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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1972

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 Speier and Silvers axed
By TOM STAFFORD
Sociology profs Matthew
Speier and Ron Silvers have been
fired.
The two junior profs — who
have been the focus of a
four-month struggle in the
anthropology-sociology
department over the issue of
tenure - were informed Thursday
by department head Cyril Belshaw
that arts dean Doug Kenny and
his promotions and tenure
committee voted against
recommending the two for tenure.
Speier and Silvers will be
eligible to teach for one more
year, at which time their contracts
terminate, and they will have to
find work elsewhere.
The decision by Kenny and his
gang is a reinforcement of the
hard-line policy that has been
maintained by administration
figures throughout the conflict.
Anthrosoc students and faculty,
upon hearing the decision,
generally viewed Kenny's move as
unsurprising, but callous.
The Speier-Silvers firing came
on   the  heels  of two  decisions
made by the entire department
that indicated that grave doubts
exist about the way in which the
cases have been handled. The first
department-wide response was a
30-8 vote at the beginning of
January to have the cases fully
reconsidered. On Tuesday, the
department voted to call in the
Canadian Association of University
Teachers to investigate the
situation.
Although the Kenny decision is
probably irrevocable, the cases are
not technically closed. The
negative    recommendation    on
WE UBYSSEY
L
Vol. UN, No. 43      VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 28,  1972
48     228-2301
Speier and Silvers is now
forwarded to administration
president Walter Gage and his
senior committee, and. in due
course of time, the two will be
informed officially by Gage that
they are getting the axe.
Anthrosoc graduate students —.
who have led the struggle for
reconsideration of Speier and
Silvers' cases — are expected to
continue to press for new hearings
on the matter and to appeal
directly to Gage.
The students began their
defence of the two profs with a
brief, on Oct. 29 that
demonstrated that the cases had
been improperly handled. The
brief showed that both Speier and
Silvers met all the teaching and
publication criteria for tenure.
Victories were achieved when the
students got the senior faculty to
sit down and talk about the cases
again, and at the January meeting
that resulted in a formal
department request for
reconsideration. But it appears
that the war will be won by the
administration through the use of
superior fire power.
However, the administration
win will be achieved at a cost. In
the course of the dispute,
department head Belshaw has
been discredited, the
power-wielding mechanism of
secrecy has been cracked, the
collusion of top administrators
has been exposed, and any
semblance of mutual trust in the
anthrosoc department has
dissolved. And, of course, there is
still a CAUT investigation
pending.
In addition, there is a lingering
possibility that the mostly
exhausted junior faculty will
make some further move at the
department's next meeting
Saturday.
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LOOKING   MORE   LIKE   DOWNTOWN  every  day, Walter  Gage  towers jut  into
Ubyssey photographer Kini McDonald's lens as she snapped scintillating view from top
of Acadia Park towers. Trees cower in foreground pondering their fate as campus
expands and expands and expands and ...
New nafional sfudent organization proposed
OTTAWA (CUP) - Canadian
student councils will consider
creating a new national student
organization at a conference of
student politicians at the
University of Windsor in May.
Student council representatives
have decided to hold the May
conference to discuss problems of
student aid and university
financing.
The Queen's University student
council proposed the formation of
a national student organization
and is supported by the University
of Saskatchewan student council.
Queen's     student    council
president Patrick Riley said:
"Some kind of official body is
required to make representations
to the federal government and the
education ministers' council about
the problems of student
assistance."
Cost-sharing arrangements
between the provincial and federal
governments on the financing of
post-secondary education are
being renegotiated this year and
student leaders believe there is a
necessity for a co-ordinated
campaign to present student
views.
There has been no Canadian
national    student    organization
since the dissolution of the
Canadian Union of Students in
the fall of 1969. CUS's death was
caused by the withdrawal of a
number of student councils which
were unhappy about its political
bias.
Riley said he hoped a new
national student organization
would confine its activities to
matters "directly related to
students' lives", but added he
didn't know how to prevent it
from taking stands on
wider-ranging political issues.
"We can only hope the people
running such an organization
realize their limitations," he said.
As well, Ontario student
councils hope to organize a
federation of students to succeed
Don't ffergit
to rip it up
SUB is finally open 24 hours a
day.
Giving in to Alma Mater
Society council demand,
co-ordinator Rick Murray opened
the building Tuesday.
The building will be open on a
trial basis to determine if damage
occurs as a result.
the Ontario Union of Students,
which was dissolved in May, 1971.
Council representatives will
discuss the provincial
governments' post-secondary
education commission report with
university affairs minister John
White before discussing the
federation in March.
Richard Labonte, Carleton
University student council
president, said provincial
university and community college
student councils generally favor
the re-establishment of an Ontario
student association.
The group would deal
primarily with student aid. Pa?
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972
An uneasy four years
for CAUT, universities
By MIKE SASGES
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers and B.C.
universities have had an uneasy
four-year relationship.
However the anthropology-
sociology department's vote
Tuesday for a CAUT investigation
of tenure proceedings in the
department is the first time the
association has actually been
called in at UBC.
Simon Fraser University has
been censured by CAUT on two
occasions:
In May, 1968, SFU
administration   president Patrick
PARTRIDGE
.. censured
BROTHERS
... looking
BRIEMBERG
... removed
McTaggart-Cowan and the board
of governors were censured for
"administration interference in
traditionally faculty affairs".
Precisely three years later
CAUT censured the
president, Ken Strand, and the
SFU board of governors for "...
the improper treatment... of the
proper safeguards of academic
appointments and tenure."
This cenure followed two years
of embittered struggle between
the political science, sociology
and anthropology department and
the administration.
The process leading to the
1971 censure started in
September, 1969, when the PSA
department went on strike over
Strand's refusal to negotiate with
the department on a number of
issues including the reinstatement
of department chairman Mordecai
Briemberg, who was removed
from his position when the
department was put under
trusteeship.
The department was put under
trusteeship because it had
disbanded traditional department
head rule in favor of an elected
chairman.
Also in that month CAUT
called for an investigation of the
relations between the department
and the administration.
However this call did not seem
to worry the administration since
in October, 1969, it suspended
nine PSA profs including
Briemberg.
After other departments went
on strike against the suspensions
the administration got an
injunction against the picketing.
During the summer of 1970
an ad-hoc committee
recommended the re-hiring of
seven of the nine profs.
Strand rejected the
recommendations as he did the
May, 1971, censure of himself and
the board of governors by
condemning CAUT for "meddling
in SFU's private business".
Since that time only two of the
embattled PSA profs have been
re-instated.
CAUT also started an
investigation of three professors at
the University of Victoria in
January, 1971.
The profs were part of a group
of 14 who students alleged were
"purged" from the faculty by
administration president Bruce
Partridge, who has since resigned,
taking with him $73,000 in
severance pay.
Partridge's competency was
first doubted in February when
UVic's student newspaper, The
Martlet, discovered that he
received his degree from an
American correspondence school.
During the spring struggle
Partridge continually refused to
explain to CAUT representatives
the reasons behind the denial of
tenure to the three profs.
Finally in May, CAUT
censured Partridge.
These major confrontations
between CAUT and university
administrations have been over
tenure and academic freedom.
Now it appears UBC may be in
for its share of a CAUT
investigation of tenure procedures
and academic freedom.
However CAUT executive
secretary Alwyn Berland says he
has   heard   nothing   yet   of the
anthrosoc vote, but is familiar
with the cases of the two assistant
profs, Matthew Speier and Ron
Silvers.
"You're the first to convey this
interesting information to me,"
Berland said in a Thursday
telephone interview from Ottawa.
"It's very hard for me to say
anything about CAUT's action in
this case," he said.
He said CAUT usually
intervenes in a dispute only when
the local faculty association has
tried and failed to solve the
matter internally.
"After that if they feel they
can do nothing they invite us in,"
said Berland.
He said it is unusual to get an
appeal from a department to
investigate that department.
"But on the other hand when
you're dealing with academic
freedom and tenure nothing is
unusual."
Faculty association president
Robert Kubicek is out of town
and could not be reached to
confirm the association's response
to the vote.
CAUT action here means bad
publicity at a time when the
university needs all the good
publicity it can get.
B.C. education minister Donald
Brothers has indicated a
legislature , committee will be
looking into academic tenure.
He said he decided to do so
because of the much-publicized
tenure disputes at UVic and SFU.
If CAUT comes in, Brothers;
should be able to add UBC to that
list. .
MUSSOC PRESENTS ...
LIVE ON STAGE!
Feb. 3rd - 12th
8:30 P.M.
Old Auditorium
Tickets $2.50, $3.00 at
Vancouver Ticket Centre and Outlets
Special Student Rates: $1.50
February 7 & 8 and Matinee
Thursday, February 10 — 12:30
Tickets available Main Floor of S.U.B.
A lot of things to go wrong .    .
If they do; come to the experts
to get them fixed. Fully
guaranteed work, reasonable
rates too . . . let us quote on your
next repair work.
SALES and SERVICE LTD.
8914 OH STREET (at Marine) Phone 263-8121
Lake Louise Area
Banff National Park
Public Hearing
March 9 and 10, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Ballroom, Holiday Inn, Calgary
"The parks are hereby dedicated to the people of Canada for their benefit,
education and enjoyment...and such parks shall be maintained and made
use of so as to leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future
generations."
SECTION 4: NATIONAL PARKS ACT
A public hearing will be held in Calgary March 9 and 10 (also March 11 if
necessary) to hear comments on planning proposals for the Lake Louise area of
Banff National Park, in particular on the development proposals submitted by
Village Lake Louise Ltd. This is one in a series of public hearings being held
across Canada to hear the views and recommendations of interested citizens on
planning proposals respecting Canada's National Parks.
Individuals and organizations are invited to submit written briefs, in either
official language, and to indicate if they wish to speak at the hearing. It is not
necessary to submit a written brief in order to speak.
Everyone is welcome to attend these meetings—to listen or to participate.
Documents describing planning proposals for the Lake Louise area can be
obtained for $1.00 (money order or cheque payable to the Receiver General of
Canada) from:
Regional Director, Western Region,
National and Historic Parks Branch,
131 Customs Building,
11th Avenue and 1st Street S.E.,
Calgary 21, Alberta.
Written briefs and requests to speak
are to be sent to:
Public Hearings Office,
National and Historic Parks Branch,
400 Laurier Avenue West,
Ottawa, Ontario
K1AOH4
The Hon. Jean Chretien, P.C., M.P.,
Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Friday^ January 28,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Young Socialists denied slate
Only two groups will be
running in the first slate of the
Alma Mater Society executive
elections since the Young Socialist
candidates were ruled ineligible to
run.
"Constitutionally, no political
club working under the university
clubs committee may enter a slate
in any elections other than those
held within the UCC," AMS
secretary Hilary Powell said
Thursday.
The clause in question reads:
"No club shall participate,
directly or otherwise, in elections
outside the club itself and
acceptance of any such support
shall   render   any  candidate  for
office ineligible."
' 'The eligibility committee
seems to plead helplessness before
an obviously McCarthyite clause
in the AMS constitution ... We
will take the issue to the student
court for ruling," YS presidential
candidate Joan Campana said in a
prepared statement Thursday.
Other candidates for
presidential office are Svend
Robinson, science 2, of the
Human Government slate,
independent candidate Fred
Ferdman, grad studies 9 and
Student Coalition candidate Doug
Aldridge.
U.S. rule of media blasted
. By SANDI SHREVE
The Massey report, the Davey report, the
O'Leary report, the Canadian Radio and
Television Commission.
These government studies from 1951 to
1970 on United States domination of
Canada's media filed a lot of complaints.
"But the government has only diagnosed
the disease — it has yet to take effective steps
toward curing it," UBC law librarian Al
Soroka said Wednesday at noon in a brief talk
on U.S. domination of the Canadian
publishing industry.
Soroka told less than 30 people in the SUB
clubs lounge Canada is a cultural and
economic satellite of the United States.
He said the media is representative of this
situation, pointing out that only five per cent
of the books sold in Canada are written,
published and manufactured in Canada.
"This means 95 per cent of information
available to Canadians is composed of foreign
ideas," he said.
"Some foreigners are quite noble and take
Canadian interests to heart but I don't know
too many in the publishing industry."
He said even the five per cent all-Canadian
literature is in danger because companies such
as McLelland and Stewart depend on
government loans to stay in business.
When the Canadian industry becomes
successful its owners are ready to retire and,
because no Canadians are willing to run the
business, they sell out to the United States
anyway, he said.
"We make a good publishing industry for
the Yanks to take over."
He said the 1970 CRTC ruling which
will require all radio and television
programming to be 50 per cent Canadian
content provides no solution to the problem.
This is because Canadian content includes
performers such as Paul Anka, v/ho, although
they are Canadian, live in the U.S. and
therefore reflect the same ideas as do
American performers, he said.
He concluded that foreign control of the
media means foreigners are telling Canadians
what to think.
And Canadians are just sitting back and
taking it, he said.
When asked to provide a solution to this
Canadian   dilemma,  Soroka   said   the  only
answer is for Canadians to "determine to rid
themselves of American influence."
"This does not mean we must become
anti-American people, it means we must be
anti American corporations which control the
media," he said.
He did not say how to apply this
determination taeffective action.
Soroka is the second of a series of
Academic Activites Committee sponsored
speakers on the subject of Canadian foreign
control.
SOROKA ... disease not cured
The other Human Government
candidates are Garfield Sundeen,
agriculture 3, for secretary, Penny
Newman, arts 2, for external
affairs officer and Keith
Richardson, arts 3, for internal
affairs officer.
Running on the Students
Coalition slate are Sally Clarke,
arts 1, for secretary, Lynne
Phillips, arts 2, for internal affairs
and Teresa Ball, agriculture 2, for
external affairs officer.
The ineligible YS slate also
includes Dan McLeod, arts 1, for
external affairs, Andrew Davy,
arts 2 for secretary and Elizabeth
Davies, arts 2, for external affairs.
'The fact the Young Socialists
have been banned on the basis of
being a political club is a crass
violation of democratic rights, an
attempt to exclude a viewpoint
from the elections by bureaucratic
red tape," Campana said.
'The YS is singled out and
excluded by one constitutional
clause while other clauses lay the
groundwork for candidates to run.
"We will launch a petition
campaign to repeal the clause. If
denied our right to run on the
ballots we will conduct a write-in
campaign," she said.
New executive
for law students
The Law Students Association
Wednesday elected Bill Wilson,
law 2, as its president by a vote of
239 to 80. He won over Alma
Mater Society law rep Bob
Bellows.
For vice-president, the
association elected Ross Ellison
over Keith Rontley, by 199 votes
to 101.
Bill Duncan is the new
secretary, defeating Tom
Mackinnon, 201 to 108.
Bellows said Wednesday the
UBC finance department has
invalidated the LSA $3.50 fee
levy of Jan. 18 because the
department's computers are only
programmed for round figures.
The problem will be dealt with by
the new executive, he said.
On his presidential loss,
Bellows remarked: "Beware the
creeping liberal meatball."
Classroom Report
By VAUGHN PALMER
Dennis Chitty's zoology 400: Principles and History
of Biology, accomplishes a difficult union of the science
and arts faculties.
The course is a study of the philosophy of scientific
methodology, and the problems faced by scientific
discoveries, using as examples the work of William
Harvey and Charles Darwin.
When Chitty began the course in 1961 he intended
it for life science honors students, but its non-technical
aspects appealed to arts students, and now the split
between students of the two faculties in the 50-member
class is about equal.
Chitty says while the division does create
communication problems, he tries "not to talk down to
the arts students or bore those from the science
faculty."
While there are complaints from students that the
course is confusing, it is largely due to the volume of
material presented, rather than the content.
Chitty  says he is aware of this confusion, and
explains it is a result of the fact that he presents a lot of
information in his lectures.
The first term is spent accumulating information
from the 10 to 15 book reading list, which includes
works on the philosophical foundations of science,
creativity in science, and such general works as James
Watson's The Double Helix and Alfred Whitehead's The
Aims of Education.
In the second term students are expected to prepare
and present to the class a group or individual project
dealing with a particular scientist or scientific discovery.
Chitty uses his first term lectures to present the
story of Harvey's discoveries of blood circulation, while
in the second term he talks about Darwin and evolution.
His lecture on Jan. 20, for example, dealt with the
conflicts between the methods Darwin used to develop
the theory of evolution, and the inductive scientific
method of Francis Bacon.
Chitty, a demanding marker, gives a mid-term exam
in the first semester, a Christmas exam and a final, all of
which are composed of questions requiring application
of the general principles learned to specific cases.
He determines a student's over-all marks for the
course by selecting his or her highest mark on any one of
the exams or on the project. Even so, he requires that
everyone write and pass the exams and project.
Students said the workload for the three unit course
was heavy.
Arts students said the course was interesting and
they were taking it for their science requirement.
Science students said it was far more interesting, and no
harder than the other options offered them.
Admission to zoology 400 is limited to about 50
people, all of whom are selected by Chitty at personal
interviews.
He selects serious students who aren't just looking
for three easy units or a science requirement.
Zoology 400, with Dennis Chitty meets Thursdays,
2:30 to 5:30 in Hut B-6, room 14A, behind the
biological sciences building.
The first hour of the session is devoted to Chitty's
lecture, the last two hours are set aside for discussion of
projects and the reading list. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972
Jive!
Dear Walter and Doug and Cyril and all the great people
on your promotion and tenure teams:
Thanks for a simply enchanting performance.
You all look so cute dancing together.
W court mjg&w,
HIM OF HIS
QKISTIT^
OE3HTS.
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mckie we cojemxHss.
1fc PRE& rS cm\CNr.     IMFDUMP TH£ PRgSS.      1H£ GOUWGH 5
Letters
Sorry
I wish to apologize to the
whole student body for the
absurdity of the decision handed
down by the so-called student
court in the MacKinnon v. Powell
case. I feel I am indirectly
responsible for this shameful and
irresponsible    farce    because    I
submitted the list of names from
which the "judges" were
appointed.
The AMS constitution has a
provision for a board of
arbitration in order for it to settle
disputes between students vis-a-vis
one another or the AMS. This way
we can avoid lengthy, complicated
and expensive hassles in the
regular courts. But along comes a
THSU8YSSEY
JANUARY 28, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising. 228-3977.
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Hey let's go to the Grape benefit, belched Mike Sasges to Jan
O'Brien. Hey let's not burped Berton Woodward while Lesley Krueger
waffled. Pat Fitzgerald said he thought benefits were not beneficial and
Sandi Shreve agreed. Leslie Plommer couldn't wait and got Into the act
before her cue which prompted Vaughn Palmer to throw gum bubbles to
the audience. Paul Knox requested vegetables, but Kathy Carney gave him
a nasty look and told him she thought he was one which made Kent
Spencer snicker. Mike Gidora tried to be useful, but failed in all attempts
pleasing Gord Gibson to no end. John Twigg didn't even try and hung
around Mike Finlay all day. Kini MacDonald hung around Gary Gruenke
and they both died of emulsion fever. Sandy Kass tried to be efficient, to
no avail.
bunch of law students, who, in
order to impress one another and
themselves, destroys the whole idea
by stupidly declaring the court
has no jurisdiction. Who the hell is
supposed to settle these issues
now?
The moral of the whole farce is
simple: Keep the law students out
of the student court. Let them do
their legal ego-tripping at their
own and not the whole student
body's expense by limiting their
mouthings-off to the moot courts
of the law faculty.
Let's amend the constitution
so we can avoid such
inconsiderate, irresponsible,
immature and just plain shameful
behavior in the future.
I am embarrassed and do
apologize.
Til Nawatzki,
President,
Law Students Assn.
Crap
Dear Shitheads:
Congratulations for Tuesday's
effort. The paper was as
interesting as an overrated
stag-film and as useful as wet
toilet paper.
\
Here's a list of the articles that
comprised most of Tuesday's
publication: 1) a rehash of Bangla
Desh (They've already had one
war. What's Ali want? - another
one?); 2) more crap about tenure;
3) a bit about the Georgia
Straight; 4) two letters, including
some more Cyril Belshaw stuff;
5) a    few    sports    notes;
6) something about women's
studies; 7) a trivial comment from
trivial PC leader Derril Warren;
and 8) a hell-of-a-lot-of
advertisements (which,
incidentally, makes The Ubyssey
resemble the January sale flyer
from Eatons).
Question: What in the above
(aside from the sports notes) is
worth reading?
Kevin Bourgeois,
Pharmacy 1
P.S. When it's dry, The Ubyssey
makes good T.P.
Answer: We thought just about
all of the above was worth
reading, though you must realize
that we were working under
somewhat of a handicap — not
having any articles by you on
hand, nor any indication of the
kind of articles you'd like to read.
(We're still waiting.)
EfifflMW*
CAT*
And a note to other readers —
the student directory shows that
this guy's name is for real. ..
Towers
Lately I have pondered this
whole business of the new Walter
Gage residences and now have
concluded that there must have
been a lot of near-sighted people
who planned and created them.
Most likely involved were a
president, an architect, a
contractor, an interior designer, a
board of governors, a resident
administrator and some student
representatives. The whole idea is
supposedly a high-rise commune.
Six people (all the same sex)
having separate bedrooms live
together sharing a common living
room, bathroom and kitchen.
There are many problems that
result, and all of them from poor
planning.
First, try to think of five
friends you could bear for a whole
year. Second, try to picture
yourself cooking for six people. I
can cook better than most men,
but I cannot cook for six people.
Cooking for six requires
agreement    on    food    and    a Friday, January 28,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
tremendous amount of shopping.
Most people in residence do not
even have cars and with two bags
of groceries it is a long walk from
the bus stop.
There are also major problems
in design.
The "Can: There is only one
toilet per group. I do not see six
people sharing one toilet. In any
of the newer downtown
apartments the person-to-toilet
ratio is 2:1 and not a ridiculous
6:1.
It will be quite amusing when
somebody wakes up one morning
— runs to the John — and finds
five people lined up.
The price: Seventy-five dollars
a month is expensive. This bothers
me the most because it will cause
price hikes in off-campus
apartments (that is where I intend
to live next year). At any rate, for
$450 a month six people can rent
the best homes in Vancouver, so
why even consider moving in to
the Walter Gage towers?
Unlike the other residences,
the boarding cost does not include
room and suite cleaning services. I
wonder who gets the job of
cleaning the can?
One final point is that the rules
do not allow "mixed sexes".
Maybe this would work better,
but in that case what is the need
for six rather than three
bedrooms?
It should be realized that many
of these so-called planners and
designers are getting paid $30,000
a year for doing this and other
w-o-n-d-e-r-f-u-1 things. It is
obviously too late to remedy the
towers situation, but we should
get rid of any people associated
with this blunder and see that in
the future more care is taken in
planning,     designing    and
developing buildings for UBC.
Gordon Funt,
Commerce 1
Food
The anti-Ruthie feelings these
days are warranted, for sure, but
is Lyle Osmundson an alternative?
The AMS has allowed him free
space in SUB while charging God's
Kitchen types 16.6 per cent, and
is now loaning him $ 1,800 to bus
around his starch and sugar
concoctions.
Better idea is for the
International Food Festival to
expand into The Pit and be given
Osmundson's prominent space
outside the SUBstandard
kafeteria. Then prices for good
food would come down.
Anyone else for an alternate
Alternate Food Service?
Peter Frinton,
Science 5
Food service gets money
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Alternate food services
manager Lyle Osmundson
received one half of his $1,800
Alma Mater Society loan
Thursday.
The loan will be used to
renovate his food bus, which has
been inoperable since late last
year.
'This is perfectly acceptable to
me," Osmundson said.
"There was not enough money
in the AMS account to pay the
entire loan this week, so I'll get
the rest of the money when it's
available," he said.
AMS treasuer David Dick was
directed at Wednesday night's
council meeting to give
Osmundson an $1,800 cheque
"subject to confirmation of his
vehicle insurance".
In an earlier council meeting
Osmundson had been granted a
loan "of a sufficient amount to
cover the renovation of the bus."
At that time Osmundson
submitted an estimate of $1,251.
Osmundson later upped this
figure by $350 when vandals
broke the bus' windows, but
because of the wording of the
motion more money was
advanced.
Ed check begins
Following complaints from
Vancouver public school
principals, the education students
association plans to conduct a
faculty-wide course evaluation,
scheduled to begin Monday.
All next week, course
evaluation forms will be sent to all
education professors, to be
distributed to all students in all
education classes.
Each class will elect a student
representative to tabulate the
results for that class and record
them on forms provided by the
EdSA.
"The purpose for the
evaluation is to stimulate
discussion among students and
profs," education ombudsman
Gary Gumley said Thursday.
"Students are upset that
people in the public school system
are dissatisfied with their teaching
methods and it's not their fault,"
said Gumley.
He said the set of
questionnaires to be distributed in
methods courses next week will
be followed by another set to be
sent to education seminars.
"Although the motion was
obviously worded this way in case
the repairs came to less than
$1,251, it allows for the extra
amount to be paid now that the
repairs have come to more than
the estimate," arts representative
Colin Portnuff said.
During Wednesday's meeting,
Osmundson charged that the AMS
executive had used "delaying
tactics" in not giving him the
loan.
Dick said they had only waited
for confirmation of Osmundson's
insurance coverage, because he
said Osmundson's insurance
agency told him the AFS policy
on the bus was going to be
cancelled.
Osmundson denied this and
said the policy was only going to
be moved from one company to
another.
"The company I'm presently
with won't insure the contents of
the bus, and so I'll have to change
to another company that will.
"At all times the bus will be
insured," he said.
The bus is presently insured for
$2,500.
When the rest of the AMS loan
comes through Osmundson will be
in debt to the society for $2,800,
and said he will up his insurance
another $300 to cover the
discrepancy.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - The
president of the Blighted States of
America paid a state visit here last
week, it was announced somewhat
later to a waiting, hushed world.
The august leader, looking
more like Mayor June, spoke to a
huge blorg crowd fully seven
strong. Even tight security
precautions, however, could not
prevent a perceptive blorg child
from crying out: "That man has
no clothes, Mommy!"
This was true. Media coverage
had insisted, over some
opposition, that the man would
speak clothed. The blorgs had
believed it.
SUB THEATRE
Thursday 27th — 7:00
Friday & Saturday — 7:00 & 9:30
Sunday — 7:00
50*
SUB FILM SOC preterit*:
MICHELANGELO
ANTONIONI's
J.iJtHIISrIHMIiiMIMIII;;
iriid'iiiwi ii
STUDENT
FOOD!
On Wednesday, Feb. 2nd you will
be asked to approve in principle
student control of Food Services
in SUB.
THIS DOES NOT MEAN
PURCHASE AT THIS TIME
What it does do is allow Council to negotiate with the
administration for some form of control. If the only
way to gain control over prices and quality is to buy the
operation, then you will be asked later to approve the
purchase price.
We Must Start Now
If there is to be a marked improvement in food by next year, we
must negotiate now!
Vote Yes
on Food Services
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
GET OUT AND VOTE!
There will be elections for the following positions on
February 2, 1972:
AMS PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
At the same time, students will be asked to vote on two
referendums, one on S.U.B. Expansion and one on Food
Services.
Polls will be open as follows:
February 2nd    10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Angus
MacMillan
SUB South
Buchanan
Main Library
SUB North
Civil
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Librar\
Law
Advance polls will be open as follows:
February 1st    11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
SUB
Education
Cafeteria (old auditorium)
Gym (War Memorial)
. . and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.:
Fort Camp
Place Vanier
Totem Park
N.B. Students will have an opportunity to hear all candidates speak at the
ALL CANDIDATES' MEETING on Monday, January 31st at 12:30
p.m. in SUB Ballroom.
Take an interest
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972
Third crossing — 'a ru
December 21, 1971 — "Everytime you want to run to the toilet
you shouldn't run to a taxpayer group to hold your hand." So said
Vancouver aldermen Earle Adams about a plebiscite on the new third
crossing of Burrard Inlet. Let us see just how such a crossing would be,
quite literally, a "run to the toilet."
The core of downtown Vancouver has already surrendered 46 per
cent of its ground space to the automobile. More overall space (square
feet of high rises, offices, and parking garages included) goes to cars
By GLEN EWAN
than to people — almost twice as much space for each car as each
person. Every day there are 25,000 parked cars in downtown and about
that many again pass through en route somewhere else.
If you do not already believe that the downtown traffic is too
crowded, can you honestly believe another crossing will remove the
congestion? Those cars that already pass through downtown may not
add to this problem, providing each car was to use the new crossing and
its advantageous "distributors".
But what is to stop more downtown workers from bringing their
cars in? Traffic will flow easier now (so we are told), encouraging more
to enter the area.
Will downtown Vancouver become like New York, where five fire
engines are sent to one call in the hopes that one truck will reach the
scene in time to be of assistance?
Will there be trouble parking? Not likely, for as long as there is a
buck to be made, either by the Downtown Parking Corporation or
private lots, there will be more parking spaces. Anyway, there are still
many parking lots in downtown without multi-level garages on them!
Further, studies have shown that the present two crossings would
be insufficient to handle the thru downtown flow alone by 1985. That
estimate does not include cars that enter and stay in downtown.
Assuming an immediate start on the third crossing it is unlikely to be
opened until 1975. Do the experts mean we will need yet another
crossing in ten years?
For every full bus that enters downtown there are 50-70 less cars
entering. This is said on the assumption that there is slightly more than
one person (1.1, 1.2 people) in every car on the road. (If you doubt
this, stand on any street corner and watch . . .)
Presently about 1/3 of the people who work in downtown ride in
on a bus. Actually, 39 per cent of the eastern commuters ride busses,
37 per cent of the southerners, and a lowly 20 per cent, one out of
every five, of the northerners.
■Tf Lion's Gate Bridge is as crowded as one is led to believe, and
only 20 per cent are willing to ease the congestion by getting out of
cars, with a new crossing making entry into downtown easier, who can
believe more people would leave their cars at home and take mass
transit?
Speaking of mass transit, many say this tunnel is the only hope
for a cross inlet service. More on that later. But first, if the tunnel is
built we will have a sealed concrete tube in its centre. Useless.
Even the existing possible connection, underground CP rails, is
considerably closer to the surface than the closed mouth of this tube.
Alderman Hardwick estimates it would cost $6 million to make the
tube operational.
To the individual in terms of dollars and cents, it costs a bus rider
50c-Sl daily to go to work. A driver will pay at least that for parking
alone. On top of that how much gas is used? how much more gas is
wasted in stalled traffic? and how much money-is-time is wasted in
stalled traffic?
Let me try an appeal to the esthetic. What does the view of the
North Shore mountains mean to local residents? This is undoubtedly
some of the most beautiful scenery in the world — when it can be seen!
How often have you cursed the smog, from the driver's seat of your
car?
Is Vancouver's pollution not bad enough without this lure to
increase it? (If you still don't believe car traffic will increase, the
instructions to Swan-Wooster-CBA were "to design a crossing to
maximize traffic flows") West End residents have said that the exhaust
fumes will not be in their eyes and hair with a new crossing. But where
will the fumes go?
There will be even more than now! Into a hole in the ground?
Nonsense. Even if cars travel underground the fumes will be vented into
the atmosphere.
Despite all these arguments to the contrary, let us assume
(shudder!) that the crossing is to be built. Who is paying for it? The
North Shore municipalities have agreed to $1.5 million. Vancouver has
already said yes to $3.2 million. Let's look at that. Council was told
$12.2 million to distribute tunnel traffic. The $3.2 million set aside will
only cover the widening of one road, and does not include on and off
ramps.
Once this is spent, the rest ($9 million) is doomed to follow. The
federal government has offered to loan $142 million. Tolls are expected
to be 50c per crossing when the tunnel opens, jumping to $2 one way
in 30 years. The costs if interest alone, are estimated at $600,577,000
— three times the price of the crossing.
■Flfel
lany believe the tunnel will lead, like dominoes, to a trans-city
freeway, conveniently connecting the new crossing to the new Georgia
"ell, there is improved bus se
an  improvement). The  proverbial
solution has to be approached with
(tunnel construction may start in thi
Immediately, nearly everyont
be done. The quickest, easiest, and 1
existing B.C. Hydro bus service. An
probably better. Perhaps the Greate
it takes over, finally, control of ex
do this.
More, and more frequent, ex
and through present centres. For
Shore through Vancouver to UBC. 1
CHBWftVfm
OFF IU MV CA£-
7H&) lowe
VtW A 6I6K):
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7
Viaducts and the 401 (estimated cost, at least, $97 million to the
taxpayers of Vancouver). Will Vancouver become the last of the
freeway cities or the first of the people transit cities???
SOLUTIONS:
Admittedly, such a crossing is a solution to the problem of
increasing commuter traffic. But if we spend nearly $200 million on
access to the North Shore, what of the south and east parts of the lower
mainland? (Thank God we have a clear expanse of water on the west.)
Will we spend an additional $400 million on "connectors" to facilitate
the flow of cars from the east and south?
The point is there are other, more sensible, and more widely
applicable solutions. Mass rapid transit is easy to say but what does it
mean?
all day, would shorten (and has sh
Relatively easy to implemer
One such is bieng tried for North
the PNE lots, park their cars, anc
downtown area. This is a step in
enlightening to watch.
Temporary schemes such as I
plans are drawn up and instituted I
New Democratic Party leader Dave
that if indeed there is $200 millioi
seven per cent per annum, is $14
any system.
loth Vancouver City and_V
studies on bus service possibilitie:
yet. (I personally am sceptical abc
mass transit system. I feel f
complementing restrictions on at
experience that free bus service
traffic conditions in that city.)
As for more sophisticated,  By DICK BETTS
The Wilhelm Reich revival
is going full swing in the
United States these days.
There are a few people in
Canada studying him too.
Who is Wilhelm Reich and
why is he important? What
does a man who lived and did
his best work in the thirties in
Germany, escaped fascist
persecution shortly after,
went to the U.S. in the late
forties and died there in
prison in 1954 have to say to
us today?
In light of the haze of
misinterpretation,
r einterpre tation and
mystification concerning him
we should deal with Reich
first in a work-biographic way
before we get into the
implications of what he said
and why it is relevant in the
70's.
bio«radicalism
Wilhelm Reich was a
German psychoanalyst. His
disciples in psychology today,
including A. S. Neil and
Alexander Lowen, have
incorporated the technical
innovations of Reich, his
theory on body repression
and character into their work.
They ignore him precisely on
the point where his theory
and researches divide,
between practical therapy
and radical political theory.
And this is generally the case.
Reich's life and work
revolve around one major
theme: the role society plays
in shaping and moulding
character through repression
of sexuality. In this he took
the theories of Sigmund
Freud to their logical
conclusion. Organized society
stands in direct opposition to
freedom and free, uncoerced
development.
In his early phase (the one
which will concern us here)
he incorporated the
still-renegade theories of
psychoanlysis  and  Marxism.
This marriage between the
theory of the body and the
body politic enabled Reich to
launch some of the most
devastating criticisms against
the repressive capitalist
world-order since Marx
himself. Freudian
psychoanalysis gave Reich
material on sexuality while
Marxism filled the gaping
holes and mistakes left in!
Freudian thought concerning,
politics and history.
His early theory in
summary contains a critique
of society run by private
propertied interests and bent
on suppressing freedom
through sexual repression.
Unlike Freud, Reich was
very    specific    about    such
general terms as "civilization"
and "society". For Reich
these meant the economic
and social institutions of
capitalism. Whereas Freud
abstractly declared that
sexuality had to be
suppressed in order that
necessary work in building
society could take place
Reich fore-saw a society
which could bring sexuality
and labor together in a
work-democracy, a
communal society, once
private ownership and
economic greed were
abolished.
Reich saw a clear
connection between the
historical origin of the family
as a means of sexual
repression and education and
capitalist society which
brought in the nuclear family
as we know it. The family for
Reich was one of the major
mechanisms of repression and
authority-formation. He
traced the submissive
character-structure formed by
social and family influences
to the mass acquiescence of
a nation to a super-authoritarian such as Hitler and the
system of fascism.
More fundamentally Reich
evolved a political theory
which was based on
individual longing for
freedom. He drew
connections between sexual
and social liberation stating
categorically that a sexually
suppressed person was
incapable of a free existence.
His political theory
revolved around his concept
of work-democracy or a
social system in which people
cooperated in work which
was done in a climate of
sexual and social freedom.
The need to work would
always be subordinated to the
needs of sexuality.
Reich's historical
importance is not the body
therapy which establishment
psychologists have taken
from his theories. Rather it is
his assumptions about the
relationship of the personal
to the political, an
individual's sexual needs in
harmony with her or his
social and political activity.
If we take some of our
cues from Reich then the
sexual component of
liberation becomes essential.
It becomes the means by
which our submissive and
crippled characters have1 been
formed. In short, it becomes
the basis of our hang-ups.
One of the greatest
problems of any collective
activity (and of society in
general) is peoples' lack of
ability to work together.
Personal jealousies and power
trips all point to a neurotic
trait in the way we deal with
others. The sexual imbalance
and moral prohibitions in
which we were raised give
clues to the basis of many
shortcomings. The fact that
we can accept authority
structures which rest only on
their own justification, the
fact that we are frightened of
the possibilities of having to
govern ourselves points to
characters which crave
authority, which cannot meet
their own needs.
It was Reich who first
formulated the reasons for
this. A person raised in an
atmosphere which suppressed
her or his bodily needs of
pleasure; masturbation, early
and enforced toilet training
.and later sexual acts
themselves cannot
immediately find her or his
way clear to working towards
structures which permit
freedom. We are simply not
used to the notion that we
should be happy or satisfied
except in the most artificial
sense; money, power,
security, work to do etc.
All of these are beside the
point and come from social
conditions in which wealth
and property are sanctioned.
When some people own the
means of production and
others can only work for a
wage it makes sense that
society orders itself along
those lines. Those who have
nothing but their labor and
tid-bits must be conditioned
to think that as long as they
are in a subservient position
they must accept it.
A hint of liberation for
workers would be disastrous
for the bosses. A political
movement which had life
could destroy the present
system.
Small wonder that
psychiatrists whose living
comes from the dominant
social classes have ignored the
political Reich.
The explosive position of
sex can be seen more clearly
today than in Reich's time.
What do moralists and
reactionary politicians scream
about most when they think
of young people in
communes? Free love, orgies,
total sex. The most subversive
thing we can do it seems. The
entire new left has been
branded as bearded anarchists
who practice free love.
Morality (sex-negation) has
been seen as the last stand
against the communist
conspiracy.
This and other nonsense
continues along hand in hand
'with increasingly blatant
symbolism in advertising and
an apparent relaxation of old
standards of morality. This is
at best a surface alteration.
Women are still used as
tools for advertisers, the
latest car is identified with a
woman in a bikini. The new
morality is largely
commercial, it makes money.
Reich in fact forecast this
trend pointing out the
exploitative effect it would
have on people who were still
kept sexually ignorant and
economically enslaved.
Women's liberation has
done much to point this out
and the "new morality" is in
fact the old morality tailored
and made to sell. Society
does not have the free
gratification of the
individual's natural desires as
its focal point. It exploits
these desires to further
confuse people and keep
them in servitude.
"Swinging life-styles" are
still the propery of the
middle-class who are plugged
into and capable of expensive
consumption. Social
engineering and psychologists
are being tapped to increase
this. Liberated sexuality in
the true sense is being held
back.
The male ego dominates
these so-called progressive
trends just as it has every
other social endeavour since
patriarchy. Reich was careful
to point out that as long as
women were treated as
objects and were
economically dependent on
men true liberation was
impossible. The "new
morality", even as practiced
by radicals, has been based on
male supremacy.
Women and men are
longing for complete
relationship with persons of
their own or opposite sex.
They must be treated as
equals and must be satisfied
with the relationship's
development.
The division betwen
people starts at the sexual
level. The important or
unsatisfied male covers the
frustration by dominating
people, especially women.
The woman who is more
socially repressed than the
man replies by establishing
her own self as doting mother
or sexual blackmailer. The
neurotic process, rooted in
childhood, thus goes on.
The development of a free
sexuality is linked to the
social process. The two are
indistinguishable. As a
repressive society makes free
sexuality impossible so
repressed sexuality makes
final freedom impossible.
The importance of Reich
rests upon this recognition
and his insistance that the
two poles of being the
personal and the social be
united and that our lives
become unified in this way.
Beautiful
clothes
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
PHOENIX 72   presents
A Night at the Ponderosa
Only Advance Tickets
50c in SUB Concourse
Wed. Feb. 2
8:00-1:00
REFRESHMENTS-3/$1
There's Something for Everyone
All Star Entertainment — Games — Films
And More
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For OIcums
for that smart look m glass** ...
look to
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Page Friday. 2
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972 AT AGE 4
"If a girl comes to school with a new haircut or a
new pair of shoes, the other girls will avoid her. I
think this is true of all women period. They have
these little ways about them that are nasty ... I
really think they are nasty, I really do."
—Nursery School Teacher
AT AGE 16
"A wife should not expect her husband to do
any of the housework like doing the dishes, doing the
wash . . . any of these menial tasks. Leave time for his
education to help his later life. I feel this is so
important if you want your husband to be a
successful man. You do want your husband to be a
success." —Guidance Counsellor
AT AGE 11
"Last Christmas my daughter asked for a
football, a kickball, a monkeyswing. Now isn't that
absurd. I thought little girls played with little girl
things."
—Mother of 11-year-old girl
BY AGE 21
"To sell to women you make them insecure.
That's the reason for all the beautiful wispy chicks on
the TV screen. Any Mrs. America watching this will
run right out and buy those products. Then you have
them exactly where you want them."
—Advertising Executive
How six women
became one
BY AGE 35
"If I had my lifeto live over again right now ...
if I hadn't married . .. would I live it the way I'm
living it today? Oh boy ... I doubt it."
—Housewife
Most of us probably feel the same way, but why?
Growing   Up   Female:   as   six   become   one,   a
documentary description of the socialization . of
American women, is an intense and captivating film
which goes a long way toward helping people understand
how the seemingly trivial details of our culture combine
to support an economic system which has the
manipulation and subjugation of women at its very core.
What happens to a woman is shown through
interviews with six women ranging in age from 4 to 35.
Through their work and play and the words and actions
of the people who act as agents of the culture the
process of socialization comes into focus.
From 11-year-old Joleen, who sees her inclinations
toward physical activity slowly stifled as "femininity"
becomes a desirable trait, to 21-year-old Tammy, the
spaced-out hippie girl who'd rather be in bed with her
boyfriend than anywhere else, each feels a longing for~
freedom.
But in the interview with the moustachioed ad man,
with Joleen's parents, with the vocational school
counsellor, it becomes clear that freedom is the
proverbial carrot on a stick, made almost tangible
through advertising and culture but always unattainable
because of socio-economic structures.
Terry, 16, training at vocational school to be a
cosmetologist, thinks marriage will bring her freedom.
But in watching the film's housewife, and the single
mother whose husband turned out to be "no good", we
see how this is an adolescent illusion.
As Terry's guidance counsellor talks to her about
how a married womam's main purpose in life should be
to please her husband, the camera shows us both pairs of
hands twisting nervously, betraying the attempts of each
woman to cover up the suppressed intuition that it's all
bullshit.
And Tammy's belief that the hip style of life will
bring her freedom is rendered grotesque through expert
splicing with shots of the ad man, for whom woman's
psychological insecurity, derived from economic
impotence, is the key to consumption and the selling of
useless products.
It is with Joleen, on the verge of adolescence, that
the enormous destruction of human potential that is
visited on us through the socialization of women comes
through most clearly. Tender and sympathetic
questioning by the female interviewer brings out the
admission that Joleen resents having to "be feminine",
that she is going to miss being a strong person in her own
right. But in listening to Terry, just five years older, we
hear none of this. Pathetically, Terry has swallowed the
line all too well.
Growing Up Female got an enthusiastic reception
when it was shown as part of The Canadian Woman: Our
Story last Tuesday night, and it would be a good idea if
it reached a larger audience. It's available from New
Day Films, 267 West 25th St., New York, N.Y. 10001,
U.S.A.
And if someone really wants to do Vancouver a
favor, they could buy it and make it available on a much
broader basis. Price of a print is a paltry $375.
-P.K.,AJ».
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SUB THEATRE
Thursday 27th — 7:00
Friday &' Saturday — 7:00 & 9:30
Sunday — 7:00
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SUB FILM SOC presents:
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2580 BURRARD STREET,
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.*
736-0261
Friday/ January 28, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 By LANNY BECKMAN
Ihe Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues is made up mainly of
social psychologists. It is the liberal face of the reactionary sloth of social science.
The members have a number of things in common. They are concerned about social
problems. They want to apply their "expertise" to the solution of social problems.
They earn over $10,000 a year - which enables them to spend a lot of time
thinking about social problems and making "responsible" pronouncements about
social action.
In case you don't get the point: social problems are their bread and butter. In
case you still don't get the point: SPSSI is a liberal organization. It's concerned. It
doesn't do anything that makes it all the more concerned. As long as nothing
changes, SPSSI will be in business. As long as there are social problems like
"Negroes" and poor people to be concerned about and to study, those five-figure
salaries will just keep rolling in.
When you get right down to it though, SPSSI doesn't really see "Negroes" as
constituting a social problem. It sees them as constituting a subject matter. I mean,
SPSSI is made up of academics, and academics gotta publish or they might wind up
being subject matter themselves.
In its periodical, The Journal of Social Issues, SPSSI publishes
thought-provoking, agitational articles with catchy titles like "The SRS Model as a
Predictor of Negro i Responsiveness to Reinforcement". The author's summary of
this almost randomly chosen aricle pretty well captures the sort of "expertise" that
SPSSI endeavours to apply to social problems.
"An attempt was made to demonstrate the relevance of an interpersonally
oriented incongruity model — Baron's SRS theory — to understanding Negro
responsiveness to social reinforcement. Based on the SRS model it was
hypothesized that Negroes would find a low rate of approval from a white
authority figure, at least under certain conditions, more appropriate and preferred
than a high rate of approval. The results of a series of studies carried out with
disadvantaged Negro youth suggest that this proposition is relevant to
understanding how Negro self-evaluation and task performance is affected by social
reinforcement parameters such as type, source and frequency of reinforcement. The
role of such research in broadening the focus of the SRS model from a monistic to
a multidimensional conception is also discussed."
The political implications of this viewpoint are blatantly obvious. It is
important for students with growing political consciousness to bear in mind that
the foregoing summary typifies the most progressive attitude in mainstream
psychology. It is also important to see that it is the kind of repressive horseshit that
lies behind tempting platitudes about "social action" and "the social scientist's
responsibility as a citizen'"
I got out of the social sciences by the skin of my teeth - a couple of months
from a Ph.D. In the letter below, I bid farewell to the arid field of academic
psychology and to the pious little corner occupied by SPSSI.
Newsletter Editor
Society for the
Psychological Study
of Social Issues
Post Office Box 1248
Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48106
U.S.A.
Dear Sir:
I am writing to cancel my membership
and journal subscription. This is
concurrent with my decision to drop out
of psychology. It has taken me a long
time and a lot of hard work to become a
drop-out, but looking back, I feel that it's
all been worth it. The decision to quit
was not an easy one; I too like the
security and fat salary that goes along
with having a Ph.D., but there comes a
time when you must say no to the
bullshit.
I ask you not to dismiss this too easily.
I've been around the field for quite a
while — six years as a graduate student —
and have a pretty good understanding of
what constitutes adacemic psychology.
I've received consistently high marks and
all of the (misguided) praise that they
engender. I have read hundreds of
mainstream psychological journals and
texts, have passed my doctoral
comprehensives, written the first draft of
my dissertation and have only a couple of
months to complete all requirements. I
do not view my decision to quit as either
fanatical or foolhardy, but as the first
sensible and honest action I've taken
since entering the field as a graduate
student in 1964.
After almost a decade of formal study,
I would like to take this opportunity to
summarize my feelings about psychology
in general and SPSSI in particular.
Psychology, as defined in North
American universities, is a spiritual
wasteland. Well, of course, what has
spirituality to do with the objective study
of behaviour. But then, what has
spirituality to do with the desolate
quality of life in America? I see the two
issues as inherently related. Psychology is
the study of alienated man, but lacks the
recognition that it is so. Psychology is the
product of alienated men, men so
removed from the meaning of their
humanity that they actually believe that
rigor, control, experimentation and
statistics constitute vehicles toward
understanding human life. Academic
psychology is a reflection of American
alienation. It explains nothing about the
human condition, but is itself a symptom
of a poisoned culture and, like that
culture, requires explanation and radical
change.
Should the world survive the evils in
which social science plays its part,
historians will look back on the dinosaur
of American imperialism and see
psychology as a tiny ganglion in its toe.
And they will be amazed that for a
century, a group of men and women, who
pretentiously called themselves Doctors,
were so blind as actually to believe that
the methods of science could illuminate
anything of the human heart.
Well, these criticisms apply equally to
fields such as contemporary philosophy,
but where psychology differs is in the
fact that it is also an intellectual
wasteland. The level of intelligence one
finds in mainstream publications is
astonishingly banal. Psychology is an
object of ridicule among intellectuals.
How often I have felt embarrassment
when a friend has glanced through one of
my books and shaken his head at the
pathetic simplemindedness aggrandized
by inflated psychological jargon. The best
minds in the field are third-rate thinkers.
What a tragedy that students who
bring to their freshman course the naive
and healthy desire to study the "meaning
of life" are exposed to the ignorance and
reactionary platitudes that parade under
the banner of psychology. The best
students continue to leave the field. I
take this to be a hopeful sign. The liberal
enjoinder that the student ought not to
reject, say the experimental method, until
he has familiarized himself with it is
nonsense. Wasting several years
familiarizing oneself with it is nonsense.
Wasting several years familiarizing oneself
with the valueless is wasting several years.
One function of a teacher (to use an
obsolete term) is to encourage students to
Up from
psych
avoid what is worthless. The psychologist
who does so, however, finds himself out
of a job. It is my conclusion that
psychology has nothing to teach and will
eventually find itself without students.
As far as SPSSI goes, I find it in many
ways the most objectionable branch of
the psychological establishment. If
anything, its intellectual impoverishment
is even greater than the other branches'.
It's a tight race, however, and I wouldn't
want to argue the point.
From a political — or as you would
have it, "social action" — point of view,
SPSSI brings into sharpest relief the
bankruptcy of the liberal position. Your
chickenshit reformism, your Activists'
Corner, your rational consideration as to
whether military psychology promotes
human welfare (how can men and women
of reputed intelligence even entertain
such an insane proposition?) — all of
these typify the fraudulent and
comfortable concerns of over-paid
professionals living in a world filled with
misery and oppression.
"SPSSI," you say, "provides an
important avenue through which social
scientists can apply their knowledge and
insights to some of the critical social
problems of today." I believe that social
scientists possess no special expertise to
solve social problems. You record in
military, educational, industrial and
marketing psychology leaves little doubt
that your expertise serves only create and
perpetuate social problems. It's no
coincidence that social science has been
used by the powerful to make their
schools, factories and wars run more
efficiently. The biases underlying
positivist methodology co-ordinate
perfectly with the needs of the ruling
class: the separation of subject and
object; the concern with external,
measurable behaviour; the preoccupation
with method rather than content; the
need to manipulate, control and predict.
Again, it's no coincidence that terms like
"manipulate" and "control" are desirable
in the lexion of social science and
pejorative in the vocabulary of social
ethics.
The myth that scientific methodology
is value-neutral, and that therefore social
scientists can beneficially apply their
knowledge to social problems, is false. To
be sure, most SPSSI members would
agree that regretably much applied
research in the social sciences has been
used to reinforce rather than alleviate
problems. But then, they would go on,
that is not the fault of the methodology;
no, that's the fault of the application of
the methodology. For, methods are
abstract tools; it's up to us how we use
them etc., etc.
I reject that line of reasoning. I don't
believe in the separability of method and
application. Both evolve interdependently
in a context of specific political and
economic realities. Who controls the
funds to support what research? Mainly,
as we all know, government, military,
industry and its tax-exempt foundations
foot the bill for research which sharpens
the tools of "value-neutral"
methodology. And, as most of us know,
they do so because that methodology,
when applied, serves their interests.
Workers produce more; consumers buy
more; inhabitants are made more docile
in concentration camps called
pacification centers.
The entire network of research
projects is strictly controlled
economically. There is no academic
freedom. That's another fake myth that
SPSSI fights so tenaciously to uphold.
And there are no data. The world isn't
given to us; it's created. The belief in data
is one more piece of the positivist pie
baked up by SPSSI, science and the
established powers. As Laing says, the
things gathered in research are capta, the
things which have been seized.
And SPSSI seizes at every turn the
things which betray its avowed intention
of mitigating social problems. You study
blacks, the poor, hippies, radicals,
delinquents, the emotionally disturbed —
all the groups your government tells you
are problems. The oppressed are
problems; they threaten vested interests;
they have to be understood and boiled
into the putrid soup of American culture.
And SPSSI is there, Johnny-on-the-spot,
to study them, to understand them, to
help the system accommodate them.
Hopefully, the giant machine, which
you strive so sanctimoniously and
ineffectively to lubricate, will one day
grind to a halt. And then your most
catastrophic expectation will have come
true: there will be no research funds with
which to study social problems. Or worse
yet, there may not even be any social
problems.
My conclusion after four years as an
undergraduate and six years as a graduate
student is that academic psychology
offers me no knowledge or insights about
the social world in which I live. Rather, it
consistently beclouds any understanding.
I have always disliked the pomposity
with which psychologists have named
their ignorance science. The situation
reaches absurd proportions, however,
when SPSSI couples that pomposity with
pious resolutions about social action.
Logical agruments aside, my visceral
reaction against SPSSI is provoked mainly
by the relentless strain of
self-righteousness that runs through
everything you publish.
You are a group of men and women
earning hugely inflated salaries, while in
its name retarding social progress.
Consider whether you would be willing to
take a cut of $10,000 a year to see the
"social, problem" with which you are
professionally concerned disappear. If
your answer is no, I advise you to return
to the less hypocritical lie of doing
socially irrelevant research. If the answer
is yes, I encourage you to sacrifice the
remaining thousands of dollars, get out of
the field, and join forces with "your"
oppressed group to change the conditions
responsible for its misery.
I would like you to print this letter
intact as I believe that is is relevant to the
entire SPSSI enterprise, that it speaks to a
wide cross-section of your membership
and that it articulates that sliver of doubt
which pricks the liberal conscience every
now and then (especially late at night). If
you are offended by the obscenities, you
may change "bullshit" in paragraph 1 to
"hypocrisy" and "chickenshit" in
paragraph 9 to "cowardly".
— Lanny Beckman
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972 itue^iiwotki REF-tRENDUfY',.; uoesuworic? REFERENDUM: aoes v *
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PUBLIC MEETING ^nBay- 12:30PM
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S.U.B. EXPANSION REFERENDUM:
Whereas Student Council has recommended the development of the
following areas of S.U.B.:
(1) Area 18-D; and (2) Area 18-F;
and    whereas    Student    Council    has    recommended    the
redevelopment of the following areas of S.U.B.:
(1)  Room 30; (2) the present Lounge and Music areas and (3)
Room 130;
ARE you in favor of extending the term of financing for the Student
Union Building to allow a $350,000 expansion program in these areas, it
being understood that such extension of term will result in no increase in
the amount of the current $15.00 Building Fee portion of the AMS Fee?
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LISTENING   ROOM
READING   ROOMS
OUT DOOR   CLUBS
SERVICE   REVENUE
Advertisement The Radical Therapist is a newspaper
journal started by a collective of former
psychologists, psychiatrists and
psychotherapists who ard dedicated to a
critique and change of the present
structure of psychology. Page Friday
urges all students in the social sciences,
particularly psychology, to read RT and
subscribe to it. Reprinted below are
excerpts from their manifesto.
Therapy today has become a
commodity, a means of social control. We
reject the pleasant careers with which the
system rewards its adherents. The social
system must change, and we will be
workers toward such change. But to be
true instruments of change, therapy and
therapists must be liberated from their
own forms of oppression.
The Radical Therapist will be a
rallying ground for all people concerned
with this task. Therapy to us broadly
encompasses all factors affecting the
psychic well-being of individuals, families,
and social groups. We open our pages to
all people with pertinent ideas about
therapy today: to clients of therapy
systems, therapists, and people in related
fields.
Developing new training programs
Therapists are groomed for elitist,
frequently escapist and exploitive careers.
Professional associations and journals
legitimize such training, and the mass
media tout its necessity. Yet current
training perpetuates outmoded systems.
In an age when everything is under
question, therapy training bears down all
the harder on those it teaches, as if this
will abolish doubt. Hierarchical systems
obviate change; and training programs,
like practice, tend to stultify and wound
many people. The system is slow to
respond to popular needs.
Artificial barriers are created
everywhere: between senior and junior
staff, between therapists from various
disciplines, between "professionals" and
laymen. Institutional rigidity represses
the need for alteration, and men of good
will are lost year after year within their
labyrinthine tangles.
Training programs keep therapists
apart and encourage false professionalism.
Course work in other relevant fields is
lacking in every discipline. Psychiatrists
lack training in psychology; social
workers lack training in psychology;
social workers lack training in simple drug
use; psychologists lack training in
sociology. All therapists lack training in
politics, art, history, and economics,
which they vitally need today. Therapy is
not a medical specialty, nor is it a branch
of the social sciences. It is a field all its
own, dealing with relationships between
people; and as such it demands its own
orientation and its own training programs
which draw on the experience of all
pertinent disciplines.
We need new training programs, not
amended or expanded versions of what
we already have. We need ten times as
many therapy workers. We need to make
better use of community resources and
extend to more people the insights now
available to the few. We need, not more
of the same, but a wholly new approach.
Finally, we need to examine the free
system which allows some therapists to
obtain excessive wealth at people's
expense.
Training must be demystified and
made more open, more responsive, and
more creative. New experiments are
already beginning to challenge and
redefine our notion of therapy. We
encourage them and look forward to their
results.
Elaborating a new psychology of men and
women, and new concepts of family and
community life
The ways we live intimately with one
another are changing. Yet much of this is
RT Manifesto
poorly understood. We must look into
ways in which unquestioned
male-dominate ideas have influenced
therapy, especially therapy of women.
Men and women must both be liberated
from rigid sex sterotypes in order to
develop their own potential. Deviance as
a social diagnosis must not be confused
with nerotic behavior.
We need to know much more about all
this, for our old ideas are no longer
appropriate. The nuclear family, so long
revered and unchallenged, now appears as
simply the most common alternative for
achieving needs for intimacy and raising
children.We need to evaluate the other
alternatives. Similarly, we need to
investigate the changing notions of men
and women, as well as alternate modes of
living. But unless we ourselves are freed
from dogma and bias, we will never
understand others who experiment with
new ways. Instead, we will see dangerous
"sickness" everywhere.
Encouraging the development of more
responsive therapy programs under client
control
Despite all the talk about "community
mental health," therapists have done little
toward considering the real health needs
of communities. The community mental
health movement is a fraud. It has never
been in popular hands. Affording a
crucible of power to ambitious
professionals, it often offers but another
form of oppression to the people.
Professionals' needs for wealth, prestige,
and influence are satisfied, while distress
in the community goes on as before. Yet
the therapist's money comes from the
community. Bringing a skill in
understanding human feelings to the
community, he must learn to offer it as
his clients need it, not as he would give it.
More sensible forms of therapy,
controlled by and responsive to
community needs, must be devised and
offered.
The community is its people: not the
therapists, or the university, or the
research teams, or big business, or the
government. Therapists who enter the
community may consider themselves part
of it: but they cannot claim to know
what is best for it. They cannot shape its
needs. As radical therapists, our task is
exposing the nature of current practices
and pursuing new innovations in therapy
services: decentralized, democratic,
noninstitutional, and popular. We can
identify and channel grievances, and help
stimulate action. This way we join the
search for new ways of serving the
community's needs.   .
More than communities are being
violated. Therapists define what is
appropriate and what is not, even while
claiming to be "disinterested." They
operate as forces for social control,
weeding out deviance with the label of
"mentally ill." Wherever it functions as
an agent of the system, encouraging
conformity, helping people "adjust" to
the realities of exploitation, antiquated
roles, and a casual dehumanizing ethic,
therapy is an instrument of oppression.
Such "therapy" institutionalizes and
stigmatizes those whom society will not
tolerate, numbs minds, tranquilizes and
antidepresses, electroshocks,
disenfranchises, diagnoses, ostracizes,
psychologizes, and treats people as
commodities and things. We oppose this
from the core of our being. We denounce
all "therapy" which dehumanizes and
violates our brothers and sisters.
Encouraging new techniques
We encourage the search for
self-realization, singly and in groups, with
the eventual goal of growth within
communities. Growth can be individual as
well as collective. We support new
techniques and innovations in therapy,
but we decry their use as middle-class
escapist outlets or as vehicles for
profiteering by some in our field.
Effective techniques should be popularly
available.
New forms of therapy are important in
our move toward liberation. They deserve
sympathetic and critical evaluation, freed
from insistance that whatever exists now
is best. So long as innovations are honest
and open and are not used to exploit
people, we are interested in them. Moves
toward group and communal experience,
as well as individual growth, can help free
us from inner as well as outer forms of
repression.
At the same time, we are alarmed by
the use of insights from therapy fields to
extend institutional and governmental
control, through required psychological
tests for employee applicants,
inappropriate in-depth interviews, and the
use of therapists as consultant engineers
for third parties such as corporations, the
military, and universities. Psychological
innuendo in advertising is also
questionable on moral grounds, and must
be reexamined. Therapy cannot escape
responsibility for the oversexualization of
every commodity on the market; and for
the undersexualization of sex itself.
Confronting the way our society
functions
We are concerned with the social
milieu in which we all live, and with its
effect on psychological well-being. Thus
we join the crusade against violation of
our natural resources, whether through
encroachment on our minds by
advertising, the mass media, sterotyped
education, and outdated cultural myths;
or through the blatant destruction of our
environment's wholesomeness through air
and water pollution, overpopulation,
chemical and industrial waste, and
unlivable cities. Our technology might
create an environment free from scarcity
and want, clean and aesthetically
pleasing. Instead, it destroys whatever it
touches.
Just as the rivers and lakes are
destroyed by an arrogant, unfeeling
technology, so our sense of humanness is
barraged daily by the mass media.
Advertising and the consumer economy
make every person a thing. The measure
of success becomes accumulated objects,
wealth, and notoriety; not the well-being
of one's family and self, community, and
world. We must realize that many people
called "mentally ill" have been socially
traumatized by our society, which creates
and exacerbates emotional suffering.
While we do pretend that all mental
suffering is socially caused, we are alert to
the social and political roots of much of
it. Failing to pursue this would be
negligence and complicity.
Beyond the environmental ruin and
the consumer economy lies the constant
presence of war. Breaking out now on
many fronts at once, war's results are
always the same: destruction of people,
killing and maiming, disruption of family
and community life, violence, brutality,
senseless suffering. The internal ills our
society now experiences have already
"brought the war home." What we
practice internationally, we now suffer
nationally and locally. We are all affected
by such brutality, and by the ultimate
madness of our nuclear weapons. Unless
we as therapists and people can look
beyond "professional" issues and
approach the social and political roots of
suffering we act as unknowing agents for
the established order.
In the midst of social upheaval The
Radical Therapist allies itself with those
working for needed change.
Essentially, The Radical Therapist
seeks to bring together all people
concerned with looking at therapy in
today's society. While drawing on
therapeutic tradition, we should
deprofessionalize and demystify therapy
work. Our view of existing instituions is
radically critical: but then it is no secret
how bad things have become. We will
make people aware of the situation, and
pursue programs for change. In this
exciting venture, we invite support and
participation from all who help us
redefine therapy and make it a more
responsive, meaningful human pursuit.
Fridays January 28,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Going Away
This Summer ?
COME
and
SEE US
For COMPLETE Travel
Information
and Brochures - Call
5700 University Boulevard
ON CAMPUS 224-4391
B.C.'s
LEADING
TRAVEL
ORGANIZATION
Untying the knots
No discussion of radical
psychology would be
complete without a treatment
of Ronald David Laing, the
Scottish psychiatrist whose
experiments in therapy and
treatment of schizophrenics
have turned the established
psychiatric world on its head.
Laing attacks convention
and standardization where
ever it appears thinking,
correctly, that established
practices are wrong and do
nothing but harm. He has
made the political
underpinnings of his theories
clear. Society is monolithic
and based upon
standardization and
conformity. It cannot,
ultimately tolerate anything
else.
Thus people who are
labeled schizoid are those
who have chosen different
ways of dealing with an
alienating environment.
Society eliminates them
through the standard mental
institution.
These institutions, like all
social entities in mass society,
deal with ways to
dehumanize the individual
and to rob them of creativity
and autonomy. Thus
schizophrenics are treated as
diseased and the offending
organ, the brain, is deadened
through electroshock and
drug therapy so the "patient"
can join his or her glass-eyed
counterpart on the streets of
the metropolis.
Laing fights precisely this
process and provides social
reasons why.
The family, says Laing, is a
complex set of reactions and
interactions designed to
confuse, deceive and enforce
conformity on all its
members. It is self-propelled
(within the web of the larger
society) and self-perpetuating. It is the basis of the
socialization process, it sets
up the categories of THEM
and US by its inward-looking
nature and kills any
possibilities of de-institutionalized co-operative living;
in the bud.
The family is followed by
other institutions whose
economic and political
purpose are the same.
More than any
contemporary psychiatrist,
Laing, by his work, has
shown    where    standard
psychiatric theory is leading
its practitioners, either to its
acceptance or its rejection.
Laing, needless to say, rejects
it. His focal point is the
experience of people in their
environment be it society, the
mental institute or the
family.
In the intellectual
tradition of existentialism,
particularly of Jean-Paul
Sartre he is preoccupied with
giving new interpretation to
common every day oppressive
situations which have been
taken for granted in the 20th
century.
He is, in this sense,
opposed to the dominant
Western rationalist tradition
in which the ultimate
rationality of the social
system is explored and
affirmed. From his researches
into psychic disorders Laing
concludes that our society is
not entirely rational and its
many irrational aspects
should be accentuated to
throw light on the plight of
the individual in the 20th
century.
The positive aspects of this
line of thinking shows up in
Laing's    critique    of    the
existing society; one which
by its very nature drives
people insane.
It does this in time-worn,
subtle ways but if Laing is
correct then there is not
much difference between
what we would consider sane
or an insane person. The
"insane" person is the one
who ends up in a mental
institution. The revolutionary
implications of such a
statement should be obvious.
If we are driven insane in the
belief that we are sane then
the existing order's
oppressiveness is formidable.
Fu r t hermore, our
experiences take on a new
dimension and level of
awareness.
The irrationality of our
lives within the system
becomes more obvious as we
conform to a set of
institutional rules without
any purpose except the
regulation of our behaviour
along lines other than those
we would choose were we
free to do so.
So-called madness is
simply one of the more
extreme reactions to this
process of dehumanization.
Laing's therapy involves living
through this created madness
and reaching new levels of
awareness about our own real
situation in the world. We
must realize that as madness
is a survival mechanism it is
also its own cure.
Put simply any cure for
socially induced madness
involves recognizing the
disorder of society itself and
the accompanying
recognition that people are
having it done to them by
their social roles which are
expected, nay, coerced to fill.
-Dick Betts.
a knot
After R. D. Laing.
Jack and Jill went up the hill
to fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his
crown
and Jill fell down
and   the   meaning   came
stumbling after.
-George Stanley
DO SOMETHING
FOR SOMEONE
UBC BLOOD DRIVE - BROCK HALL
TODAY - to FRI., FEB. 4
9:30 - 4:30 p.m. Continuous
Page Friday, 6
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972 "Anti-psychiatry"
This interview of Joe Berke was conducted by Andrew Rossabi. JoeBerke is
an American expatriate who has worked with R. D. Laing and David Cooper
in London on developing anti-psychiatry. He has worked at Kingsley Hall and
lis hoping to establish new places like it in London and elsewhere. His book
Counter Culture was published in London by Peter Owen.
Could you tell us a little about yourself?
I'm an American physician. I've been working in London more than
five years as a research fellow in psychiatry and the social sciences with the
Philadelphia Association. This is a mental health charity. Ronald Laing is the
director. The work of the Philadelphia Association has included setting up
several communities here where people who had previously been diagnosed as
schizophrenic, can live without being treated in the formal medical sense — or
in any medical sense, come to that.
You're specifically interested in schizophrenia?
Well, in the whole range of psychological experience of which
schizophrenia itself is a very important part. The term itself is important. I
emphasize it's a term rather than a condition; and this is an important part of
our work, showing how, in fact, people are invalidated in their own life-styles,
their life experience, by having this term applied to them. It could be another
term, like "depressive," but to take this particular instance of schizophrenic
— it doesn't describe their life experience, it's really a label applied to them
by certain other people for usually social reasons.
How do you define insanity then?
That would take several months, and the eventual answer would be
inadequate. Insanity is really a social rather than personal fact. It's a social
and cultural phenomenon. Experiences which are considered "normal" in a
particular culture or subculture may be defined as "mad" in another cultural
setting. Insanity is synonymous with behavior or experience that is
"unacceptable" within a given cultural framework.
Could you say something about your association with Dr. Laing?
I've known him personally for over seven years now. He's a brilliant
thinker as well as a "good bloke." The particular reason why I came over here
was that many of his ideas overlapped with the conclusions I was beginning to
draw about the way psychiatry operates. I wanted the opportunity to work
with him. We both saw that the way people are treated, in the usual
medical/psychiatric sense, doesn't alleviate their suffering, but usually
perpetuates it; that doctors act as societal trustees in order to maintain a
particular form of conventional behavior and experience; that the kind of
treatment that is given is a form of emotional straitjacket, drugs included.
Psychiatrists usually try to get people to forget what's bothering them rather
than come to terms with it.
Surely this is basically a question of time, money, staffing. The establishment
psychiatrist has become a kind of bogeyman for the underground, like the
policeman — I find this rather a paranoid idea.
I don't think you can be paranoid enough about how psychiatrists
function, and how mental hospitals function in their way of dealing with
people. One of the most important books in this regard is a study by a
sociologist named Erving Goffman, entitled Asylums. The book is a study of
how a mental hospital functions. Goffman spent several months as a nurse's
aide in hospital, which is the proper level for finding out what goes on. The
people who run hospitals essentially are nurses and nurse's aides, and only by
working on that level can you really find out what goes on in a social and
personal sense. Goffman found that instead of helping the person who was
admitted as patient, the hospital tended to perpetuate the same kind of
"crazy" family situations and relationships which drove the patient "mad" in
the first place. In other words he showed how and why a mental hospital is a
"maddening" environment.
The important thing is to realize why people, especially teenagers, feel
that they are going mad, feel that they can't cope, things like that. Usually,
it's because of "crazy" patterns of relationships in their families. We do a lot
of work with families, it's an important part of our researches. Often, we find
that a person who is labeled insane is often the sanest member of his or her
family.
A kind of scapegoat in other words?
Yes, that's right. The reason why the person will be labeled insane is
because he will be trying to escape from the "crazy" or disturbing
relationships - the shared behavior patterns within the family. Take a
teenager, for instance, who is trying to assert his own autonomy, rather than
going along with the mores, the rituals of the family. When such a person is
taken to a mental hospital, more often than not he is probably very
frightened, does not understand what is happening. He is taken to a very
strange place with the idea that people are going to help him. But
sociologically speaking the same kind of patterns which have invalidated him
in the family are then repeated in the hospital. So the hospital environment
often helps to drive people mad - especially if they feel they are going there
to get out of the binds imposed by the family.
You're switching then from one mad environment to another. But what's the
alternative? The notion of cure always seems to get lost in all this. How do
you actually treat someone who is suffering?
Usually, two factors are associated with the type of suffering you're
talking about - social and/or personal invalidation. The first thing to find out
is, what is this person feeling, what is this insanity that the person is worried
about. Involved in this is the question of semantics. A great deal of
invalidation comes about because people are semantically invalidating
themselves - having to do with the emotionally loaded word "schizophrenic"
or "insane" or things like that. Because insanity is a social and cultural
definition, a textbook definition; it doesn't explain or even express whatever
the person is feeling. It's quite possible to read a textbookof psychiatry and
feel one is really crazy, becuase practically everything that is expressed in a
textbook of psychiatry is felt by "normal" people. We're talking abou a cross
section of people so the thing to find out is what the insanity is all about,
what the experience is all about and to distinguish semantic invalidation from
these other forms. Really it's a matter of creating an ambience whereby
people can look at what their suffering is all about, and make it intelligible to
themselves. Suffering is intolerable when it's unintelligible. It doesn't
disappear when it becomes intelligibel but it usually becomes tolerable. It allows
one to try to get at the root of what it's all about. _The Radica, Therapist
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SUNDAY
January 30th
10:30 a.m.
Lutheran Campus
Centre
8:00 p.m.
Vancouver School
of Theology
Brother Thomas
Taize, France.
Sponsored by U.R.C.
Friday, January 28, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7  Friday, January 28,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
i to the toilet'
(I suspect anything would be
vay is a possibility. But the
things in mind: the immediate
ng) and the future.
aid agree that something must
sxpensive would be to augment
it is a poor word, restructure is
icouver Regional District when
; Hydro transit facilities could
bus runs are needed to, from,
rple, a route from the North
sive lanes for busses, all busses,
mass rapid transit I draw from the Scientific Pollution and
Environmental Control Society excellent report on Air Pollution and
Transportation ($2.00). We have at our finger tips "Line-Haul systems,
Duorails, Varo Monocab systems or the Alden capsule transit system"
to name only a few.
klong the lines of a replacement for the proposed crossing the
suggestion of combinations of park and ride, express busses, ferries and
trains is most appealing.
Commuter trains from the North Shore could use existing rails on
both sides of the inlet and the present third crossing beside the second
narrows bridge. As well, a peak hour ferry system could be reinstituted.
To explode one final myth about this crossing, the expected eight
>.8!tiKARD5-
«»-    to^-
30M WRgR
r^xicmrtmtx
how vo w KWIU
VOJR5 Alflflf?
MAlU
i on Georgia St.) transit times.
c-and-ride schemes are needed,
ommuters. People will drive to
special express busses into the
ight direction, and should be
ihove could operate while final
riore permanent transit system,
tt, among others has suggested
able, the interest from that, at
>n, a good shot in the arm for
million man-hours of work to be provided has been hailed as a blessing
to our unemployment situation.
It seems like a lot, but amounts to only 4,000 men employed for
one year, or, more likely, 1300 men for three years, about 1/7 of one
per cent of B.C.'s labour force. When there are 65,000 unemployed
here that figure hardly merits such significance.
It is clear that another Burrard Inlet crossing is an ominous sign
for the future. But, if alternatives are not put forward in whatever way
possible, I fear, we shall be saddled with a new crossing immediately,
and untold horrors will follow.
Indeed, alderman Adams, you may be running to the toilet with
this project. I only hope the flush doesn't carry us all down the drain.
Glen Ewan, a second year economics student is concerned about the
proposed third crossing over Burrard Inlet.
AMS the only way to fly
By SANDY KASS
If you want to get to England this year with enough money
left over to see the sights, taking an Alma Mater Society charter
flight is probably the best way to go.
The flights, sponsored by Western Student Services at 2021
West Fourth Avenue, are available to all registered AMS members.
There are five return flights to London, scheduled for May 2
to June 26 (55 days), May 1 to Aug. 25 (117 days), May 10 to Sept.
3(16 weeks), May 15 to Aug. 25 (14 weeks) and May 28 to July 14
(47 days) and all cost $250.
Ten comparable return flights with Charter Flights Unlimited
range in cost from $259 to $315 for 20 to 30 days, May throughout
August, with a $5 per person registration fee on top of flight costs.
If your politics can bear it, for a $ 10 membership fee you can
join the Conservative International Club and become eligible for one
of eight, three to four week flights, April through August, ranging in
cost from $255 to $310.
Membership in the club is required at least six months before
the flight departure date and British officials may request proof of
membership upon arrival in Jolly Olde.
Peggy Smith at 682-4151 has all the details.
The Flight Co-ordinators Date Centre at 1105 - 736 Granville
Street, probably has the best selection of flights to London, with
over 60 return flights scheduled for April through August.
Most allow a stay of about a month, and are scheduled with
Wardair and Dan Air charter air lines.
The Wardair flights range in cost from $260 in April and May
to $310 during July and early August.
The best deal, however, is with Dan Air, which has costs
ranging from $235 in April and May to $279 during July and early
August.
Dan Air flights, however, require membership in the British
Commonwealth Club, which costs $10, at least six months before
departure.
One-way flights from Vancouver to London are also available
through the centre, costing $185 on Wardair and $175 on Dan Air,
with BCC membership required on the Dan Air flights.
Chartair Consultants, at 850 West Hastings Street also offer
one-way flights to London.
Flights leave Vancouver April 19 for $155, June 20 and July
24 for $175 and Sept. 5 for $160.
But even on the one-way flights, those scheduled by the AMS
are still the cheapest.
One-way AMS flights leave Vancouver for London May 15 and
Sept. 11, both costing $145.
One-way flights are not generally available through regular air
lines, unless a British working visa can be presented when buying the
ticket.
Air Canada and the British Overseas Airways Corporation offer
a 22 to 45 day return flight costing $323 in April and May and $394
during July and August.
CP Air offers a similar deal, with flights costing $3 less than on
Air Canada and B.O.A.C.
On charter flights, baggage is generally limited to 44 pounds
per person, but what you carry with you is not weighed.
Children under two years of age are normally allowed free
passage on both charter and regular air lines.
Most charter companies request a $100 deposit, which is
normally refundable up to eight to 10 weeks before departure.
Some companies, however, including the AMS, keep $25 as a
service charge even if the reservation is cancelled before the
scheduled deadline.
Considering the safety factor, the Vancouver Better Business
Bureau executive vice president said British air lines like Dan Air and
Lloyd Air are more troublesome to passengers than Canadian lines
like Wardair.
Vincent Forbes told The Ubyssey Thursday that British
flights, which are licenced individually by the federal and British
governments often have their licences revoked at the last minute
"because officials feel it is time to start enforcing the rules."
He advised students to book flights with Canadian companies,
and not to be discouraged by "the odd one per cent of people who
get stuck somewhere."
ve.r Regional District have done
nothing has come of them as
mple take-a-bus system, or any
to   succeed   there   must   be
bile use. I cite Rome's recent
ad little appreciable effect on
ikely long-run, candidates for Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January 28,   1972
Hot flashes
Canada:
firsi or 51st
The Centre for Continuing
Education is offering a series of
lectures on the relationship
between Canada and the U.S.,
scheduled to begin next week.
The program entitled Canada:
First or Fifty-first will begin
Thursday noon at the Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse with a lecture
on Canada's relationship with the
U.S. and USSR by University of
Toronto political science
professor James Eayrs.
Subsequent sessions in the
series will be held Tuesday noon
at the Vancouver Public Library
auditorium, beginning Feb. 8, and
Wednesdays at 8 p.m. in
Buchanan  216 beginning Feb. 9.
Phoenix
Phoenix '72, organized by UBC
fraternities and sororities will
present four noon-hour speakers
next week.
On Tuesday, Vancouver
alderman Art Phillips will speak in
the SUB art gallery on where the
city is going.
Vancouver poet Bill Bisset will
read his own works Wednesday in
the SUB art gallery, in
co-operation with the Alma Mater
Society special events committee.
Psychiatrist Bennett Wong will
speak Thursday in the SUB
auditorium on the dehumanizing
effects of our society.
On Friday, Georgia Straight'
owner Dan McLeod will talk
about his paper in the SUB art
gallery.
Abortion action
The UBC abortion action
committee is meeting today at
noon in SUB 210 with all women
who wish to protest the Canadian
abortion laws.
The meeting is sparked by the
Jan. 5 repeal of a New York state
law allowing abortions to be
performed.
The B.C. Women's Abortion
Law Repeal Coalition, along with
other coalitions across Canada, is
canvassing for signatures on a
cross country petition campaign
for repeal of the laws.
Transit fist
The citizens co-ordinating
committee for public transit will
be collecting signatures on a
petition calling for a Greater
Vancouver Regional District
plebiscite on the proposed third
crossing of Burrard Inlet.
People who want to add their
names to the list should do so
Saturday from 11 a.m. on at the
Steelworkers Hall, 33 East
Broadway.
Tween classes
TODAY
COFFEE   HOUSE
Chaplin   film   and   folk-singer,   Lutheran Campus Center, 9 p.m.
«"?E-SOCtAL   WORK   CLUB
Speaker from Division of Community
Development,   Neighborhood   Services
discussing   Community   Social   Work.
Al) welcome. SUB 115 at noon.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Discussion   on   constitutional   reform
in Canada in SUB 111, noon.
ANSOC   UNDERGRAD  UNION
Very important  meeting.   All  anthrosoc  majors  and  honors must  attend.
Bu.  107, noon.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
General meeting. New members welcome in SUB 210, noon.
MONARCHIST  LEAGUE
Organizational    meeting,     SUB     119,
noon.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting with speaker Gordon
Gibson.   Election   for   delegate.  Clubs
Lounge, noon.
SATURDAY
CUC-NVC
Basketball—CUC   vs.   NVP,   PE   complex,  Gym B, 9-11 p.m.
SUNDAY
UNIVERSITY  RELIGIOUS  COUNCIL
Brother  Thomas   of   Taile,  Lutheran
Campus Center, at 10:30 a.m.
LUTHERAN  STUDENT MOVEMENT
Pot Luck supper at 6 p.m.  and discussion    with    Brother    Thomas    of
Taile at 8 p.m. at Lutheran Campus
Center.
L'ESCRIME   UBC
Regular practice cancelled due to B.C.
novice tournament in Chilliwack.
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk Mass at  St.  Marks  Chapel,  11
a.m.
MONDAY
UBC  CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
General meeting, SUB 211, noon.
TUESDAY
CIC
Meeting every Tuesday, SUB 10SB at
noon.
WAFFLE-NDP
Meeting in SUB 213, noon.
WEDNESDAY
PRE-OENTAL  SOCIETY
Dr.   Jinks  speaks  on  periodontics  in
SUB 211, noon.
tf your beetle needs debugging
JOHN'
PAIRS
^465 W. 41 st Ave.^ 266-9410
10% Discount for UBC Students
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
Grape siomp
Vancouver's community
newspaper, the Georgia Grape, is
holding a benefit dance Saturday
at the Fisherman's Hall, 138 East
Cordova St.
Two bands, Headstrong and a
surprise band, will be playing at
the dance, scheduled to begin at 9
p.m.
Admission will be by donation.
Films, coffee
The Lutheran Campus Centre
has planned two events for this
weekend.
On Friday, starting at 9 p.m.,
the centre will hold a coffee house
featuring four films, including one
with Charlie Chaplin and
folksinger Celine Childs.
Admission is 25 cents.
At 10:30 a.m. Sunday the
centre will present Brother
Thomas who will speak on
meditation and social action.
Benefit
Inner-City is holding a benefit
dance tonight for the Vancouver
Welfare Rights Association with
bands Mild and Bitter and Access
Junction.
It's happening at 1895
Venables St. from 8:30 p.m. to 1
a.m. for 50 cents per person.
Refreshments will be available.
THURSDAY
CCF
"Meaning   of  Life   in   University"  in
the SUB Ballroom, noon.
FRIDAY
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting in the Kingston Hotel at 8
P.m.
FLY to RENO
3 DAY All-inclusive
WEEK-END For
99.00
DEPARTURES:
Feb. 18-Feb. 25 - Mar. 24-Mar. 31
For Information
With No Obligation
688-0266
CANADIAN TOUR PAK
WANT TO
START
SOMETHING ?
SEND   A   VALENTINE
AT THE BOOKSTORE
BEAUTIFUL VALENTINES by
Coutts-Hallmark and Carlton Cards to
convey your greetings to that special
someone.
SPECIAL
X PRICE CLEARANCE on
Christmas Cards and Gift Wrao
Claantiad ads are not accepted by telephone mnd an payable
in advance. Deadline i.111:30 a.au, the day baton pobScatkxn.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiliii^^
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO CARIB 71, SAT., FEB.
5, 9-1, Grad Student Centre.
Tickets $1.00 each at the centre
office, everyone welcome!
Greetings
12
SUSAN   LOVE     —    —    —    —
i miss you when we are apart
Toma    —    —    —   —   —    —    ■
Lost & Found
13
LOST: LAST     FRI.,     GLASSES,
light square   frames   in   flowered
case. Either   UBC    or    hitching,
from 10th & Alma. 228-8334.
Rides & Cai Pools
14
Special Notices
15
BIG BLOCK SUDS NITE MON.
Jan. 31st 8 p.m., in SUB. Varsity
&  Big  Block.   Members welcome.
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics ?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver,  B.C.
DISCOUNT — STEREO AM-FM
FM - Stereo Tuner - Amplifier,
Turntable, base, cartridge, plexi-
glas cover, two speakers, 2-year
guarantee. List $200.00, your cost
$125.00 Call 732-6769 for savings.
Also carry Sony, Dual. Akai and
Sansui.
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent furnished condominium op-
posite   Gondola,   224-0657   eves.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE SKI
trip, Feb. 12-15. $30 includes ac-
comm., food & tows. Sign up at
I.H.	
THIS WEEK-END AT THE CAM-
pus Churches on University Boulevard: University iHill United,
Morning Worship at 11 a.m., Annual meeting with Rev. Colin
Johnstone from Brazil at 7:30 p.m.
(dessert and coffee, too!). St. Anselm's Anglican, Holy Communion
at 8 and Morning Prayer at 11
a.m., Annual Meeting Monday
evening, January 31st, 7:45 p.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
SPRING QUARTER, SUMMER
Session, or Junior Tear in Mexico?
Write Dr. H. B. Benedict PNW
Rep University of the Americas
3253 Robertson, Bellingham, Wash.
Get your
EURAILPASS   &
BRITRAILPASS
at
Gateway   Travel   Service
2627   Granville   St.   at   10th
Phone:   732-3788
No  service  charge
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sal*
21
'62 FORD ECONOLINE WINDOW
van. Has rebuilt motor, new
brakes, good rubber. Phone Ron,
522-5527.	
'60 RAMBLER AMER. STAND. 6,
4 dr. Good cond. 1 owner, reg.
gas gives good mil. Good rubber,
snows, city tested. '73. Conv. to
bed, extras $400. 266-2446.	
1962 RILEY 1.5 4-DR. SEDAN. EX.
cond. $275, 736-0652.
Auto Repairs
24
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting 8c Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
33
35
Photography
the £en* anrj Abutter
AiJ       Cameras!
afie 3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alio at Denman  Plaat
15
"At last we are able
to recommend a moderately priced zoom lens
in this range which has passed
our optical test with flying corrected colors . . . Certainly
among the medium priced zoom
lenses the LENTAR must be
classed as a best, buy."
—February Modern Photography
LENTAR    ZOOM     LENS t$1cfl.95
80-200 mm  T3.5 103
Scandals
37
RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
latest releases in rock, folk &
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctum 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
LOIS MALYSH EDUC.3 WHY DO
you have to go when I love you.
Life  is cold  without  you.	
GARY MOORE — COMM 2. I LOVE
you and I want your body.	
40
Typing
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My Home. Essays, Theses, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates.  Phone 263-5317.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick service   on   short essays.	
EXP'D TYPIST — THESES, ES-
says, etc. Phone Mrs. Brown, 732-
0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — —
Agricultural Field — Niagara
Chemicals — For interviews call
Peter Waterman collect 763-2904
before Feb. 14.
WANTED: DRUMMER, PREFER-
ably female, must sing. Out of
town,  steady work.  594-4078.
PART TIME TYPIST FOR W.
Bdwy. Law Office. Must be accurate. Evenings & weekends,
Call Kathy 9-10 a.m. at 736-6345.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT A COURSE?
The U.B.C. Tutoring Centre reopens Monday, Jan. 31, SUB 228,
12:30-2:30 Tutoring available in
almost every subject.
THESES, ESSAYS CORRECTED
by retired publisher for grammar,
syntax, spelling, punctuation, redundancy, etc. 263-6565.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MUST SELL — 190 CM OLYMPIC
skiis — brand new, $30. Call 596-
0680. ' 	
ROSIGNOL STRATO 190 CM MAR-
ker rotomat bindings $75. Hes-
chung boots ($185 new, used twice)
size 6 narrow $145. Joan 926-4789.
TRACK TAPE DECK. *CALL
John at 224-7937 any week night
after 6 p.m.	
PUREBRED PEK PUPS 7 WK.
male, beautiful black sable. Phone
872-1747.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE DKE
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.,
224-9691.
PRrVATE     BED-SITTING     ROOM
BATHROOM, TV-
bathroom,  TV  plus  board  in   exchange  for   evening  housekeeping
duties on campus,  224-6296.   .
Furnished Apts.
83
COMFORTABLE BASEMENT
suite, 2 bedrooms, newly constructed. Near university. Very reasonable.  263-8441	
AT BEACH. POINT GREY RD.
Attractively furnished accomm.
Quiet, non-smoking girl. $75.00
month Includes utilities. Mrs.
Clarke, 228-9616 or 731-3360.   	
Unfurnished Apts.
84
DUPLEX FURNISHED 10th &
Alma. 2 bedrooms, living room,
kitchen. Fridge, stove, heat included. 2-3 students or couple. Tel.
732-6449  evenings.   $170/month.
Halls For Rent
85
FOR    YOUR    CATERING    NEEDS
phone THE NORMANDY
738-7231 or 738-1110
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Friday, January 28,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Other My Lais ignored
NEW YORK (CUPI) - American army
investigators concluded 347 civilians had been slain
at My Lai, "a total twice as large as has been
publically acknowledged," claims Seymour Hersh,
the reporter who broke the massacre story.
In a story in the current issue of 'The New
Yorker" magazine, Hersh charges army authorities
are ignoring the testimony of a second massacre
which occurred the same day at the nearby My Khe
hamlet.
Quoting from what he calls the complete
testimony of lieutenant general William Peers'
commission investigating the My Lai incident, Hersh
claims lieutenant William Calley Jr.'s platoon was
responsible for 90 to 130 My Lai murders.
He said the second platoon murdered as many
as 100 civilians and attributed the other deaths to a
third platoon and helicopter gun ships.
According to the secret Peers commission
transcript, he said, lieutenant Thomas Willingham's
infantry platoon shot into the hamlet and killed 90
to 100 women, children and old men.
Hersh said evidence about the 1968 massacre
was destroyed by American division officers who
had no connection with the incident, to "protect
the officers who preceeded them."
He said the army had evidence that reports on
the massacre "were on file at the American Division
Headquarters as late as May, 1969 — 14 months
after the massacre.
Hersh said Kenneth Camell, eleventh brigade
intelligence sergeant, told the Peers commission he
recalled seeing a number of reports on investigations
specifically dealing with My Lai in his predecessors'
file but when the file was returned by a senior
officer, some of the reports were missing.
The sergeant said another senior officer later
asked for the file. He said he never saw the folder
again and reports were never found by Peers'
commission.
Of the 12 men charged with crimes connected
with the My Lai massacre, only Calley was
convicted of any crime.
Seven cases were dropped and four resulted in
aquittal after military courtmartial.
Calley is appealing his 20 year prison sentence
for the murder of 22 Vietnamese civilians.
mm
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SEAN CONNERY
as JAMES BOND 007
"Diamonds Are Forever"
TECHNICOLOR
Vogue
VIS SWWVILil
• SS-S434
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The fabric of American destiny is threatened by a violence that
tears at the seams of our culture. .. _., „_ . ... ,_
STANLEY KRAMER'S
Odeon
•(I GIANVIUE
6«2-746f
"BLESS THE BEASTS &
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7:05, 9:20
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A   fast-moving,   modern   adventure
lumberjack In Oregon's timber lands.
drama   dealing   with   the
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PAUL NEWMAN - HENRY FONDA
'SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION'
Adult Ent.
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COLOR
Commerce gets organized
By PAT FITZGERALD
An organization is being
formed for commerce educators
and administrators to keep its
members updated on new
methods and techniques.
'The purpose of such an
organization would be to
introduce new methods and
techniques and to help members
increase their skills," said group
spokesman Paul Talbot.
The association will consist of
commerce educators as well as
business education students.
"It's planned to include
personnel from offices connected,
no matter how remotely, with
education," said Talbot.
"It will include those who do
on-the-spot training in industry,
people involved in the publication
of educational books and even
those working for foundations
giving grants for educational
projects," he said.
When contacted by The
Ubyssey, a UBC commerce
education spokesman said he was
not familiar with the organization
but that his department is
planning a conference this spring
to consider the formation of a
similar program.
People interested in the
organization    can    contact   Paul
Spring Rush
at
PHI KAPPA SIGMA
FRATERNITY
Get Acquainted Party
Beginning of Feb.
For Information
GIVE US A CALL
AT 224-9684
Ask For A Member
OBITUARY
OMAR — On January 24, 1972,
of Forestry, passed away, after a
long history of ailments and
amputations, at tne age of 16.
Though Omar never achieved
real fame (nickname: slug), he
managed to remain fairly active
throughout the rather dull
history of F.U.S. The beginning
of the end came while he
valiantly tried to stop the
unstoppable E.U.S. Chariot,
sustaining severe internal
injuries. Survived by 200
rootless trees. Rev. R. H. Lloyd
will conduct the funeral services
on Mon., Jan. 31 with interment
following immediately at theH.
R. MacMillan Cemetery.
Talbot,    secretarial   department,    institute,   250
care   of   Vancouver   Vocational    Vancouver 3.
W.   Pender   St.,
*»
"Fiddler on the Roof"
TICKETS ON SALE AT BOX OFFICE OR BY MAIL
AT ODEON THEATRE, 881 GRANVILLE
FOR PHONE RESERVATIONS CALL
688-2308 DAILY 11:30-7:30
Tickets for Tonight's Performance
Available at Park Theatre From 7 P.M.
tmmmmmmmmmm
w@GQ(i
Breakthrough Medicines
Canada is an important link in the
worldwide Hoechst network in
1 I 4 countries. Hoechst has over
a century of research and experience in developing breakthrough
medicines throughout this geographical spectrum, with its
vastly differing living conditions
and its diverse medical problems.
Breakthrough medicines that are
not only effective, but reliable.
Hoechst in Canada has a modern
pharmaceutical manufacturing
plant at Varennes, near Montreal. Hoechst products include
oral antidiabetics, diuretics, antibiotics and anaesthetics, as well
as veterinary pharmaceuticals
and vaccines, and diagnostics
reagents.
Pioneering Diabetes
Research
Hoechst is proud of its pioneering
contributions in the field of diabetes. The company's work in
this area reaches back to the
early years of the century before
the discovery of insulin by Drs.
Banting and Best in 1921. After
the discovery, Hoechst was the
first company to be granted a
license to manufacture insulin in
Europe. In 1955, Hoechst discovered tolbutamide (Orinase*),
the first oral antidiabetic,
changing the life style of millions
of adult diabetics.
Helping Build Canada
Products and ideas from Hoechst
have touched and improved the
quality of people's lives in every
area around the world, in a
hundred countries on six continents. As an affiliate, of the
worldwide Hoechst organization,
Canadian Hoechst Ltd. has a full
century of research and
achievement to draw upon. In
Canada, Hoechst is an autonomous company employing Canadians to serve Canadian
needs.
Hoechst in Canada concerns itself with supplying both the
present and future needs of Canadians. The range of products
and services covers the spectrum
through industrial chemicals,
dyestuffs, plastics, printing
plates, human and veterinary
medicines, pharmaceuticals, and
textile fibres. Hoechst products
andservices, Hoechsttechniques
and know-how in these fields,
combined with a large international fund of experience, have
given the company a reputation
for expertise which takes constant striving to live up to.
Hoechst thinks ahead.
REG T M  HOECHST
HOECHST
Canadian Hoechst Limited
4045 Cote Vertu
Montreal 383, Quebec
40 Lesmill Road
Don Mills, Ontario Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 28,  1972
V*   10th & ALMA     vf
SALE   SALE   SALE
LEATHER GOODS   •   PIPES   •   JEWELLERY
COLLAGE TABLES   •   PATCHWORK PILLOWS
2619 ALMA
Mon.-Sat. 10:30-6 P.M. - 224-1921
EVERYBODY WELCOME!
. . . political activists, political atheists, political agnostics and
even the totally a-political ... the idly curious and the curiously
idle. . .
ALL ARE INVITED:
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
Monday, January 31st
12:30 p.m.
S.U.B. BALLROOM
This is for you!
This  is  your  chance to  hear the candidates for the
upcoming AMS elections.
Dammit, don't just read this . . . make a POINT of
coming — or give yourself one good honest reason why
not.
SPOB TS
Highlights - past and future
Gymnastics
The biggest gymnastics dual
meet of the season takes place at
the War Memorial Gym Friday
night starting at 7:30 p.m.
The University of Oregon
gymnastics team, one of the top
in the U.S., will be in town to
battle the Thunderbird team.
Events will include floor
exercise, rings, vaulting, parallel
bars, pommel horse, and high bar.
Admission is free with your
AMS card.
Field hockey
The men's field hockey team
continues their winning ways.
Sunday, the 'Birds won the 6th
Annual Thunderbird Indoor
Tournament held in the UBC
Armoury.
The keenly contested
five-a-side tourney culminated in a
playoff victory for the 'Birds 1-0
over the Hawks and 5-0 over the
Jokers. In the Joker game, the
'Birds led only 1-0 up until the
last few minutes when they came
alive and scored four quick goals.
The UBC Braves had won the
division 2 tournament the
previous week.
At the halfway point of the
outdoor season the 'Birds, led by
coach Eric Broom, are in first
place of the 10 team division 1
league. Not rated as the number
one contender at the start of the
season, the 'Birds are tied in
points for top spot, but a better
goals-for average gives them the
lead.
Volleyball
The UBC men's volleyball team
takes to the nets this Saturday in
the Thunderbird Invitational
Men's Volleyball Tournament.
Teams involved in the tourney
are the UBC Thunderbirds,
Vancouver Volleyball Club,
Spaghetti Factory, Fauntleroy Y
of Seattle, Reubens Five of
Portland, MAC of Portland,
Tungstal Bay of Vancouver, and
Spokane. Four teams are also
expected from the prairies if
transportation difficulties are
solved.
Reubens Five is composed of a
group of "long haired hippies",
and are expected to be one of the
top teams.
Action gets underway at 9 a.m.
Saturday morning with the
semi-finals starting at 5 p.m.
Admission is free with your AMS
card.
Curling
Competing in the Victoria
Racquets Club Annual Tartan
Bonspiel, the women's curling
teams enjoyed their most
successful weekend of the season.
Skip Marion Chamberlain's A
rink of Dawn Knowles, Leslie
Carin and Kerry Querns won five
straight games to take first place
in the A event.
The A rink of skip Robin
Klasen, Linda Watson, Leslie
Clarke and Mary Saunders were
dropped to the D event after they
lost their first game, but then won
seven straight games to take first
place in that event.
Coach Charles Kerr was
understandably happy with the
team's performance and is
optimistic about their chances in
the Collegiate Bonspiel to be held
in Victoria on Feb. 24 to 26.
STEREO RECORD SALE!
KC 30590 — BLOOD. SWEAT      C2 30110 — CHICAGO II
& TEARS B.S. & T;4   e*»   *«     2 Record Set
Sugg, list 6.49
$4.69
Sugg, list 10.49
*5
69
G   30038   —  MILES   DAVIES
At Fillmore. 2 LP's c*»   ,
Sugg, list 6.98 *3
DX5W      7205     —     TOMMY
The Who. 2LP's e
Sugg, list 12.58 »£•"
DL     79182     -
WHO'S NEXT
Sugg, list 6.49
THE
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DL 75285 —OSIBISA
Sugg, list 5.98 $J.»»
Columbia
Sugg
3
CS 1058—It's A Beautiful Day
CS 8490—Time Further Out-
Dave Brubeck
CS 8579—Bob Dylan
CS 8905—The Times They Are A
Changin'
CS 8993—Another Side Of
Bob Dylan
CS 9049—Wednesday Morning 3 A.M.—
Simon & Garfunkel
CS 9128—Bringing It All Back Home—Bob Dylan
CS 9189—Highway 61 Revisited—Bob Dylan
CS 9269—Sounds of Silence—Simon & Garfunkel
CS 9516—Byrd's Greatest Hits
CS 9533—Songs of Leonard Cohen
"^* CS 9720—Blood, Sweat & Tears
CS 9604—John Wesley Harding—Bob Dylan
C 30449—For The Good Times—Jim Nabors
C 30475—Live'—Johnny Winter And
Z 12 520022—There Are But Four Small Faces
E 30109—Potlach—Redbone
E 30125—Open Road—Donovan
E 30267—12 Dreams Of Dr. Sardanicus—Spirit
E 30512—White Trash—Edgar Winter
BN 26456—Stand'-Sly & The Family Stone
List 5.49
Ours
.39
Sugg. List 6.49
Ours
3
.69
KCS 9913—Kozmic Blues—
Janis Joplin
KCS 9914—Bridge Over Troubled
Water — Simon &
Garfunkel
KCS 9947—Second Winter—
—Johnny Winter
KC 30130—Abraxas—Santana
KC 30259—Christmas & The Beads
Of Sweat—Laura Nyro
KC 30290—New Morning — Bob Dylan .
KC 30322—Pearl—Janis Joplin
KC 30590—Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
KC 30595—New Santana
KC 30734—It's A Beautiful Day
KC 30797—You've Got A Friend—Andy Williams
KC 30737—1 Think We're All Bozos On
This Bus-Fire Sign Theatre
KC 30987—Gonna Take A Miracle—Laura Nyro
KE 30209—Dellverin' Poco
KE 30986—There's A Riot Goin' On-
Sly & The Family Stone
DL79176—Mae West—Original Voice Tracks
DL79184—Meaty Beaty Big & Bouncy—
The Who
UN 193030—Velvet Gloves & Salt-
Nell Diamond
UN193071—Touching You Touching Me—
Neil Diamond
UN193084—Gold—Neil Diamond
UN193096—Tumbleweed Connection—Elton John
UNI 93120—Madman Across The Water—Elton John
DL7T0175—The Gates of Justice—Dave Brubeck
DL710176—Duke Ellington & Cincinnati Symphony Orch
Sugg. List 5.98
Ours
.39
3
ALI653—Moms & Dads
CRL757279—Buddy Holly Story
CRL757492—Buddy Holly's Greatest Hits'
CRL757511—Pete Fountain's Golden Favourites
CRL757516—Something Misty—Pete Fountain
DL74137—Satchmo's Golden Favourites
DL74227—I Love Jazz—Louis Armstong
DL74165—Ebb Tide—Earl Grant
DL74810—Bert Kaemfert's Greatest Hits
DL74813—Earl Grants Greatest Hits
DL75264—Later That Same Year—Matthews Southern Comfort
DL75235—Osibisca
DL75295—Pilgrimage—Wishbone Ash
DL75302—On The Shores of Americay—Irish Rovers
KS3649—Cher
KS3654—Sonny & Cher Live
MCA707—Blue Canadian Rockies — Moms & Dads
MCA7013—Souvenirs — Moms & Dads
MCA7015—High Grass — Crosstown Bus
Mail Orders Promptly Filled: Just tick off the records you
want; enclose your list with remittance, plus 5% tax and
postage, and we'll get your order away promptly. First
record 35c — each additional record 20c postage and
handling charge.	
• QUANTITIES LIMITED
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M. Friday, January 28, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Brundage#s Law overrules scholarships
By MIKE GIDORA
In international athletics there's this law.
It's the law of "Keep the Money Under the Table"
and it was devised by Avery Brundage.
For the uninitiated, Brundage is the Chairman of the
International Olympic Commission; at least when he's not
in his Chicago mansion counting his Chicago millions.
And these millions are the source of Brundage's Law
which says that no athlete shall receive monetary
compensation for competing in an athletic event, or that
no athlete shall receive monetary compensation for
advertising a commercial product, or that no athlete shall
receive monetary compensation, period.
It's a sound law if you happen to have millions of
Chicago dollars in a Chicago mansion. We know of only
one athlete or ex-athlete who can qualify under that set of
rules.
You guessed it, Avery himself.
You see, Avery was once an athlete. He won a silver
medal in the 400 metre event in the 1912 Olympics in
Stockholm. And Avery didn't receive any monetary
compensation for that. In fact, he probably paid his own
way to Sweden.
But then, he had those Chicago millions sitting in that
Chicago mansion.
Well, as the story goes, Avery grew up and became
instantly senile, and now he's the 86 year old Chairman of
the IOC. But he still thinks in terms of the 1912
Olympics, and Chicago.
But the real crime of Avery Brundage isn't that he
believes in what he terms "sport for sport's sake", it's the
influence he wields.
In Canada that influence is felt the most at the level
of university athletics.
The Grand Poohbahs of the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union surveyed the work of Avery, decided that
it was 'A Good Thing' and then decreed, "Let there be
no athletic scholarships".
And there were no athletic scholarships.
Women's basketball
The high flying UBC women's basketball team
completely outclassed the Washington Sandpipers from
Seattle last weekend.
The Thunderettes, led by Bev Bland who scored 14
points with the rest of the team each getting their share,
thumped the 'Pipers 72-42.
Next action for the women is this weekend when
they journey to Victoria to take on the University of
Victoria Vikettes in the Canada West collegiate league.
Now this wasn't 'A Good Thing'. In fact, your writer
would call it 'A Bad Thing'.
Because what it does, you see, is to limit, very
effectively, all sorts of things. It limits the number of top
flight athletes who will stay in Canada for their University
careers, thereby lowering the overall standard of sport in
Canadian universities. It limits athletic participation to
those who can afford the time and travel involved.
And it denies several people an opportunity to get a
university education, for what that's worth.
It stands to reason that if you're an athlete of high
enough calibre to be offered an athletic scholarship in the
U.S., and you accept it you are going to lower the quality
of Canadian sport by your absence.
It's become a fact of life. That's why Hamilton's
Robbie Croft went to Kentucky State University where he
was rated as one of the top ten players in NCAA
basketball.
It also explains what Vancouver's Rick Ritchie is
doing running for the University of Oregon when the man
who is considered as Canada's finest track coach, Lionel
Pugh, is coaching at UBC.
We haven't room nor inclination to list those who
have left Canada and Canadian sport for the U.S. Besides,
lists are a bore to read.
But, to get back to -Brundage's Law, and the CIAU
position on athletic scholarships.
If it were implemented to its fullest extent, there
would be no athletes at all. Who could afford to devote
the necessary time, usually between four and six hours
daily, to train for international competition?
That would effectively limit any international or
intercollegiate competitors to those who don't need a
summer job to go to school. And there aren't many of
those creatures around.
Take, as an example, the UBC rowing crew. Last
summer they were training for the 1971 Pan-Am games.
They had to be on the water for six hours a day, and hold
a job. Otherwise they just wouldn't be able to return to
UBC.
Or so they believed.
So when it came down to choosing between going to
Cali as Canada's representatives and as UBC's
representatives, or going back to school in September, it
was a hard decision to make.
But they got lucky. An arrangement was worked out
with the endowment lands enabling them to work half a
day only. Problem solved. That's "under the table
money" and satisfies Brundage's Law.
But there are others who aren't as lucky. One of these
is Debbie Brill. Brill found it impossible to find summer
work and still compete in track.
Should she be compelled to go into debt if she wants
to go to school and still represent her country?
Apparently some would say "Yes".
Among those is the CIAU. How else could you
explain their insistence that Canadian universities remain
free from 'degenerate' athletic scholarships?
Some would say that it's an attempt to prevent
further Americanization of our universities.
Bullshit.
Athletic scholarships are not a particularly American
notion. Rather, lack of athletic scholarships is a
particularly British and Canadian notion.
Most countries in the world provide special
considerations for those who are exceptional in athletics
just like they provide special considerations for those who
are exceptional in a cultural or academic field.
Canada does neither, and it shows in our athletic
performances and our cultural development.
Instead of being an anti-American influence, the
CIAU's position has encouraged Americanization.
With all of Canada's best athletes competing south of
the border, Canadians are more likely to follow American
College action rather than supporting athletics within
Canada.
This neglect, partially a result of the CIAU position,
has greatly strengthened the view of Canadian sport as
second rate and of American sport as the best.
That is 'A Bad Thing'.
Some would say that the granting of athletic
scholarships would turn Canadian universities into degree
factories, where most of the graduates would find
employment in the ranks of professional sport.
Again, bullshit.
Canadian educators, if they are at all capable of
learning, should have learned from the American example,
and should be able to minimize this effect of athletic
scholarships.
But then we wonder if Canadian educators are
capable of learning.
We're being unfair. The government of Canada does
give grants-in-aid to some athletes.
To a maximum of $2,000 a year. And then only if
you earn less than $500 a year. And then only if you're an
international competitor. And then only if you're to go to
school in Canada.
That's what you call "under the table money".
We would like to suggest that maybe the CIAU might
be able to reconsider their position. Maybe they might be
able to find a moral basis to allow them to approve
athletic scholarships. Maybe it could be 'A Good Thing'.
Where would the money come from?
Well, we see that the former president of the
University of Victoria has been awarded $73,000
severance pay, and that the going wage for a university
president is $42,000 a year.
Maybe ...
Sports program offered
Why do people become
involved in sports? What drives
the successful athlete?
These and questions like thern
will be explored in a six session
evening program, The Pyschology
Women's
Intramurals
IMPORTANT MANAGERS meeting today at
noon, room 211 War Memorial Gym.
of Sport, being offered by the
UBC Centre for Continuing
Education beginning Tuesday, 8
p.m. at the Lutheran Campus
Centre.
Dr. Susan Butt, a former
member of the Canadian Olympic
tennis team and now with the
UBC psychology department will
head the program, bringing an
unique combination of theory and
practice to the subject.
Registration may be made by
contacting the UBC Centre for
Continuing Education, 228-2181,
or at the opening session.
Weekend Action Box
Due to the continuing Air Traffic Controllers strike many sports events
scheduled for this weekend have been cancelled and rescheduled for later
Only those events listed below are tentatively scheduled for this weekend, but even these  may be changed if present weather in B.C.  and the
Northern States continues to hamper travel.
DATE SPORT OPPONENTS PLACE TIME
MEN
Jan. 28-29
Hockey JV
Alaska Meth. Un.
Anchorage
TBA
Jan. 28-29
Basketball
U. of Victoria
Victoria
8:00 p.m.
Jan. 28-29
BasketblJV
U. of Victoria
Victoria   •
5:0O p.m.
Jan. 29
Volleyball
Men's Tourn.
Mem. Gym
8 a.m.-11 p.m.
Jan. 28
Gymnastics
U. of Oregon
UBC
7:30 p.m.
Jan. 29
Swimming
Portland! State
Percy Norman
4:00 p.m.
Jan. 28-29
Skiing
WCIAA
Banff
TBA
Jan. 28-30
Tennis
Snohomish Indoor
Everett
TBA
Jan. 28-29
Rowing
U. of Washington
Seattle
TBA
WOMEN
Jan. 29
Fid Hockey
Vane. league
Trafalgar Pk.
11:30 a.m.
Jan. 29
Swimming
Portland State
Percy Norman
4:00 p.m.
Jan. 30
Basketball
Seattle
Mem. Gym
7:00 p.m.
SUGARCANE HARRIS
IN PERSON
SUNDAY, JAN. 30th - 8:30 p.m.
AT THE GARDENS
COLUMBIA    RECORDS Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1972
STUDIOUS VALOUR above and far beyond the call of duty was discovered late Wednesday afternoon by
Ubyssey photog Kineret Annina McDonald. Matching wits with the library's hydro-shortage strategy of
dousing every second light, Ken Cole, ed 5, simply and modestly pulled out a match.
Unsightly grime confronts
Montreal's clean sweeper
Tars and taints will not resist Jean Drapeau,
Montreal's answer to Mr. Clean.
After he had wiped his own Civic Party and
City Hall clean of all opposition and scared the
Cinema Supervisory Board into removing Henry
Miller's pornography from the screens, the mayor
might have been expected to lay down his mop and
take a well-deserved rest abroad, perhaps launch
another quest for fun (there seems to be nothing on
the program following the 1976 Olympics). But no.
He proceeded to tackle still bigger fish -
newspaper moguls, Bell Canada and the Post Office
Dept.  —  and  rid city  streets,  in swift order, of
From LAST POST MAGAZINE
newspaper and mail boxes and antique telephone
booths.
In the meantime, he made the downtown area
safe for Power Corporation by prohibiting public
demonstrations around La Presse and managed to
attend to a bit of personal business, relieving the
Windsor Hotel - his lessor in his short-lived
restaurant venture Le Vaisseau d'Or — of all the
junk they had neglected to remove from his unpaid
premises (according to the hotel, a 70-year-old
painting, cutlery, dishes, tablecloths, etc.)
The days are far gone when publishers like the
late John McConnell, of The Montreal Star, could
pick up the phone and order the Mayor of Montreal
around. Months of negotiations to preserve some
form of newspaper distribution in the areas where
there are no newstands failed to move this one. As a
result, it has become more difficult ro secure the
latest editions of local newspapers and a great many
Montreal  citizens  will be spared the trouble of
reading bad news about City Hall — however little
newspapers dared to print.
If the mayor has his way with Bell Canada and
the Post Office Dept., only modern plastic-phone
booths will be permitted to grace the streets of
Montreal (which means there will be a lot fewer
public phones) and we may have to hop on a
35-cent-a-ride bus to mail a letter.
Since garbage cans, like phone booths, have a
tendency to be used by the FLQ to channel its
communiques through to the public, the mayor
might also have them removed and force tailors,
through by-law, to affix garbage can-size pockets to
all coats and trousers.
Unfortunately, the mayor's campaign may now
be forced to a lull. Snow has begun to fall over the
city and, from here until April, it will be more and
more difficult to move in the streets. In the Spring,
when the Mayor will resume his fight against "dirt
and grime and grease", here are some of the things
he could go after:
1. The Sanguinet garage which, through an
inexplicable oversight (some say it's because the
owner happens to be a friend and supporter of Mr.
Drapeau), was the only commercial building to
escape demolition when the entrance to Jacques
Cartier Bridge was re-designed prior to Expo '67;
2. The line-ups of job seekers and welfare
recipients;
3 The corpse-a-week abandoned in the
streets by Montreal's crime gangs in 1971;
4. The powerful extortion racket which has
so far prevented a major Western Canada steak
house chain from opening a place in Montreal;
5. Club-swinging helmeted cops.
Then, his job well done, Mr. Drapeau might
think of sweeping himself out of the mayor's seat.
REGULAR WEEKLY PROGRAMS AT I.H.
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Resumes at I.H. — every Wed.
8 p.m. in Lower Lounge
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE DANCE
With the Thin Red Line
$2.00 ($1.75 for members of I.H.)
Friday, Feb. 4th - 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
I.S.P.C. MEETING
Every Tuesday at 12:30 - Rm. 400
**•/ .A.
lnternational=Between Nations
REIFEL BIRD SANCTUARY TRIP Jan. 30 - $1.50 - Bring lunch - Sign
up at I.H.
MID-TERM BREAK TRIPS
SKI TRIP TO HOLLYBURN MOUNTAIN
WEEKEND IN VICTORIA
SIGN UP NOW FOR THESE TRIPS!
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
$225.
UP
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
GRADS!
FREE
4X5 Color Portrait
Moke your appointment now
and avoid the big rush
CANDID STUDIOS
3343 West Broadway — 732-7446
wood/tQ<k
with
JOAN BAEZ •    JOE COCKER
• CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
• TEN YEARS AFTER   • SLY & THE
FAMILY STONE • JOHN SEBASTIAN
• COUNTRY JOE AND THE FISH
• SANTANA     • JIMI HENDRIX
• RICHIE HAVENS
a CINEMAWEST presentation
TODAY -
12:30 Noon & 7:30 p.m.
FRI & SAT at 7:30 only
$1.25
OLD
AUDITORIUM

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