courses
If Okanagan College receives an
expected five per cent provincial
funding cut next year it will end
university transfer programs at its
Penticton and Salmon Arm campuses, a new proposal says.
The proposal is included in a
discussion document the Okanagan
College board recently released.
Allan Donaldson, Okanagan College board chair, said closing these
campuses means laying off 48 full-
time faculty and staff and other
part-time staff.
He said related services such as
the library system would also be cut
back if the university transfer programs ended.
Donaldson added proposals in
the discussion paper range from
emptying the garbage once every
two weeks to reducing counselling
staff by 50 per cent.
If the two campuses' transfer
programs end 273 students would
be affected and 33 per cent of these
students are enrolled in full-time
transfer programs, Donaldson said.
The question of accessibility is
"serious, there's no question,"
Donaldson said. "It's not optimal,
but what can you do?"
Okanagan College principal
Peter Williams said students in
Salmon Arm or Penticton would
Delegation
says leave
Simon Fraser University delegates
to a recent Canadian Federation of
Students conference will recommend the SFU student society withdraw from CFS at the national
level.
SFU delegate Charles Menzies
said the services section of CFS,
which oversees CUTS travel services and other CFS ventures, is becoming so large it is hurting CFS.
"If you look at the services side it
looks like they are establishing a
small corporate empire," Menzies
said. "It (CFS) is just a service wing
with a weak excuse for a political
wing."
He said SFU's four delegates will
recommend SFU stay within the
provincial portion of CFS but withdraw from the federal part due to
the problems they perceive. He added there is now no precedent for this
in B.C., although the Ontario Fed-
eraton of Students allows its members to join OFS and not CFS.
A strong grass-roots movement is
needed before students can have a
strong national movement, Menzies
said, adding the delegates think
they will benefit CFS and Canadian
students by limiting CFS participation.
Within the present CFS structure
the bureaucracy has too much
power, he said.
He added he is telling his friends
not to vote yes in next week's CFS
referendum at UBC. UBC students
will vote Nov. 21, 22 and 23 on
whether to join CFS or not.
But a UBC delegate to the recent
CFS conference said he still supports joining CFS. Duncan Stewart
said the SFU delegates want to pull
out because CFS is not radical
enough, adding he did not think
SFU is generally that radical.
"This proposition to the SFU
student society (to leave CFS) will
fail miserably," Stewart said.
CFS representatives could not be
reached for comment.
have to attend campuses tn
Kelowna or Vernon. But Williams
added these two campuses can only
accommodate half the transfer
students.
Williams said the college must
take such drastic action because it
faces an unusual problem. "We are
not getting any recognition for the
added cost of operating a multi-
campus college," he said.
He said centralized colleges can
reduce overhead where multi-
campus ones cannot because they
must duplicate services.
Williams added a five per cent cut
in 1985-86 for the college makes the
real cut 20 per cent over two years
including inflation.
He said proposed cuts will be the
result of an expected $2.1 million
shortfall created by an increase in
the college's 1985-86 expenses and a
decrease in the 1985-86 budget.
Williams said the expected five per
cent decrease in the provincial
government's funding is realistic
although it is the worst case
scenario.
"Cost increases every year and
Porn endangers
women — lawyer
By SARAH MILLIN
Pornography makes it dangerous
to be a woman, a U.S. lawyer said
Saturday night.
"When people consume pornography, they are sexually enjoying
discrimination against women,"
Catherine MacKinnon told 500 people in Woodward Instruction Resource centre.
"Pornography is the graphic and
sexually explicit subordination of
women in pictures and words," she
said.
Pornography is thrust on people
in our society, MacKinnon said.
"Pornography isibrced on women
in marriages. When it is forced on
children, they develop the same
symptoms as victims of incest," she
said.
"It is forced on patients by their
psychotherapists," MacKinnon
said. Some women have been told
to act out the Story of O by their
doctors. This book describes the
submission of a women and how
she enjoyed it.
When men are exposed to pornography over a one week period,
they emerge more willing to be aggressive to women, she said. "They
are more willing to think women
would like to be raped and more
likely to blame the woman for the
rape," MacKinnon said.
And there is a systematic use of
children in pornography.
"Children are presented tied up
in every possible way, penetrated in
every way, urinated and defecated
on, as women are in pornography,"
she said.
One of the most abusive uses of
child pornography is that which
pedophiles use to obtain cooperation from children.
Children are also dressed as
adults and adult women are dressed
as children, she said.
When society is saturated with
pornography, sex crimes will become simply sexy, she said. "Child
sex and incest simply become infantile sexuality." She added in
such a society the victims don't see
themselves as harmed.
MacKinnon said there are four
types of pornography. The Playboy
and Penthouse type is available in
paperback books, magazines and
increasingly in video tapes.
This kind of pornography
portrays women with legs
splayed, seeming to ask for penetration, MacKinnon said. "Buying
that magazine is buying the possession and use of those women."
There is also an explicit genre
with pictorials of oral and coital
sex, and the bondage genre which
MacKinnon calls the genre of torture.
"The Penthouse pictures are only
a small example of a whole range of
Asian women bondage," MacKinnon said.
MacKinnon was referring to the
December issue of Penthouse, pulled from the racks by two major
Vancouver distributors last week.
Police are considering charges
under the obscenity section of the
Criminal Code.
And MacKinnon said torture
films are on the rise.
"The splatter, slasher films contain the sexualization of torture of
all kinds," she said, adding these
are films in which women are cut,
mutilated, disfigured and finally
murdered.
MacKinnon gave a graphic description of Snuff, a film where a
live woman was said to be slain.
Murder was sexualized in the film.
"Real 'snuff films exist."
The speech was part of a series of
Vancouver Institute lectures.
we're not even at a constant level of
funding, that would be bad
enough," Williams said, "but an
actual reduction of funding ... the
(provincial) priorities are wrong."
But   Dick   Melville,   education
ministry information director, said
the college is deciding to cut programs and the province cannot be
blamed.
"They are given a certain amount
of dollars as is every other college.
They do with that money what they
wish," Melville said.
— elio mendonca photo
DRENCHED THUNDERBIRDS CLAIM national soccer title this
weekend in Ottawa by beating Carleton Ravens 2-1.
'Birds win national crown
By MONTE STEWART
OTTAWA — The men's soccer team walked away with a national
banner here Saturday.
The 'Birds edged the Carleton Ravens 2-1 in the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletics Union championship match. They walked away
from their first-ever national victory because, after nearly three
hours of playing in relentless rain, they could not do much else.
The title was ultimately decided by penalty kicks — a bastardized
manner of determining national champions. After 30 minutes of
overtime, UBC outscored Carleton 4-2 in the showdown segment.
Sean McLaughlin gave the 'Birds a 1-0 lead in the first 10 minutes of
the contest, stroking Jim Armstrong's centring cross behind Ravens'
goalkeeper Mark Stokes.
The Ravens' Mike Lanos evened the score five minutes later. The
Carleton soccer team's first ever All-Canadian capitalized on a mis-
cue by 'Birds' goalkeeper Brian Kennedy.
Lanos fired a free kick that appeared to be heading over the net
but it suddenly hit the far post and bounced into the net behind Kennedy", who had let up on the shot.
See page 8: SOCCER
Arbiter turns down commerce wage request
By PATTI FLATHER
A commerce faculty request for a
wage increase was justified but
turned down because the university
lacks the ability to pay, the case's
arbiter said Tuesday.
"The (commerce) faculty said
they were in a special position as a
world-ranking faculty competing
for faculty. The university said a)
they didn't have enough money to
pay and b) the amount requested
was not appropriate," said Vancouver lawyer Bruce McColl.
McColl said the provincial
government is underfunding universities and that he agrees with the
commerce demand.
"I didn't turn down the request
because they were not entitled to it.
The employer didn't have enough
money."
The commerce faculty sought a
subsidy agreement to the zero per
cent wage increase ratified by the
faculty association for the past two
years. But the faculty and the
university could not agree on an increase and the case went to arbitration in October. McColl said he announced the award Oct. 27.
Mark Thompson, a member of
the commerce faculty steering committee, said commerce needs the
wage increase to combat severe problems recruiting and retaining
faculty.
"We're going to lose some people
and we can't replace them," he
said, adding the only options now
are restricting enrolment or reducing quality.
"The university has real financial
problems but they also have a
budget of $200 million. We're only
a small part of the pie."
Thompson said commerce professors are in high demand now
because there is a huge surge in
business school enrolments all over
North America.
In 1981 the commerce faculty
won the right to bargain for a larger
settlement than allotted in the
general faculty association
agreements, Thompson said. Commerce was  mainly contesting the
1983-84 wage freeze but also questioned the 1984-85 freeze, he said.
Neither Thompson nor Charles
Bourne, advisor to UBC's ad-
minstration president, would
release details of the commerce
demands and the university counter
offer.
But associate commerce dean
Larry Jones said commerce received
less than what it could have by rejecting the university offer. "As a
result of arbitration we got less," he
said.
Jones said seven commerce professors have left recently and more
will likely join them. He said they
can get other jobs, especially in the
U.S., at much higher salaries. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 14, 1984
Students hit streets in protest
TORONTO (CUP) — Thousands of Ontario and Quebec students plan to take to the streets
Nov. 15 in protest of government
education policies and university
and college underfunding.
The two provincial days of action
are being organized by the Ontario
Federation of Students and Quebec's   largest   student   association,
I'Association    national   des   etu-
diante(e)s du Quebec.
While Quebec's protest will focus
on the provincial government's
loan and bursary policy and its plan
to thaw tuition fees, frozen since
1975, Ontario's actions will be aimed at the impending report of a
commission set up to plan the
reshaping of Ontario's universities.
Alberta texts racist
CALGARY (CUP) — Although
nearly 10 per cent of Alberta's
public school books have been
singled out for their sexist or racist
content, a provincial government
official said they won't be removed
from circulation immediately.
"It will take some time for the
natural replacement cycle to
eliminate the resources," said Linda Youell, an Alberta education
department official.
An Alberta education audit
found almost 10 per cent of books
and resources do not have "an acceptable level of tolerance and
understanding."
Several elementary grade history
and     social     sciences     texts
discriminate against native people,
the report said. Both the student
and teacher editions of the grade
five music text Exploring Music are
sexist and have an American bias,
and other books have a strong male
orientation, according to the
report.
Provincial education minister
Dave King said he is encouraged by
the study's results.
"I am satisfied that Alberta
education procedures for developing new curricula and selecting support materials have proven successful," he said.
The government is notifying
teachers about the books'
drawbacks and they are expected to
correct them while teaching.
OFS chair Monika Turner said
Nov. 15 has been specially designated as a day of action because the
Bovey commission — named after
entrepreneur Edmund Bovey — is
expected to hand over its report that
day to Ontario's education minister
Bette Stephenson.
University and college students in
both provinces will converge on
provincial legislatures. OFS and
ANEQ hope student councils will
encourage students to protest at
Queen's Park and in Quebec City
respectively.
And students in Ottawa, who
plan to contact federal political
party leaders for their position on
the underfunding issue, will rally
Parliament Hill.
OFS wants to hold a press conference following the legislature protest and will circulate petitions
across the province demanding that
the Qntario government make education a priority. So far, 10,000
people have signed the petition.
ANEQ is urging universities and
CEGEPs to stage occupations and
student strikes on the two days preceding and on the day of action.
The decision to recommend student
strikes was approved by the ANEQ
national congress in a September
vote.
In a separate move, several universities in Quebec signed an agreement Nov. 1 expressing opposition
to any tuition fee increases at their
institutions and demanding Quebec
education minister Yves Berube immediately renounce this policy as a
means of university funditig. Concordia University, l'Universite du
Quebec a Montreal, l'Universite du
Quebec a Chicoutimi, l'Universite
de Montreal and l'Universite de
Sherbrooke all gave their support.
The schools planned lo send telegrams and press releases to provincial media Nov. 5, outliningtheir
positions on a thaw in tuition fees.
UBC tuitions increased 33 per
cent  last year and another hike is
likely this January, but how much
has yet to be decided. The B.C.
government cut education funding
five per cent last year.
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
1984 AUTUMN LECTURES
PHIL GOLD
Dr. Phil Gold is one of Canada's leading cancer researchers. He has an international reputation for his
research involving the identification of one of the basic cancer cell antigens. Dr. Gold is currently a Professor of Medicine and Physiology at McGill University, a senior investigator at the Montreal General
Hospital Research Institute, and Physician-in-Chief at the Montreal General Hospital. He is active in many
professional and scientific research organizations and in recent y.ears has been the recipient of several
prestigious awards, including the Gairdner Foundation Award and the Ernest Manning Award. Dr. Gold is
a stimulating speaker whose lectures will be of interest to students and faculty alike.
TUMOR MARKERS: THE FOOTPRINTS OF CANCER
Wednesday,    November   14,    In   Lecture   Hall   6,   Woodward   Instructional   Resources
Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
THE CLOUD OF CANCER: WITH THE EVER-INCREASING SILVER
LINING, Saturday,  November 17, In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, at 8:15 p.m. (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE-PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information. Wednesday, November 14, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
People imperil wildlife — Mowat
By DAVE STODDART
Human encroachment upon
wildlife in North America is serious,
an internationally renowned author
and conservationist said Tuesday.
Farley Mowat told 170 people in
Angus 110 of the seriousness of the
human role in the biological process. "Man has reduced the (nonorganic) biomass in North America
by 80-90 per cent over the past four
or 500 years," Mowat said.
"We've become alienated from
what we are. We're part of a large
biological fabric. We don't participate on a natural level anymore.
"We are concerning ourselves
with the animals that have
economic importance." Mowat
said he fears only domesticated and
recreational animals will survive.
Mowat, a Canadian who
has been writing professionally
since 1949, has devoted much of his
work toward conservationist goals
and issues. A list of the author's
works includes such bestselling
novels as People of the Deer, The
Snow Walker, and Never Cry Wolf.
After Mowat delivered a 20
minute address a panel questioned
the author's ideas.
Ray Hilborn, associate professor
at the Institute of Animal Resource
Ecology, said there has been a
decline in the population of most
animal species in North America,
but added there is positive evidence
the situation is improving.
"Mr. Mowat's findings are accurate but recent data show many
animal populations are increasing.
This is a result of a conscious attempt by interest groups and
governments to restore our natural
environment.
"Salmon hatcheries and wildlife
sanctuaries are good examples of
this. Mr. Mowat makes no mention
of this in his new book."
Two students run
for school board
By ROBERT BEYNON
Two Simon Fraser University students are running for positions on Vancouver school board because they say the board needs shaking up.
Oscar Ramos and Norman Felix, both independents, say the present
Non-Partisan Association-dominated board is more concerned with balancing the books than maintaining a quality education in Vancouver secondary and elementary schools.
"The board has to implement $10 million in cutbacks before 1986,"
Felix said, "and this only emphasizes the need for a ward system where the
people doing the cutting are entirely aware of the schools they are cutting."
He said across the board cuts to elementary and secondary schools in
Vancouver are not the answer. Schools where the majority of students do
not speak English as a first language are already hurting more than other
schools, he said, and they will hurt even more if hit by across the board
cuts.
Felix said he and Ramos understand the problems involved in these
because they are only recently out of school whereas most school board
trustees are parents in their 30s and 40s.
"Most of these people want a total emphasis on the three R's," Ramos
said. "We realize the importance of fine arts and sports activities in
schools."
Ramos said even if these programs are cut from the curriculum the board
should attempt to provide them for students in after school recreation.
"But the board is offering no assistance," Ramos said.
He said youth gangs and a lack of space are other problems the board is
not addressing. The board should address youth gangs before they get out
of hand and not leave them entirely up to the police, Ramos said.
Vancouver electors will go to the polls to elect alderpeople, school board
trustees, parks board trustees and a mayor this Saturday.
Pregnant evicted
HAMILTON (CUP) — A McMaster University student said he is
so enraged at a Hamilton realty
company's practice of evicting
pregnant women from its adult
apartments that he is moving out of
one of its buildings.
Kevin Best, a second year student, said he and his lover decided
to move after discovering the terms
of their lease. The lease says female
tenants must agree to provide Van-
on Properties with immediate notification of their pregnancies and be
prepared to leave one of their five
adult apartment buildings by the
seventh month of their pregnancies.
"We would never have taken the
apartment (if we had known in advance)," Best said. "They are very
sick individuals. How can they ask
people to leave when a woman gets
pregnant?"
if,'' PRODUCED BY AMS
■fCRAVEN "A" presents
MIKE
Daniel D'lgnazio, Hamilton human rights officer, said a woman
cannot be evicted if she bears a
child.
While the manager of an adult
apartment building can refuse to
rent to people with children, the
contract discriminates on the basis
of sex if Vanon evicts pregnant women, D'lgnazio said.
Catherine Catlin, manager of
Vanon Properties, said if the tenant
did not agree to the terms of the
lease, then no agreement to rent
would be made.
Maggie Roberts, a local community legal services branch member, said such a contract is contrary
to the Landlord/Tenants Act.
"(Any pregnant woman) would
certainly not have to move," she
said.
Mowat said he knew little of the
situation on the west coast, having
devoted his recent work to the situation on the east coast.
Mowat added he has a distrust of
scientific data obtained by government commissions, even though he
himself was once a federally commissioned research scientist.
"There is an overall feeling (in
the scientist) that he has to stay
within the boundaries of his
bureaucracy," Mowat said. "I used
to send back 500 word telegrams
that told the government they had
their priorities fucking backwards,
and they would send me a three
word telegram that said 'You are
fired'."
Mowat recently published a new
book, Sea of Slaughter.
~-ingo breig photo
FARLEY MOWAT promotes his new book, Sea of Slaughter, at UBC bookstore after Tuesday's on-campus lecture.
Student to blame in loan fiasco
A student who recently discovered he will not receive
his expected student loan has only himself to blame,
UBC's awards director said Tuesday.
Byron Henders said in Sepember Dave Ball received
a pink slip with his conditional acceptance which clearly spelled out the academic conditions for receiving the
loan.
Henders said, "I'll admit the loan booklet is unclear,but if he read the pink slip he should have understood the criterion."
The awards office would have contacted Ball
sooner, Henders said, but the office was too busy processing application forms and sending them to Students
to examine each form. He said the only criterion for
both federal and provincial loans the awards office
does not consider initially is the academic requirements, which this student lacked.
Dave Ball, arts 2, passed 80 per cent of his courses last
year. But because he did not pass 80 per cent of a full 15
unit course load, he is not eligible for the provincial portion of the B.C. student loan program.
Until Ball received a letter from the awards office
last week he did not know he would not receive the
$1,641 provincial loan he applied for.
Ball said if he does not receive the money he will
have to drop out of school and probably fail all his
courses this year. Students receive failing grades for
dropping courses after the two to three week deadline.
Ball will then be ineligible for a loan next year.
Henders said the awards office would still like to
help Ball if they can find a way to raise money for him.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 14, 1984
We become what we see
STERLIMfr
Exactly what is it about pornography that arouses
such strong feelings in people who get involved in
discussions about it?
From those champions of free speech, who maintain that anything goes, to those who believe that a
photograph of any woman for men per se is pornography, all parties must agree the issue revolves
around more than simply matters of taste.
Since studies show men who watch violent sexual
films are inclined to advocate violent sexual activity,
that children never recover from incestual abuse, that
we can't help but learn from what we see, fundamental values increasingly seem to be connected to the imagery with which we surround ourselves.
Hustler and Penthouse are glossy packages offered
as entertainment that one might relax and lighten an
evening with.
Presented as normal behavior in the pages of these
magazines are bestiality — a woman with a snake lurking near her genitalia, masochism — women with injuries inflicted during sexual activity, and total submission — women on their knees, tied up or lying down,
completely exposed and vulnerable. It is important to
remember that some weird fringe of our culture isn't
responsible for supporting these attitudes, but the biggest money in North America — cigarette, alcohol and
automotive companies buy advertising space in
Playboy, Penthouse and Hustler. As well, these
magazines would perish without a large, paying
readership.
Two Vancouver distributors recently withdrew Penthouse from the stands. Penthouse and Playboy are
the two best selling rags in North America. Bigger
than Time, and bigger than Newsweek. These and
other magazines, films, and video are the purveyors of
packaged sex.
And the largest market for the package of pornography is men. It is entertainment by men for men
at the expense of women and children.
Children too are portrayed in films, video,
magazines, and paperbacks. They are shown engaging in activities which are far beyond their scope. Most
of these children are at kindergarten age, an age too
young to know they are victims of acts committed by
men who believe there is nothing wrong with a little
early sex. These men also believe there is nothing
wrong with a little healthy pornography.
However, studies show ihose exposed to pro-
nography become desensitized to the people they see
exploited as sexual subjects. Pornography has been
linked to acts such as rape, sexual harrassment and incest.
Easily available pornography makes it clear that
abusive and sexually discriminatory attitudes are the
'normal attitudes' to have in our society. And attitudes
are the precursors to  actions.
Some claim morals and values cannot be gleaned
from magazines, video, and film. They are wrong. Our
educational system is based on audio-visual methods.
If reading a magazine doesn't pass on food for
thought, however rottern it might be, then the whole
educational system is questionable. It is presumptuous
of anyone to claim reading a Penthouse of Playboy will
leave them unaffected.
Pornography is sexual discrimination of the worst
kind because of the subtlety in which it works in our
society. Pornography is discrimination condoned by
the law. Porn is a consumer product readily available
in corner grocery stores. It is a product that conveys
attitudes that as one U.S. lawyer said, "makes it
dangerous to be a woman" and one may well add, a
child.
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Letters
* Irrational' letter on Indian crisis shocks
In response to the letter from the
Sikh Students' Association,
(Media too quick to condemn Sikh
emotions, Nov. 9) I was simply
shocked by what I read.
India is the biggest democracy in
the world, not only in name but also
in practice. No other country in the
world has such freedom of speech,
freedom of press, and freedom of
action.
India is comprised of people that
have different faiths and different
cultures. India has representation
of people from all different
religions (even if they are a minority) in the government. There are 73
Sikhs in the parliament and the
president of India is a Sikh.
When I hear statements such
as that Indira Gandhi was a
"Hitler"   I   feel   saddened.   It   is
Suicide pill scheme false
Mark Fettes of the UBC peace
club insisted in his recent letter that
the critics of his club's cyanide proposal don't understand the reasons
for pushing the suicide option (Club
wants awareness, Nov. 6). He said
that the cyanide referendum will
shock students out of their alleged
apathy over the danger of war.
Fettes is wrong. We understand
the reasons for advocating cyanide
very well, and we reject these
reasons. The suicide pill scheme
presents two equally false and abhorrent choices: either we rely on
the warmongers to disarm, or we
take cyanide pills. These false
choices, put forward as the only options open for people, are actually
part of the war preparations.
The peace club, The Ubyssey
which editorially endorsed the cyanide scheme, and the other media
which promoted it Te generating a psychosis of war, sowing pessimism and despair,  and actually
dissuading people  from acting to
avert the war danger.
The students are not apathetic on
the question of the war danger, contrary to what the peace club spokesperson suggests. People are greatly
concerned over the danger of war,
and they are seeking ways of harnessing this great concern in the
practical struggle against war and
war preparations.
Neither the "cyanide choice" nor
the choice of counting on the superpowers to disarm are choices which
are acceptable. Many people are demanding that the cyanide petition
be withdrawn, and that no referendum on this question be held.
What is needed is a serious conference at UBC which will practically assist people in developing protests and other mass actions to avert
the danger of war, as well as examine the source of the war danger.
Allen H. Soroka
Law library
THE UBYSSEY
November 14. 1983
The Ubyssey Is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Save the whales!" pleaded Sara Millin, Robert Beynon, Patti Flather and Charlie Fidelman as they
proceeded to blow up the Vancouver Aquarium. "What the hell for?" queried Monte Stewart, Renate
Boerner and Dave Stoddart as the whale flesh fell from the sky. "Because Farley said so," snapped In-
go Breig, Rory Allen and Elio Mendonca as they observed the spectacle with insipid glee. "Chuck
Farley," Jonathan Rhone and Uaku moaned in disgust Tune in next week when the staff of the Daily
Blah play rollerbal! for keeps.
amazing that educated young people at UBC are so irrational in their
thinking!
Do you think if Gandhi was prejudiced towards the Sikhs she
would allow them in the government, allow them to take over so
many key positions in the army,
and keep them as her own personal
bodyguards?
The bodyguards that she had
such faith in killed her in cold
blooded murder. The Sikhs should
condemn this act instead of condoning it on the basis it was fate
and she deserved it. If Sikhs continue to do this they will continue to
live by the sword and definitely die
by the sword and innocent people
will die due to their fanaticism.
I am ashamed at the Sikhs who
celebrated after her assassination.
They have no brains and are not
practicing the Sikh religion as Guru
Nanak preached it. Most of the
Hindus believe Guru Nanak was
one of the greatest sons of India.
As for the invasion of the Golden
Temple, this was not a sudden
event. For two years, Gandhi had
been talking rationally to the Sikh
fundamentalists to no avail. Finally
Gandhi had to flush out the terrorists.
You can't use any religious place
in the world as a sanctuary. The
Golden Temple had dangerous
weapons and murderers inside.
There were rapes being committed
inside this so called Holy Place.
This was not a place of God, but
a place of crime. The Golden tem
ple in the true sense of the word had
been converted to a place of crime
by the criminals and murderers.
No democratic government,
which has a duty to maintain law
and order, would allow these acts to
be permitted even if it was the
Vatican (Roman Catholic), the
mosque in Mecca (Moslem), or the
Birla Temple (Hindu). In fact, just
a few years back, the Holy mosque
in Mecca was invaded by the
Moslem government due to terrorists.
Gandhi, in my opinion, was a
woman of steel. She had compassion and she wanted peace in the
true meaning of the word. In the
eyes of people in the world, she will
always be mother India.
Sharmila Kumar
arts 3
Gandhi-Hitler comparison ignores history
This is in reply to a letter from
the Sikh Students Association of
UBC who complain of unfavorable
media coverage for the Sikhs
following the assassination of Indian prime minister Indira Gandhi.
(Media too quick to condemn Sikh
emotions, Nov. 9)
How can the Sikh Student
Association justify the use of their
sacrosanct temples by armed terrorists seeking to undermine the na-
Elections officer explains CFS rules
On Nov. 21, 22 and 23 both
undergraduate and graduate students must decide whether they
wish to join the Canadian Federation of Students at a cost of $7.50
per fulltime student per year.
As elections commissioner I must
ensure that this referendum proceed in a fair and orderly manner.
To do so, I will be enforcing referendum policy (Sec. IV Alma Mater
Society Code and Bylaws).
Especially pertinent to any prospective yes or no campaign is Sec.
IV, Article 12: "All campaigns, either for or against a referendum
question must be registered with the
Election Committee before campaigning on campus."
Any party not registered with me
will not be permitted to advertise
during the campaign and have a
scrutineer    present    during    ballot
counting. There will be no exceptions to this rule.
So much for the warnings. I have
one more thing to add on a more
positive note. At present, the elections committee is compiling a list
of paid clerks to work in poll
booths during the referendum. For
those who are interested, you can
use that spare time between classes
to make a little extra Christmas
money.
If you wish to help, or have any
questions concerning the referendum contact me at 228-2361, or
come and see me at Referendum
Central in SUB 246.
I can't overemphasize how important this question is to every student on campus, so take a few moments to get involved in your education's future. ,. .... , .
Donald Mustard
AMS elections commissioner
tional government? It was the terrorists who chose the battleground,
so why this self-righteous indignation?
As for the cowardly assassination
of their prime minister by her
trusted Sikh bodyguards and the
subsequent outpourings of joy
amongst some Sikhs, it only
deepens the distrust felt over a
criminal breach of trust.
Comparing the invasion of the
terrorist-infested Golden Temple to
an invasion of Mecca and the
Vatican is self-serving. The latter
places are not misused as inaccessible terrorist bases, and are therefore
sacrosanct.
Further, to allude to the elected
leader of the world's largest
democracy as "Hitler" only
displays a lack of intellectual honesty, an ignorance of history, and
contempt for the democratic process.
The Sikh Student Association
would do well to realize the damage
it does itself when it tries to justify
recent actions in tormented India to
a not unintelligent public.
Ligand D. Talwar
unclassified 2 Wednesday, November 14, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student misconstrued arms control talks
P. Sugra's letter shows an obvious failure to grasp the purpose of
Jane Sharp's talk (Soviet occupation, terrorism contradict desire for
peace, Nov. 9)
Sharp was speaking of peace on
a much larger scale than Sugra
seems to realize. The issue, as I understood it, was not whether or not
the Soviet Union was interested in
stopping its interference in the affairs of other countries such as Poland and Afghanistan, rather it
was: is the USSR interested in arms
control.
The reason for the Soviet's "40
year occupation of Eastern
Europe" and its "bloody suppression of freedom movements in Afghanistan etc. "is the age old feeling  of insecurity  of the  Soviets,
CRAB vigil
happens today
Thank you for your Oct. 30 back
cover story on CRAB, Create A
Real Available Beach. Eric Eggert-
son has written one of the best accounts of our activities to get a central waterfront park between Main
Street and Abbott Street.
However, we have moved our
"CRAB Candlelight Vigil" at 200
Granville Square (near the Sears
Tower) to today and Thursday,
Nov. 14 and 15. There will be a rally
at Granville Square at 2:00 p.m. today.
It's now a matter of the politicians coming through for the people. We await a three-block park
that the Downtown Eastsiders have
worked for for two and a half years
at their own expense of time, energy
and money. Mayor Mike Harcourt
and Vancouver Centre MP Pat
Carney can make sure it is a noncommercial three-block park.
And will they?
Don Larson
CRAB president,
60A Alexander St.,
Vancouver
We want your letters. They must
be typed, triple-spaced on a
70-space line. We edit for grammar
and brevity, and do not accept sexist or racist letters. And don't forget
that "Dear Sir" went out at The
Ubyssey years ago, but the letters
editor becomes overjoyed when she
sees a letter addressed to the "Dearest editorial collective."
FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE
University of British Columbia
TWELFTH
NIGHT
By William Shakespeare
HOLDOVER
PERFORMANCES
Monday, Nov. 19
Er
Tuesday, Nov. 20
8:00 p.m.
Student Prices: $4.50
(Box Office: Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre)
Res. 228-2678
their desire for a buffer zone between East and West, and their wish
to expand or at least maintain their
"sphere of interest." American
policies towards Nicaragua and EI
Salvador reflect similar desires. I
don't recall Jane Sharp saying or
even implying that she "admired"
the consistency of Soviet policies of
suppression or expansion, but perhaps I wasn't listening closely
enough. Then again, maybe Sugra
misunderstood or made no effort to
understand what Sharp said.
Without belittling the need for
peace in Afghanistan or Nicaragua,
the subject of Jane Sharp's talk was
Start Your Christmas Shopping Now!
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Call for an appointment before Nov. 24, 1984
A CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVE
ON
HOMOSEXUALITY
BY FRANK SHEARS
THURSDAY, NOV. 15
CHEM 250
12:30
SPONSORED BY INTER-VARSITY
CHRIST/AN FELLOWSHIP
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to
run for election for the following positions:
BOARD OF GOVERNORS - TWO students
SENATE-SEVENTEEN students (five at-large
and one from each faculty)
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later
than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 7, 1984.
peace on a larger scale — East-West
relations and Soviet foreign policy
with regard to the United States and
arms control. While the Soviet Union may not be interested in changing all its policies, it could, given
the right circumstances (and here
both superpowers must make concessions), show a serious interest in
disarmament.
I do not endorse the Soviet actions of suppression any more than
I approve of much of the American
interventionist actions.  But I give
my wholehearted approval of any
interest that the Soviets show in favor of disarmament and the cause
of world peace.
Sugra should think things out before confusing the facts and doing
injustice to those who know what
they are talking about. Sugra has
gone beyond distorting Jane
Sharp's views to the point where the
argument has very little relevance to
the matter Sharp discussed.
Stephen Forgacs
arts 3
Arc thanks Boor helpers
We at Arc magazine would like to
extend our thanks to all those who
came out to our Boor Garden on
Nov. 9 and gave us their support.
The evening was a great success;
consequently, we look forward to
publishing in early March. The
deadline for submissions is Jan. 14,
1985, and our box is still located in
the English office on the third floor
of Buchanan tower.
Further, 1 would personally like
to thank all our staff who helped
make it happen, the members of the
Arts Undergraduate Society who
were most approachable, and as
weil, all the friends who stayed behind to clean up.
Denise Baker
arts 4
^ ks ss: ssj sss *n $5* sss *n js* sk x* ssx *** tt* ss
TRAVEL CUTS
Christmas Charters
VANCOUVER
Toronto $369       Winnipeg $219
Edmonton $139       Ottawa $399
Saskatoon $159       Montreal $419
The travel company ot CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
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WHERE CORPORATIONS BUY SOFTWARE
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JH   J*M^sL   438-2142
AMEX
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e. accept University PO's.
CJJR^VEN
Presents
INCREDIBLE
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For An Evening of Hypnotic Hilarity
[$5000 REWARD to anyone who can prove that Incredible Mikel
JMandel uses any accomplices or decoys in the audience during hisr1
[spectacular show of ESP and the power of suggestion.
FRIDAY, NOV. 16-8:00 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM-UBC
No Minors Please
with musical guests REVENGER
Tickets: $4.00 advance — $5.00 at door
Available from AMS B.O.
Produced by AMS Concerts
/5u ^^^^^a
Bernard
Labrosse
, hair studio inc.
5784 University Blvd.
IN U.B.C. VILLAGE
NEXT TO BANK OF COMMERCE
MONDAY to SATURDAY - 9:30-5 p.m.
APPOINTMENTS - 224-1922 or 224-9116
VALUABLE COUPON
worth $3.00 Off Hairstyles
$10.00 Off Perms
With This Coupon
Expires Nov. 30, 1984
l : :	 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 14, 1984
TODAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB IUBCI
The Orient: Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and
Hong Kong, a slide presentation by David Skillan
of David Skillan Worldwide Tours
AMS ART GALLERY
Paintings by Neville Grey and Susan Vedoy. 10
a.m -4 p.m., SUB an gallery
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Our weekly hot lunch, noon, Hillel House.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Time out, newcomers welcome to meet at 4:30
p.m.   in   SUB   237A,   4:30-6:30   p.m .   Gallery
lounge.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Volleyball, 4:30-6:00 p.m , Osborne
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Awareness night, everyone welcome, 4 12 p.m
Garden room   graduate student centn;
THURSDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal for the new dance work by Jennifer
Mascall, new dancers welcome, 5:00 6 30 p.rn
SUB partyroom
CUSO DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION SERIES
What is International  Development:1 a film and
discussion, 7.30 p m.. International House.
AMS ART GALLERY
Paintings by Neville Grey and Susan Vedoy,   1(J
a.m   4 p.m , SUB art galle-y
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film    The   Land  of   Disappearing   Buddha,   ad
mission  free,   12:30  p.m.,   Asian  centre,   room
604
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Film:  Falasha        Exile of the Black Jews, noon,
Buch A102
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Nym Hughes and Yvetie Perrault will speak on
their  Press Gang  publication,   Stepping Out  of
Line, noon, SUB 215
SOCIALIST EDUCATION SOCIETY
Literature table, 11:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m , SUB concourse
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting,   1 30 p rn ,  International
House.
LSAT
Preparation
Training
18 Hour
Weekend Course
(Sexton .f;
Educational Centers ,
414- 1200 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C
V6Z 2C7
(604  6o4-141 i
CAN YOU SEE
ME YET
By Timothy Findley
Directed by Craig Duffy
NOVEMBER 21-24
8:00 p.m.
Sat., Nov. 24 (2 Perfs.)
5:00 &8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
(Box Office - Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre)
Dorothy Somerset
Studio
University Of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
Corky Says:
"Bald People Are
More Reflective'
HAIR
CORKY'S
«ryuHG
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
*Juk
IlilSJM'
EAST INDIANS' STUDENT ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 125
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly   meeting,   everyone   welcome,    noon,
Brock Hall 307.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN
THOUGHT IN SCRIPTURE
Discussion:   Christianity  and  the  Physical  Sciences, noon, Scarfe 204
FRIDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Special  Rock'n   Roll  lessons,   noon.   SUB  ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation    meeting,     noon,    International
House.
AMS ART GALLERY
Colors m the Dark   -  paintings by Neville Grey
and   Susan   Vedoy,   10  a.m.-4  p.m.,   SUB  art
gallery.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal    gathering,    3:30   p.m..    International
House.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Dr   Jim Garrison speaks on: The Soviet Threat:
Myths and Realities, noon, SUB 205.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD-
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112
Jack Daniel Distillery Named a National Historic Place by the United States Government
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY wc
have everything wc need to make our whiskey
uncommonly smooth.
We have daily deliveries of the very
finest grain American farmers can
grow. A stream of pure,
iron-free water (ideal
for whiskey-making)
flowing close by our
door. And a unique
way of smoothing out
whiskey by filtering    ,
it for days through ten feet of finely
packed charcoal. Thanks to all these
things—and some others too—we
predict a pleasurable moment when
you discover the smooth-sippin'
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Our own iron-free water
St Louis
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f you d like a booklet about Jack Daniel s Whiskey
THE DINER1
Serving   UBC     and   West   Pomt   Grey
for the last 25 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
F ngltsh Style Home Cooked Meals
<it Reasonable Prices including
Ro<ist Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8 00am   to 8 30 p rn
Closed Sundays £r Public Holidays
For  the  parly   ones,   we  start serving
breakfast from 8 00 a m
4556 W.   10th Ave        224 1912
We accept Chargex
Vote
HOWARD FAULKNER
Alderman
"Common sense for a change'
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines. .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and   65c.
(.'I.r..'■,■!,i'tl .id.-, nr jiayahl ' />• .nfv:incf   [),\nl7nr ;>,   1(1 .W a n.    Il
dav  htrlort' /.',7.'''.'i ./;.>r in
Publications Room 26'i  SUB.,  UBC,   Van.,  B.C   V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
the
11 - FOR SALE - Private
"SOLID GOLD" entertainment booklets are
now on sale throuyh the UBC Swimming
and Diving Team. Call 228-2033/4521 for
further information. Price is S35.00 per
booklet.
20 - HOUSING
ON CAMPUS HOUSING, avail, reasonably
priced, rent incl. Great meals prepared by
our full-time cook. Contact David Kelly,
224-9930 or drop by Deke House, 5736
Agronomy Rd.
ROOM &■ BOARD in exchange for light
hsekeeping duties (10-15 hrs'week). Dunbar area. Close to bus. Call Jane 732-8209.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
PREPARATION for the E N G I ISH
COMPOSITION I EST. Develop stratey.es
for writing summaries and essays. iWe
have essay clinics, too). 731-1252.
30 - JOBS
STUDENTS needed for p/t canvassing work
with well established insulation company. 16
hrs/wk. $8/ hr, car and some sales experience
an asset. Call Jim Hogan, Insul Pdts.,
324-2444 or home 731-6761.
CP HOTELS Chateau Lake Louise requires
temporary staff during Christmas holidays.
(Dec. 18-Jan. 6). Accom., meals subsidized. For further info call personnel office
Chateau Lake Louise, 403-522-3635.
IF YOU LIVE in a girls' dorm you can make
easy $$$ displaying our product. No selling.
Cal! 253-6279.
ACTORS, ACTING STUDENTS wanted:
for innovative business venture. Professional, reliable manner a must. Acting experience a plus. Call John, 255-5387 after 6
p.m.
35 - LOST
WOULD THE PERSON who picked up my
blue pencil case containing my keys at the
bus stop 3 wks. ago please return them to
lost & found or call Donna, 224-9984.
Reward.
40 - MESSAGES
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
50 - RENTALS
SKI MT. WASHINGTON, Vancouver Is.!
Condominium on ski hill for occasional rent.
Sleeps 6, Sauna. Ph. 24 hr. answering service 112-286-3112 or Box 410, Place Vanier,
UBC
70 - SERVICES
85 - TYPING
WORD PROCESSING $ .50 PG IDS)
CRWR    major Winona    Kent   438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST     All
|obs,   year around  student  rates,   on  King
Edward route  879-5108
WORD   WEAVERS word   processing.
Student   rates,   fast   turnaround,   bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
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and reliable,
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST     U
write, wo type ineses, resumes, letters
essays. Days, eventtu s, weekends
736-1208
WORD PROCESSING 'Mcoml. S'uden;
rates $14 hr Equation t/pinq avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays & resumes Speilinq corrected
733-3676.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
Theses, reports, letters, resumes. Days,
evgswknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731-1252.
STUDENT (former secretary) will type
essays, theses, etc S1/pq Call 228-8827
after 4:30.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, all kinds. Will do
math, sciences, languages, fine arts,
literature Will correct grammar & spelling.
872-7934.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING. Reports, essays,
resumes, etc. For professional results at
very competitive rates call 266-2536.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 98EM3890.
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced typist.
Reasonable rates. Call Mary Lou at
421-0618 (near Lougheed Mall).
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2896;
872-3703.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional results call Audrey. 22&0G78.
rite us a letter here in Lynchburg tennessee 37352  USA
TYPEWRITER    cleanups    and    minor
adjustments. Special $25. phone 669-2657.
TYPING SPECIAL
EXTENDED TO NOV. 30
Double Spacing
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Reg. $1.80/pg. NOW $l.60/pg.
Fast, Accurate Typing
CALL Glenna 734-8661 eves or
weekends
WORDPOWER
3737 W. 10th (at Alma)
PROFESSIONAL
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15% Student Discount
All types of written maturial accepted.
SUPPORT SERVICES INCLUDE:
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"Translation & Tutoring
222-2661 Wednesday, November 14, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Status policies unfair to Canada's native women
By KAREN HERLANI)
Reprinted from the Link
by Canadian University Press
Mary Two-Axe Early, a 73-year-
old grandmother who lives on
Kahnawake Indian reserve in
Quebec, faces expulsion from her
home, her reserve and her culture
because the Canadian government
says she is no longer an Indian.
Two-Axe Early, a Mohawk, has
lived on Kahnawake since her marriage to a white American broke up
nearly 10 years ago. She is one of
hundreds of native women forced
each year to leave their reserves.
They leave their families and
friends, sell their property and give
up their right to return, even to be
buried on the reserve after they die.
Their crime is marrying non-
native men.
"There are Indians in Nova
Scotia marrying their first cousins
just to keep their (Indian) status,"
Two-Axe Early said in a recent
speech at Montreal's downtown
YWCA.
Two-Axe Early and 30,000 other
native women and their children are
victims of Canada's Indian Act of
1869. According to section 12(l)b
of the Act, any women who marries
a non-native immediately loses her
Indian status. Her children are also
deprived of Indian status and not
even divorce, widowhood or
separation will return status.
In Two-Axe Early's case, she
married and lived with her white
husband in the U.S. for many
years, returning to Kahnawake.
after the relationship ended. The
band council there turned a blind
eye to Two-Axe Early's lack of
status until 1975, when she went to
speak about the issue at an International Women's Year Conference in
Mexico City.
"Two women were sent to report
on anything that was said," says
Two-Axe Early. "When I was to
talk, they phoned the police, who
phoned Ottawa, who phoned my
chief and an eviction notice was
given."
Two-Axe Early did not keep
quiet and instead founded Indian
Rights for Indian Women. This
Secretary of State-funded lobby
group fights for changes to the Indian Act. Nearly 40 women on
Kahnawake have lost their status
and face expulsion, but media attention given to their case has temporarily postponed their eviction.
These women are very careful, do
not give out their names and quietly
live on the edges of the reserve.
Before 1956, the Act defined Indians as anyone married to an Indian, whose parents on either side
was Indian or was adoped by an Indian. Now a woman can only have
Indian status if her father was one
of if she marries one. White women
who marry native men are immediately considered Indians as are
the children of such marriages.
But native women who marry
non-natives can no longer own property or live on their reserves. They
cannot vote in band elections or be
buried on the reserve and lose all
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claim to social, educational and
health benefits on the reserve.
Between 1973 and 1976, 99.32 per
cent of all women who lost their
status lost it through marriage. The
other 0.68 per cem did so voluntarily.
For the women who lost their
status, the end of a marriage can
mean the end of their livelihood. "I
know a woman who can't close her
doors or windows because it is so
icy," sayd Two-axe Early. "Her
five children are illiterate and she
has no status. They can't go to the
reserve school and the white school
says they have their own school."
Many women who live near white
cities and meet white men do not
children off the reserve have no
support system to fall back on in
trying to pass on their culture to
ihem. They cannot take their
children to native celebrations or
teach them their language in a white
urban Canadian environment.
Children with native fathers and
white mothers who live on a reserve
may have a support system, but if
the mothers do not understand the
language or traditions, it is unlikely
that they can teach them to their
children.
The selectivity with which the act
is applied indicates that economics
are more important than culture for
some bands. In the West, where
bands are located on oil-rich land,
"These women don't want money,
they want respect and a birthright."
want to get married. According to
the department of Indian Affairs
nearly 50 per cent of all native births in 1977 were out of wedlock.
That same year the national average
was less than 10 per cent.
The Indian Act makes Canada's
natives the only people in the Northern Hemisphere who do not
determine their own membership.
The Dene people of the Northwest
territories do not fall under the act,
nor do the Inuit, the Cree or the
NjaskaL None of these groups
define membership on the basis of
marital status of fatherhood.
By taking a paternalistic attitude
and defining status for natives, the
government can constantly narrow
the definition and assimilate more
people into the mainstream.
Changes made to the act after 1956
made Indian status more exclusive
and easier to lose.
The official term for loss of
native rights is enfranchisement.
"In the 1950s, native men were enfranchised simply -by going to
university," says Two-Axe Early.
The real issue is cultural, according to a Secretary of State
Women's Committee report released last year on the status of Indian
women. The paper says culture is
passed on through the mother, who
spends more time with her children
in a traditional nuclear family. The
Indian women forced to take their
women are enfranchised immediately. This ensures that any
profits from the land are shared
among fewer people. At least in
theory.
The department of Indian Affairs
reports that in 1977 more women
gained status by marrying native
men than lost it through wedding
non-natives. In this way the act
taxes reserves both financially and
culturally.
Jeannette Lavell took the issue to
the supreme court in 1974 and based her case on the right to equality
before the law as entrenched in the
then Canadian Bill of Rights. Her
case lost in a split 5-4 decision.
Justice Ritchie, who wrote the majority opinion for the case, explained that in the view of the court
equality before the law' meant
equal application of the law to men
and women and had no power over
laws that perpetuated inequality.
An aborted attempt to change the,
Indian Act was made this summer
when then .Indian affairs minister
John Munro introduced legislation
to change 12(l)b just two weeks
before Parliament recessed. Munro
promised money would be set aside
to help bands cover the costs of
womerr returning to their reserves to
claim their status. The proposed
changes would allow the children of
returning women to be re-instated
but not their grandchildren.
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Since reserves offer so little
employment (on some reserves
unemployment is close to 80 per
cent) and white communities have
more social services and conveniences, it is probable that only
those with strong cultural ties will
return.
Anita Pratt, now the director for
the Montreal branch of the QNWA
says "It's ridiculous, these women
don't want money, they want
respect and a birthright."
Two-Axe Early also agrees. "It
won't cost extra taxes. If an Indian
girl lives in the city on welfare, she
could go back to the reserve and live
good."
These arguments were not heard
and the Bill, which had passed
through Parliament on the last day
of the session, did not go through
the Senate. Its passage was blocked
by Senator Charlie Watt, a Quebec
Inuit.
"I wept," says Two-Axe Early.
She says the Bill would have passed easily had more attention been
paid to it. "Trudeau was never in
favour of native Indian rights and
neither was Munro," says Two-Axe
Early. "Munro was too busy campaigning (for last spring's Liberal
leadership race)."
Meanwhile more and more bands
ar; using the existing act to suit
thdr own purposes. At Kahnawake
a group of women lobbied for and
were given a complete moratorium
on all mixed marriages. Now
anyone on Kahnawake who marries
a non-native loses his or her status.
At least six young men have lost
their status through this band ruling."
Women like Two-Axe Early
realize that they have little time to
act before the Canada Act entrenches the Indian Act for good. She
urj;es all women to flood prime
minister Brian Mulroney and the
department of Indian Affairs with
letters.
"I must cry out in the darkness of
despair," she says. "The only hope
is hat the women of this society
reared in justice will rise up to our
cai.se."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 14, 1984
Women Basketbirds start right
Believe it or not, the women's
basketball team might actually
make the play-offs this season.
Traditionally the doormats of the
Canada West Conference, the
'Birds started to improve last
season and won not one but three
games.
The team has already started off
on the right foot this season. Last
weekend, the Thunderbirds finished
second in the Saskatchewan
Huskiettes' Invitational tournament in Saskatoon.
UP AND IN: Ken Klassen sinks shot as 'Birds blast SFU Clansmen 80-64 in game two of Buchanan Classic Friday.
UBC victory tied the three-game series 1-1. Last night 'Birds bounced the Clan 63-50 to win the Buchanan Cup for
the second straight year.
Soccer 'Birds national champs
From page 1
On average the 'Birds were better
than the Ravens. UBC displayed a
much higher skill level but failed to
connect on several scoring opportunities. Ken Mulleny, El Ladha,
Jonathan Pirie and Murray Millard
all came close to clinching the
championship in regular time.
"(The Thunderbirds) should have
had us earlier," Raven's head coach
Hockey gets ready
The varsity hockey club resumes
action this weekend after a two
week layoff from Canada West
competition.
The third place T-Birds take their
4-2 record into Calgary for a
weekend series against the fourth
place Dinosaurs.
Bill Holowaty leads the league in
scoring. The high scoring centre has
notched six goals and added nine
assists so far this season. The next
highest 'Birds in the scoring race are
Graham Kerr and Dave Brownlie.
Each has recorded four goals and
four assists to date.
Bill Thomson said.
"We felt we had a better team
than Carleton," said 'Birds' coach
Joe Johnson, "but we didn't underestimate them."
The T-Birds were unable to dominate the scoreboard in regulation
time because of the precipitous weather conditions. The pouring rain
never ceased, preventing the 'Birds
from formulating their crisp one-
touch passing attack.
Goalkeeper Kennedy probably
had one of the best chances to score
when he sent a left-footed punt way
downfield. The ball bounded in
front of the Ravens' keeper on the
goal line and flew over his head and
the crossbar.
However, Kennedy did do what
he did best all season long — keeping the ball out of the net. He made
up for his earlier mistake in the
overtime and penalty kicks portion
of the contest. The engineering student made several vital saves as Carleton opened the overtime session
with two quick and dangerous scoring chances.
Ravens' Sean Holmes and
UBC's   Rob   Shelley   opened   the
tie-breaker segment by exchanging
goals. Joe Cinani put Carleton up
by one goal only to see Armstrong
bring UBC back into a tie.
Kennedy proved to be the difference between a national crown and
second fiddle for the 'Birds. The
UBC keeper stopped John Rou-
melis twice (because the officials
ruled that Kennedy had moved prematurely on the first shot).
After Frank Iuele scored on
UBC's third shot, Kennedy shunned Ian Scott. Kent Burkholder ensured the championship by scoring
on the fourth UBC attempt, thereby making it impossible for Carleton to win. The goal immediately
silenced the vociferous fans who
had constantly harassed the
Thunderbirds.
Like the 'Birds, the Ravens were
unexpected finalists. While the
T-Birds were defeating McGill Red-
men in one semi-final contest in
Montreal the previous weekend, the
Ravens posted a 2-0 home victory
over the University of Prince Edward Island Panthers. That semifinal contest drew their largest
crowd of the season.
The 'Birds lost 57-33 to Alberta
in the opening game Friday. Karen
Dawson and Janene Seabrook led
UBC with seven and six points
respectively.
The 'Birds were twice victorious
Saturday, defeating Brandon and
Saskatchewan. In the first game,
the 'Birds trounced Brandon 57-30.
Nadine Fedorak was the leading
scorer with 18 points while Dawson
contributed 13. In the second game
of the day, the 'Birds bounced the
host Huskiettes 57-30.
Delia Douglas paced the 'Birds
against Saskatchewan. The fourth
year forward netted 16 points while
the consistent Fedorak scored 13
points
Sunday, Manitoba came close to
beating UBC but the revitalized
'Birds prevailed 65-63. Fedorak
fired the 'Birds engines with 19
points and Natalie Johnson produced 14 while Andrea Belcyzk was the
leading rebounder with four to her
credit.
The Alberta Pandas won the
tourney.
This  weekend,  the 'Birds  stage
their   home   opener against    the
University        of W i n n i p e g
Weswomen.
The regular season docs not start
until the new year but the 'Birds
have a strong chance of finishing in
one of the four play-off spots.
Rowers third at Head,
Frostbite coming up
B> MARK TEARE
and WAITER MARTINDAEE
Sunday the men's and women's
varsity rowing squads raced in the
Head of the Lake regatta.
The course started on Lake
Union, passed through the narrow
Montlake Cut, and finished outside
the University of Washington's
Conibear Shellhouse on Lake
Washington.
The women's varsity and junior
varsity crews faced strong competition from 12 crews in the women's
open event. The race was closely
contested between the top five
crews.
The University of Victoria took
first place in 20:16. The UBC varsity women placed third in 20:42 and
the UBC junior varsity crew finished eighth (22:29).
UBC coach Drew Harrison said
"The varsity crew raced strong and
hard. Washington and UVic provide the toughest competition in
North America. It was a commen
dable performance b> our crew."
In the men's lightweight eights
event UBC finished third (20:15)
behind first place University of
Washington (20:01) and second
place Vancouver Rowing Club
lightweights (20:07). 'Oregon State
University placed fourlh in 20:17.
In the men's open event, UVic
dominated the five kilometre race,
demolishing the field of 10 crews
from UBC, VRC, UW , OSU, Seattle Pacific, and UBC junior varsity.
Victoria was the overall winner.
Although it is disappointing not to
have the regatta trophy installed at
UBC, it is a pleasure to know the
trophy will spend the next year at a
Canadian university.
The Frostbite (Green Lake) and
Head of the Lake regaltas conclude
the fall series of races for UBC.
Land and water training will continue over the winter, and competition will resume with a spring series
of races starting at Shawnigan Lake
in late February.
-X
PERM SPECIAL
Women
Men
35.00
25.00
illniii Xiv. X>  M    BOOK MAX.)
3621 W. 4th Ave., Van.   733-3831

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