UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 16, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127488.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127488.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127488-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127488-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127488-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127488-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127488-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127488-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127488-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127488.ris

Full Text

Array  // Page 2
EVENTS        V THISWEEK, CHECKOUT.
FRIDAY' 17
LATIN DANCE 101
7:00-8:30P.M.@SUB214/216
Learn how to dance beyond shuffling side-to-side and repeatedly shaking
your hands in the air. This joint effort by the CVC and UBC Dance Club will
have you moving your body in style in no time. No partner necessary. Free
FRIDAY •   17
PSIUPSILONS TIGHT & BRIGHT PARTY
9:00 P.M.® #72880 WESBROOKMALL
PSI Upsilon is hosting a party in which the host can reminisce on his days of
his "mom's aerobic videos." Wear stuff that's tight; wear stuff that's bright —
optimally both. Tickets are $15 for guys, $10 for girls.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY ' 18
fl pHh
UBC APPLE FESTIVAL
11:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. @ UBC BOTANICAL GARDENS
With a projected 54,000 pounds of apple sales, UBC is hosting its annual
apple festival. Dozens of varieties of apples will be available for sampling and
purchase, along with a food fair and entertainment. $4 entry
ON
THE
COVER
Although the expected 3,000
didn't show up it was good to
see some campus activism.
-Photo Geoff Lister
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
4^
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
OCTOBER16.2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXV
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Matalie Scadden. a Pentland,
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss ey.cs
Design Editor
Nick Adams
copy@ubyssey.cs
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
Soren Elsay, Olamide Olaniyan,
_awrenceNeal Garcia,Taric
Vira.Kelley Lin, Jenny Tang, Lee
fpe reira@ubyssey.es
Ad Sales
Geoff Lister
Business Office: SUB 23
ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
nquiries604.S22.66S1
pri nted i tor@ ubys sey.cs
cai@ubyssey.cs
Azizi.Koby Michaels
a dve rti s i ng @ uby ssey es
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Illustrator
Accounts
613S SUB Boulevard
Peter Siemens
Julian Yu
Thea Simpson
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
web@ubyssey.cs
julianyu@ubyssey.cs
3 ccou nts@ u byss ey.es
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Twitter: ©ubyssey
JovanaVranic +
Veronika Bondarenko
LEGAL
news@ubyssey.cs
The Ubyssey is the officia
cannot te reproduced without
and clarity. All letters must te
stident newspaper of theUniver-
the expressed, written perrnis
•eceived by 12 neon the day be
Culture Editor
5ity of British Columbia. It is pub-
sion of The Ubyssey Publica
fore intended publication. Let
Jenica Montgomery
idled every Morday and Thurs
tions Society
ters received after this point
culture@ubyssey.cs
day by The U by ssey Publications
The Ubyssey isafoundinc
will te published in the follow
Scciety. Weaiean autonomous
mernterof Canadian Universi
ing issueunlessthereisan ur
Sports* Rec Editor
democratically run stidentcrga
ty Press(CUP)andadherestc
gent time restriction or other
JackHauen
nization.andallstudentsaieen-
CUFsguiding principles
matter deemed relevant by
oduraged to participate
_etters to the editor must
the Ubyssey staff.
-ditorials are chosen anc
oe under 300 words. Please
t isagreed byall persons
Video Producer
iwitten by theUb/sse/ staff They
nclude your phone number
Dlacing display or classified ad
are the expressed opinbn ofthe
student number and signa
vertising that if theUbyssey Pub-
video@ubyssey.cs
staff,and do not necessarily re
ture (not for publication) as
i cat ions Scciety fails to publish
flect the views of The Ubyssey
vvell as your year and faculty
anadvertisernentcrifanerrorin
Publications Scciety or the Uni
with all submissions ID will te
the ad cccurs the liability ofthe
versity of British Columbia. AI
checked when submissions are
JPS wil not begreater than the
photo® ubyssey.c;
Editorial content appearing ir
drepped effatt heed iter el effice
orice paid for the ad. The UPS
The Ubyssey is the property of
of The Ubyssey other wise ver-
shall rot be responsible for slight
Opinions + Blog Editor
The U by ssey Rj b cation sSccety
fication will te done by phone
changes or ty peg ra phica I er rors
Stories, opinions, photographs
The Ubyssey reservesthe right
that do not lessen the value or
and artwork contained hereir
to edit submissions for length
the impact of the ad.
:@ubyssey.ca
OUR CAMPUS//
ONEONONE^
EOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Zeke Blumenkrans and Maya Zwang are two of the driving forces behind UBC-based charity, Generocksity.
UBC charity Generocksity is partying
hard and making a difference
Armaan Malhotra
Contributor
It was the middle ofthe night.
An ambulance was racing down
a street through the downtown
core of Jerusalem with sirens
blaring and paramedic personnel frantically working. A
pregnant patient in the back of
the ambulance had just delivered a baby. There was silence.
In a chaotic moment of CPR, the
baby finally started crying and
everyone shared in a moment of
pure elation. One ofthe paramedics in the ambulance was
third-year kinesiology student
Zeke Blumenkrans.
Three days before this moment, Blumenkrans had found
out that his very good friend
— whom he had met whilst
volunteering at the Canuck
Place Children's Hospice — had
passed away from cancer. As he
sat in the emergency room parking lot listening to Elton John
and completing paperwork,
Blumenkrans tried to make
sense of his last few days.
"I definitely felt that there
was something there. There's
no way something like that
just happens three days after
my close friend passes away. I
decided to use the pain as fuel
to create something awesome,"
Blumenkrans said.
After returning to Vancouver
from Israel, Blumenkrans and
a newly built team planned an
event called Grooving for Kids
to pay tribute to his recently lost
friend. With over 150 attendees,
more than $2,500 dollars were
donated to the Canuck Place
Children's Hospice. From that
moment onward, "it took a life
of its own" and Generocksity
was born.
Today Generocksity continues to be led by a team of
UBC students. It is a registered
non-profit organization that
has hosted several large-scale
events to raise money for a
variety of noble causes, including the Downtown Eastside
Women's Centre. In Blumenkrans' words, "we realized that
we could engage our generation
into doing philanthropic and
charitable events while not
compromising their wallets or
their busy schedules."
The diversity of Generocksity continues to be a source of
inspiration for its members.
"It is so easy to get caught
up in your own world," said
marketing Vice-President Maya
Zwang. "I needed something
outside of all the stress that
was actually going to make an
impact."
For Generocksity chairwoman Vivian Braithwaite, the
spark came from the inherent challenge behind hosting
an event.
"I honestly just wanted to
see if we could actually make a
difference," Braithwaite said.
"Every time we go and make our
donations, we see the impact
that our work has and it drives
our team to the next event."
At each Generocksity concert,
the philanthropic focus changes
so that donations are made to
several worthwhile organizations, opposed to just a single
charity. Their coming event on
Saturday, October 18 — Good
Deeds and Dirty Beats — will
aim to raise money for the Ronald McDonald House, which is
an organization that lies close
to Zwang's heart. In her words,
"every time I do an event, I become more connected and more
passionate."
The Generocksity model
involves throwing parties with
great musicians at local venues
to raise awareness and inspire
philanthropy amongst students in an approachable and
affordable manner.
"Raising money is almost an
aside to the main idea. You can
go out, let loose, have a couple
drinks with your friends and
dance while also helping kids at
the Ronald McDonald House,"
said Blumenkrans.
The social landscape of university often forces its students
to compartmentalize their own
lives. Whether you are volunteering, cramming for exams
or celebrating the fact that you
survived another week at UBC,
these compartments are rarely
mixed. Generocksity actively
invites you to break down these
walls and combine aspects of
your social life and education
with your passions. Their philosophy is well-expressed in their
mission statement: Generocksity
strives to "engage our generation
not only to the importance of
philanthropy, but to show them
how accessible it can be." Xi
— °«—[jG.
rwus // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
RESEARCH»
UBC-O professor
studies link between
mobile fitness apps
and health
tit
90 -
PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNFTHE UBYSSEY
Koby Michaels
Contributor
Can a mobile fitness app really
help with something as complex as
a health and obesity epidemic?
Mary Jung, an assistant professor with the Faculty of Health
and Social Development at
UBC-O, is studying the role that
mobile fitness applications play
in helping people get in shape.
Jung was recently awarded
a $450,000 research scholarship which enables her to look
into how smartphone apps, step
counters and other mobile health
technologies can encourage
people to meet their fitness goals
and stay healthy.
According to Jung, mobile
fitness apps can be one of several
steps that help people get in control of their health.
"[Mobile apps] can't cure, but
in conjunction with learning
skills, realistic goals and skills
to overcome barriers, [they]
can help," said Jung. "You need
practice with skills and I think
the applications can continue
learning and help individuals."
Jung also said that as smartphone use will not decrease any
time soon, it is important to differentiate between apps that are
based on scientific evidence and
those that are not.
"The reality is that these
[mobile health apps] are going
to keep popping up. I wish that
more health apps were based on
theory and evidence," said Jung.
According to Jung, one ofthe
biggest problems that people
face when trying to lose weight
or stay healthy is sticking to unrealistic goals and expectations.
A fitness app can then be a useful
tool in monitoring progress from
day to day.
"Simple health tracking helps
people consistently self-monitor
so at least they can acknowledge
what they are doing and what
they aren't doing," said Jung.
However, no app is guaranteed
to improve a user's health.
"Do exercise in morning, because you are more likely to follow
through," said Jung. "Make exercise a priority, app or no app." Xi
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
FORESTRY »
STUDENTS»
UBC Forestry creates online registry of B.C.'s largest trees  Sauder grad creates
The B.C. Big Tree Registry finds a new home online thanks to UBC professor Sally Aitken    restaurant app
UBC's Faculty of Forestry is documenting some of B.C's biggest trees.
Hudhaifah Zahid
Contributor
Sally Aitken, a UBC professor of
forest and conservation sciences,
is aiming to keep up the legacy of
a young man who was passionate
about the big trees of B.C.
When Randy Stoltman would
explore Stanley Park and other
places around Vanouver in the
1980s, he would keep an eye
out for big trees. He would then
measure and document them
tirelessly and eventually formed
the first workings of a tree
registry with friends in 1986. But
when Stoltman tragically passed
away in a skiing accident in 1994,
the registry was left without a
permanent home.
"The registry was kind of neglected," said Aitken. "It was just
AMS»
boxes of records, hand-drawn
maps and notes and photos."
After being approached by the
B.C. Big Tree Committee, UBC
Forestry agreed to keep these
records. As an expert in the field
of forest and trees, Aitken gladly
accepted the opportunity.
"I'm a big tree enthusiast and
there was this whole committee of big tree enthusiasts,"
said Aitken. "It presented the
opportunity to do something for
the community, do something for
these big trees and really develop
a citizen science type project."
Having secured the necessary
resources and enlisted the help of
colleagues Christine Choumouzis
and Bert Tearhart, Aitken began
the job of setting the B.C. Big
Tree Registry on its feet.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
According to Aitken, the registry is such that it can also be actively improved upon and updated
by students who provide photos,
or GPS coordinates for trees that
may be missing from the registry.
"[Students] can intentionally go
visit the trees in the registry that
we don't have photos for and contribute the pictures," said Aitken.
"A lot of trees we don't have good
GPS coordinates for and so now
that we all have GPS capabilities
with our smartphones we need to
confirm these."
Aitken also said that when it
comes to preserving these trees,
along with the stories on their climate, health, history, life and spirit
that each has to tell, students can
play a part by remaining mindful
while out in nature. tJ
Feel like browsing some restaurants based on your food craving at
the time? Ask Tangoo.
Founded by Sauder graduate
Paul Davidescu, Tangoo is a phone
app that gives you restaurant
recommendations based on your
mood or the type of event that
you're planning.
Along with fellow UBC students
Jonathan Hill and Tristan Slade,
Davidescu came up with the app in
the hope of being able to take away
the stress of planning social outings.
Currently, Tangoo is free to download and includes over 300 restaurants in Vancouver and Whistler.
According to Davidescu,
Tangoo stands out from all other
restaurant apps with its simplicity
and social factor. Food apps often
involve more steps and often provide generalized lists, while the
restaurants Tangoo generates are
based on personal factors.
"It is the simplest thing ever,"
said Davidescu. "There is a reason
we call it the pocket concierge."
Davidescu said that the idea for
Tangoo came years ago when he
went on exchange through UBC to
Barcelona. After workingto create
an event planning business for one
of his projects, he was inspired
to do something similar with a
restaurant app.
Davidescu wanted to make it easier to recreate similar social experiences. He plans to expand Tangoo
to include restaurants in Montreal,
Toronto, Ottawa, Calgary and other
Canadian cities. Currently, cafes
and bars are being added to the vast
restaurant list and there are goals to
expand in the US by 2015. Xi
AMS opposes tuition and residence fee hikes
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
On Tuesday October 14, the AMS
held an emergency council meeting to discuss their strategy going forward with UBC's proposed
tuition and residence fee hikes.
At the meeting, the AMS
approved an official letter of
opposition that expressed the
society's disapproval at the university's brief consultation time
for the proposed international
tuition hikes and complete lack
of student consultation for the
residence fee increases.
While the AMS also approved
a motion that expressed the
society's general disapproval
=ILE PHOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
ofthe proposed fee increases,
they deferred passing an official
policy that would also urge the
university to explore all possible
avenues for reducing the financial burden of students and that
the office ofthe VP External continue to advocate for increased
provincial and federal funding
for UBC.
The proposed policy has been
sent back to the society's University
and External Relations Committee
(UNECORN) for further review
and student consultation after some
councillors expressed concern that
its wording would prevent the AMS
from opposing UBC on cuts in student services in the future. Xi
Did you
witness this?
Thursday, October 2, 2014
approximately 12:15 pm
Lower Mall, University Boulevard
A female student was hit by a white UBC vehicle. The
white UBC vehicle did not stay at the scene.
Please call 778-707-3723 4    I    NEWS    I   THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16,2014
1  v;
i\
h
tell
1 » A
ii
UBC students
gather for teach-in
on Main Mall
Roughly 400 students
listened to six speakers
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
On Tuesday, October 14 roughly 400 students assembled
in response to rising costs
for international tuition and
on-campus housing.
The event, a teach-in organized by UBC Students for Accessible Education, the Social Justice
Centre and The Calendar, was
advertised to inform students of
the changes UBC is pushing for.
It was the first of what will be a
series of events aimed at raising
awareness, sparking debate and
voicing student opinions on the
cost increases.
ey've] already
decided exactly
how long it's going
to take for them to
convince us that
they are right,"
said Leonce.
That's not consultation, that's
notice.'
Speakers included Anne
Kessler, AMS VP Academic and
University Affairs; Elvin Wyly,
UBC geography professor and
chair ofthe Urban Studies Program; May Anne Then, President
ofthe International Students'
Association; Kaitlyn Melton,
President ofthe Residence Hall
Association; Ivan Leonce of
Colour Connected Against Racism and Gabriel D'Astous ofthe
Social Justice Centre.
MCs Lawrence Lam and liana
Shecter provided territorial
acknowledgement and outlined
the event's rules of engagement
as students gathered around the
fountain at Martha Piper Plaza,
a location named after a former
UBC president who once "oversaw a tuition increase without
standing up for the rights of students," according to Shecter.
The first speaker was Kessler,
who outlined the AMS' stance
on the cost increases and what is
being done to tackle it.
"We think it's unacceptable
that the university has started a
consultation process without all
the details upfront and ready,"
she said. According to Kessler,
UBC had made their decisions
on the fee increases without
consulting students, and failed
to send a broadcast email to let
students know ofthe consultation period on the international
student tuition increase, which
BeAMS urged to have extended
until November 21.
"[Tlhe AMS wants to] make
sure students know they have
the opportunity for their voice to
be heard," Kessler said after the
teach-in.
In his address to the students, Leonce urged students to
question the fairness of UBC's
proposed plans.
"Is it really a democratic consultation process when the university has already decided what
the problem is — they're lagging
behind on how much they're
charging students, already
decided how they're going to fix
the problem — they're going to
increase our fees, and already
decided exactly how long it's going to take for them to convince
us that they are right?" asked
Leonce. "That's not consultation,
that's notice."
The atmosphere ofthe event
remained lively, though tame.
Some students in attendance
expressed disappointment in the
student turnout.
Emmett Keyserlingk, a third-
year student from Quebec, participated in the province's 2012
student strike, just like speaker
Gabriel D'Astous.
"What amazes me is that the
university is proposing to do
something that will affect tens
of thousands of people in a huge
way, and we got only [a couple
hundred] people here who seem
to care enough to come and find
out about it," said Keyserlingk. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16,2014    |    NEWS    |    5
"On the streets of Montreal in
2012, we were tens of thousands
and hundreds of thousands of
people, and that made a difference."
Keyserlingk emphasized the
importance of increasing student
support for the rally efforts.
"There's this sort of atmosphere of apathy towards this that
makes me nervous going forward," he said. "We might not be
able to get enough people to care
enough about other people to get
out and make a change."
Mohamed Shaaban, VP External ofthe Science Undergraduate
Society and and AMS student
representative, expressed
greater concern on the side of
UBC's administration.
"What we were presented with
[at consultation meetings] was a
completely irrelevant argument
about market value, about how apparently students care more about
their ranking than how much they
have to pay and how increasing
incoming students' tuition will
somehow boost our rankings up,"
said Shaaban. "I was in a state of
shock."
According to Shaaban, the
Science Undergraduate Society is
currently drafting an official statement opposing the fee increases.
At the October 14 emergency
council meeting, the AMS
discussed their strategy going
forward with consultations with
UBC.
As part of their response, the
society approved a statement
that opposed the university's
approach to student consultation,
but deferred an official policy on
tuition increases.
The next UBC Students for Fairness in Tuition and Housing Prices
event will be a student assembly
debate on Tuesday, October 21.
More information will be posted on the Facebook event page as it
becomes available. tJ
Current   Proposed
International Tuition
International Tuition
per 30 credits per 30 credits
$23,999.10 $28,798.92
undergraduate degree undergraduate degree
$95,996.40 $115,195.68
PHOTOS WILL MCDONALD, GEOFF LISTER, CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
LITERATURE »
Closing Time showcases the role of Canada during prohibition era
Olivia Law
Contributor
In recent years, the world seems
to have developed an obsession
with 1920s culture. From The
Great Gatsby to Midnight in Paris,
it seems as though everybody is
reading, watching and dressing
1920s. For UBC alum Daniel
Francis, however, it was his time
at school that inspired his new
book Closing Time — a compilation of anecdotes, articles and art
to show the role of Canada in this
prohibition era. After graduating from UBC in 1969 with a
BA in literature, Francis spent
several years as a news reporter
in Alberta and Ottawa before
returning to Carleton to take a
master's in Canadian Studies.
"I'd always wanted to be a
writer but I'd never really found
the subject, then when I did the
degree in Canadian studies I took
my first courses in Canadian history and discovered that this was
the sort of subject I wanted to
write about." Now living in North
Vancouver, Francis has published
more than 20 books, principally
on the topic of Canadian history,
and has been the recipient of several awards in the past few years.
This October, he will be presented with a prestigious Mayor's
Arts Award for Literary Arts.
Now approaching its centennial, the prohibition era is definitely of interest to many. Closing
Time tells the story ofthe federal
and provincial governments in
Closing Time is UBC alum Daniel Francis' newest book.
Canada attempting to control the
social habits of Canadians at the
time. This age of liquor smugglers
and rum-runners, larceny and
violence, gangsters and bootleggers, is exhilarating, and is
captured beautifully in Francis'
book.
Every page in this hardcover
book is laid out beautifully between text and pictures. Using
archives from newspapers and
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN FTHE UBYSSEY
memoirs, Francis found the research for the book enjoyable.
"As you can see, this is a
highly illustrated book.... It's a
summation ofthe whole subject
of prohibition in Canada for a
general reader," said Francis of
Closing Time. "There's so much
information available from the
newspapers ofthe time and in
memoirs of people who were
writers and so on."
Evidently a popular topic,
Closing Time stands out from
the masses precisely because of
its resemblance to a work of art
— not only in appearance, but in
the language used in describing
the era. Bringing the story of
the prohibition in Canada to life
through captivating biographies
and real-life anecdotes, it almost
feels as though you are walking
through a museum as you turn
the pages ofthe book.
"Certainly the decision to repeal the laws on alcohol is totally
relevant to society today," said
Francis. "We're living in a period
where people are considering the
same sort of things in relation to
drugs and legalization. People
are making the same arguments
today about criminalization of
drugs as they were during the
prohibition of alcohol. You hear
that all prohibition does is allow
criminals to make profit, why
doesn't the government make
these things legal and make profits from this?"
The book not only connects
to current issues, but also
draws parallels to times past.
Thought-provoking, beautiful
and engaging, this book is a true
work of art, inspiring to be read
time after time. Xi
CLUBS»
Nerdfighters club does more than nerd out
Miguel Santa Maria
Contributor
There's a relatively new club on
campus and they're ready to give
students the space to geek out un-
apologetically. But in truth, there
has been some confusion as to
what the Nerdfighters club was all
about; is it a club celebrating nerd
culture? A charity club? A John
Green fan club? Chances are you
may have been just as confused.
So who are the UBC Nerdfighters? According to Trixie Hernandez, a Sauder student and Vice
President Marketing ofthe club, it
can be whatever you want it to be.
"Nerdfighters [is] this community of people that care about pretty
much like a spectrum of anything.
There's no criteria you have to
meet [to] become a nerdfighter,"
said Hernandez. "It's just this
idea where you don't have to be a
'full blown crazy geek, only live
in my computer' nerd — if you like
the same stuff we do, even if you
don't, just hang out with us! It's
just this spirit of let's talk about
anything from Jane Austen novels
to Pikachu."
UBC Nerdfighters stems from
Nerdfighteria, a subculture that
started out from a Vlog series of
author John Green (The Fault In
Our Stars) and his brother Hank. At
first, the series started out as your
typical Vlog discussing pop-culture
but grew into something more.
"It started off as this kind of
fan-base and it's kinda grown to
these people that value intellectual-
ism and that care about the most
random things from anywhere
like Sherlock, Harry Potter, Doctor
Who, to science, Syrian politics,"
said Hernandez.
The most important aspect of
Nerdfighteria, however, is its philosophy of maintaining a culture of
acceptance and, according to their
official motto, to "decrease world-
suck". This helped create a strong
presence in charity work from
followers, to the point where global
Nerdfighters have contributed
approximately 3.5 million dollars to
KIVA, a global non-profit organization, according to Hernandez.
Despite the strong charity
front of Nerdfighteria, Hernandez insisted that's not what it's
all about, particularly with the
UBC iteration.
"I would say we're more of a social club, and it's just a space where
people can hang out" she said. "The
charity portion... that's not why the
club is there, it's just a philosophy
that [we believe in]; that we understand we're a group of people that
can do things together and if we
have that capability, we will do it."
The club in particular is relatively new, only having started
last year. Still — along with the
charity efforts — it has kept itself
very busy with various events and
hangouts throughout the year.
"We do things like poetry reading
[and] vintage bookstore hopping...
we'll go to random bars ... literally
it's just hanging out. It's just like
getting together [and] 'let's discuss
how much I hate Ginny from
Harry Potter in the movie but I
love her in the book'; just random
stuff like that."
Despite the simplicity, the club
has already gained a tremendous
— and unexpected — amount of
members. A spike from just a few
to almost 150 in a year, according
to Hernandez, an influx the club
itself was not prepared for.
"We just had an icebreaker
and we budgeted for 30 people.
90 people ended up showing up ...
we ordered like 20 more pizzas,"
said Hernandez.
Things are expected to get bigger and more ambitious, with club
execs hoping to help revive the
=HOTO COURTESY WINNIE KWAN
Nerdfighters is a semi-new club who boast a group of open minded and welcoming students.
two-year dormant Vancouver Yule
Ball, a large celebration inspired
by the Harry Potter series.
So if your idea of having fun is
unpredictable, relatively judgment
free — while helping make the
world abetter place, if you please-
chances are you would be a good
fit with the UBC Nerdfighters. Xi THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2014    |    CULTURE
ART»
MUSIC »
MOA challenges
stereotypes in
Without Masks
=HOTOCHRISMILLSFTHE UBYSSEY
The MOA hosts many exhibits that challenge representations of different cultures.
Jamey Gilchrist
Contributor
The Museum of Anthropology's
latest exhibit, Without Masks:
Contemporary Afro-Cuban Art,
showcases 85 pieces by 31 Afro-Cuban artists, methodically chosen
by Cuban artist and poet, Orlando
Hernadez. It is a diverse collection, in that almost every medium
is used — painting, calligraphy,
photography, soft sculpture and
visual art. There are two common
themes that transpire throughout
the exhibit: the cultural and religious beliefs of Afro-Cubans and
the racial barriers and stereotypes
that surround them.
The exhibit is unique in its
organization because it is ordered
out of respect to the elders and the
deceased of four African religions:
Palo Monte, Santeria, Ifa and Abu-
kua. This is seen when you enter
the first room ofthe exhibit, all the
artists in that room are deceased.
Then, as you move further into
other rooms ofthe exhibition,
you see the works of elders who
are still alive, and then to the end
ofthe exhibit, where you can see
the pieces of younger and younger
artists.
"The idea is that they are looking out on the other artists from
wherever they are now," says Dr.
Nuno Porto, Associate Director of
Research for MOA and the co-curator for Without Masks.
A Havana-based painter, Alexis
Esquivel, featured in the exhibit,
has a series of works, one of which
demonstrates memory called "The
Genealogical Tree." It incorporates
portraits of famous historical figures like Barack Obama, Madonna
and Adolf Hitler — as all connected
by roots or branches on the tree.
"The idea that is captured is the
assumption that for black people
in Cuba, it gets to a point where
they arrived in a boat. So if you
have documentation about your
family, and you're black, you can go
a couple of generations above you,
but it gets to a point where there's
a list of slave trade boats that came
to the port in Havana and so you're
confronted with the choice of
taking this as a malevolent destiny,
or fate on your head, or you can be
creative and assume that regardless who you came from, there is
a sort of universal genealogy to
everyone," said Porto.
A visually very strong piece
called "Remember," by the Merger
speaks volumes for African Cuban
ancestry. It is a black glassy sculpture of a head with USB drives
sticking out in place for hair.
"This symbolizes that all African memories they have is totally
embodied memory... slaves didn't
come with a suitcase or a container of their goods. They were just
brought literally not as people,
but as merchandise. And all the
possibilities for cultural survival
that existed were in their heads,"
said Porto.
A huge self-portrait of artist Rene Pena depicts a strong
representation ofthe themes of
stereotypes and racial biases. In
the photo, it appears as if he is
touching the tip of his penis with
his index finger, but it is actually a
tip of a knife.
"What Pena is doing is a debate
of black male sexuality in that the
male reproductive organ is replaced by the knife. And the knife
does not give life to anyone ... it is a
killer," explains Porto.
Relating these cultural biases
from Cuba to British Columbia,
one sees that the most vulnerable segments of our population
in terms of poverty, of education
and of regional population, is the
First Nations. This comparison
between Afro-Cubans to First
nations gives the MOA a dialogue
between a very local situation,
and an exhibition that shares
cultural and racial issues within a
common space.
Art can influence the way that
we interpret political, social and
racial barriers that exist, not just
in history, but also in contemporary society, which is truly what
Without Masks embodies.
"What this exhibition also
tells us is that we should not take
things for granted," said Porto.
"This exhibit is about the world
we live in and the world we want
to live in, and how can we as
artists, curators or even human
beings, for that matter, can make
it better. That is the bottom line." Xi
Sustainability concert at CIRS will challenge how
we view sustainability and environmental change
Artistic Director Giorgio Magnanensi.
Victoria Lansdown
Contributor
UBC strives to be a leader in
sustainability efforts in Canada,
so it comes as no surprise that the
Centre for Interactive Research
on Sustainability will be playing
host to one ofthe sustainability
themed concerts which are a part
ofthe Sonic Topographies — sound,
music and sustainability, a concert
series part ofthe Vancouver New
Music Festival.
"CIRS has been really supportive of us and our connections with
other cultural organizations. I
think they really see the opportunity to bridge more academic
research with music artists," said
Giorgio Magnanensi, Artistic
Director for the Vancouver New
Music festival.
In presenting a very diverse
group of musicians, composers
=HOTOCOURTESYCHRISSRANDLE
and performers, the Vancouver
New Music Festival will facilitate discussions and activities
centred on the question: how can
contemporary music practices
contribute to the larger issue of
creating sustainable systems in a
technological world?
"It is important for us to create
availability for the audience to
think of sound in ways besides aesthetics. This concert will be a great
way to use these performers' creative energy to question our roles as
musicians and the environmental
and sioclogical issues that society
faces," said Magnanensi.
According to Magnanensi, this
free panel discussion will include
the facilitators reflecting on "what
artistic creation really means in
a context that fosters sustainable
ideas about creativity, culture and
tradition."
What makes this particular
event so unique is the focus on
hearing sustainability. These
musical performances are designed
to put sound to natural resources,
to help us respect and connect with
our community.
"Sounds go beyond rhetorical
language and political discourse
in a way that is more in tune with
the symbolic lines of, like, dolphins
swimming in the ocean. They
don't talk, but they make music,"
said Magnanensi.
A few ofthe performers who will
execute this innovative view on
music include John Luther Adams,
Michael O'Neill, Georg Friedrich
Haas and more.
Themes presented throughout
the performance include how
music can contribute to sustainability through presenting acoustic
representations of nature. This
new approach to sustainability is
heard through the redefinition of
natural materials — such as timbre
— to create new music which can
be examined through the eyes (or
ears) of various interdisciplinary
academic disciplines.
Magnanensi strongly believes we
can improve our society by thinking of ways to impact sustainability,
made possible by this new style of
music.
"We must be agents of change,
not just be a distraction. We [don't
want] anything too intense (or
controversial), but very honest and
very grounded music, questioning
things that everyone goes through
in everyday life," said Magnanensi.
The Sonic Topographies —
sound, music and sustainability
is coming to UBC on October 19
at 3 p.m. with a panel discussion
before the concert at 2 p.m. at the
Centre for Interactive Research
in Sustainability. Tickets are $15
students (includes taxes), or $35
for regular customers. Xi
mm nights
^
WESTERN CANADA'S SCARIEST HAUNT
OWEN SELECT DATES FROM
OCT 10 - NOV 1
FEATURING A
KffiPERS DOLL FACTORY
ASTPASS!i
TWTOTHE
.USES -AST
STALKIJS m
PNE.PLAYLAND PNECLIPS
ADMISSION INCLUDES UNLIMITED ACCESS TO
1 THE
mmsmm
OF SCHLOCK
GHUESOIE COMEDY ACT
HAUWTH5 MOUSES
KINSrtRA HRE PERFORMANCE
SAVE ON FRIGHTPASSES AT:
M FRIGHMHTS.CA // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
LETTER»
OH, MY CHECK EN6INE LI6HT 14. ON!
I BETTER TAKE THE S.TAIR&!
LAST WORDS //
STUDENTSVCAN T JUST
BE FACEBOOK ACTIVISTS
The first in the series of events
under the banner of "UBC
students for fairness in tuition
and housing prices" occurred on
Tuesday. Though the organizers,
MCs and speakers all did quite a
good job, presenting a fair mix of
background facts and impassioned
speech, the turnout was lacklustre
— at the event's peak, there were,
at most, 500 people. Throughout,
it averaged around 300-350.
This is an archetypical example
ofthe attitude of Facebook activism
that seems to pervade our generation — or at least UBC students.
Over 3,000 people said that they
were attending the teach-in; no
more than 500 showed up. A showing like this suggests that this issue
doesn't matter to students as much
as one might think.
It's much easier for people to
click like on a Facebook post than to
actually make an effort and make
their voices heard where it matters.
It's akin to those posts that pop up
on your timeline once in a while:
"If this photo gets 10,000 likes the
hospital will pay for little Johnny's
surgery." And it's not like the assembly was inaccessible — it took place
in a highly trafficked location on
campus, in the middle ofthe day, in
nice weather with plenty of notice.
We're not saying that everyone has to be involved. Obviously
not everyone, for some reason or
another, is going to think that the
changes UBC plans to implement
are worth protesting. But if you say
you care about it and do nothing
beyond a couple of clicks in support,
there's no one to blame but yourself
if the changes go through. Activism
is more than a brief exhalation of
support. UBC has a rich history of
fiery and effectual student movements — from the Great Trek to
APEC — and that legacy is something that any self-proclaimed activist should strive to live up to.
RAMPS OVER STAIRWAYS
It wasn't even near anything that
one could reasonably be expected
to drive on, but there it was — a
Mercedes SUV teetering on the
stairs near 1KB. Clearly, the driver
had either misinterpreted his
vehicle's acronym as ATV, or he
just expected flight capability to
come standard in newer models of
high-end luxury automobiles ("I
paid $70,000 for this thing, it can't
handle a few stairs?").
Days later, a Volkswagen was
caught in the same compromising
position. We couldn't believe it.
These events were followed by not
one, but two different taxis from
two different companies becoming
stuck on two different sets of stairs.
Events like these aren't exactly
common, but it stands to reason that
UBC should implement some sort
of system to allow for vehicles to
drive in places from which they are
currently prohibited. The Ubyssey
suggests cartoonishly large ramps
be constructed over every set of
stairs, with a crawlspace under-
J^RATION JULIAN YU FTHE UBYSSEY
neath for pedestrians. This will
allow for motorists to pass through
the unwashed masses without fear
of handprints or peasant breath
defacing their chariots.
Sure, the suggestion is ludicrous
now, but if tuition and housing
costs continue to rise, the only students left at UBC will be the ones
who would be in favour.
EXERCISE APPS DON'T
ALWAYS WORK OUT
UBC-O professor Mary Jung is
studying how mobile fitness apps
affect actual exercise routines;
she may really be onto something
here. Some of us at The Ubyssey
have used different exercise apps
with varying degrees of success,
but we did agree on one thing:
on the whole, the ability to do
things like quantify your exercise
progress, keep track of how far
you run or how many sit-ups you
do and compare exercise patterns
with friends is good.
Seeing your exercise progress
systematically laid out on a screen
can even serve as motivation to
stay on track with your exercise
plans.
But as Jung has already pointed out, even the trendiest fitness
app will not be a quick-fix for
anyone who is looking to get in
shape. In the end, the decision to
put down the butter chicken pizza (which is actually a Ubyssey
office favourite!) and get moving
still isn't one that an app can
make for you. Xi
Anti-prostitution Bill C-36 isn't aimed at students
EMILY MONAGHAN
Letter
University students who choose
to engage in sex work are not the
focus of Bill C-36. This bill seeks
to protect the most marginalized
women (those with fewer options
than university students). University students have access to capital,
or at least loans, among other
resources, which many women
who work within the sex industry
do not. As suggested by the author,
women who experience the brutal
reality of being a member of an oppressed class often have multiple
barriers stacked against them in
entering the dominant workforce.
A study which focused on prostitution in the Downtown East-
side articulated the structures of
oppression which impact women's
and girls' choices to enter prostitution. Aboriginal women and girls
are overwhelmingly visible within
the streets ofthe Downtown East-
side. In Canada, the average age at
which women enter prostitution is
between 13 and 19 (this is a generous
statistic). According to a 2001 PACE
Society study, 52 per cent of 183
Vancouver women turned their first
trick when they were younger than
age 16 and 70 per cent turned the
first trick before age 18.
In her letter, Shi argues that decriminalizing men who buy sexual
services from women will produce
a safe environment for women. The
Bedford decision clearly states, however, that decriminalizing sex work
does not protect the most marginalized class of sex workers: women
who work the streets.
Yes, it is noble to question the
praxis of male domination. The
material and social inequalities
between men and women as a class
create an arena for male dominance
and, subsequently, a situation set up
for male violence to prevail. Men as
a class have more access to social
and economic capital. A symptom of
this inequality would be male violence against women. The gendered
sexual nature of prostitution is not a
social phenomena, it is not simply a
monetary transaction between two
consenting adults. It exists because men have power, and women
have less.
The choices of men are being
overlooked: why do men purchase
the bodies of women and girls,
and what enables them? Feminist
anti-violence organizations which
aim to deconstruct male entitlement
are not policing individual men's
choices to buy (exercise economic
power over) the bodies of women
and girls. Women's organizations
aim to deconstruct the putative belief that biology equals destiny; the
myth of irrepressible male sexual
desire as a biological need is socially
constructed and reinforced by patriarchy. Feminist initiatives to bring
attention to the atrocities committed by male buyers are admirable.
The Invisible Men Project is an important resource that illustrates the
mentalities of men who buy women.
There are not substantial services
for women who are seeking to
exit. The neoliberalization ofthe
discourse which hyper focuses
on individual women's experiences is detrimental. Analyzing the
experiences of women as a class
allows us then to prioritize the most
marginalized groups within that
class. All women deserve access to
labour that is not gendered, that is
not inherently based on their sexual
and financial subordination to men,
that is not detrimental to health and
spirit and that is not a by-product of
a capitalist patriarchy. The aim of
abolitionists is liberation, not mere
survival within the confines of a
violent, sexist, ableist, classist, racist
system. Xi
Emily Monaghan is a second-year
UBC student, unequivocally pro-
woman, activist and anti-violence
worker.
$50 billion divested from fossil
fuels globally; UBC lagging behind
COHEN HOCKING
Letter
Climate change may be the defining
issue ofthe 21st century. Isn't it time
for UBC, with its many awards in
sustainability, to end its investments
in the fossil fuel industry?
UBC's endowment fund is worth
over $1 billion with an estimated
10% of it invested in the fossil fuel
industry. The fossil fuel divestment movement, initiated by 350.
org, urges institutions to withdraw
ownership of funds in oil, coal and
gas companies.
At the UBC AMS elections last
year, 76.9% of students voted in
favour ofthe Divest UBC Campaign.
In turn, the university responded
with a new policy "incorporating ESG (environmental, social and
governance) factors in the investment process," but declined to begin
divesting from fossil fuels.
Globally, however, things are
heating up in the Climate Movement against the fossil fuel industry. In Canada there are now 20
universities with active divestment
campaigns, bringing the North
American count to over 500 campuses. It is now the fastest growing
divestment movement in history.
Historically, divestment has been
used to address issues such as South
Africa's apartheid government.
As a student, Barack Obama was
involved in the South Africa Divestment Campaign. Obama offered his
opinion on the fossil fuel divestment
movement last year.
"Divest," he said. "Remind folks
there's no contradiction between
a sound environment and strong
economic growth."
Earlier this year, the president
ofthe World Bank, Jim Yong Kim,
weighed in.
"Through policy reforms, we can
divest and tax that which we don't
want, the carbon that threatens
development gains over the last 20
years," Kim said.
On September 21,2014, while
hundreds of thousands of people
marched for climate action in New
York and around the world, the
Rockefeller Brothers Fund announced that they were joining the
divestment movement. The RBF
has assets of over $800 million. The
president ofthe RBF reminisced
about the historic "big oil" figure
John D. Rockefeller.
"As an astute businessman
looking out to the future, he would
be moving out of fossil fuels and investing in clean, renewable energy,"
he said.
Huge news for the fossil fuel
divestment movement came in May
2014 when Stanford University
announced its plans to divest from
all coal companies. It's the first
university of its size to do so. This
shows tremendous leadership on
behalf of Stanford, and reveals that
UBC is lacking the political will to
truly lead in sustainability.
This brings us back to campus,
where Divest UBC is beginning the
next phase of its campaign.
Following the success ofthe
student referendum, UBCC350 is
now focused on connecting with
faculty in the push for divestment.
Just in the last week, over 50 faculty
members have pledged to vote in
the upcoming faculty referendum in
favour of divestment. With students
and faculty joining forces there is far
greater pressure on the university to
make divestment a reality. Faculty
can sign the pledge on UBCC350's
website.
Faculty are preparing for an
October 27 Faculty Association
meeting in which they will vote on
whether or not to hold a referendum on fossil fuel divestment. The
referendum would take place in
January 2015.
Looking forward, UBCC350 will
be reaching out to all stakeholders
on campus. The campaign will
continue with increased pressure
from students, but also a growing
contingent of faculty, staff and
alumni. At this exciting time,
UBCC350 welcomes all members of
the UBC community to join us and
become involved in the Divest UBC
campaign.
To date, over $50 billion have
been committed to divest from fossil
fuels. The time is now for UBC, with
its self-proclaimed title of a living
lab, to join the movement and end its
investments that are destabilizing
the climate. Xi
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES
OR19BLUE
WHALES
You can make a difference
Use recycling stations
to sort your food scraps
and recyclables into
the proper bins.
■Q£
Sort it Out.
rainihiiitv
ubc sus
istain.ubc.ca/sortitout // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
BASKETBALL»
UBC men's basketball comes back against Balloholics
Thunderbirds gear up in preparation for the UBC Invitational Tournament this weekend
The 'Birds were led by a monster effort from second-year Conor Morgan.
Jacob Gershkovich
Contributor
The Thunderbirds out-balled the
Vancouver Balloholics in a 93-85
victory Thursday night at the War
Memorial Gym.
UBC entered this Thursday's
matchup seeking a repeat performance of their blowout win
against the Seattle Mountaineers last Friday. The Vancouver
Balloholics, a flashy, fast-paced
squad tested UBC early, slashing
through a disoriented Thunder-
bird's defence on the fast break,
and after one quarter of play, the
Thunderbirds trailed 26-21.
Conor Morgan, the second-
year forward out of Victoria
=HOTO ARUUN HAIRffHE UBYSSEY
torched the Balloholics' defence
for 33 points, helping UBC climb
back into the lead after their first
quarter woes. Morgan scored
at will, displaying the range
and quickness of a guard, the
post-presence of a power forward
and the tenacity and eagerness
of a youngster with something
to prove.
"It's hard to remember sometimes that he's still only a second
year kid," said UBC head coach
Kevin Hanson. "He's out there,
still learning the game, and with
his height and length, he's going
to be a very difficult match for
anybody."
Feeding off of Morgan's play,
UBC entered halftime with a
slim 45-42 lead.
The Balloholics were peculiarly flat to start the third quarter,
and UBC was able to capitalize,
almost extending their lead to 30
at one point. This game quickly
got out of control. Tommy Nixon,
the suave veteran and team's
leading scorer last year supplemented Morgan's performance
with 19 points of his own. In
the backcourt, the incredibly
quick Jordan Jensen-Whyte
added 14 points and six assists.
Notwithstanding a late push
by the Balloholics in the fourth
quarter, UBC cruised to another
preseason victory.
"Offensively, I was happy with
a lot of things that we did," said
Hanson. "Defensively, at times, I
thought we were good, but when
you're playing against a team like
that, you've got to be good all the
time. We took a lot of possessions
off, made some mental mistakes,
and hopefully we'll be able to
grow from games like that."The
Thunderbirds remain undefeated
in preseason play this October,
and it seems as though all the
pieces are in place for a solid
season.
The team looks confident, and
the fans feel optimistic. Eli, the
seven-year-old boy I was sitting
next to in the stands, actually
predicts a national championship for the men's team this year.
He seemed pretty certain, so
who knows?
The Thunderbirds return to
preseason action this weekend
when they host the UBC Invitational at War Memorial Gym. On
Friday they'll play the Western
University Mustangs, and on Saturday they'll take on the Windsor
University Lancers. Both games
will be at 3 p.m. Xi
^ffl
^ WOODWARD'S
SFU's Vancity Office of
Community Engagement
FALL HIGHLIGHTS
OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 20U
i
I
TUESDAY
OCTOBER 14/ 7 PM
TAXI CASABLANCA
FILM SCREENING
CO-DIRECTED BY MARY FOWLES
FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE
TAXI CASABLANCA IS A FEATURE
DOCUMENTARY THAT JOURNEYS
NTO THE DAILY LIFE OF MOROCCO'S
FIRST AND ONLY FEMALE TAX
DRIVER, ZAKIA MEZZOUR
SATURDAY
OCTOBER 18
WRONG WAVE 2014
ART ROCK? REPRISE
THIS YEAR'S UNIT/PITT FESTIVAL
OF ARTISTS WHO ROCK AND
ROCKERS THAT ART RUNS OCT
16 AT THE FOX, OCT 17 AT THE
WESTERN FRONT, AND WRAPS
UP WITH MECCA NORMAL AND
FAKE TEARS AT SFU'S GOLDCORP
CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
MONDAY
OCTOBER 20/ 7 PM
DYLAN ROBINSON
PUBLIC LECTURE
DESPITE AN INCREASING NUMBER
OF COLLABORATIONS BETWEEN
INDIGENOUS ARTISTS AND
CLASSICAL MUSIC ENSEMBLES,
THE POLITICAL EXIGENCIES OF
FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES
ACROSS CANADA ARE RARELY
REFERENCED IN THE WORK.
WEDNESDAY
OCTOBER 22 / 7 PM
RED SKIN, WHITE
MASKS PANEL
PANEL DISCUSSION OF GLEN
COULTHARD'S BOOK RED SKIN,
WHITE MASKS: REJECTING
THE COLONIAL POLITICS OF
RECOGNITION. WITH RITA KAUR
DHAM00N. SARAH HUNT, JARRETT
MARTINEAU, AND MATT HERN
GOLDCORP CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
149 W. HASTINGS ST.
WEDNESDAY
OCTOBER 29 / 8 PM
BENJAMIN BRATTON
PUBLIC LECTURE
THE STACK: DESIGN AND
GEOPOLITICS IN THE AGE OF
PLANETARY-SCALE COMPUTING
FROM SURVEILLANCE TO JIHADIST
SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE SI NO-
GOOGLE WARS, COMPUTATION HAS
BECOME GLOBAL INFRASTRUCTURE
sfuwoodwards.ca
TWITTER. C0M/@SFU_Vf
FACEB00K.COM/SFUW00DWARDS
SATURDAY-SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 1-2
HEART OF THE
CITY FESTIVAL 10    I   SPORTS   I    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16,2014
SOCCER»
Thunderbirds tie 'Bird-killer Fraser Valley
Women's team battles against the only team to beat both UBC squads in three years
The Cascades have had the Thunderbirds' number in the past.
Olamide Olaniyan
Staff Writer
During the Thanksgiving weekend, the Thunderbirds drew 0-0
against the University of Fraser
Valley Cascades, the only team to
beat both UBC soccer squads in
the last three years. After a tight
game between two great teams,
both parted ways, each with a
point to keep.
All the players followed the
game plan to the very end with
continuous collaboration, but most
ofthe game can only be described
as "scrappy" as goalkeeping coach
Mike Norris said.
"We started well in the first
half, had a couple of chances, but
didn't quite execute. We should
have, but then we knew it was
going to be a tough match," said
Norris, who is also the goalkeeping coach for Mountain United
FC. "It was a tough battle but we
worked hard as a team. We stuck
to the plan."
The first half ofthe game was
mostly inactive, with a few opportunities here and there but a failure
to finish for both teams. The players
came back fired up after halftime
and kicked off with a new fervour.
=HOTO SOFYTSAI ffHE UBYSSEY
"I think everybody did their
role to be honest, everybody
battled through and I think that
as a team we collectively tried to
do the jobs that we were asked,"
said Norris.
The 'Birds then began to dominate early in the second half with
forwards Jasmine Dhanda and
Amirit Berar leading the charge.
In the 46th minute, Dhanda
managed to get the ball after a
corner kick and unleashed a fierce
shot on goal, only to be denied by
the powerful hands of cascades
goalkeeper Kayla Klim. Altogether, Dhanda managed four shots,
which were supplemented by
Berar, Madison Guy and Tamara
Roughead, who each had two.
However, despite the collaborative
efforts of the Thunderbirds, the
Cascades held them back.
"We need to be ready to be
successful, whether in the 45th or
the fifth or even the 90th minute,"
said Eckerle.
Thunderbirds goalkeeper
Emily Wilson made several great
saves on Friday, saving them a
loss and stopping the opposition's
attack in some key moments. In
the 68th minute, Cascade's Shelby
Beck caught Wilson slightly off
her mark and fired a shot from
far off, but Wilson stretched and
managed to stop the ball for a
catch in one ofthe closest calls of
the match.
The Cascades started pressing again in dying minutes of
the game, making the danger
of a late goal very possible, but
Wilson pulled off a beautiful save
with a quick dive. In the end, the
Thunderbirds managed to maintain their rock solid defensive
record.
"We're on the way up this year
and [to be on top], we're going to
have a strong finish towards the
end of this season," said Eckerle.
The Thunderbirds dropped their
game on Saturday vs. the Trinity
Western Spartans in Langley, but
will be back home this Sunday,
October 19 at noon for a rematch to
close out their regular season. Xi
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
TALENTED TRANSFERS
KELLY
MURRAY
Hockey
ife
KEEGAN
ZANATTA
Swimming
DIANA
LEE
Basketball
¥
1. Which university did you transfer from and
why?
2. What's been the toughest adjustment or
sacrifice so far?
3. What's your favourite movie sequel?
I transferred from Cornell
University down in the
States because of injury
problems; so I could gain
an extra yearto play
hockey.
Probably trying to fit
myself into an entirely
newteamand lifestyle
than what I had been
used to.
My favourite movie
sequel would have to be
Star Wars or something
along those lines.
I transferred from UVic
so I could live the ladybird lifestyle.
Well, I was homeless
for a month. That wasn't
ideal.
Step Up 2: The Streets.
Dalhousie University.
UBC has a muchstron-
gerswimming program.
Being awayfrom [my
home province of] PEL
miss the small towns,
potatoes and inbreds.
The Dark Knight.
I transferred from
Arizona State University
after spending two years
there. I ultimately decided to transfer because it
wasn't the right fit for me.
The toughest adjustment for me is learning
how to play Canadian
football again.
Myfavouritemoviese-
quel is Lord of The Rings:
The Two Towers.
I transferred from Boise
State University. I ...decided to use the rest of
my eligibility back home
in Vancouver while pursuing a master's degree.
haven't really had any
difficult adjustments.
I'm originally from North
Vancouver so I'm just
really happy to be back.
The Dark Knight Rises
4. How do UBC's sports fans compare to the
fans at your former school?
5. If your new teammates had to describe you
in three words what would they say?
Cornell did bring in ...
around 1,500-2,000
fans... I was pleasantly
surprised to see that
UBC does have a decent
amount of fans.
Probably something
along the lines of energetic, competitive and
happy.
UVic doesn't really have
any fans. There's just too
much disappointment.
Bald, sarcastic and bald.
Honestly, I never
watched any other
sports at DAL. Oops.
"Is very aggressive."
UBC's sports fans are
awesome. I wish every
student could come
out to all of our home
games.
If they described me
in three words they probably would say funny,
confident and outgoing.
Fans at UBC are great
and it's awesome to be
able to have my family
and friends at all the
games.
Competitive, outgoing,
always-laughing. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
The men's soccer team lost
for
were the only team to upset
past two years. For whatever
more offensive threat would
MEN'S
the first time this season on
the equally dominant men's
reason, they kick their game
come from the UBC team that
Friday against the University
/
team lastseason, breaking a
up a notch when they face the
averages a division-leading
SOCCER
of Fraser Valley Cascades,
who are inexplicably compe
t-
27-game win streak. This time,
it was only 19. UFV's disman
best of the best. The game
saw Navid Mashinchi knock
three goals per game. Cascade
Justin Sekhon hammered an
LOSES A
itive when playing UBC. The
tling of the CIS' top team is
in his league-leading eighth
other one in to put Fraser Valley
GAME
Cascades are the only team
curious, considering the fact
goal of the season to tie the
on top again in the 86th minute,
to beat both UBC squads in
that their record has been close
game after UFV's Colton O'Neil
snatching the win from the
the past three years — they
to .500 over the course of the
opened the scoring, but no
home team.
BEATS THE
UNBEATEN
the season, the Cougars have
allowed 11 goals — seven of
those were against U
high-scoring game on Friday,
:saw a number or oaa-
2-0 lead by the halfway
OT to take the weeken^
point, bui
shorthanded goal (Lockhart's).      ly in as many games to get his
ULTIMATE »
UBCs Ultimate pastime
BIRD
DROPPINGS
The Ultimate Club is open to complete beginners, but is also internationally competitive.
Ciaran Dougherty
Copy Editor
It's hard to walk around UBC
without seeing groups of students chasing, in what seems
an excessively athletic manner,
after what we commonly call
a Frisbee. It doesn't take much
observation to realize that there
is some organization behind the
exertion; in fact, what you see
are various incarnations of a
dynamic and colourful up and
coming sport.
I spoke to Alex Hackney, a
member ofthe UBC Ultimate
club and a Team Canada U19
representative, about the history
of the game to get a better idea of
why UBC has adopted it as one of
its favourite pastimes.
"It started in the U.S., in the
60s, the creator named it Ultimate Frisbee ... he said the game
made him feel 'Ultimate' and he
wanted a name to describe it as
such," said Hackney.
The game is made up of a
mixture of concepts from other
sports. To score a point you must
receive the disc in the opposition's
end zone, players cannot run
with the disc and once the disc
is received the player has limited
time to throw it again. This sport
has a unique feature, though, and
it's quite a charming one: it is
completely self-officiated.
"[It gives] the players that
amount of respect in order to
referee their own game and
make their own calls, not cheat
the rules, it really brings sort
of a new element to the game,"
said Hackney.
This offers a change of pace
from other similar sports that
can have a highly combative
nature; no officials have control,
which promotes sportsmanship
and respect.
The sport may have begun in
the U.S., but it has spread worldwide, and Canada is now a major
force at an international level.
Both the men's and women's U19
Team Canada squads medaled
at the World Championships
this summer. UBC has a lot to be
proud of, as many UBC Ultimate
club members represented the
nation at the tournament in Italy.
"Our club is very good. This
past year we've had four of its
members last year appear in the
2014 U19 [Men's] WFDF (World
Flying Disc Federation) Championships and those four members actually won the gold medal,
as well as having several girls
PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC^HE UBYSSEY
from the girls' team, so I think
there's 10 UBC members coming
back this summer with a medal,"
said Hackney.
The club started in the 1990s
and has been growing ever since.
Their numbers are healthy with
membership in the hundreds.
Now they operate using levels of
competition: a very competitive
A' team that targets the nationals and other tournaments, and a
more relaxed 'B' team that plays
in just-for-fun competitions
around the Pacific Northwest.
Despite the extreme talent of
some of its members, the club is
not exclusive. They encourage
new members and accommodate
all skill levels.
"Absolutely anyone can come,"
said Hackney. "All beginners are
welcome, and there's a lot of new
members that come out that are
nervous about that. We are totally welcoming."
The game Hackney and his
team love is vibrant and exciting — to be a top player, you need
high levels of skill and athleticism, but the real allure is that
anyone can get involved and have
a good time. It's still young, but
Ultimate is one sport that looks
like it's here to stay.
Women's soccer (5-3-2)
Friday vs. UFV:0-0T
Saturday @TWU: 3-0 L
Men's soccer (9-1)
Fridayvs.UFV:2-lL
Saturday @TWU: 3-0 W
Women's hockey (3-0-1)
Friday® MRU: 3-2 W
Saturday® MRU: 8-0 W
Men's hockey (2-2-2)
Friday vs. MRU: 3-5"'
Saturday vs. MRU:3-zi
Men's volleyball (18-4)
Friday @MEU: 3-1W
Saturday @MEU: 3-0'
the kaleidoscope
mental health support group at UBC
student run
confidential
all welcome
www.the-kaleidoscope.com
info@the-kaleidoscope.com | Twitter @empowrchange 12         3          4         5               MB         7          S          3                ■ 10        11       12       13
14                                                             I 15                                                 1 1G
1 IS                                                 1 19
20                                                       21                                     M22       23
■ 24                                    M^^
26       27       28                                                 M^^
30                                                 Hjl       32                                                       33       34       35       36
37                                           ^^H       B39                                     B40
41                                                       42                                           ^^H       B44
■ 45                                  B46     4T
48       49       SO       51                                                 B^^
53                                        m^^                          5S    56    5T
58                                                 H59       GO                                     BGI
62                                                 Bg3                                                 Ie4
65                                                 B G6                                                 B 67
9
6
8
9
6
2
8
7
5
9
4
2
3
2
7
1
8
9
6
7
7
1
3
9
2
9
8
5
4
7
8
9
5
5
7
2
'c
'a
3L
*E
B
0
*A
*R
's
|
A
lT
N
0
A
M
I
G
0
A
G
E
E
0
0
1
N
B
0
G
G
Y
S
E
E
R
-E
R
T
E
I
R
E Ih
*A
1
R
D
R
E
S
S
E
R
N
E
R TV
0
u
s | |a
C
T
0
R
S
H
0
K 1
A
T
H
E |
s
T
A
N
d If
0
D
E
0 I'P.
1
A
S
0
N
s lr<
A
R
E
d It
A
L
C
s
P
a Ih
G
E
n If
E
N
E
E
Iw
0
M
E
N lo
E
R 1
E
A
s
E
u
P |   |'(F
R
E
N | A
T
E
A
L
T
E
R
N
A
T
1
0
II I F
H
A
S
E
E
0
|
^
R
A
T
T
E
T
E
S
E
R
L
E
's
1
R
E
E
M
0
T
E
D
0
E
«
"s
A
N
S
R
U
R
A
L
1
4
3
9
7
6
2
5
8
8
6
7
2
4
5
9
3
1
2
5
9
8
1
3
4
7
6
4
3
8
7
6
9
5
1
2
7
2
6
1
5
4
3
8
9
9
1
5
3
2
8
6
4
7
5
8
4
6
9
7
1
2
3
3
9
1
4
8
2
7
6
5
6
7
2
5
3
1
8
9
4

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127488/manifest

Comment

Related Items