UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 15, 1982

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127493.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127493.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127493-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127493-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127493-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127493-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127493-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127493-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127493-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127493.ris

Full Text

Array Graduation
By CHRIS WONG
To some people graduation conveys visions of entering a world of opportunity and success.
But to most, these visions turn into a seemingly endless nightmare of
slammed doors and long line-ups associated with unemployment. Welcome
to the real world.
The latter interpretation is emphasized by
the expressions etched upon faces seen daily
in the UBC Canada Employment centre.
These are expressions of despair and futility.
The bleak sight of the job board indicates
university graduates are definitely feeling the
crunch of the worsening unemployment
crisis. Only 13 positions are listed under the
category of permanent jobs, while the
number of recruiting offers for upcoming
graduates is also low.
ing graduates were not much better off with
only 25 out of 76 graduates in the program
obtaining jobs.
She stresses the figures may be overly optimistic because they do not take into account
the possibility of layoffs.
One B.C. industry which has been experiencing massive layoffs is the forest industry. Of the 59 forestry graduates who
went through the recruitment program, only
26 found jobs.
Acting CEC manager Pat Hagerman says
the current academic year stands out as a
poor year for recruiting activity by companies at UBC.
"Certainly the recruiting activity in this office is down this year. These are economic
hard times and I think the activity of companies is a reflection of those conditions."
She says the few firms still recruiting on
campus are offering less positions and being
more careful in their hiring.
"A large number of firms that might have
booked have waited to the last minute and
opted out. The firms that are coming are being a lot more conservative."
Competition among unemployed
graduates is growing, says Hagerman.
"Some of the students are a year out of their
program and still looking. The longer
you're out there, you end up getting caught
in the group that graduates next year."
Statistics compiled by the CEC on the
1981-82 recruitment program, show the
percentage of graduates finding job
placements is extremely low.
Of the 62 computer science graduates who
sought employment through the recruitment
program, only 15 found jobs. Civil engineer-
—allaon hoons photo
"Certain areas like forestry, I don't know
if we can say that 26 people are still
working," Hagerman says.
Whonnock Industries and Western Forest
Products are two major B.C. forestry firms.
Both sent recruiters to UBC in an effort to
find candidates from last year's graduating
class to fill permanent job openings.
According to Whonnock personnel
manager Susan Davidson, only one graduate
hired through their 1982 recruiting drive at
UBC is still with the company.
Forestry graduates found even less opportunities with Western Forest Products where
no graduates have been hired for the last two
years.
joe /HWMeus? uere seniors,
WKKJWVt ZONK  UHAT
sem*5 up for emeu chocs
JOBMB9HBU/S' DOUEHAVE'.
7"S
T\
BUT IPONT KNOW
THE FIRST 1HIN6
mmxeiHw.-
v/oib! iv be
eaten alive >
ho, you
kMMT,
ZONK..
The road to ruin
or riches?
"We haven't had any need (for forestry
graduates)," John Allanson, Western's
general manager of Industrial Relations says
despite his company's recruiting activity at
UBC.
"The outlook for graduates in the forest
industry at this time is very poor," he adds.
But instead of resigning themselves to the
ranks of the unemployed, many graduates
are creating fresh alternatives.
To refer to Beverley Scott as being well-
qualified in her field of librarianship would
be a major understatement.
Her qualifications include a bachelor of
arts in psychology from UBC, a masters in
social policy from Carleton University, a
masters in librarianship from the University
tually pick up. "I just have to hang in there
and things will come."
Shelley Friessen and Diane Ho (not their
real names), are two other graduates who
have encountered difficulties in the job
market. Friessen's hopes are hanging on an
advertisement she has placed in the Vancouver Sun.
A degree in economics from the University
of Victoria qualifies Friessen to be a research
assistant. But jobs in this capacity are extremely scarce she says.
"There's pretty well nothing right now.
I've been looking for jobs with the provincial
and federal governments and right now they
have a hiring freeze."
She says the outlook for job possibilities at
•rsNoust.
ACCORPINSTD
OUTOFtl/HAT,
MyCALCULATIONS,
20W>
\ were'sjustno
\
•■ im our of it
wis time'
m/y
itm
/mm.
m^y -
-~~^^v
lLjhS=
L_LD
120*^ ' *=SE^
* my>~^
avvumoN.   oooe thenkucan
moHLyiHtm am.'NwrmMe
BEWEENME      WW AHPSI6NUP
msmnEAL msomjo&men
map is one.   views
UNFWHKABLE
aimcs course      .!&•*;■
maibe you
LET Mt CANBREAK
RECHECK THE KILN.
^MY FIGURES
"^
of Western Ontario, and two years as head of
government documents at UWO library.
But despite this impressive background,
Scott was unable to find work as a librarian
in Vancouver.
"I did the conventional thing by contacting the Vancouver Public library and the
UBC library. In both cases they had so many
applicants on file, that I couldn't even get a
general interview
"It certainly gave me the picture right
away that I had to come up with something
else."
What Scott came up with is a scheme she
calls, "Rent a Librarian." Her idea involves
hiring herself out to students in need of
assistance with their research skills. Her fee is
$20 per hour for a private appointment.
She denies that she is attempting to undermine the ability of the library.
"I'm not trying to compete with them, I'm
trying to compliment them. A librarian
points you to one thing but that's it. I follow
through."
Scott says reactions to her newly formed
business have been favorable. "The library
staff (at UBC) as a whole wishes me well."
Although she has had only one client to
date, she is optimistic that business will even-
ITS REALLY NO 816 PEAL
ya,'just talk to ne
RECRUITER UK WENT/
MnmsoR.so.Au.you
HAVE ID PO IS BE yWR-
Bur..BuTum    mu.,iou
IF TietOFFER       AUMYSRUN
UEAJO0T THAT RISK
/7      &0/7m*<
the time she chose her field differs greatly
from the current situation. "When I went in
to get my degree, things were looking very
good."
Because of her reluctance to accept jobs
out of her field, Friessen is counting on the
advertisement to attract employers in need of
her specific qualifications.
"I've got my degree and I would like to use
it."
Her hopes may soon be realized as several
job opportunities have already resulted from
her advertisement.
Ho is back at UBC after graduating
last year with a degree in cell biology. But
rather than returning as a student, she is
presently working part-time as a campus support staff worker.
A lack of employment opportunities in her
field has brought about this situation she
says. "There's just not a demand for
biologists."
She admits she never considered what her
job prospects would be like after graduation.
"I just doddled my way through university.
"But I don't consider my degree useless.
I've done everything expected of me and now
I can do whatever I want."
Ho feels she can benefit from her experience as a member of the unemployed. "I
can't find a job now (in her field), but at least
its taught me what it feels like not to have
one."
If all sources of optimism and creativity
I run dry, she will choose the final alternative
! of returning to university for more years of
study and perhaps a more useful degree.
According to Dina Riera, assistant records
officer at the registrar's office, graduate
studies enrolment currently stands at 3,431,
an increase of 318 from this time last year.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 10
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 15,1982
228-2301 Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
ONLY AT
FELLINI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
• GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
• NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus ,
CHARLIES
GIRL
Innovative Hair
Services for Men
and Women
30% OFF
to all Students
Expires December 1/82
3615 W. 4th Ave.
734-3841
ARTS'20
ARTS '20
ARTS'20
ARTS '20 RELAY
ITS COMING OCT.21st
REGISTER NOW!
WMG - ROOM 203
$16.00 FOR A TEAM
1:00 p.m.
Vancouver General
P.E. WEEK DANCE
FRIDAY, OCT. 15
8:30 ARMORIES
TICKETS $5.00 IN SUB
OR WAR MEM. GYM
OCT. 12-15, 12:30-1:30
FEA TURING MERCEDES
COME AND GET PHYSICAL
Friday, October 15, 1982
For ThMtre Information call
WARNING: Fraquant nudity, aome sex -
B.C. Dlractor
2:30. 4:16. 6:00. 7:46. 9:30
voquE
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
l/*TB^ffl?ff^
WARNING: Fraquant uaa of coaraa and
suggestive languaga. Scanaa of parvartad
■ax   — B.C. Director
2 IS. 4:40, 7:10. 9:40
ocJeon
881   GRANVILLE
68 2-7468
/TJSjwn-^
[ady (Merley's |over
CORONET  I
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
SYLVIA KRISTEL
/"^ESffiffl*^
WARNING: Soma nudity and sex
B.C. Director
2:00. 3:50. 6:40. 7 40. 9:40
TWO BRUCE LEE MOVIES!
FISTS 2-6-10
CONNECTION 44
WARNING: Many scanaa of Violence
— B.C. Director
CORONET 2
fefHft*^   WARNING:   Occaaional   coarae
vSSsSSbS   language.
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
B.C. Director
Evenings 7:16, 9:30
Matinee Sat. & Sun. 2:00
ET
the Extraterrestrial
Eveninga 7:30, 9:20
_THE-
VARSITy
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
JOHN CASSAVETES  •  GENA ROWLANDS
"THE TEMPEST"
DROAdWAV 1
70 7   W. BROADWAY
874-1927
(f"ZE^SJE^
WARNING:    Soma   awearing   and   sug
gestive language. — B.C. Director
DUNBAR 7. 9:30
BROADWAY 7:30. 9:30
HUGO AWARD BEST SCIENCE FICTION FILM
A BOY AND HIS DOG"
JASON  ROBARDS WARNING:    Soma    brutal    and    gory
violence. — B.C. Director
7:15, 9:15
bROAdwAy2|     duNbAR
70 7 W. BROADWAY      DUNBAR  at  30th
874-1927
224  7252
(MAniftf)
CS-508 SEMI-AUTO
TURNTABLE
• Extraordinary performance at a surprisingly low price
• U.L.M. tow mass tone-arm
• New XM3O0 alloy increases tone-arm rigidity, reduces resonance
• Tuneable acoustic isolators to minimize external shock and acoustic feedback!
• New flush-mount dust cover
• Strobe-pitch control
• Anti-skating calibrated for all stylus types -»—»   *+.
• Damped cueing lever OUR   PRICE
• Cartridge not included
OFFER ENDS OCT.30/82  WITH STUDENT CARD $135
STEREO
AWARENESS
You Deserve The Difference
2053 W. 41St Ave. (Near Arbutus)
263-0878
Closed Wednesday
VISA Friday, October 15,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
rS\j\s 3
Delays surround grants
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Education minister Bill Vander
Zalm's promise to announce student aid grant levels by today won't
be kept, the minister's executive
assistant said Thursday.
Instead the ministry issued more
rumors that the government may
make up an estimated $5 shortfall
in program funds and announce
soon how money will be
distributed.
But while the Socred government
delays their decision, student anxiety is increasing, according to the
UBC awards office.
Dan Worsley said the office has
handled "a fair number" of enquiries.
Cuts of $300 from each applicant
may be required to meet increased
demand for funds Worsley said.
About $2 million of the $5
million shortfall would be absorbed
by 6,000 applicants at UBC, said
Worsley. He said there is little
chance the university would find
that much money to fill the shortage.
Students are left with only the
grim prospect of coping with less
money in an already tight fiscal
year.
"It's really tough for me. If I
don't get the grant I may not be
able to finish school," said David
Firman, arts 3.
"I can see how some students are
considering dropping out," said
Jeff Kearney, arts 4. "Three hundred dollars is a substantial part of
a student's budget.
"That they might announce cuts
Charter helps
gays and lesbians
By SARAH COX
The new Canadian Charter of
Rights has the potential to help
secure equal rights for gays and lesbians, a UBC law professor said
Thursday.
Bill Black spoke to 30 people in
SUB 125 on the controversial Body
Politic case and the law's mishandling and manipulation of gay issues.
Five years ago, Toronto's Body
Politic magazine published an article entitled Men Loving Boys Loving Men, based on interviews with
three men engaged in relationships
with boys. The Pink Triangle Press
and three members of the Body
Politic staff were subsequently
charged under the criminal code.
"They were charged with sending
indecent, immoral, or scurrilous
material through the mail," said
Black.
"It's really hard to believe that
anyone laid a charge in the first
place," he said. "Judging by the
standards of tolerance in the community, the article was not indecent, and you can't apply immorality to it."
Black accused the office of the
Ontario attorney general of trying
to force the Body Politic to fold by
draining its financial resources. The
case has been brought to court three
times in five years and is now being
appealed again by the attorney
general. Black said the process is a
vendetta against Body Politic. He
Cut may kill college
TORONTO (CUP) — Cutbacks
are starting to claim entire institutions as victims.
The Nova Scotia government announced in August that it was
withdrawing nearly $1 million in
funding from the Atlantic Institute
of Education, forcing it to close.
Now Hearst University College,
Ontario's only full-time francophone institution, is on the brink
of bankruptcy.
Hearst College, an affiliate of
Sudbury-based Laurentian University, is located in the Northern Ontario mining belt. It offers degree
courses for 250 students, off-
campus teaching and research
geared to the North.
The college administration is projecting a $250,000 deficit by April
— 30 per cent of its budget. It may
miss payroll in October if the provincial government does not
guarantee a loan from the Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce.
University director Raymond
Tremblay said the college needs the
loan to continue offering its three-
year arts program, most of which is
offered  in  French.  He said  the
government has ignored Hearst
College's unique role in providing
higher education to francophones
in Northern Ontario.
The provincial government is
considering amalgamating all of
Laurentian University's affiliated
colleges. But education minister
Bette Stephenson said the government is waiting for a report from a
fact-finder appointed to examine
the university's financial situation.
"Everyone recognizes it is
serious, particularly if the bank
decides it will not be cooperative,"
Said Stephenson.
right now is extremely unfair. People need to know what their financial position is before the year. It
would have been easier for them to
say you're not getting grants," he
said.
Jennifer   Fahrni,   arts   4,   said,
"What they are giving me now is
not enough. Another cut right now
would be critical."
"I don't think that just because
the economy is bad they should cutback education," said Monty Mitchell, arts 4.
Mitchell also criticized the student aid system for allowing some
students who don't need aid to get
it  while  those  with  greater  need
don't get enough.
The provincial government is
looking at four methods of dealing
with the shortfall:
• More funds may be added to
the program. These would come
from university operating budgets.
• Grant recipients may have
awards cut by a percentage.
• A fixed dollar amount may be
subtracted from each grant.
• The government may institute
a provincial student loan program.
Worsley criticized plans for the
student loan program.
Banks are reluctant to negotiate
loans already and the bureaucracy
is not set up in the government to
administer the program, he said.
On percentage cuts, Worsley said
students who need the most aid
would be hit the hardest. The
awards office favors across the
board dollar cuts which are prorated according to need, he said.
The government has not contacted the awards office for advice,
said Worsley.
No announcement will be made
until all sources of funds have been
obtained and the applicants assessed, said Derek Debiasio, Vander
Zalm's executive assistant.
(attorney general Roy McMurtry)
can drop this case anytime he wants
to.
"There seems to be an all-out,
unfair attempt to wear down the
Body Politic by the attorney
general's office. To win by wearing
down misuses the powers of the
prosecutor," said Black.
Black said the Body Politic case
was proceeding under the old constitution, and might have been dealt
with in a different manner under
the new Charter of Rights, which
has not yet come into effect.
"With regard to the charter's affect on the gay movement, it's probably going to be more an indirect
help than a direct help," Black said.
Although the new charter gurantees
freedom of expression and freedom
of the press, there are no clauses
which specifically protect gays and
lesbians, he added.
"The meaning of the new charter
will require a great deal of interpretation by the courts. Whether or
not the courts will use it in order to
protect gay people is something we
just don't know."
Black said the issue of freedom of
expression and freedom of the press
was one which affected everybody.
It goes way beyond gay and lesbian issues. We're better off with
the new charter but we shouldn't
think we're safe. It won't do
anyone any good if the general
public tolerates conduct that
violates people's rights."
-charlaa campball photo
DARK AND OMINOUS shadows mask lone student radical in search of cause. Disillusioned with peace movement, disgruntled with Palestinians and disgusted with Western Canada Concept party, he passes upper priced
bicycles and inspiration comes to mind. Preppy bashing was and always will be his ultimate direction in life.
Hazardous houses vacant
By BERNADETTE
GONZALEZ
People have repeatedly asked to
live in two Acadia Camp units
which have stood vacant for more
than 18 months.
Acadia Camp is on-campus housing which provides low cost housing
for student families. Fourty per
cent of the units are single-parent
homes.
The two empty units on President's Row were inspected after the
latest leases expired and were
declared too hazardous to lease,
said housing facilities manager Ken
Simpson.
Due to the short life expectency of
the Camp and the fact that the
dwellings were originally designed
to be temporary, the decayed units
were never repaired because they
didn't merit the extensive repair
costs, said director of student housing Mary Flores. The one-bedroom
and two-bedroom huts require
repairs last estimated at $7,000 and
$15,000 respectively.
It is first necessary to determine
housing's budget for the year and to
discover how much further decay
has occurred in order to estimate
new repair costs. The deciding element is whether "repair costs stay
within recoverable limits."
Because of uncertainty over
Acadia Camp's future, some
residents feel uneasy about their
situation. Resident Jean Watters
said,    "I   don't   think   anybody
should have to put up with health or
safety hazards, but few people ever
complain about basic upkeep even
when it's necessary."
Watters herself has complained
about necessary repairs and received
them.
Watters said that if housing took
a closer look at the danger,
residents would probably lose their
homes.
"Nobody wants to rock the
boat," she said.
Director Mary Flores said that
longheld plans for the reconstruction of Acadia Camp are not an immediate possibility due to current
market conditions. She said that the
Camp could have a life expectancy
of five years.
University senate supports Great Trek
By CRAIG BROOKS
The student movent is doing
something wrong when the university supports it.
That was the situation Wednesday night, when the university senate
unanimously approved a motion of
support for next week's Great Trek
sixtieth anniversity celebrations.
SFU votes to |oln CPS
Simon Fraser University students voted Thursday to join the Canadian Federation of Students.
Sixty-two per cent voted in favor of joining the federation which
represents students both provincially and nationally.
Only about 800 of 9,000 students voted in the referendum. Simon
Fraser Student Society bylaws do not require a quorum.
A $4 per semester membership fee will be assessed on all students at
SFU. ■-■-'■■
Simon Fraser is the first university to join CFS in B.C. The University of Victoria will hold a membership referendum this year and
UBC students will vote next year on whether to join.
The motion stated that since the
original Great Trek was "a
response to the government's
failure to recognize the importance
of education and of university, and
whereas there exists a parallel (today)," the university senate and
community should endorse and support the Great Trek '82.
The motion, introduced by student senator Lisa Hebert, was
seconded by UBC chancellor J. V.
Clyne, a participant in the original
Trek.
On October 22, 1922, more than
1,000 students marched from
UBC's former campus near Vancouver General Hospital to the uncompleted Point Grey campus to
protest provincial government
delays in building the new campus.
The provincial government
allocated money to build the campus a week later.
"To get the senate, the top
academic body on campus, to support something like this is important," Hebert said Thursday.
Hebert has criticised the week of
activities, particularly the Trek re-
enactment, for not being political
enough.
She said that while the motion
was not overtly political, it did express senate's concern over the
university's worsening financial
position.
The week's activities culminate
Saturday, Oct. 23 with a recreation
of the 1922 march. The parade
leaves at 11 a.m. from the Queen
Elizabeth theatre at Georgia and
Beatty.
The motion encourages all
members of the university community to take part in the week of
activities. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1982
War and peace wins award
WALLACE
peaceful fellow
UBC political science professor
Mike Wallace has received a
prestigious international award.
The Karl Deutsch Award,
presented by the world academy of
arts and science, was given to
Wallace in recognition of his studies
on the causes of war.
"Almost all past great power
crises preceded by an arms race
have led to all-out war," Wallace
said Tuesday.
The probability of nuclear war is
rising rapidly, he said. A 1980 conference of political scientists assessed the probability of a nuclear war
before the end of the century as one
third to one half, he added.
Precautions against an accidental
nuclear war are dangerously inadequate, said Wallace.
Wallace blamed U.S. president
Ronald Reagan and his advisors for
the high probability of nuclear war.
"Reagan is upset about not getting
the lead role in High Noon and feels
he has to play that role sometime,"
he said.
There is a feeling going around
Washington that "the emperor has
no clothes," said Wallace. People
are beginning to suspect that
"maybe no one in Washington
knows what the fuck they're
doing," he said.
HELP!
We need reporters,
reviewers, photographers,
and anything else that
crawls in off the street (like
copy editors). Time committment is minimal and
you too can get your name
in nine point english times
bold on an article or review
15,000 times (good for ego
building).
Drop by SUB 241k any
Monday or Thursday afternoon. No preppies please.
Glassblowing
LOUIS FABIAN
An advanced class for those
who have previous experience
and a basic knowledge of
glassblowing techniques.
Wed., 7-10 p.m.
Oct. 20 - Dec. 8
ROOM 370,
MacMILLAN BLDG.,
$128
a
Information, 228-2181,
Local 254
Creative Arts
Program
Centre for Continuing
Education
Texas Instruments
Programmable TT-58C/TT-59
advanced programmable calculators
with plug-in Solid State Software™ modules
and Constant Memory™ feature
TI-58C
TI-59
• Up to 480 program steps.
Or, up to 60 memories.
• 25-program Master
Library Module with
5,000 program steps.
• Optional plug-in library
modules available.
• AOSIM entry system.
Enter problems just as
you would write them.
• Prints alpha and plots
with the K'-IOOA
printer, plotter.
• Up to 960 program steps.
Or, up to 100 memories.
• 25-program Master
Library Module with
5,000 program steps.
• Optional plug-in library
modules available.
• Magnetic cards to record
your persona] programs.
• AOS™ entry system.
Enter problems just as
you would write them.
• Prints alpha and plots
with the PC-100A
special Software Offer
If you purchase a TI-59 Programmable between July 1 and Dec. 31, 1982,
we'll give you 2  modules worth $90.00 at no additional charge!
Or, if you buy a TI-58C, you'll get \  module worth $45.00 at no additional charge!
Choose from: Applied Statistics, Business Decisions, Real Estate/Investment
Math/Utilities, Aviation, Electrical Engineering
Marine Navigation, Leisure Activities, Securities Analysis
For details, check with your Campus Bookstore or your nearest retailer.
© 1982, Texas Instruments.
ubc bookstore
2009 MAIN MALL, UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
VANCOUVER V6T 1Y5 228-4741 Friday, October 15,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Wages set
By CRAIG BROOKS
The real impact of a $7.2 million
budget cut recently inflicted on
UBC will be seen after "fair
bargaining" is done with campus
unions, UBC president Doug Kenny
said Wednesday.
Under questioning from student
senator Lisa Hebert, Kenny told the
monthly meeting of the university
senate that any statement from him
would be "seen to be undue influence."
Hebert asked Kenny, who chairs
the senate budget committee, what
procedures will be taken to remove
the shortfall from the current
university budget.
Kenny said the real impact of the
cuts would have to wait until the
union contracts had all been settled.
Only then, he said, will the university know how much it will be short.
"I am not trying to duck the
question," Kenny said.
"The direct impact (of the
budget cut) is very dependant on all
collective agreements submitted to
the compensation stabilization
board. Until that (outcome) is
decided, it would be improper for
anyone at the university to make a
comment."
Currently the Teaching
Assistants Union and the Association of College Employees are
negotiating with the university. The
faculty association's arbitrated nine
per cent wage settlement is currently
under review by the CSB, while
CUPE has received CSB approval.
The Universities Council of B.C.
cut $7.2 million from UBC's budget
in September, after the provincial
universities ministry ordered UBC
to lower all three university grants
by a total of $12 million.
The cuts come more than half
way through the university's current fiscal year. Under the B.C.
Universities act, UBC is not allowed
to run a deficit, so the cuts will have
to come from remaining expenses
until the end of the fiscal year in
March, information officer Jim
Banham said.
Last year the university made
$7.2 million in cuts after the faculty
association received an unexpected
18 per cent arbitrated wage settlement. The library, arts faculty,
physical plant and computing centre received the heaviest cuts.
Haitian on
protest fast
MONTREAL (CUP) — Living
on water, sugar and vitamins, exiled
Haitian journalist Henri Alphonse
has entered his fourth week of a
hunger strike here to protest Canadian support for the Haitian dictatorship of president Jean-Claude
Duvalier.
"Trudeau is responsible for my
life," said Alphonse, who came to
Montreal last year after his exile by
Duvalier. With the support, of his
Monteal hunger strike group,
Alphonse has made two demands to
the Canadian government:
S Official Canadian intervention
to press for the release of all
political prisoners in Haiti.
e Official Canadian action to
block any financing of the proposed
hydro-electric dams at two sites in
Haiti's Artibonite Valley.
Construction of the dams would
flood prime agricultural land, a
scarce resource in poverty-stricken
Haiti. The dams will be jointly
funded by the Canadian International Development Association
and the International Development
Association. Alphonse said it will
be a serious threat to the lives of
many Haitians.
"Haiti has very little fertile land
and the Artibonite valley happens
to contain most of it," he said.
"The realization of such a project
would drown some of the country's
most fertile land, seriously menacing the lives of 60,000 farmers."
Alphonse charged that Canadian
corporate involvement in Haiti was
a major factor in the federal
government's reluctance to veto
funding for the project.
"The project will mean a lot to
some Canadian companies, two of
which have their headquarters in
Montreal," he said.
And he said Haitians will not
directly benefit from the project,
because the electricity will be used
by factories that finish imported
raw materials for export abroad.
Amnesty International ranks the
Duvalier dictatorship, which it says
uses torture regularly, as the
world's worst violator of human
rights.
Recently Duvalier banned all
political opposition and, according
to Amnesty, there are at least 3,000
political prisoners languishing in
Haitian jails.
But since the strike began,
Alphonse's support group has
gathered a growing list of friends.
Military obsolete
The present military system is obsolete, the president of the World
Federation of Canada said Thursday.
"We want to replace the present
military system with alternate
security systems, "Hannah
Newcome told 240 people in Computer Science 200.
Newcome's speech was sponsored by the Educators for Nuclear
Disarmament.
The federationists, who advocate
global government, rather than national divisions, recognize the need
for some new method for resolving
disputes, despite the arms reduction
that would result from world
federation, Newcome said.
Even if arms were globally banned, arms technology would remain.
"If hostilities endure, countries will
return to weapons again," she said.
Newcome said credible alternate
security systems are therefore required. "Non-violence is more effective at minimizing losses on both
sides."
Methods of updating the present
military system offered by
Newcome included disarmament,
tension reduction, conflict resolution, peace keeping, and peacemaking.
Her suggested models for disarmament varied from a no-first-use
promise to a world state protecting
all people.
"I think a world institution is required for total disarmament."
The growth of international institutions is the beginning of the
world state, but the UN is inadequate, she. said.
The UN's problem lies in its
structure and inefficiency, she said.
—aliaon ho«n* photo
PORTRAIT OF STUDENTS waiting for student loans and grants. Weary students in foreground sit dejectedley
on steps gazing at futures, while poor student in background looks east for relief. Does O-t-t-a-w-a spell relief?
Feds say l-o-a-n-s spells relief, but write protest letters to provincial government for g-r-a-n-t-c-h-e-q-u-e'-s.
Residence lifestyle suits men
By ANGIE GERST
While there are 10 residence
vacancies for women at UBC, male
students still cannot find on-
campus accommodation.
Thre is no longer a waiting list for
the female rooms, but almost 1,000
men are still registered with the student housing department.
Residence administrator Robert
Frampton said Thursday there has
always been a greater demand for
male residence rooms than for
female rooms.
Frampton said this may be
because more men may come from
out of town, or because females
may be more willing to live off-
campus.
At the beginning of the
September, 795 single female, 260
double female, 1449 single male,
and 256 double male names comprised the waiting list.
Each weekday at 1 p.m., the
housing department calls the vacancies in numerical order. Ten to 20
males appear at the housing office
every day. The male single room list
has reached number 467.
Those people who have found
housing off-campus can and should
request the return of their housing
deposits so their applications can be
closed, Frampton said.
"Last year we (housing department) didn't reach the empty room
stage until January," said Framp-
AMS DOA TKO
A possible election irregularity is threatening to invalidate the
results of the current race for Alma Mater Society administration
director.
AMS elections commissioner Al Irwin said Thursday a complaint dealing with campaign cut off time has been lodged after one
candidate continued to campaign past the 5 p.m. Wednesday cut-off
time.
He declined to comment on the allegations further, saying any
comment might sway current voting. "The committee met and the
complaint has been dealt with."
Irwin said a full report on the allegations, including names, will
be released after the polls close today.
On Thursday 939 students voted in the by-election. Voting continues across campus today until 3:30 p.m.
Running for the position vacated by Terry Cox in April are
Scott Ando, Chris Fulker and Alan Pinkey.
ton. This year, the department cannot fill all the female rooms.
Frampton said these vacancies
may exist because off-campus housing is easier to find and cheaper
than last year. During August and
September, most students located
off-campus housing on their second
or third try, he said. "There was an
extreme demand on housing last
year."
Frampton had several theories
for the sudden availability of off-
campus housing. "Vancouver is
becoming an expensive place to live
in" he said, and added because
Vancouver residents cannot find
jobs, they are leaving the city.
He said vacancies are opening up
near UBC because people cannot
afford expensive West End apartments and east side homes are
becoming more attractive. Finally,
in the economic crunch, people can
bring in extra income by renting out
basement suites.
Off-campus rents are lower this
year, especially on individual
houses or individual suites, said
Frampton. But, he said, residence
housing is still cheaper: the meal
portion costs only six dollars a day.
Residence housing, however, has
only remained this cheap because
residences have been filled to 100
per cent capacity, said Frampton.
Student housing has launched an
advertising campaign, but has
received little response. Frampton
said, "If women students or men
students would like a room, contact
us (housing)." ***»-*-S"
Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1982
People loving people loving people
Of all the liberation movements in the
world, the gay liberation movement is the
most silent.
Homosexuality transcends all cultural,
geographical, and even political boundaries.
It directly involves 10 per cent of the human
race, and the majority of people in any
culture are exposed to it at some point in
their lives.
However, homosexuality remains an issue
which many people avoid facing and dealing
with. Instead, lesbians and gays are still
regarded as threatening to society, and are
subtly but directly persecuted by people who
have not yet come to terms with homosexuality. And their insecurities directly affect
the basic freedoms of homosexuals,
freedoms which are not denied to others.
A prime example of the suppression of the
gay minority is the Body Politic case in
Toronto. For five years, the magazine has
been dragged through the court system by
the government for printing an article entitled
Men Loving Boys Loving Men. The article
itself contains nothing "indecent or
immoral," yet its publisher has been prosecuted on these grounds.
Ontario attorney general Roy McMurtry's
actions go beyond the call of what is questionable—and reprehensible—duty in the
first place. And McMurtry's continual appeals of court decisions dismissing the provincial government's case only serves to reinforce the attitude that treating homosexuals
as scapegoats is acceptable and should be
continued. Prosecution has regressed into
persecution.
The   persecution   of   the   Body   Politic
newspaper has other ramifications. In addition to implicitly denying the freedom of
choosing an alternative lifestyle, it severely
infringes on the freedom of the press. It sets
a very dangeous precedent, which cannot be
ignored.
But whereas freedom of the press is
guaranteed in the new constitution, there is
no sexual orientation clause that guarantees
equal rights for gays and lesbians—rights
which cannot be assumed under other provisions of the act.
Efforts by MP Pat Carney (PC-Vancouver
Centre) to include a sexual orientation clause
in the original charter of rights were defeated
last year by the federal government, while it
was advocating the importance of the affirmation of human rights in Canada in the new
constitution. But then, we accept such contradictions, don't we?
a     4 MMMP    S   jm     M "■€ W1*^    m   '     ^i!ll
The courage to challenge your assumptions
It is good at last to see some
coverage of the Palestinian question
in The Ubyssey and to note that two
of the three letters to the editor (Friday, Oct. 1) commented on the in-
appropriateness of the caption beneath the picture of the Palestinian
children.
Two of these letters, however,
assume one particular point of
view, that world opinion and press
coverage are much more critical of
Israel's actions than those of any
other nation, and make a number
of statements which deserve to be
challenged individually.
What is the distinction between
"terrorism"    and    "military
action"? If Israel is permitted to
protect its settlements in Northern
Galilee, were Palestinians not permitted to protect their villages in
southern Lebanon from the bombings by Israeli jets?
On Saturday, Oct. 2 the Globe
and Mail stated that there are at
present 95,000 Israeli troops in
southern Lebanon. How can one
country justify the invasion of
another country under the pretext
of removing the domination of
foreign forces from that country's
soil, unless the invading country
considers it has the right to interference in the country invaded.
What do Menachem Begin and
Ariel Sharon consider as the
borders which they want to see
secured? How long will it be before
Israeli settlements are built on the
rubble of villages in southern
Lebanon as were built on the sites
of the three hundred some Palestinian villages destroyed since 1948?
The Lebanese who "welcomed"
the Israeli invading troops were
members of the Phalangist party
whose founder, Pierre Gemayel,
derived inspiration for the party
from Hitler, Mussolini and Franco.
The Phalangist party is by no means
representative of the mass of
Lebanese, either Christian or
Muslim. Did those Lebanese whose
Should we believe them?
Heather Glassman's letter (Oct.
1) makes a number of dubious
statements about this summer's
merriment in Lebanon. May I comment on some of them?
1. She says that Israel entered
Lebanon to protect Galilee from
"constant bombing" (meaning
rockets) from Lebanon.
This has been the party line of the
"Peace for Galilee" set, but many
are not convinced. Beginning with
the truce of July 1981, "For nine
months not a single rocket or shell
was fired by PLO gunners into
Israel," writes Anthony Lewis
(New York Times, June 7, '82).
"When Israel planes bombed
Lebanon on April 21 . . .the PLO
did not respond. When there was
another bombing on May 9, there
was a limited response: about 100
rockets that Israel said caused no
damage or casualties. Then, after
the massive Israeli bombing last
week, the PLO responded with full-
scale barrages," and the Israelis
marched in.
2. "Israel was also concerned,"
writes Glassman, with helping to
end Lebanon's civil war by ridding
it of "foreign forces."
This was not an announced war
aim — until the Israel "defence"
forces went beyond the 40 km. buffer zone originally claimed and
headed for Beirut. Just how the
Lebanese muddle will be helped by
forcibly introducing more "foreign
forces" into it is not explained, nor
does Glassman mention the Israeli
ambition — at least as old as Ben
Gurion — to find a friendly
Lebanese Christian to set up as a
puppet.
3. "The   beleagured   Lebanese
welcomed the Israeli troops, according to Charles Wilson, a Texas
Democrat ..."
Which Lebanese? The first
political fact anyone learns about
Lebanon is the depth of the
Moslem/Christian split. Did Wilson
find leftists, or Moslems (now a majority of the population) "welcoming" the Israelis? Or were they
rightists and christians, possibly
Phalangists — the folks who gave
us Sabra and Shatila? Or could
Wilson tell the difference?
4. Israel's role as "invader" has
been "highly exaggerated" by the
media, especially the casualty
figures. Israel's figures are much
lower.
Of course they are, but why
should we believe them? Who is in a
better position to estimate
casualties, the people sending the
shells and bombs or the people
receiving them? And have the
media traditionally been unfair to
Israel? Is there any reason why they
should change now? Really, if this
were not so obscene it would be
funny, with top marks going to the
quotation marks around
"invader." Surely the point, as
Glassman concedes, is that there
were "too many civilian deaths."
5. The PLO kept their ammunition dumps in populous urban
areas.
If they did so with the intention
of sheltering behind civilians, they
reckoned without their enemies'
determination to destroy them at all
costs. We can only pity the poor
Lebanese (of whatever persuasion)
caught in the middle, and hope that
some Levantine Marquis de
Queensbury will persuade the PLO
to locate their arms caches out in
the open henceforth, saving
everyone a lot of grief. But that this
point should be deduced in defence
of Israel is ghoulish.
6. Israel is being judged by a
double standard."
Indeed it is. What other nation
could have done what Israel has
done in the last four months, and
still remain the number one recipient of U.S. military aid, not to
mention being defended by
Glassman?
7). Israel has "chosen life" by invading Lebanon.
An unsophisticated observer
might be forgiven for thinking that
Israel had chosen death on a large
scale for its neighbours rather than
face up to the Palestinian problem.
What Glassman means here is
"life" for the Begin-Sharon brand
of Zionism; what she ignores is the
considerable opposition to the
whole Lebanese campaign inside
Israel, featuring the peace now
movement, but including some
Israeli soldiers and Knesset opposition members.
What is most depressing about
her letter is the lack of any humane
feeling towards the Palestinians as a
wronged, dispossessed people; all
she can see is the PLO. If terrorism
invalidates a cause, how can she defend an Israel born out of the terrorism of Mr. Begin and others in
1947-48? Is it not clear by now that
Palestinians have an equal right and
need to a homeland, as a sanctuary
against Phalangists, Israelis, Jordanians, or whomever?
Dick Bevis
english dept.
families were killed at the Sabra and
Shatila camps or those 2,000
Lebanese who have been arrested
by the Phalangist party in the past
week welcome the destabilization
which has resulted from the Israeli
invasion?
It is not adequate to state that the
Phalangists rather than Israel must
be blamed for this massacre but
rather to ask why Israel has extended military and financial support to
this party since 1975, what part this
aid had played in the destabilization of Lebanon — the 1975-76
Civil War — and what part this type
of foreign policy plays in the overall
intent of Israel towards a settlement
of the Israel-Palestinian question.
In respect to the casual allusion
to the "PLO's record of atrocities
in Lebanon." This remark is a
trivialization of the experience of a
people who have endured a
systematic dispersal of person and
culture for thirty-four years. In the
Globe and Mail (Thursday, Sept.
30) Edward Said, an English professor at Columbia University,
notes that recently the Institute of
Palestinian Studies and the
Palestine Research Centre, which
publishes the Journal of Palestinian
studies, in Beirut have had their
contents   emptied  and  destroyed.
Are the actions of Israeli soldiers
in lighting flares throughout the
night to facilitate the massacre at
Sabra and Shatila, and in refusing
to allow civilians out of the camp,
indicative of the care that was taken
elsewhere in avoiding civilian
casualties? In August for the first
time in modern history we in North
America could watch the bombing
of a city in mid-daylight on our
television   screens.   Can   anyone
watch such and still declare that
care was taken? The loudspeaker
campaign warning of impending
raids and the numerous bombs
dropped in streets to be picked up
by children could be interpreted as a
campaign of "terrorism" rather
than warnings.
After this summer of 1982 how
can we with any credibility say that
Israel is subject to more criticism
for her actions than any other nation for equivalent actions?
On Friday, Sept. 24 I saw an individual in Buchanan building rip
from a bulletin board two posters
announcing a demonstration to
commemorate the victims of the
Sabra and Shatila massacre. This
individual then proceeded into a
classroom and commenced to
teach. If this individual is unable to
defend opinions with reason and
fact rather than such censorship,
then his students are not receiving
the education they deserve. If truth
and rational discourse will not promoted at the university then where?
It is difficult to accept the fact
that assumptions we have been
given and perhaps have grown up
with, may be distorted, biased or —
false. Many of us grew up with an
idealized image about the nature
and creation of the state of Israel.
To challenge one's own assumptions requires a depth of intellectual
integrity which I hope is not lacking
at the university. For those of us
who have concerns about racism in
general and anti-semitism in particular, who possess strong emotional links to Judaism and admiration for both its sacred and secular
traditions, there is a particular
urgency. Sylvia Woodcock
AUCE local 1/Arts 3
THE UBYSSEY
October 15, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office next door. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
From the foothills of Cowtown to the grungy streets of East Vancouver, the Trekies came slowly
but surely. Recently promoted Admiral Chris Wong welcomed his comrades with open arms. Brian
Jones took his place alonside Arnold Hedstrom as they were engulfed in the emotional fervour of the
crowd, trailing close behind Robert Beynon and Kelley Jo Burke yelled and waved to the television
cameras. Muriel Draaisma desperately tried to control a raging Keith Baldrey wanting his own air time.
The Campbells, Nancy and Charles marched passively, oblivious to the chants sung by Kerry Reiger
and Robby Robinson. Shaffin Shariff noted the esthetic value of their rantings while Lisa Morry, Dan
Treisman, and Angie Gerst wondered whether these people had been into the mushrooms again.
Sarah Cox zipped through the masses with her high powered bicycle, while Ann Marie Fleming puffed
and sweated at a jogger's pace. As the emotions of the throng slowing reached a momentous climax,
Craig Brooks motioned Peter Berlin whi subtly told the crowd they were a bloddy lot for forgetting that
the Great Trek was next week. Victor Wong noted the whole fiasco and went crazy with his pen. Friday, October 15, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Law and order party misunderstood by all
As I rushed from an organic
chemistry lab to my noon math
class a pile of papers caught my eye.
The headline, WCC Separatists
come of age, stopped me short;
with the whole front page of The
Ubyssey dedicated to articles about
my party, I had to see what it had to
say.
Snatching paragraphs of the article between theorems and examples
I realized that the story had problems. Later that night as I studied it
in greater detail my fears were confirmed; Brooks and Shariff s commendable effort at objectivity was
sadly marred by slight but critical
mistakes and misconceptions.
Apart from relatively minor errors such as calling Western Canada
Concept party founder and provincial leader Doug Christie the elected
president of WCC-BC (David Bannister is president), the biggest
source of error was the authors' apparent confusion over the difference between official party policy and the opinion of a party member or committee of party members.
Official party policy is outlined in
a document entitled Our Creed and
a more detailed version entitled
Creed Backup, both of which can
be found at any party office.
The resolutions of the committees at this summer's convention
are, in contrast, not official party
policy or they would be included in
the creed or its backup. They are
possibilities and suggestions that
arose from the convention's discussions, not the skeleton of a new
party stance.
Further Lila Stanford's opinion
as expressed in Brook's Separate
Schooling, are not official policy either. Quite the contrary, some of
her and Irene Anderson's ideas,
such as regulated school dress and
banning of Communist teachings,
are irreconcilable with the party's
belief in democratic freedom as expressed in the creed backup.
"We believe in Democracy, Freedom, Equality, and Justice . . .
Freedom (and Liberty) infer that we
have the opportunity to direct our
lives as we individually see best, unhindered by government intervention beyond what is necessary for
the maintenance of law and order in
society."
This statement means, among
other things, if students and teachers choose to wear T-shirts and
jeans or read Das Kapital my party
or any government formed by it will
not interfere with any of us doing
so.
Certainly, some of the ideas expressed by the committees, such as
guaranteed personal and property
rights, were part of the party creed
before the meeting occurred. Some
others may become official policy
in the future. But the party definitely cannot adopt policies that run
against the democratic ideals which
form the party's foundation.
Now, with the misconceptions
cleared away, I can devote the rest
of this letter to my opinion. Doug
Christie says that he doesn't think
WCC will form the next government in B.C., but that we may hold
the balance of power. I agree, but I
also believe that we could win if
more people knew what the party
platform was. In fact I would venture to say that if every voter in
B.C. read and understood the
Creed Backup and heard Doug
Christie speak about the issues involved, we would win the next elec
tion by the biggest landslide B.C.
has ever seen.
Social Credit president Bernie
Smith says that the WCC will not
have any real impact on provincial
politics. All I can say is that he may
well be right. There are a lot of people out there who are so afraid of
change that they will not even read
our literature. If the people will not
listen to what we have to say, they
may never find out why they didn't
have jobs this summer or why they
can't afford the payments on their
cars. And if people don't listen and
don't start wondering what is going
on, my party doesn't stand a
chance.
But as a bit of a postscript I
would like to comment on the un-
bylined article UBC target of WCC
club.
Firstly, we were not recruited by
the party. I went to the party and
told them what I wanted to do.
They thought it was a good idea and
said they would back me. With the
help of a personal friend I bootstrapped the preparations and got
the booth set up for the clubs day
membership drive.
Secondly the club could have had
its papers before Student Administrative Commission bx the end of
September, but we believe in doing
things right the first time. The fill in
the blanks paper work required by
the Alma Mater Society is a minimum requirement, and I am convinced that the people in SAC can
appreciate the value of a well-
thought-out and comprehensive
constitution.
As a whole I regarded this unnamed person's article as a shot at
my club's ass and I would like to request of the author: If you must
write anonymous articles about the
UBC WCC please try not to distort
the facts.
Robert Forsyth
WCC party member/elected
president of UBC WCC
(not yet constituted with the AMS)
Protest Polish people's plight
The members of the UBC
Solidarity Study Group would like
to urge all members of the university community, and in particular
unionists and progressive activists,
to personally protest the continued
suppression of the Polish workers
and intellectuals. Solidarity has
now been officially outlawed, and
once again the army has taken control of the factories.
This time however the workers
are being told that they are military
conscripts, and that any form of
strike action equals army desertion,
with its consequent penalties. All
effort must be made NOW to show
our solidarity with the Polish
workers. This is especially so with
the difficult times of the upcoming
Nov. 10 general strike, called by
Solidarity's underground leadership, ahead of us.
Please   write   or   telegram   im-
Get facts right on Palestine issue
MacRae's letter asserting that the
"Palestinians were kicked out of
their country" and had no choice
but to set up a paramilitary to "protect their daughters from being
raped by the first guy with a gun" is
in desperate need of factual
clarification. It's time for a history
lesson, boys and girls.
In 1920 the World War I allies
conferred on Britain a mandate to
govern the area on both sides of the
Jordan River — Palestine. The
mandate included the 1917 Balfour
Declaration which essentially committed Britain to provide a Jewish
homeland. In 1922 the British
altered the situation by creating the
emirate of Transjordon with the
Hashemite Abdullah (Hussein's
grandfather) as Emir of all the territory east of the Jordan River. In
1946 this region was renamed the
Kingdom of Transjordon.
However, Transjordon was not free
from the British mandate. The
residents of both the East and West
brnks (Arabs and Jews) were all
regarded as Palestinians under
British control.
The British intention was for
Transjordon to serve "as a reserve
land for use in the resettlement of
Arabs once the National Home for
the Jews in Palestine . . . became
an accomplished fact."
Following Israel's independence
Transjordon (accompanied by
several other Arab countries) waged
war on the Jewish State. Transjordon subsequently annexed the West
Bank and became Jordan. In 1967
Jordan, under the leadership of
Hussein, again attacked Israel but
lost control of the West Bank.
Israel argues that the historic area
of Palestine mandated to Britain
was divided into two legal entities
— Jewish and Arab — one of which
became Israel and the other Jordan,.,
It logically follows that the PLO demand for a Palestinian state in the
West Bank denotes the creation of a
second Arab Palestinian state. It is
interesting to note that all the
residents of Jordan, except the Be-
duins and the Kings family, are
Palestinian. The PLO, rather than
accepting Jordan as their homeland
(an area comprising four-fifths of
Palestine) seek to eliminate the state
of Israel.
Thus, the assertion that the
Palestinians were "kicked out of
their own country" is false. They
merely refused to accept a peaceful
compromise. As for "having no
choice" but to set up a paramilitary
the fact is that they chose to engage
in terrorist warfare which included
the  assassination  of any  Palesti
nians who fail to agree with PLO
aspirations. If this paramilitary was
established to protect the Palestinian children, as MacRae so naively
suggests, then how does he acco-
dunt for the PLO attacks on Israeli
market places, school buses,
athletes, kibutzim, and cities?
The spilling of Arab and Jewish
blood must cease. Compromises by
all parties concerned are essential to
a successful Middle East peace
plan. The Camp David framework
is the most promising route to
achieving this goal. However, for
the dialogue to progress the Palestinians must abandon their goal of
the destruction of Israel.
Cary Rodin
arts 4
'Israel's solution was best'
Regarding Rod McRae's
response to my letter on the Middle
East issue, I suggest he re-examine
the facts. Firstly, the Palestinians
were never kicked out of Israel;
they were told to leave by the other
Arab nations who would, after
"drowning the Jews in the sea,"
return the land to the Palestinians.
Secondly, the "paramilitary," as
McRae calls the P.L.O., is only a
fancy word for a terrorist group.
And by its own definition, terrorists
do not protect people, they cause
bloodshed and destruction. The
P.L.O.'s history as such is a very
long one.
The one thing McRae got right is
that the P.L.O. is not fighting an
honourable war. But his justification for it just does not hold water.
Survival is not achieved, nor can it
ever be condoned, by hiding behind
innocent people. Yet McRae can
still stand on his soapbox and blame
Israel for its tactics.
As for Nazi techniques, I suggest
McRae reread his history books for
evidence of what exactly the Nazis
did. Mass, cold-blooded murder is
consistent with the P.L.O.'s style
and their aim to completely destroy
Israel. This more closely parallels
Nazi techniques.
Instead, McRae should ask
himself what he would do in Israel's
shoes: allow the ammunition
stockpiles to stand as a threat to innocent Israel lives or minimize loss
of life to all by destroying the
stockpiles while at the same time
sustaining great losses themselves in
the effort to harm as few civilians as
possible? I think McRae would
find, as would most reasonable people, that the Israel solution was the
most viable one available to them.
Heather Glassman
..       ... law 1
mediately to voice your support for
Solidarity, and your opposition to
its suppression on the grounds of
basic human and worker rights, by
writing to:
General Wojciech Jaruzelski
Chairman of the Military' Council
for National Salvation
al. Ujazdowskie 1/3
Warsaw, Poland
and to:
His Excellency
Dr. Stanislaw Pawlak
443 Daly Ave.
OTTAWA, Ontario
KIN 6H3
The UBC Solidarity Study Group
(Bill Tieleman, Arnold Hedstrom,
Alice Kim, Fraser Easton, Horacio
de la Cueva, Ewa Busza)
Rick set for 20 mile jaunt
Rick Hansen will be wheeling his
fourth Rickathon around a 20 mile
route at UBC. Each year this event
raised much needed funds to assist
CWSA-BC Division in a large programming budget that attempts to
provide each member with any
sport or event he or she wishes to
participate in. Pledges for the
Rickathon will be collected per
mile Rick completes.
This year UBC's student council
for exceptional children and
rehabilitation departments will be
organizing the on campus route of
20 miles as well as an fntramural
event, Teamwheelchair Challenge,
a wheelchair obstacle course that
any department, faculty, or frat of
UBC can organize a team and participate in to compete for intramural points.
Rick begins his wheel at 12 noon
on Wednesday, Oct. 20 at SUB entrance by the loop (parking meters).
Team Wheelchair Challenge begins
at 12:30. Everyone get those
pledges, support CWSA, come out
and enjoy the event as well as watching Canada's Top Wheeler, Rick
Hansen do his thing!
Jane Sikorski
student council for
exceptional children
Cruise missile destabilizing
features dangerous portent
Several destabilizing features make the cruise missile far more dangerous
than any other nuclear weapon. These include its extreme accuracy and its
unverifiability. In fact, many experts believe that the deployment of cruise
missiles will make nuclear war inevitable. Canada is playing a major role in
developing the cruise missile. Instead of increasing our security, this
weapon will seriously threaten our security.
We must pressure our government to refuse the testing of cruise missiles
on our territory. Pressure is being applied by groups and individuals all
over the country in many different ways. At UBC, we intend to publish a
full-page ad in The Ubyssey on Oct. 22 protesting the cruise tests, and send
a copy to every member of Parliament in Ottawa. To help defray the costs
of the ad, we are asking members of the university community to pay two
dollars to have their name listed on the ad as Canadians "Refusing the
Cruise".
This type of political pressure does work. Vancouver Conservative MP
John Fraser recently changed his mind on the cruise and has now begun
publicly speaking out against the cruise tests. It was tactics such as
newspaper ads, public rallies, and personal letters which caused him to
change his mind. Many MPs have now stated their opposition to the cruise
missile, but even more have not. However, we can make them change their
minds.
If you would like to help refuse the cruise and have your name on The
Ubyssey ad, send two dollars and your name to Box 71, SUB; or drop it off
at SLFB 230B. Also, write your MP and tell him or her how you feel about
the cruise missile, and survival. Remember, one nuclear bomb can spoil
your whole day.
UBC Students for Peace and
Mutual Disarmament
Dump WCC, join WCC-ML
I was surprised to find, in last Thursday's Ubyssey that I was at one time
a member of West-Fed. This is a complete lie; as a matter of fact, I was an
NDP member for six years. Simply because I am a separatist does not mean
that I am also a fundamentalist conservative. In joining the WCC, I have
had to look the other way with regard to their more right-wing policies, but
I am a separatist first.
So next time you make a statement about someone, please make damn
sure you're right.
Chris Fulker
  ex-student senator Page 8
Friday, Oct
Tales reflect only dull colors
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Back in the 1950s, Robert
Silverberg was a young man attending university who paid his tuition
toy churning out word after word of
science fiction for the thirty-odd
pulp magazines in the market. He
was bright, quick and a fast study
— earning the 1956 Hugo for Most
Promising Writer — and as the
years went by he matured into one
of the grand masters of science fiction with acclaimed works such as
Lord Valentine's Castle, Dying Inside, The Book of Skulls, A Time of
Changes and Night wings.
His stories for the pulps,
however, were just that and now sf
readers can prove it to themselves
by perusing his newly released anthology, World of a Thousand Colors.
World of a Thousdand Colors
By Robert Silverberg
Arbor House,
329 pages, $20.95
What Silverberg, in his introduction, calls the "fertile era" of his
career several reference works more
aptly sum up as "prodigious but
mechanical". In a career which
spanned just over 20 years
(Silverberg now refrains from
writing, but continues to edit), the
four-time Nebulla winner wrote 200
uncollected short stories, 70 science
fiction books, 60 non-fiction
books, and untold articles for non-
sf magazines as well as editing 40
anthologies.
The frenzied pace of his writing
becomes apparent in the short
stories of the '50 and '60s through
erratic pacing, poor characterization, banal imagery and, at times,
lack of plot.
Of the 19 stories in World of a
Thousand Colours, all but five date
from his pulp era. While many of
his concepts are intriguing, such as
the fake war in Passport to Sirius
used to stimulate the galactic
economy, they have lost their
freshness — either through a
hackneyed approach to the story or
a better implementation by other
authors or media such as Star Trek.
Silverberg's anthology also has to
compete with the tastes of readers
weaned on the tight, weird humour
of Philip K. Dick, Larry Niven and
Harry Harrison. Most of the short
stories in World of a Thousand Colours are of the earnest but plodding
variety, so that a promising plot like
that of Solitary, where a bored
police computer technician decides
to match his intuition against the
system's logic in tracking down an
escaped convict, quickly turns into
a rote whodunnit exercise.
But the anthology also presents
another side of Silverberg to those
used to his later novels. For most
readers, the stories are new — only
one, How It Was When the Past
Went Away, (where an amnesia victim is dropped into a city's water
supply) is familiar. Silverberg's
selection includes themes ranging
from Earthmen against the aliens
(Neutral Planet, Journey's End) to
the more subtle shades of Earthman
against Earthman (The Pain Ped-
dlars, world of a Thousand
Colors, Prime Commandment).
The strongest element in the anthology is its varied concepts, and it
is interesting for sf buffs to date
each story and figure out if the
parallel works of other authors
came before or after Silverberg's
work. In the case of The Pain Ped-
dlars, where EEG-amplifiers turn
movies of amputations and the like
into sadistic titillation of the
masses, the similarities to the
Feelies of Huxley's Brave New
World are overpowering, yet the
1963 publication date is similar.
There is no doubt that Silverberg
is a fine author and capable of sustained works of excellence like
Nightwings, or even ripping good
reads like Hawksbill Station.
However, World of a Thousand
Colors does not reflect the depth he
is capable of and novice sf readers
should save this book until last
when perusing Silverberg's works.
And for us pros, the best advice is
to wait until a cheaper paperback
makes its appearance. These stories
can wait a bit longer.
Science Observed dispenses with
facts and captures whimsical mood
By KERRY REGIER
If it's facts you want, don't
bother with Science Observed,
Jeremy Bernstein's latest book on
the physical sciences. There are
almost no facts in it.
Science Observed
By Jeremy Bernstein
Basic Books
$21.95
Science Observed deals with patterns and pattern making. Bernstein
is interested in how science itself
works, with special reference to his
own field, physics; and he sketches
the elusive mood of science — a
peculiarly whimsical one.
Science is not just an encyclopedic ■ accumulation of facts,
or even the process of accumulation. It is, as Jacques Barzun
pointed out, a big game.
This game has no fixed rules and
no goal except this: to guess the
rules of the game and to continue
refining that guess. What are called
"facts" follow the rules, and as we
find that our estimates of the rules
must change, so must "facts"
change.
Imbalanced humors once caused
disease, but now bacteria are
responsible.   The   earth   was   flat
once, but now it is round. The
universe used to be about 6,006
years old, but now it is 20 billion.
Of Science Observed, author
Tracy Kidder says, "Bernstein . . .
reveals that science is strange, funny, and above all,
comprehensible."
Bernstein sets about giving us
precisely this picture of science;
science as a process in a game, an
intuitive process, a natural process.
It is the process by which a baby
learns to see, to hear, to use its hand
and feel by which racoons learn
which houses have the tastiest garbage; and by which lovers learn to
know and please each other.
Science is the very idea of flexibility
in the face of change, of delight in
the unexpected.
Bernstein is not a crabbed and
dusty philosopher muttering
metaphors, but an anecdotist.
Science Observed begins with a portrait of a scientist, Marvin Minsky,
who is trying to design more
machines. A more perfect example
of Bernstein's implied vision of the
scientist would be difficult to imagine.
Minsky is a little packrat, constantly making new toys out of
loose electronic parts, playing with
"smart" machines, and even con
quering the world backgammon
championship vicariously as one of
his machines plays unaided to victory.
One eloquent little essay recalls
the days of atmospheric nuclear
weapons testing, and culminates in
Bernstein's 1957 meeting with Adlai
Stevenson who with a simple
gesture showed Bernstein the truth
about the enormous attraction of
these devices. In the middle of
Bernstein's harangue in favor of
atomic weapons tests, Stevenson
stood up and walked away. "He
was right," Bernstein writes. "Proximity to absolute power can make
fools of any of us."
Bernstein includes several fanciful essays such as Nuclear
Research: Shooting the Pussycat,
about nuclear medicinal reactors;
Topless in Hamburg, about the colors and flavors of quarks; and a
funny and literate piece, rather
more of a short story than an essay,
entitled Bubble & Squeak, about
falling in love, and the careful
estimation and influencing of probabilities.
Bubble & Squeak is perhaps the
most intersting piece in the collection. Some may find it frivolous
because it concerns the pursuit of
the opposite sex at a holiday hotel
in the mountains of France and has
little immediately apparent connection with gammoning machines or
charmed quarks. But it is well to
keep in mind the opening passage of
the story while reading it:
"/ knew a mathematician who
had a recurrent dream. He dreamt
that he was a partial derivative. The
number of people who have dreamt
about differential calculus may be
quite substantial, especially if one
includes engineers. Only a professional mathematician, however,
could dream that he had become
the differential calculus."
The story has a certain flavor of
Kafka, and perhaps of Hemingway,
broken as it is into short sentences
and subdivided into little vignettes
which contribute to the slightly
brooding mood of the piece.
"Furthermore, there are the con-
servtion laws — energy, momentum, anular momentum, baryon
and lepton number, to name just a
bare minimum. These are not as
deeply understood as one might
hope, but they must, in any case, be
taken into account on a daily basis.
Summer turns into fall. Decisions
must be made, and later regretted.
There is next to nothing to be done
about this. It runs throughout the
animal kingdom." Page 9
ier 15,1982
FOCUS
ONB00KB
Five Dramatic, True Tales
of People Who Lived in an
Eighte*snth-Ceiituiy Garrison
♦**♦*•*•* Town •*••*••*•*•*••*■*
CHRISTOPHER MOORE
Bastard
child
flawed
By ROBERT BEYNON
Dramatized history is frequently
the bastard child of illicit procreation between history and fiction.
Fiction writers and readers will accept the child dramatized history,
but historians will generally not accept it as being valuable.
A cinematic example of this in
Reds. The film's story is amusingly
told, but the characterization of
John Reed is of dubious historical
value. If you read Reed's Ten Days
That Shook the World, you seriously doubt that the book's dedicated
author was the frivolous romantic
Warren Beatty plays in Reds.
Nevertheless, Beatty's Reed is an interesting character.
Again, the movie is good fiction,
but is of doubtful historical value.
Louisbourg Portraits
By Christopher Moore
MacMillan 302 pages
Louisbourg Portraits is a book of
dramatized history that wants to be
respected as history, not fiction.
The author attempts to understand
a few individuals within the time
and place that shaped them —
Louisbourg from 1713 until its capture by the British in 1759.
Louisbourg was a French fortress
on Cape Breton Island.
The book consists of five tales
based on its inhabitants' lives. The
stories are substantiated by French
historical documents, court
records, marriage registers, diaries
and letters.
The five characters portrayed are
a fair representation of the community's population, which included soldiers, fishermen and merchants.
Describing people of different
times and interests, the tales are
wholly unconnected and not the-
matically unified. The only real
connecting factor is the fortress,
Louisbourg.
In a tale entitled Louis Davory's
Crime a man is tried and acquitted
of stealing tobacco. The Marriage
of Marie-Louise  Cruchon  is   the
See page 12: CHEAP
Re-released classic 'affectionate
critique that seeks old England'
By KELLEY JO BURKE
Bored, beautiful women trail
about immaculate gardens, attended by adoring suitors. If they slip
into the bushes for a moment, what
can happen? A less than chaste kiss,
an adulterous exchange of passionate glances are really the only
possibilities. Cravats must remain
decorously knotted, exquisite combinations of silk and voile must
float with as much lady-like grace
before the interlude.
Margaret Kennedy's The Ladies
of Lyndon, first published in 1922,
is deceptive. Little appears to happen. Passion is beyond the reach of
most of the characters. The main
character, Agatha, forms liasons
out of sheer boredom, rather than
desire. She scarcely participates in
her marriage. Getting married is
after all, "a duty to one's neighbor
and not a personal affair."
When she takes a lover, the loss
of Lyndon, the gracious home of
which she is chatelaine, is her major
concern. The loss of her husband,
and the death of her child apparently pale is comparison which the suffering that will entail.
The Ladies of Lyndon
By Margaret Kennedy
Virago
$7.95
Although the novel focuses on
the web of social convention entrapping Agatha, it is not intrinsically feminist. It is rather a
description of the general malaise
that hit British society following
WW I.
Agatha, like many other
characters in the novel, is struck, in
a quiet and nagging way, by the absolute separation of her life from
the brutal realities which the war
brought home to the ruling class.
Her role within the ruling class is
a brilliant female ornament, her
husband's as the benevolent squire.
The absurdity and irrelevance of
these roles are painted in delicate,
ironic tones by Kennedy. The word
socialism is often bandied about,
but much in the same manner that
one would speak of other family
skeletons, like incest, or bad table
manners.
There is a quality of affection in
that critique, a sort of longing for
the old England, where ladies and
gentlemen seemed to have a place,
and the gracious life of the few was
a  natural  part   of order  of the
universe.
Virago Modern Classics published this book, not for its feminist
content, but for the quality of the
writing, their main objective is to
ressurect literary works which may
have been ignored because of their
female authorship. Kennedy's work
easily ranks in quality with Aldous
Huxley's writings of the same era,
and gives an attention to the minute
and personal details of experience
that Huxley's does not.
Canajan graphics very excellent eh?
Mu duii) Kins \
By NANCY CAMPBELL
If you've ever doubted the axiom that Canada is a
faceless country, Friends, Hosers and Countrymen! will
provide more than sufficient proof that you're right.
FHandC is the first collection of caricatures drawn by
Isaac Bickerstaff, who is better known in real life as Don
Evans. His Aislin-ish graphics have adorned the pages
of Maclean's, the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star,
Weekend Magazine and the Tamarack Review, as well
as exercises in Canadiana such as Canajan, Eh? French
Canajan, He and Canada 1984.
Friends, Hosers and Countrymen!
By Isaac Bickerstaff
Lester & Orpen Dennvs
135 pages, $9.95
Divided into several chapters (including Politicians
and Other Bigwigs, Stars, Jocks and Hotshots, Can Litters and Pundits and Personages), Bickerstaffs pen
savages, or in some cases merely mauls, Canadians well
known and obscure.
Unlike Aislin, whose style he most resembles,
Bickerstaffs faces are always easily recognizable and
fair in their exaggeration. He also pays a lot of attention
to clothes, and when not used to set the scene they are
used as secondary jokes — for example, Irving Layton
wears a sporran designed so that it only focuses more attention on his highly publicized loins.
Bickerstaffs Canlit caricatures are the bitchiest in the
collection and certainly the most humorous. Gems include a self-flagellating Leonard Cohen, a bejewelled
and bikini'd Michel Tremblay, Marian Engel with a
salacious bear and Little Red Riding Hood Margaret Atwood with an American wolf after her.
See page 12: EASTERN Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15,1982
(       'Birdwatch       )
FOOTBALL
UBC Thunderbirds clinched first
place in the WIFL when they gained
a 21-14 come-from-behind victory
against the University of Manitoba
Bisons in Winnipeg last Saturday.
The WIFL placing gives UBC
home advantage for the playoffs.
Coach Frank Smith said that
although the team hadn't played as
well as they might they had still
played well enough to deserve the
win especially after fighting back
from a 13-0 halftime deficit.
The next match for the Thunderbirds is today at Thunderbird
Stadium against the University of
Alberta Golden Bears with the San
Diego Chicken in attendance.
The athletic department normally
has trouble
giving football
game
tickets away.
But not the San Diego
Chicken who will be charging $2.50
unless you're an adult in which case
it is $5.00
TEAM
GP W L   T    PF
PA TP
B.C.
6    6    0    0    209
52    12
Manitoba
5    3    2    0    149
93      6
Saskatchewan
5    2    3    0     80
118      4
Calgary
6    2    4    0      93
205      4
Alberta
6    1    5    0     88
159      2
Outstanding plays of Saturdays
match were 50 and 56 yard
touchdown passes by quarter-back
Jay Gard to Chris Gradenia and
Ken Munro.
The University of Alberta Golden
Bears started this season going for
an unprecedented fourth consecutive WIFL title (obviously winning football is a way of life in Edmonton) after turning over the
Thunderbird's in last year's
playoff. Now they have a one win
five losses record so the chances are
UBC will gain sweet revenge.
It is widely speculated that having
secured first place and the valuable
home playoff advantage, coach
Frank Smith will rest quarterback
Gard and give Sheldon Petri a rare
outing in his place.
ICE HOCKEY/RUGBY
This weekend sees two alumni
matches on campus. The ice-hockey
team will play on Friday night at the
winter sports arena facing off at
8 p.m. On Saturday the rugby
team face their old boys for the
Buzz Moore tankard at 2:30 on the
rugby field.
SOCCER
Also on campus this weekend will
be two women's soccer matches.
One is at 10 a.m. on Sunday and
one at 2 p.m. the same afternoon.
Both are on Wolfson field. We
guess that one is a cup match and
the other a postponed league game.
"/ have clinched and closed with the naked
North, I have learned to defy and defend;
Shoulder to shoulder ive have fought it
out-yet the xoild must win in the end."
The black sheep of Canadian liquors
\Ukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
ORE AT TRFK
WEEK
OCT. 18 - OCT. 23
^22™19*
MONDAY:
GREAT TREK BUTTON GAME
FIND A MATCHING BUTTON ON CAMPUS AND
WIN A PRIZE! PRIZES PROVIDED BY MANY
VANCOUVER RESTAURANTS. BUTTONS
AVAILABLE FROM YOUR A.M.S. CLUB,
UNDERGRAD SOCIETY OR THE A.M.S. TICKET
CENTRE. (CONTEST ENDS FRI., OCT. 22,
4:00 P.M.)
TUESDAY:
1920S FILM NIGHT
S.U.B. AUDITORIUM, SHOWS 7:00 and 9:00
P.M., TICKETS $1.00. SEE THE ORIGINAL
GREAT TREK OF 1922!
WEDNESDAY: 1920'S CABARET, "GIN AND SIN"
S.U.B. PARTYROOM, 7:00 P.M., TICKETS $5.00.
ALL FLAPPERS AND GANGSTERS ARE INVITED
TO A NIGHT OF FUN!
THURSDAY:   ANNUAL INTRAMURAL ARTS '20 RELAY RACE
S.U.B. PLAZA 12:30 P.M., RECEPTION
FOLLOWING, S.U.B. CONVERSATION PIT.
20'S SWIMSUIT & FUNNY DIVING COMPETITION
U.B.C. AQUATIC CENTRE, 7:00 P.M.
FREE ADMISSION FOR THOSE IN PERIOD COSTUME.
FRIDAY:
SATURDAY:
FOUNDERS DINNER AND DANCE
GUEST SPEAKER: PIERRE BERTON.
S.U.B. BALLROOM 6:00 P.M., STUDENTS &
SENIORS $15.00. NON-STUDENTS $25.00.
COME AND DANCE TO THE SOUND OF THE
WILDROOT ORCHESTRA AT 9:30 P.M.
GREAT TREK PARADE AND BBQ
PARADE LEAVES Q.E. THEATRE AT 11:00 A.M.
(BUSES LEAVE S.U.B. FOR Q.E. THEATRE AT
9:30 A.M.). FREE BBQ FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS
FOLLOWING, S.U.B. PLAZA.
JOIN THE CELEBRATION!
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE A.M.S. TICKET CENTRE, S.U.B.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT CLIFF STEWART,
GREAT TREK COMMITTEE CHAIR, 228-3092. Friday, October 15,1982
Page 11
Newfies give
great show
By RICHARD THOMAS Salutin as they rehearsed, building
The man who loves to boast that the sharp-witted play,
he is the only person alive who The script examines the spirit of
created a province — "the little the   man   who   began   as   New-
fellow from Gambo" — is now in foundland's   hero  and  ended  up
town until Oct. 30. their enemy, smashing unions, af-
St. John's Rising Tide Theatre's filiating with corrupt German in-
production   affectionately   and dustralists, destroying industry on
humorously   traces   the   life   of the rock and destroying the region's
Joseph R. (Joey) Smallwood, tak- charm.
ing an auspicious peek at an event- The first act follows Smallwood
ful career of ups and downs of the as he fights to make Newfoundland
81 year old former Newfie premier Canada's  tenth  province.   "After
who was lord of the rock for 23 all, 10 is a good, round number"
years. says Joey. Eastern Liberal in bow
Joey looks at the life of this col- tie and spectacles,
orful demagogue from my career as The second act illustrates the
a journalist, through his young "mainlanders' benefits" that New-
years as a socialist in New York, to foundland reaps after Confedera-
failing as a pig farmer, to his sue- tion: "fascinating" flush toilets,
cess as a popular radio personality, 255 municipal dumps, 1200 new
confederalist and, beginning April schools, a new university, 28
Fool's Day 1949, as the first hospitals, 102 libraries and new
premier of Canada's favorite source kinds of candy bars. The result is a
of jokes, Newfoundland. fair and balanced look at Joey,
The  production  follows  Joey's perhaps more than history will allot
political career right to his  final in the years to come,
election defeat in 1971. Newfoundland must be proud to                         NOBLE . . . tears for
play home to the Rising Tide
Joey . . . Theatre. This is a professional realistic set that relies on imagina-
By St. John Rising Tide troupe that has an abundance of *>on, lighting and an open mind. It
Theatre creativity, spark and teamwork. lends great atmosphere and energy
Directed by Donna Butt Donna Butt has directed Joey to the play itself.
At Vancouver East Cultural flawlessly, with pacing that evokes But by far. the star and founda-
Centre until Oct. 30 richness of each character's talents. tion of the play is Kevin Noble in
  David Fox,  Sheilagh Guy,  Brian     the difficult leading role of Joey.
Some found it surprising when Downey,   David   Ross   and   Jeff     Rocking   on   his   feet,   hands   in
.Smallwood was named best actor Pinter carry multiple roles, playing     pockets and arms by his side, this lit-
for  his  performance  in  the  film Joey's friends and foes alike: Greg     tle performer mimicks Smallwood
documentary   The   Little   Fellow Power,   John   Crosbie   and   Dr.      perfectly. Hands suddenly burst in-
From Gambo a few years ago. But Alfred Valdmanis just to name a     t0 1u*clc and dramatic gestures,
it should not be a great surprise few.   The  roles  generally  remain         But Noble can do more than keep
when one examines his theatrical comic and are played with energy     us   laughing.   There   is   a   fine
talents as a statesman, which are and ease. There is a hilarious scene     dramatic side to his character as
captured in this two-act production, involving David Fox as an Ottawa     well, as seen in a very emotional
First conceived four years ago by bureaucrat   trying  to  explain  the     moment when Joey goes out in the
Newfoundlander Michael Cook, the federal   census   to   three   motor-     rain to convince his friend Greg
play   of  Smallwood's  life,   Joey, mouthed fishermen on the end of a     Power to stay with him. He begs "I
took form in a whirlwind, being pier.   When  these  three  machine     don't want you, Greg. I need you."
written   in   less   than   six   weeks, guns open up, the English language        Joey offers many messages for
Eleven members of Rising Tide col- doesn't stand a chance.                         the rest of Canada.  It  is an in-
laborated   with   playwright   Rick Derek  Butt has created a sur-     teresting exercise to compare the
You can bet your chicken sausage
gumbo on Louisiana sweatathon
By CHARLES CAMPBELL some questions of your own, like        The Bon Temps Zydeco Band are
If Elvis Presley had been black,    who is Queen Ida and what does zy-   about as peculiar as the music they
female, born in Louisiana and a vir-   deco mean? Queen Ida was one of   play. There is Queen Ida festooned
tuoso accordion  player would he    the greatest surprises of last sum-    with more glittery decoration than a
have been  Queen  Ida?  Probably    mer's folk music festival. She is also    Christmas tree. There is the band's
not. the person who explains to the cor-   anchor on the triangle and bullet-
If the Allman Brothers played    pulent flesh that zydeco is the new-    proof  washboard,   a  silk  shirted
reggae at 78 rpm would they be The    est sounding kind of music. cowboy referred to only as Willy.
Bontemps   Zydeco   Band?   Well,       And while zydeco is quite unlike    He may have the only face in the
maybe. anything you will hear on the radio,    southeast older and less animated
If you were at the Commodore    new is an adjective the belies the    than Mount Rushmore.
And there is his opposite: Pierre
Leroux,   an  impish   fiddle  player
whose multicolored headband kept
his abundant hair from mixing too
,^^^^^^^m, I, .—m m im      ,,Lji******at******************************i   freely with his bowstrings.
(•-M^^^^^^^HIiHsflL   ^SXwA^l^f-I^^^^H       Leroux  almost   stole  the  show
'^^\?qfck^k^Bl^^B   frorn Queen Ida when he danced
across the stage like an elf on midsummer night's eve and burned
through the most peculiar version
of Orange Blossom Special I've ever
iiSe." '^EGkWfffiP "1K\ x^\\\\X\\1^mE^*M heard-
ffa*  4mj5i\ *K mife 12M   wftvo&sMiflMM But ne sti" didn't dance quite as
r.'l2mmmmS: vJL ^^^^J^3^_^ja|jBBj|^^^^B much as most of the members of the
j^^VHHl^^^^^H audience who packed the Commo-
JA" * "ifiMmmmmmmmWi^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-^-* dore floor for three 45 minute sets
-chan.. cmpb.li Pho«o of Queen Ida on one very hot Octo-
QUEEN IDA . . . zydeco, what zydeco? ber ni8ht
The Vancouver Folk Music Festi-
Ballroom last Thursday or Friday traditional influences that zydeco val sponsored concert was enough
night were you dancing? Does the incorporates. Queen Ida and her of a success that they've already
Commodore call an open window band take a healthy chunk of coun- made tentative arrangements for
air conditioning? Do 20 tons of os- try and bluegrass, a dose of blues another Louisiana sweatathon next
dilating, corpulent overheated flesh    and a little bit of rock and roll and ' March.
on a well sprung dance floor make   blend them with their own cajun       They will have no trouble selling
you wish for an extra pair of under-   heritage. Then they add a unique   out two more shows on the reputa-
wear? You can bet your chicken   and   infectious   rhythm   that's   as   tion of last week's concerts,
sausage gumbo. hard to describe as the word zydeco       Be there. Pour le bon temps tout
■ B*y-now you're probably,asking.  i,t$eJC. ......... . .. . . .vie.temps. . .   .
the finance minister after presentation of Newfie budget
different cultures of the people of
two coasts which are similar in so
many ways. Joey is a fair and funny
tribute to the statesman who at one
time had been hated. Much of the
cast, being Newfies, add their own
biases and opinions instinctively to
the performance, giving us a convincing and entertaining evening of
theatre.
Ashby impressive
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Hal Ashby's new film has such a
glittery, superficial surface, that at
first glance, one is inclined to dismiss it. The tale of two gamblers on
the run from the mob has the feel of
a '40s Abbott and Costello or Bob
Hope movie, in which our heroes
are trying to elude gangsters and
killers.
But times have changed. What we
used to laugh at before, what was
just comedy before, has now turned
sour. Beneath the surface humor of
Ashby's Lookin' To Get Out is the
tragicomedy of a man who would
not — or could not — control his
life.
Lookin' To Get Out
Directed by Hal Ashby
Starring Jon Voight and Burt Young
Playing at Capitol Six
In Lookin' To Get Out, Jon
Voight plays Alex Kovac, a man
who can never sustain a winning
streak. But he doesn't take his debts
seriously. All he sees before him is
the comfort of numbers and dollar
bills, and he doesn't see why mob
goons get excited when he loses and
cannot pay them.
Alex doesn't have any friends except Jerry (Burt Young), who acts
as a surrogate spouse and is frequently the quiet voice of common
sense. The only thing is that Jerry
doesn't know just how wise he is;
all he wants to do. is avoid trouble
that Alex continually finds and
brings home.
After they are threatened by two
heavies trying to collect Alex's
debts, Alex and Jerry escape to Las
Vegas, where Alex continues to act
as freely as ever. What Alex is interested in is the big game that will
make him rich so that he won't have
to worry about anything ever again.
But the film makes it clear that
Alex's hope of winning such a game
is merely a pipe dream because Alex
is the archetype of a loser who is
perennially optimistic.
There is added dimension to
Alex's character. At the heart of his
gambling life is an unwillingness to
deal with any certainties or realities
that creep into his life. Alex can't
handle anything long-term or defin
ite that involves responsibility, because then he would have no choice
but to pay up.
When Alex meets his former lover
(Ann Margaret), who he had left
years ago and who still cares about
him, he acts as if she were an acquaintance, and he doesn't stop
Jerry from believing that she is a
prostitute. And when her lover and
boss (Richard Bradford), who owns
the hotel casino where Alex and
Jerry are staying under aliases, tells
him about the child he fathered,
Alex doesn't know how to deal with
the revelation. After meeting the
child, he puts on the happy face of a
clown, as a cover-up — as
Chaplin's characters sometimes
did.
Lookin' To Get Out has such a
neon surface, primarily due to Haskell Wexler's cinematography, that
viewers may not realize that in
Voight and Burt Young they are
seeing a standard theatrical and
cinematic archetypes — Laurel and
Hardy, Abbott and Costello, or
perhaps more appropriately, Beckett's Didi and Gogo.
The difference here is that the
vaudevillian atmosphere of years
past has now been replaced by Las
Vegas, where the bad joke is a slot
machine or a game of blackjack.
Lookin' To Get Out doesn't hold
together the way Ashby's Harold
and Maude or Being There did, primarily because the script, by Al
Schwartz and Voight, doesn't have
the kind of crisp dialogue that
makes you pay attention to the significance of Alex's situation. And
everything in the movie sounds familiar — even the plot, which seems
to have its genesis in Altman's California Split.
In one sense Alex represents
something more significant than the
archetype of the born loser. The
story of Alex could be the story of
modern America, a hedonistic
America, in which no one connects
with each other, and the motivating
factor is money.
Like Miller's Willie Loman, and
this film's Alex, Lookin' To Get
Out deserves our attention. To dismiss it would be something close to
tragedy. Or at least tragicomedy. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15,1982
Cheap stinks
From page 9
story of a merchant ruined by his
mother-in-law's malice. A fisherman drowns and leaves his family in
France in poverty in Charles Re-
naut's Letters.
An air of doom hovers above the
tales. Consequently the tales seem
just oppressive, not dramatic.
Author Moore frequently endangers his characters and plot by focusing on historical circumstances.
For example, most of Sergeant Kol-
ler in Peace and War is concerned
with 18th century siegecraft, not
Sergeant Roller.
But the book sometimes stinks of
the cheap odor of rosy National
Geographic romanticism.
In the preface's first two
paragraphs he refers to the "careful
ritual of . . . siegecraft,"
"showered death," "a satisfying
moral," and "drama of its conflicts" — illustrating instances of
such unnecessary romanticism.
If Moore had avoided romantic
doggerel in his attempt "to restore
to vivid life five people," the book
might have been excellent. As it
stands it is merely a bastard child
yearning to be accepted in the family called history.
Eastern bias
From page 9
While some people are unknown
to Westerners (who, for example,
knows that Elwy Yost is Global
TV's resident movie critic?), the
Eastern bias isn't strong enough to
leave the reader shaking his head in
confusion.
With Doonesbury books going
for $14.95 in some cases, FH&C! is
a made-in-Canada bargain with
good humor as a bonus. As one of
the better cartoon collections to
come along lately, it's certainly
worth picking up — and the laughs
will still be relevant a few years
from now as the victims continue to
move inexorably through public
life.
EXPERIENCE
TOTAL ENJOYMENT
YOUR ENTERTAINERS
Oct.5-Oct. 16 "JIM FOSTER'
Oct. 19-Nov. 1 "STEVE INGRAM'
MondavNiteis "JAZZ NITE'
PLUS
Enjoy \unct\\dirfei or a
ate night snitfkl
Be tempted witn homemade
pastas. :   j
quiches seafood and saiads
Relax,s' back w\th desse'ts
cappuccino apd\ood
conversation!
WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE
Six week course. Class size limited to twenty. Register now at
the Women Students' Office, Brock Hall, Rm. 203. Only $15.
STARTING:
TUESDAY, OCT. 19 — 12:30-2:30 — SUB 215
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20 — 4:00-6:00 — Brock 302
Sponsored by ubc women's centre
WOMEN SHAPING THE CITY
A panel discussion with five women who shape our city — its
politics, its culture and its environment!
Here's an opportunity to meet them and hear them talk about
their careers.
 PANELISTS	
ANNE MACDONALD, Community Arts Council of Vancouver.
PAULINE WEINSTEIN, ?%£££&%»*«
RONDA HOWARD, Area Planner, Vancouver City Hall
HELEN  BOYCE, Alderman, Vancouver City Council
SUSAN ANDERSON, Social Planner, Vancouver City Hall
IlTWr  I VTUrAP    Director of Women
MODERATOR: J U PN £/ JL I 1 tHjUlti, Students'Office
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21,
12:30-1:30 p.m. — BROCK 302
SPONSORED BY THE
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Open Daily from 11:00 a.m.-1:00 a.m.
Sundays: 11:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m.
Sunday Brunch: 11  JO ,; m.-2 uu p.m.
1184 DENMAN 084-5C-:2 Friday, October 15,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Crimes less than accurate
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Lenny is taking care of grandpap-
py who is threatening to lapse into a
coma. Meg has come back home
after suffering a nervous
breakdown while pursuing a singing
career. Babe, the youngest of the
three women, has just shot her husband and likes making lemonade
during moments of crisis.
Lenny, Meg, and Babe are three
sisters indulging in Crimes of the
Heart, the pulitzer-prize winning
Beth Heley play which is currently
given a less than successful production by the Arts Club Theatre.
Crimes of the Heart
By Beth Henley
Directed by Bill Millerd
At the Arts Oub on Granville Island
Set in Hazlewurst, Mississippi,
"five years after Hurricane
Camille," Crimes of the Heart
draws out every cliche and
stereotype   about    small   town
situations that end up being comic,
is instead stretched to an unnecessary length.
With a play like Crimes of the
Heart, which may look interesting
on paper because it potentially has
strong women characters, one may
wonder why it has settled in for a
long run on Broadway, much less
why it deserved a Pulitzer prize.
And it doesn't help matters if the
actors try to put on a Southern
drawl that is reminiscent of Dukes
of Hazzard.
USED COMPUTER
Buy-Sell-Trade-Consignment
Call 738-3841
KEY COMPUTER
Sale and Service Ltd.
2391 Burrard St.
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
With the exception of Moira
Walley's protrayal as Babe, none of
the perfomances are truly
memorable. One may marvel at
designer Alison Green's realistic
set, but that can be done during the
intermission. What is not possible is
watching a play that has competent
actors who in this instance have
turned in less than accurate performances.
The play—and the current production—should have been called
Heartbreak of Psoriasis.
WALLEY . . . lemonade fetishes
Americana. There is the neighbourhood gossip and busybody, and
even a character called Doc Porter
who isn't really a doctor.
The problem with depicting
sterotypes—or just types-as a comic
send-up of Southern melodramas
is that the writer must come up with
situations that seem original and innovative. What is needed is a twist
to the familiar to jolt the reader —
or the audience member — into appreciating the writer's craft.
But Crimes of the Heart offers
few surprises. Everything is drawn
out, sometimes laboriously
sometimes interestingly as the three
sisters come together at a reunion,
but never does the play get intriguing enough for one to sit up and
take notice. Henley has a gift for
capturing idioms of her Southern
characters, and nothing rings false
in the lines.
The truth is, though, that there is
nothing in the play that deserves to
be played out for three acts. What
could have been a witty one-act
play, loaded with dramatic, ghastly
Slapstick film will please
By ALLAN MAIN
The year was 1954, it was a time
when a Buick was a Buick, comedy
was king, and television was live.
The film about that years is My
Favourite Year, a swashbuckling
tale of a television scriptwriter's
adventures as the chaperon of an
alcoholic movie idol.
Directed by Richard Benjamin in
his first time role as director, with
help from Mel Brooks, the film is a
visual and physical slapstick, a pie
in the face gags type comedy with
an unconcealed Brooks touch.
Brooks' films are slapstick comic
entertainment, which Benjamin
seems able to handle.
The story concerns Alan Swan
(played by Peter O'Toole) an
alcoholic movie idol, whose off
screen personality resembles his
swashbuckling film roles. He is
forced to do a television guest spot
because of financial problems with
the IRS. He is placed in the care of
one of his biggest fans, comedy
scriptwriter Benjy Stone, played by
newcomer Mark Linn-Baker, and
the two of them are paired for My
Favourite Year's New York adventures.
My Favorite Year
Directed by Richard Benjamin
Playing at Capitol Six
With the addition of a little
romance and a gangster union boss
the film works its way to a predictable climax. Swan gets the chance
to redeem himself, as if he were out
of a Douglas Fairbanks film.
The role of Swan is well played
by O'Toole, an actor more experienced in playing the serious
swashbuckling hero type than the
comic character he protrays in this
film.
Brooks fans and lovers of the
visual comic style will love the film.
It's not enlightening, and it's not
particularly heart warning. But the
least you can say is that it is
humorous.
Mi Mi ■■ tm Mi Mi Mi MM
■ You'll be Home ■
1 for CHRISTMAS ■
with a low-cost TRAVEL CUTS
flight!
TORONTO $339
MONTREAL $389 j
EDMONTON * 119        \
SUBJECT TO
GOVERNMENT!" APPROVAL'
Going   r* TRAVEL
Youri-Vaylt*   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
Mi
,-H
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION PROGRAMME
as taught by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
SCIENTIFICALLY VERIFIED TO
• Improve Academic Performance
• Increase Intelligence Growth Rate
• Increase Mental Clarity
• Reduce Stress
Introductory Lecture
Every Monday
SUB Room 211
Phone 263-2655
OPEN TO EVERYONE
LADIES
MANUFACTURERS OUTLET
FOR
DESIGNER & BRAND NAME
FASHIONS
EVERYTHING UP TO 90% OFF
ORIGINAL PRICES.
(ALL THE TIME;
B
roken Lines — Broken Sizes — Broken Price
for those who like exciting shopping.
New Shipments Weekly!
s
JUST ARRIVED
DESIGNER SILK BLOUSES
s29'5
V
"A THING OF BEAUTY AT A LOW PRICE"
■■   3316 CAMBIE STREET (AT 17th)    mt
■"                       875-1922                       ^
&
I ah   LSAT'MCAT-GRE
1 GRE PSYCH • GRE BIO
MAT • GMAT • DAT
OCAT • PCAT • VAT
SSAT-PSAT-ACHIEVEMENTS
SAT - ACT - TOEFL • MSKP
NATL MED BDS • ECFMG
FLEX • VQE • NDB • RN BOS
CPA • SPEED READING
.Sfeifley-H HNPMN
EDUCATIONAL  CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since   1938
for tnlormation. Please Call
■■■i   (206)832-0634    ^—
$1.00
or 20% OFF
with this coupon
on repair of shoes
or handbags.
Students /Faculty
1 Day Service
Broadway
Shoe Repair
754 East Broadway,
 872-5744	
450 members Since Clubs Days
UBC Dance Club
You Can Still Join and
CATCH THE BEAT
SKYSAVHt
mm 11.
*<«
Ihvel Aid Save $$$
—Xmas Special Fare to Toronto from Vancouver
(R.T.)   $389
—Vancouver-Toronto (R.T.)  $249-$299
—Special Low Fare to London from Vancouver
(R.T.)    $688
—Standby Fare from Seattle to London
One Way,   $U.S.339-$450
—Vancouver to Dublin (R.T.)   $952
-Vancouverto Tokyo (R.T.)   $960
—Vancouver to Hong Kong (R.T.)   $1050
—Special Low Fare to Asia:
Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore, Manila,
Penang, Bangkok, Jakarta, Columbo
e.g.: Vancouver-Kuala Lumpur(R.T.)    $1260
—Vancouverto San Francisco (R.T.)    $149to $208
—Vancouver to Tokyo (Air, sea, ferry, rail,
includes 7 nights hotel)    $1350
—Special  Group  F:are to  Many Oriental  Cities for
Education Programme
1719 Davie Street Phone
Vancouver, B.C. (604)682 7212
Release your slress the oriental way;
relax and unwind- while our Shiatsu
therapist works stress and tension out
of your body.
Shiatsu is a type of
acupressure therapy which
engages the use of fingers to
apply pressure to specific
points of the body, thus
stimulating the body's
natural powers of recuperation, eliminating fatigue
and promoting general
good health.
Shiatsu is soothing and non-painful,
and generally generates a feeling of
deep relaxation.
Shiatsu is one of the few remaining arts in the world
where a Shiatsu apprentice's
skill is directly proportional
to the skill of the master.
Our Shiatsu therapist was
trained under Tokujiro
Namikoshi.
Welcome to SKINFIT 2511 Burrard
at Broadway, Vancouver Telephone:
734-5564
STRESS
GETTING YOU DOWN? Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1982
J&M
Vancouver
after Classes ...
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
1275 Seymour St.
LiVER-^l'ROI^
Till Saturday
CITY SCAPE
Next Week
CRYSTAL HAZE
limit
932 Granville Mall      687-6418
687-5566 684-2944
1136 W.Georgia St.
Is Rock and Roll
Appearing
To Oct. 16
3-D
Next Week
PACHEENA
Monday—Battle of the Sexes
Tues.—T & A Night
Wed.—Ladies Night
(Male Strippers)
Ladies admitted free
Mon.-Thurs.
Open 8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
Mon.-Sat.
Nightly from 8 p.m.-10 p.m.
M.T.V.   live   from   N.Y.   on
Canada's largest 25 ft. Screen
HONG KONG
CHINESE
FOODS
Mon.-Fri 11:30 am - 2:00 pm
4:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Sat & Sun     4:00 pm - 10:00 pm
0
Mr
1*
'Ht
EAT IN
OR
TAKE OUT
LUNCH
SPECIALS
$2.90
5732 University Boulevard
TEL. 224-1313
Give yourself a treat —
eat out tonight at one of the
fine restaurants advertise in
The Ubyssey!
UBG Gampas
■Stt"    Pizza
 i
, Pie.*'
Steak & Pizza -  Lasagna
Spare Ribs       Ravioli
Chicken       Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224 4218 - 224-0529
Hours Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 a.m.
fri   11:30a.m.  - 3:00a.m
Sat. 4:00 p.m.  - 3:00 am
Sun. 4:0Pp.m    -   1:00a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
august
Pub
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
Two Shows Nightly
9:30 & 12:30
The Dufferin Hotel
900 Seymour • 683-4718
CITR & THE PIT
Present
THE
HOT
AIR
SHOW
The Cheapest Free
Entertainment in
Town featuring
Politik Krash
&
GROUND ZERO
Mon., Oct. 18. 1982
9:30 p.m. - NO COVER
R
fml02
mtti&tt^hj^rji<^r^x*=ja^it=ip:'
THIS WEEK
Innocent Bystander
NEXT WEEK
RAGE
Mondays — Bo Derrick Wet 10, excellent cash prizes.
Tuesdays — So You Think You're
Funny Contest (open to all amateur comedians). Win a trip to
Hollywood's "Comedy Shop."
Wednesdays — Discover Ladies Nite
Male Dancers from 8-10 p.m.
Thursdays — Ladies Nite, Mini
skirted ladies free
Fri. & Sat. - First 50 ladies free
(FREE Parking at Kingsgate)
315 E BROADWAY
879-4651
5The Kind's
Head
ENTERTAINMtN
F<TWO FOR HUAN"
Present this coupon for one complimentary appeteaser when an ap-
peteaser of equal or greater value is
purchased (till October 31/82).
"MEET YOU AT
THE HEAD"
Wi}tWwj$]i^mhMm
1618 Yew Street, Vancouver, B.C.
e^3
Phone No. 733-3933
FULL MEAL
DEAL
$3
It's the best meal deal going. Our 100% pure
beef double burger with "More Burger Than
BunTM". A small order of crispy, golden fries.
Your favorite small drink. And, to top it all off
a cool and creamy 5 oz. DAIRY QUEEN®
Sundae. All for only $3.29. Get a good deal
on a full meal. Head for the corner of
Broadway and Trafalgar.
'■   AM DO. Corp/1981
Dairy
Queen
brazier,
2601 W. Broadway
at Trafalgar
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery I
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
^■gJ^sifeaiJBkaLs'r^r-^lr^r^e^s^j^EJig'i-^.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT '
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
^^^  CLOSED SATURDAYS
•■Ml:   Sundays and Holidays
UjgJvj,      4.00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
■j (Opposite Chevron St.itmnj     ■
TRADITION
2272 W. 4th Ave.
While still keeping to our
traditional cozy Greek
atmosphere, we have now
expanded in order to accomodate
your Wedding, Birthday, Party,
lunch or dinner. You'll be taken-
with the Full Array of our
delicacies served to your banquet.
We even take care of the Cake!
• COMBINATION PLATTERS
• SKEWER CHOICES
(SOUVLAKIA)
• POPULAR SPECIALTIES
• ORETIKA  •  HORIATIKI
11  a.m.-1   a.m.   Monday to  Saturday 4-11   p.m.   Sunday 736-2118
Gourmets of the World Unite at
%*noyfc
RESTA URANT
We're Celebrating Our Annual Anniversary
We would like to treat you to a complimentary desert of your
choice with any purchase of one of our complete dinners.
2505 Alma Street
224-1122
safi -vofti eafi»
*^   1925 W 4th Ave     734-2822   *^ Friday, October 15,1982
YilOflC
Pacheena: rock. Gators, to Oct. 16.
Army: roctc. Gators, Oct. 18-23.
David Raven and Tha Escorts: rock. Town
Pump, to Oct. 16.
Spent Youth: rockabilly. Town Pump, Oct. 18-19.
Stilatto: rock, Backstage, to Oct. 16.
Lou Valantlno: rock. Backstage, Oct. 18-23.
Nazarftas: reggae, Oct. 16, Soft Rock Cafe.
Murray McLaughlan: folk, Oct. 20-21, Soft Rock
Cafe.
French Letters: new wave, Oct. 22, Soft Rock
Cafe.
Robert Ashley: new music, Oct. SFU theatre, call
291-3514 for more information.
April Wine/Johnny Winter: rock, Oct. 16,
Pacific coliseum. VTC/CBO.
Pat Metheny: jazz, Oct. 17, Queen Elizabeth
theatre. VTC/CBO.
Modernettes: rocka-punk, Oct. 18, The Commodore. VTC/CBO.
Klngbeee/Herald Nix: rockabilly, Oct. 19, The
Commodore. VTC/CBO.
Paul Horn/David Sereda: concert for peace,
Oct. 22, St. Andrew Wesley Church, Burrard and
Nelson. Advance tickets $9.50 at Black Syvan
records. Spy records, Berlin, or Banyen Books,
Moe Koffman: jazz, Oct. 22, Orpheum theatre,
VTC/CBO.
UBC Symphony Orchestra: classical, Oct. 21-22,
recital hall.
HpVl£6
Pacific Cln.m«tfHKiiia: acreening8 at National
Film Board theatre, 1151 W. Georgia, Macbeth with
Oraon Wallet. 2, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Oct. 17. I
Vitelloni, 7 and 9:30 p.m., Oct. 20.
Ridge Theatre: 06th and Arbutus. 738-6311):
Oct. 15-17: My Dinner With Andre, 7:30 p.m.;
Meeting! With Remarkable Man, 9:35 p.m. Oct.
18: Tell M. A Riddle, 7:30 p.m.; Stevi. with Glenda Jackaon. All proceeds donated to Kinesis, a
newspaper published by the Vancouver Status ot
Women. Oiscusaion with Kinesis staff follows
movies. Oct. 19: Man Of Iron, Cannes film festival
winner, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20-21: Get Out Your
Hankerchlefa, 7:30 p.m.; Beau-Pere, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver Eaat Cinema: (7th and Commercial,
253-5466): Oct. 15-17: Loulou, 7 p.m.; Stay Aa You
Are. 9 p.m.; Nea, 11 p.m. Oct. 18-19: African
Queen with Humphrey Bogart, 7:30 p.m.; Citizen
Kane. 9:25 p.m.; Oct. 20-21: Stavisky. 7:30 p.m.,
Je T'aim., J. T'alm., 9:46 p.m.
The Savoy: 12321 Main at Sth, 872-2124): To Oct.
17: Revenge Of The Shogun women, 7:30 and
9:15 p.m. Oct. 18-19: Atlantic City, with Burt Lancaster, 7:30 p.m.; Gloria. 9:30 p.m. Oct. 20-21: All
Screwed Up, 7:30 p.m.; Tha Seduction of Mimi.
9:30 p.m.
The Black Bonepiei of Wullie MacCrimmon:
W. O. Mitchell's comedy parable, 8 p.m., to Oct. 23,
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse. VTC/CBO.
Jitter.: David French's backstage comedy, 8
p.m.. Studio 58, Langara Campus. Also at Vagabond
Playhouse, Queens Park, New West.
Joey, Newfie perspectives, 8:30 p.m., Vancouver
East Cultural Centre.
Crimea of The Heart: witty story of three sisters.
Arts Club Granville Island.
Talking Dirty: Long running (understatement)
comedy. Arts Club Seymour.
A Murder la Announced: Agatha Christie's
mystery thriller, 8:30 p.m , Metro Theatre, 1370 S.W.
Marine Dr., to Oct. 30.
- — <•
Modern Art: paintings by Lewis Desoto, to Oct.
23. Unit/Pitt Gallery, 163 W. Pender.
Parformanc.  Art:   performance  still   life  with
Rodney Clark, Oct. 20, The Luv-A-Fair, $3.
Photofmt 82: slide show, Oct. 22, 8 p.m. Robson
Room, YMCA, 180 6th St., New Westminister, *3.
Call 436-7167 for more information.
Th. Hunt Family Fort Rup.it Dancers: traditional Northwest Coast Indian dancing, 2:30 p.m.,
Oct. 17, UBC Muaeum of Anthropology.
TODAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
video tape: the last epidemic, all welcome,
noon, SUB 206.
INTRAMURALS
Peripheral road run (3.8 km), noon, SUB plaza.
UBC CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
Lecture, Jonathan Kozol:  can public schools
create a compassionate society? 8 p.m., IRC 2.
CANADIAN FEDERATION OF STUDENTS
Brenda Cote, national chairperson of CFS speaking on the national student movement, noon,
SUB 207/209.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Folk dance, 8:30 p.m.. Graduate Student centre
ballroom.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Film, assignment life, newcomers welcome,
noon, SUB 212.
UBC CANOE CLUB
Pool sessions for kayakers, 10 p.m., UBC indoor
pool.
UBC ASTRONOMY AND
AEROSPACE CLUB
Film: build by Lockheed, 5:30 p.m.. Geophysics
and Astronomy 142.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
B.C. Lions/UBC cheerleaders competition,
noon, SUB auditorium, P.E. week dance after
the football game, 8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m., armories.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Squash night, 8-10 p.m., Winter sports centre.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Genera) meeting and elections, noon, party 8
p m., SUB party room.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Safety seminar and film by B.C. safety council,
noon, SUB 111.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Football game vs. Alberta Golden Bears, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Alumni varsity game, 8 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
VOLLEYBALL
Women's high school invitational volleyball tournament, all day today and tomorrow. War Memorial gym, Osborne centre.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Second general meeting, noon, Scarfe 210.   y
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, discussion group, 4:30 p.m., SUB, the
Pit.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion,   noon.   International   House   main
lounge.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Elections, 2:30 p.m., SUB 213.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Happy hour, cheap refreshments, 430 p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Videotape of the Last Epidemic, excerpts from
conference on consequences of war featuring
scientists and retired military leaders, noon, SUB
206.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
Game vs. Jokers, 2:30 p.m., McGregor field.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Host UBC old boys, 2:30 p.m., UBC rugby fields.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car rally, food provided afterwards, 6 p.m.,
Beaver gas station at Oakridge.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Oktoberfest, licensed, food served, admission
free, 8 p.m.. International House upper and
lower lounges.
INTRAMURALS
Horseback riding, intermediate and advanced,
$36, all day, Alpine riding academy.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Federal policy conference, register in SUB 226
before Oct. 16, 9:30 a.m. SUB 206.
Dance and UBC political boat race championships, cheap bzzr, 7:X p.m., SUB 207/209.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 5 p.m., (women only), UBC Aquatic
centre.
SUNDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride and picnic to Chuckanut Drive, Bellingham, meet in SUB cafeteria, 10:30 a.m.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring ride everybody welcome, 9 a.m., met
between SUB and the Aquatic centre
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
First novice winter series slalom, registration at
10 a.m., B-lot by the barn.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice and clinic, 10 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 5 p.m. (men only), UBC Aquatic centre.
MONDAY
INTRAMURALS
Inner tube water polo, 8 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre, $20 per team.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening, 7:30 p.m.. International House, licensed.
ROCKER CO-OP
Meeting, paid members may pick up their directory, noon, SUB 119.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
Seminar: casual reesoning in organizations, 1:30
p.m., Angus penthouse.
CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mendarin class for beginners, all welcome, noon
SUB 111. Chinese painting class, try to register
at the CSA office, 3:30 p.m., SUB 111.
NEW STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
General meeting, 5:30 p.m., SUB 215
UBC CHESS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Exceptional person's week, Harry Cordelloe
speaking, noon, SUB. Call 228-8209 for more information.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
Seminar: ceuaal reasoning in organizations, 1:30
p.m., Angus penthouse.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Great Trek week festivities start.
Monday, Oct. 18
Wine  and  cheese  (participant
only)
Gallery lounge, 7 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 19
Old films night,
SUB auditorium, 7 and 9 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 20
20s Night, "Gin and Sin,"
SUB partyroom, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 21
Arts '20 Relay, noon.
Old bathing suit competition and
funny diving,
UBC aquatic centre, 7 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 22
Founders dinner and dance
SUB ballroom, cocktails 6 p.m.,
dinner 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 23
Great trek parade,
leaving Queen Elizabeth theatre
11 a.m.
BBQ following Trek on  SUB
south plaza
Page 15
TREES
—charlea cempbell photo
contributors still
TUESDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series, 7:30 p.m.. International House.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton, noon, Osborne centre gym A.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, 11:30 p.m., St. Mark's lunchroom.
LAW UNION
Forum on legal aid cutbacks, representatives
from legal services society and attorney general's
office, noon, Law 169.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY CLUB
MLA Dennis Cocke, NDP health critic will speak,
noon, SUB 207/209.
LATIN AMERICA SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
General meeting, 4:30 p.m., Grad centre lounge.
LAW STUDENTS' LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon, SUB 111.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Verne Detwiller, administrator from UBC health
sciences centre, speech on medical administration, noon IRC 1.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Meeting for recycling groups, new members
welcome, noon, SUB 230b.
FAMILY HOUSING
Film series: Oliver, 7 p.m., Hebb theatre, $1 with
AMS card and children under 12, $2 general admission.
AMS WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Wendo for woman, $15 for 6 weeks, pre-registration at women's student office, 228-241 &.
Starts today, noon-2:30 p.m. SUB 215, and tomorrow 4-6 p.m. Brock 302.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Soccer, 5:30 p.m., soccer fields behind SUB.
PRACTICAL WRITING SERIES
Developing a writing style that gets results, with
Donald Townson ot Cominco, noon. Computer
Science 200.
WEDNESDAY
■INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance languages, 7:30 p.m., licensed, International House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
General meeting and byelections, new members
welcome, noon, SUB 216e.
THURSDAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Musical program, noon, SUB 213.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
General meeting, noon, St. Mark's music room.
UBC CHESS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 212.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Panel discussion on women shaping the city,
noon, Brock 302.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Maintenance and mechanical seminar, 7:30
p.m., SUB 205.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Debate: technology vs. humanities, 7 p.m..
Graduate student centre, garden room.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, 7:30 p.m., licensed. International
House.
EDUCATOR8 FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
George Hermanson, campus minister; changing
people's minds, (this talk has nothing to do with
Maranthas) sorting out the ethical issues, noon,
Computer Science 200.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: the Mendi, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Tour of new wing at St. Paul's hospital, all members signed up welcome, meet noon, G-30 (pre-
med office, IRC).
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
Seminar: prediction and explanation of turnover,
2:30 p.m., Angus.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, organizing for Great Trek,
noon. Bio. Sci. 2449.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
AND RECREATION
Lecture: exercise stress, fitness evaluation, training of wheelchair users, microprocessor control
of paralyzed muscle, speaker Dr. Robert Glaser,
noon and 7:30 p.m., IRC 6.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Christian life seminar on Revolutionary Evangelism, noon. East Mall Annex 117. Please note
room change.
STUDENTS FOR WAR
AND MUTUAL DESTRUCTION
Nuking the peace movement, noon, SUB 256.
tfdhffa^teir
Learn to stop writing good and
start writing well. Come to the practical
writing lecture series on writing for the
professions and business. Donald
Townson, chief public relations officer
of Cominco will lecture on Developing a
writing style that gets results. Lecture is
at noon Tuesday in Computer Science
200.
Interested in pit, I mean pots. The
pot shop and gallery has opened a new
gallery at 1359 Cartwright St. on Granville Island. The gallery features a full
range of functional to sculptural work
by local clay artists. Take advantage of
the excellent poetry going for
reasonable prices. Call 687-7977 for the
pot hot-line.
•
So there's a mushroom fair happening at Van Duesen Botanical
Gardens this Sunday. So the question
immediately popping up in people's
minds, like Psilocybe after a fall rain, is
will one be able to find out what those
magic mushrooms look like?
The answer, much to the dismay of
those who are already blissfully stoned
and don't like the thought of competition, is yes.
So if you've been avoiding University
Boulevard because you didn't want to
pick the dreaded Galerine and die that
mushroom's very own mean, nasty
lingering death, avoid no more.
Go to Van Deusen Sunday. 11 a.m.
until 6 p.m. Admission $1. Ask for Paul.
And by the way, you can learn about
other mushrooms too.
FM 102, Cable 100
News and Sports
Every weekday . . .
8:00 a.m. Wake-Up Report
9:00 a.m. Breakfast Report.
1:00 p.m. Lunch Report.
3:30 p.m. News Break.
4:00 p.m. Inside U.B.C.
4:30 p.m. Sports Break.
6:00 p.m. Dinner Report.
6:10 p.m. After Dinner Portion.
Mon.: Birds' Eye View.
Tues. to Thurs.: Insight.
Fri.: This Week At UBC.
Special
Sunday 12:30 p.m. Playlist Show
— Noel Baker counts down CITR's
Top 40 albums, including the
newest from Iggy Pop, Simple
Minds, Scitti Politti, The Gun Club,
James white Et The Blacks, John
Cale, Robert Gordon, the Comsat
Angels, St Captain Beefheart.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
Unas, 80c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 dey $4.20; additional lines. 83c. Additional days. $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is f0:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
Lost
The Vancouver Institute
Free Public Lecture
JACQUES HEBERT
Founder and President
Canada World Youth
CANADIAN YOUTH AND
THE DEVELOPING WORLD
Jacques Hebert has been active in
arranging programs to stimulate Canadian young people.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING
Saturday, Oct. 16 at 8:15 p.m.
RED VW VAN stolen Oct. 7, Dunbar area.
Contained 10 books of music marked
"WILDROOT" in 18" chest. REWARD
731-8050.
LOST — Two-tone brown pencil case with
assorted pens and small Texas Inst, calculator. 228-9334.
40 — Messages
JON, I want my ID as soon as possible.
Tony.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
BAHA'I FAITH — Informal discussion.
This week's topic: "Equality of men and
women." This Friday, 8 p.m., 5629 Univ.
Blvd. Tel. 224-3596. All welcome. Refreshments.
11 — For Sole — Privete
TIRES FOR SALE. 3 H78-14, 2 G78-14.
980-6351.
FOR SALE. A pair of Olin Mark IV skis complete with Salamon 444 findings. In good
condition. Pkg. deal $200. Phone 682-3292.
WHO CONCERT - Oct. 20/28, Seattle
tickets for $20 each, regularly $24. Phone
879-0795.
16 — Found
FOUND: Set 9-H, Seat 0 3-4 Lilium anthers.
Near CEME. May be picked up in Physics
General Office, Hennings Bldg.
80 — Tutoring
WANT TO LEARN FRENCH? I want to help
you. Conversation Francaise et grammaire.
After 6 p.m. 738-4639. $7.50/h.
85 — Typing
20 — Housing
COMFORTABLE CHINESE home can accommodate Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore students. Furnished, convenient.
Mandarin/Cantonese only. Please phone
324-1477 evenings or 255-6001 mornings.
SHARED ACCOM. — 1 or 2 people to share
furnished 4 bdrm. house; W. 9th Et Blanca.
$225/mo. Rich or Abby, 224-0401.
ROOMMATE A SLOB7 Food horrible?
Commuting a pain? We have room and
board, $300/mon. Call Bob/Mark,
224-9866.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes, theses.
IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates. Rose,
731-9857.
WORD PROCESSING specialists for
theses, term papers, resumes, reports, correspondence, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
CHEAP, FAST - turnaround typing for
small-to-medium papers. $1.50/page initial,
50c subsequent drafts. Auto spelling check
free. Call 736-5127.
TYPING. Special student rates. Filtness &
Cameron, public stenographers. 5670 Yew
(Kerrisdale). Ph. 266-6814.
TYPING — Fast, accurate. Available immediately. Located near campus. Phone
732-1745.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING. Theses,
term papers, etc. $10 hr. Jeeva 876-5333.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing, theses and
essays, from legible work. 738-6829 ten
a.m. to 9 p.m.
TYPEWRITING, minimal notice required,
phone 732-0529 mornings to noon or eves,
till 10. Reasonable rates. Kits location.
90 - Wanted
25 — Instruction
CAN. INSTITUTE OF Tai Chi CJiuan class
is starting this fall. Call Steve, 731-3021,
731-8036.
30 - Jobs
FRENCH RESTAURANT in Ladner requires Sat. night bus boy, experience pre-
ferred. 946-7717.	
WANTED, caretaking couple, small Cariboo
ranch. No livestock, will pay commission.
Details Box 4438, William's Lake, B.C. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 15, 1982
WOULD YOU BUY
Vi A RECORD?
But did you know you're only getting V2 the sound? Today's new technology audio components
reproduce music with incredible realism. You'll be amazed at what you've been missing.
TEAC
V30
*199
PIONEER
SX3500
ADC
An economical cassette deck that offers remarkable sound reproduction. A
highly stable tape transport system ensures perfect tape speed at all times.
Features include: Dolby NR, LED meters Er switchable bias/EQ.
V40    Soft touch controls, Dolby NR  $259.95
V5RX   3-motor, built-in dbx $429.95
CS505
*129
Get Hi-Fi luxury at an affordable price. The
SX3500's 40 watts total power output is.
plenty of power to give you full-bodied
stereo sound in an average-sized listening
room. Other features of this smart looking
AM/FM receiver include less than 0.05%
THD and Fluroscan bargraph power meter.
*219
YAMAHA
R300
The semi-automatic CS505 features Dual's exclusive ULM ultra low mass
tonearm which has less than half the effective mass of conventional high quality tonearms. {cartridge not included)
CS508    Comes with Ortofon cartridge $199.95
CS607   Direct drive, c/w Ortofon cartridge $249.95
CS827Q    Direct drive. Quartz, c/w Ortofon cartridge $299.95
1 O
Q v •
Correct acoustical imbalance in your listening environment and adjust the music to suit
your taste whh an ADC Sound Shaper.
SS110IC   band equalizer $199.95
SSII    12 band equalizer,
LED read-out $329.96
YAMAHA
R300 - P350 - NS60
The R300 superior performance AM/ FM
receiver provides plenty of power at 60 watts.
Features include: Continuously variable
loudness control, Optical balance tuning, Station Locked tuning system.
929995
PC4009
PIOIXUE-HR
YES, THIS UNIT WILL RECORD. This
AM/FM portable cassette player comes complete with ultra-light headphones. Take your
favourite music with you wherever you go . . .
on the bus, cycling, jogging or to lectures. Not
exactly aa Wwtratad.
*129
Get a famous Yamaha Natural Sound System for only $499.96. The
R300 AM/FM receiver delivers 60 watts RMS total. The P350
semi-automatic turntable is complete with a magnetic cartridge.
And pulling it all together are NS60 2-way speakers.
SX 3700
Get Pioneer quality at an unbelievable price. The SX-3700 AM/FM
receiver features digital tuning. Quartz Servo-locked tuning, DC
power amp and 90 watts RMS total.
$499
COMPLETE PACKAGE
This was
*120
Now it's free
When you buy this
Cf commodore vic-20
Everybody loves video games and the Commodore VIC-20 has some of the best. But the VIC-20 is not just a game machine but a real
computer. It has a full featured keyboard, graphics, sound, colour & a wide selection of add-on accessories. Plus it use the same
computer language as the Commodore PET, Canada's most widely used educational computer.
The Datasette stores your own computer programs on standard audio cassettes or uses Commodores' pre-recorded tape programs.
Limited time offer: The Datasette is free when you purchase the VIC-20.
$
399
MARANTZ • SANYO • EPI • JBL • ALPINE • CRAIG • RCA • NIKK0 • BOSE • MANY MORE

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127493/manifest

Comment

Related Items