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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1975

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Array U.S. developers eye UEL
By MARK BUCKSHON
A land development company,
largely owned by two Americans,
has purchased options from seven
landholders in the University
Endowment Lands for an expensive, luxurious new community.
The proposed multi-million
dollar development will be
restricted to high income
residents, the secretary and
barrister for LRS Development
Ltd. said Wednesday.
If 18-month options on the 3.6
acres bounded by Allison, Toronto,
Dalhousie and Kings Roads are
exercised, the project would
displace a close knit middle income community of 179 people who
currently live in the area's low-rise
apartments and row houses.
The land would cost $3.7million
to purchase, more than $1 million
per acre, and about $35 million to
develop, 'lawyer William Hansen,
secretary for the development
company, said Wednesday.
Plans are to build a "very
elaborate, super-deluxe residential
development, with one bedroom
apartments having an area of
about 1,200 square feet (most one
bedroom apartments in Vancouver
are 600 square feet or less) and
several expensive amenities.
Detailed plans by architect
Gerald Hamilton are expected to
be completed in the next 30 days.
Representatives of a newly-
established tenants society appeared before Alma Mater Society
council Wednesday night and won
student support in their fight
against the development, which
would provide about 200 high-
income housing units.
But society chairwoman Jane
Corcoran said her group faces an
uphill battle because of the UEL
political structure, which allows no
TM UBYSSEY
% Vol. LVII, No. 8      VANCOUVER, BC, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1975     -^»>48     228-2301M
—andrew shearon photo
NEARING END of battle with uncooperative log, exhausted forestry type shows signs of strain. Only reason
he was to complete arduous task, as was later revealed, was his method of equating log's true identity with
(a) the prof he dislikes most; (b) crowd of jeering spectators; (c) a combination of the proceeding.
Student on appeals c'tee
ByMARCUSGEE
The B.C. education department
has allowed a student to sit on a
student financial awards appeal
committee.
Simon Fraser University student
Ross Powell has become the first
student representative in the
provincial student aid structure.
But Powell said Wednesday his
admittance to the four person
committee is a diplomatic move by
the education department.
"The significance of my being on
the committee is that the province
has decided it must throw a crumb
to student representation on
student aid," he said.
Powell said the committee,
which includes education department representatives Sandy
Martin and John Falk and UBC
financial aid officer Byron Hender,
is not the final appeals body but
merely reviews written appeals.
"In terms of financial aid policymaking it (the committee) is a
token organization. They (committee members) are not ready to
discuss the philosophical issues of
student aid and they become
hostile and unfriendly when I introduce matters of policy."
But Powell said he had good
rapport with the committee at its
first meeting Tuesday and he will
be able to learn a lot about the
student aid structure by being a
member.
Hender claimed Wednesday
Powell's admittance is "a sign the
provincial government is trying to
pay attention to the point of view of
students.
"This is a response to student
input," Hender said.
Powell, an SFU representative to
the B.C. Student Federation, said
the BCSF had hoped to have three
student members on the committee. He said last weekend's
BCSF conference appointed
himself and UBC representatives
Lake Sagaris and Stew Savard to
sit on the appeals committee.
But the committee refused to
admit more than one student, he
said.
Powell said the committee will
not allow him to have a copy of the
manual containing the rules and
criteria for granting and rejection
of appeals.
The education department keeps
the manual confidential, he said.
"The bosses of the committee
may use the confidentiality to
protect themselves instead of
protecting the individual, and- it is
difficult for me to understand some
of the technical points of the appeals without a manual," Powell
said.
Powell said he hopes his admittance to the appeals committee
will result in more student appointments to financial aid policymaking bodies in the provincial
government.
"It is not enough to filter a couple
of reps into a committee like this,"
he said.
The B.C. student loan committee
would be the first and most important target of student representation, Powell said.
Scientific
Attention science types!
The Ubyssey in its gross
ignorance of microbes, molecules,
moulds and all that other
disgusting but fascinating scientific stuff, is looking for a science
reporter.
Anyone interested in covering
science and research at UBC
should come to the paper's office in
the northeast corner of SUB noon
Monday, Wednesday or Thursday.
direct elected representation and
permits developers to complete
projects without holding public
hearings.
"LRS" are initials of company
president Dinos Lambrou, of West
Vancouver, chairman Max
Ruderian of Los Angeles and
treasurer Albert Spiegel who lives
in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Hansen declined to say where
money for the project is being
raised although he said "I've
drawn the leases" for LRS and
other members of the "Lambrou
group of companies."
Lambrou, who apparently owns
several other land development
companies, is also involved with
"Los Angeles interests" in a
controversial $15 million
development called Plaza International on the border of North
and West Vancouver.
That project, which includes
apartments, a convention centre,
hotel and commercial outlets, is
nearing completion after two years
of delay.
The project ran into trouble
when its financial backer, the U.S.
Financial Corp. of San Diego,
Calif.,   was   unable   to   provide
promised money. The USFC was
later suspended by the U.S.
Securities and Exchange Commission.
Lambrou and the Los Angeles
entrepreneurs could not be
reached for comment Wednesday.
Corcoran, chairwoman of
the UEL Tenants Society,
established to fight the project,
described the blocks as a "community nice to live in."
She said residents currently pay
about $200 to $275 a month for two
bedroom apartments and could not
afford the rents of the Lambrou
development.
She admitted the new
development would provide more
housing units than currently exist
in the area, but said the new
housing would be restricted to the
very rich and would destroy the
healthy community which
currently exists.
"There's a good sense of community and support with
children," she said.
She said the demolition of the
blocks, built about 30 years ago,
would take away the last area of
family rental housing in the UEL
See page 2: PROJECT
Kenny plots UBC's
non-sexist image
By RALPH MAURER
The university can aid the
movement toward a non-sexist
society by placing more women in
teaching positions, administration
president Doug Kenny said
Wednesday.
Kenny, speaking at the Vancouver Public Library, was waging
his campaign to improve public
relations between the university
and the community.
He said the number of women in
teaching roles at the university is
increasing, but "we must do more
— role models are important in
learning."
To do this, he said, women must
be encouraged to go into graduate
school and seek teaching degrees.
"The university has a supportive
role in the education of future
leaders and parents," he said.
And Kenny claimed the
university's record in the struggle
for equality in society for women
has been good.
"The long view shows us the
accessibility of the university to
women has been a feature since
UBC opened in 1915," he said.
He said the ideal state the
university is aiming for is when
"women are the actual architects
of educational changes, as well as
the chief beneficiaries."
And to reach this ideal state,
Kenny said, more women must go
into post-graduate studies and
teaching, especially in such important fields as commerce and
business administration.
Kenny said 43 per cent of un-
compared to 35 per cent in 1964,
and the percentage of women in
grad studies has increased in the
same period to 34 per cent from 20
per cent.
He said that although the trend
towards more women in previously
male-dominated studies is
generally good at UBC, he is
concerned that not more women
See page 3: DAYCARE
—matt king photo
TAKE THAT, SEXIST PIG, yells unidentified woman as she hurls axe
at greasy, giggling foresters outside SUB during forestry week. She
missed by mere yards, the double-edged death landing, quivering, in a
bullseye painted on a piece of wood. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 25, 1975
Project rents unknown
From page 1
and would not result in any new
student housing.
Lawyer Hansen said there is "no
possible way" the development
will provide housing for moderate-
income tenants at current rental
levels. He did not say what rents
would be in the new project.
Hansen claimed low-rental
projects cannot be constructed
without government subsidization
because of rising labor and
material costs.
"It's one of the common
economic facts of life, I'm afraid,"
he said.
Hensen said he doesn't have a
direct financial participation in the
company but acts as Lambrou's
lawyer and helps manage the
"Lambrou group."
He said LRS directors meetings
are generally conducted informally by phone, since two of the
directors live in California.
Corcoran's group has written to
housing minister Lome Nicolson
and resources minister Robert
Williams, who is responsible for
UEL administration, asking the
government to stop the project.
But Corcoran said her group has
had no power to stop LRS from
Book manager named
Administration president Erich
Vogt said Wednesday he has
chosen Don Donovan as temporary
bookstore manager to replace Bob
Smith, who resigned early in
September.
Vogt said he will establish a
selection committee to find a
permanent replacement for him in
about two weeks.
KARATE
Donovan has been a Bookstore
employee for 10 years. He was
previously responsible for textbook
acquisition and the November book
sale. Smith said Wednesday
Donovan is "one of the best bookmen in the business."
Donovan's   appointment  is
fective Oct. 1.
ef-
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CURLERS
HAVE YOU SIGNED UP TO CURL
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If not
come to SUB 115
Friday, Sept. 26—12:30-2:30
Or Phone Evenings
Bruce or Colin @ 734-1504
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U.B.C. STUDENTS
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amassing land and lacks direct
political representation to fight its
case.
"Our only political representation is a member on the Greater
Vancouver Regional District and
he's not elected," she said.
GVRD chairman Allan Kelly
could not be reached for comment
Wednesday. UEL office manager
Bob Murdoch said the company
would need UEL approval for
redevelopment and may be
restricted by an "old Endowment
Land Use Code" restricting
multiple family dwellings to three
stories.
In a tenants society newsletter,
resident Peggy Bloom describes
the community as "something
really unique."
She says the "Four Roads
Community" provides an opportunity for mutual aid between
the area's families.
"Our children, as well as the
parents and other adults in the
area, benefit from daily, friendly
relationships with other compatible people who live within short
walking distance.
DANCE to disco music
live
CKLG DISCO 75'
Featuring 4 Best 'LG Jocks
FRIDAY, Sept. 26/75
SUB BALLROOM 8:30-12:30
FULL FACILITIES
'"Four Roads' has a large
enough population to provide a
reasonably wide choice of friends
and acquaintances.
"It is open-minded enough to
foster not just tolerance but a
genuine appreciation . of differences.
"It's members are varied
enough to provide stimulation and
interest.
"Our small community can
provide mutual aid and mutual
trust without inhibiting freedom or
making burdensome demands on
its members."
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AMS Card
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NOTICE:
TO ALL APATHETIC STUDENTS
This is an opportunity for you to make the AMS something more than a
"self-perpetuating bureaucracy full of circular arguments and irrelevant decisions."
Become a member of an AMS or Presidential Committee. You can have a voice in the
policy making bodies at UBC.
The following committees have student positions available:
PRESIDENTIAL COMMITTEES
AMS COMMITTEES
1. Traffic and Parking
1. Elections
2. Bookstore
2.  Eligibility
3. Food Services
3. Students' Court
4. Master Teacher
4. Speakers
5. Safety, Security and Fire Prevention
5. Special Events
6. Charitable Donations
6. Restructuring of the AMS
7. Men's Athletic Committee
7. Housing
8. War Memorial Gym Trust Advisory
8. Open House
Get involved by submitting your name to Ellen Paul, AMS Secretary, SUB Rm. 250, or 228-2050.
IMk£JNUS
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Women losers on gov't loans
By HEATHER WALKER
The B.C. government student
loan plan discriminates   against
women, Alma Mater Society co-1
ordinator Lake  Sagaris  charged
Wednesday.
Sagaris said the forced summer
saving program is discriminatory
because it assumes equal earning
power for men and women
students.
The FSS program assumes that
students will be able to work in the
summer and contribute a
minimum of $720 to their
educational costs.
"If students don't save $720, they
won't qualify for the program,"
Sagaris said.
Sagaris said since women do
earn less than men, more women
will fail to qualify for the program.
However Dean Clarke, coordinator of student services for
the B.C. education department,
denied Wednesday that the
program is discriminatory.
"Up until this year we practiced
a sort of reverse discrimination,"
he said. "We assessed women at a
lower amount than men. But this
year we decided that because of
the new minimum wage
legislation, it would be fair to
assess them equally."
"This assumes that all students
earn the minimum wage, and that
it is enough for a student who only
works four months of the year,"
she said.
A report presented by Allen
Shirrall of Clarke's department
shows that undergraduate men
students earned a median amount
of $2,190 while undergraduate
women students had median
earnings of $1,480, and that 44.5
per cent of female students saved
less than $800, tbe amount required
by this year's loan plan, as compared to 29.2 per cent of the men
saving less than $800.
"Since women earn  less  than
Daycare policy
up to public—Kenny
From page 1
are encouraged to go into commerce, where only 13 percent of
students are women.
' 'The enrolment of women should
undoubtedly be increased. I know
the faculty is encouraging women
to go into it," he said.
UBC budget
to U Council
The B.C. Universities Council is
considering budget requests for
next year from the three public
universities before submitting
them to the provincial government
next month.
Council members and university
officials, who know how much UBC
wants for operating and capital
expenses in the 1976-77 academic
year, would not release information on the budget requests
because they said education
minister Eileen Dailly has the
responsibility to make them
public.
The council correlates requests
from UBC, Simon Fraser
University and the University of
Victoria and sends its own
recommendations to Victoria,
where the provincial government
decides how much it will allocate to
each institution.
He also said the university could
not be blamed for the lack of daycare facilities available to women
with children.
"The Universities Council has
^established    the    policy    that
education dollars should not go into
providing day-care facilities," he
said.
He said people who objected to
this should initiate "wide-ranging
public debates because that is a
public policy. The university itself
cannot change it," he said.
"Day-care is not just a university problem but a societal
problem."
men, it is obviously discriminatory
to expect them to meet the same
requirements as men," Sagaris
said.
Clarke denied that any student
failing to save $720 would be
automatically disqualified for a
student loan. He said students who
had not saved less than this
amount must explain in their
applications why this was so, and
would be given a loan of up to $720.
The rest of the money they
received would be divided between
loans and grants.
Clarke said that although women
earn less than men, they are not
discriminated against by the loan
committee. "Because they earn
less, they will be given more
money in grants and loans," he
said. "Their needs will be greater,
so they will receive more money."
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„•»-i
MEANINGLESS STONEHENGE ON MAIN MALL was toppled Monday night by bunch of funny looking
people in bright green jackets. Bunch of funny looking people in brown jackets, called there by bunch of
funny looking people in red jackets, stood around and took names. What the hell does E stand for? Eunuch?
Earthworm? Egg? Eisteddfod? Epileptic? Eskimo? Ennui?
Listeners to pay for Dayan talk
KENNY . . . you followed me.
Former Israeli defence minister
Moshe Dayan will speak on
campus Oct. 6, but those who want
to listen will have to buy tickets.
Alma Mater Society treasurer
Dave Theessen told AMS council
Wednesday the money "will go to
offset Mr. Dayan's somewhat large
fee."
Dayan will receive $1,000 for his
two-hour speaking engagement,
and an additional $5,000 will be
spent on security costs.
Theessen said tickets will be sold
in the AMS business office at 50 per
cents per student and $1.50 per non-
student.
He said ticket sales are expected
to begin Monday.
In other business, AMS president
Jake van der Kamp told council
that ex-CIA agent Philip Agee is
available in early October for a
UBC speaking engagement at a
cost of $500 plus expenses.
Agee shocked the espionage
world with secret disclosures of the
CIA's inner operation with the
recent publication of his controversial book Inside the CIA.
Van der Kamp said the ex-agent,
who is currently in England, is
scheduled to speak in Winnipeg
and is willing to come to UBC for
one-third his usual speaking fee.
The author came to the AMS
through the American program
bureau, a U.S.-based organization
handling tours for major speakers.
Van der Kamp said Agee's usual
fee is $1,500 but that was rejected
because "it would have wiped out
more than half of the $3,500
provisional budget for the
speaker's program this year."
He added the expenses would
probably amount to no more than
$250 which would include travel
and hotel expenses.
Agee's speech will be free of
charge to students and will happen
in the SUB ballroom.
Van der Kamp told council it
would be asked in the next few
weeks to release money from the
speaker's budget to pay for the
engagement.
Mayor of Gastown
Ace Aasen: Alcoholic, ain't anonymous.
Mayor Ace Aasen with a hole in his left
heel, a left-over top hat and brilliant
crimson magenta alligator shoes, sat next to
a tomato can that was functioning as a
spitoon. Hockey on TV at the wide end,
urinal at the narrow end of the $2 million
triangle Europa.
The last time we were sober in here
somebody pulled a butcher knife on us. The
last time we tried to talk to Ace, it was about
managing his campaign for de facto mayor
of Vancouver. He hit us over the head with
his cane.
Ace didn't want to go incognito concerning
such things as: should we give the land back
to the Indians? Would he recommend
politics to his children, as a profession? We
would ask that he opine on the closing of the
bloodiest expensive war on record; take a
position on juvenile delinquency, and we
would try to get a gardening tip.
Ace tried to take charge of the interview
by asking the first question himself. Have
you ever seen a differential without a car?
He went into a raving about infinitesimal
differences between people of continuously
varying qualities, going in different
directions at once.
Then he tried to sell us a duplicate of a
very impressive looking letter from the
Queen for two bucks apiece. We took the
letter for our files and convinced Mayor Ace
to take his gratuity in the form of alcoholic
beverage.
He agreed this way: "Well I believe in my
people no matter if they are going in two
different directions at once. Do you want to
read a letter? Ladies first."
Could we buy you $2 worth of beer? "Oh
yea. Or do you need the money?
"Well I could use the $2. I got murdered
twice since I seen you last. I got $2 last night
and I didn't even have to autograph it."
Then there was some discussion about the
king of hungry.
Ace insisted on a few ground rules: We
must accentuate the positive, then we must
eliminate the positive and we've got the
abstracts and that's where it's at. It it
remains negative we haven't used our
brains enough. We agreed.
THE LAND CLAIMS ISSUE
Should we give it back?
No; unless they work for it. They're trying
to get something for nothing.
It seems it was theirs to begin with.
Well what were they doing with it? They
want to inherit the earth. Indians are
alright. Let them step into our world, and
they're welcome to it. (he intoned) "You're
welcome to our world." Be part of us so we
can preserve our cultures together. WE
BETTERFIED THE LAND BETTER
THAN THEY DID.
They didn't pollute the land. We do.
Well yea, we got pollution like a disease,
but, (he declared) IT SHALL DISAPPEAR.
How?
By consoling or, no I mean controlling, the
human energy and not use gaseous fumes.
We have advanced ourselves. I'm living now
not like an animal. I have a nice place at
home.
You agree then, the Indian people were
here before us, living on the land without
polluting it?
Then why do I make such a brash
statement that was not true?
At this time Ace tried to divert our attention with a discussion about the ashtray.
Should it be full and in front of a lady who
doesn't smoke?
He tried to flag a waiter, but we assured
him that it wculd lend credence to the atmosphere of the pub. "But for the lady's
sake ..." Again we assured him. She didn't
mind sitting behind butts. Back to the point
Ace.
We want them to work. We learned a lot
from their system. We learned that we don't
have to live like animals.
But it seems that we are animals, Ace.
We are, sure. I'll mos' definitely state
that. But hang scalps on our front porch? We
never did that. Let's collaborate. We're
trying our best. It's a long time coming. We
don't want to pollute the earth, but what's
the alternative? Live in a wigwam and
pollute the world with scalps?
What they don't know now, that is
forgotten, we know now in our way of life.
We are an unhealthy society because we
don't collaborate, (again he declared)
POLLUTION SHALL DISAPPEAR!
Do you know how to make society more
healthy?
Lump the old with the young. Look after
the young and the old and we can look after
ourselves, white and Indian. Let them
become part of us then we will become part
of us.
The first animal {hat was ever born was a
primate. We're all primates. We became the
primate that advanced the world instead of
living in teepees.
POLITICS
Would you advise your children to enter
politics as a profession?
If I had men and they were man enough,
yes, because they'd have to have a brain.
See page 8 ruyc   *f
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 25, 1975
Plan stinks
"Rob from the poor and give to the rich " - a. one ac t play.
The scene: the University Endowment Lands (Sherwood Forest).
The Players: LRS Development Ltd. headed by Dinos Lambrou
and backed by heavy California interests (Robin Hood and his merry
band).
The plot: rip down nice low- to middle-income homes, destroy a
solid community atmosphere and uproot children to make a
playground for the rich. (A 20th century, inverted, interpretation of
the Robin Hood Motif.)
Once upon a time there was a little community of people in rented
accommodations on the University Endowment Lands. The houses had
been there for about 30 years and everyone loved the area's
atmosphere. Even the kids had a place to play. Then one day....
So a bunch of rich bigwigs want to level part of the UEL
for a rich kid's paradise.
This must be stopped. Now. Maintenant. Nipped in the
bud. Squished.Suffocated.
The Ubyssey refers to the scandal involving a land
development company and its plans to build a multi-million
dollar housing complex for high-income people.
In other words raze the poor and bring in the fat cats.
This is an outrage of international proportions.   *
What right do these developers, even though they own
the land options, have to terminate the housing for people
living within the university community?
The housing situation in Vancouver is terrible. If you're
a low- to middle-income wage earner the chance of finding a
decent place to live in the city is remote — especially if you
want it close to UBC.
Now the people who are least affected by high-priced
housing are those who can afford to dish out lots of rent
money. Why put people out into the streets for the sake of a
millionaire's millenium?
Bah! Put the money bags in the bogs of Delta and let
the university community, especially the ones who can least
afford housing, live near the campus.
If any housing should be built on the UEL it should be
for low-income people like students, staff and even young
faculty of UBC.
Robin  Hood would be ashamed if he saw what was    __ ,
planned. So stop it at all costs. Write letters to administration   BlTtTlS
president  Doug  Kenny,   UEL  manager  Bob Murdoch and
Resources Minister Bob Williams protesting the plan.
 but after moving all the people out and putting the
bulldozers in place a horde of people threw themselves into the path of
destruction. They refused to move so the developers called off the
project. Then the people, including some students, moved back into
their homes and lived happily ever after.
WHAT "DID YOU VO |M SOfcoL TcWf, WR ?.~
(jjBiJlKST WE WERE ML RWKTOWfltaTHW
Oft PH0TO5 WERETNfcN RKOtf VQ
(NRDb/TtJENUEHADTS
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"freedom hj MAEKva"
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flays critics
Keep duckin'. Gerry
Why would anyone want to assassinate U.S. president
Gerald Ford?
He's the guy who can barely walk and chew gum at the
same time. The guy who swims 40 lengths of a pool then
talks to his wife through a pillow.
In short, he's a harmless nabob.
But two nuts have tried, one with bad aim and the other
with a bad gun. Somewhere in the U.S. someone is plotting
to make the third time lucky.
If Gerry does succumb to the lunatic fringe something
worse will happen — Nelson Rockefeller will become
president. He's so removed from being elected to office it's
not funny.
But assassinate Gerry Ford Nah! It wouldn't accomplish
anything. As Fidel Castro said at the time of John Kennedy's
assassination: "Only a fool could rejoice at such a tragedy.
The system is the enemy, not the man."
The malcontent sat in the
Kerrisdale apartment sipping a
whiskey sour and staring at the
color TV. Star-Trek had just been
cancelled for a ball game.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 25,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"No not the leg . . . ." screamed Gary Coull. "Is he at that again?" said
Ralph Maurer. "Yes, it's really quite disgusting behavior for someone in his
position," said Sue Vohanka. "How are we expected to get anything
accomplished when he insisted on bringing his entire pet spider collection
into the office," said Matt King. "Look," said Doug Rushton, "one of them
has just sexually attracted Andrew Shearon Is nothing sacred anymore?"
"I'm glad you asked that question my dear boy, for it is one that in recent
weeks has been much on my mind," plagiarized Len MacKave.
"Look, this drivel has got to stop and we mean now!" screamed
Heather^Walker and George Baugh. "The Ubyssey masthead is supposed to
be a work of art, now let's get this show back on the road where it belongs,"
said Ken Ball.
"I feel rather hungry," said Anne Wallace to Patti-Reay Stahl. "Yes,"
said Paul Weetman, "we can all eat Doug Field." J
Joni Mitchell was singing "The
Last Time I saw Richard" when
suddenly the door splintered and a
squad of Campus Charismatic
Christians rushed in.
"Guilty before Zardoz," they
cried, "of thinking bad thoughts
about the Czar. Look, it says so in
The Ubyssey."
"That wasn't what I meant," he
replied. "Any fool knows that all
cynicism masks a failure to cope.
And anyway my name isn't
Hennessy, it's Hieronymo."
"Shut up, limey rat," snapped
Marlow. "I've just about had
enough of your phony literary
allusions.".
"Make him drink the draught
beer they sell in the Pit," advised
Joe Stalin.
"Not that," the film-reviewer
screamed, starting to sing "God
Save the Queen" in a shaky voice.
"And tell McKitrick it's Queen
Victoria I'm in love with, not the
other one. History will absolve
me."
A few members of the
Lithuanian royal family drifted by
on West 41st. "Bang," he
whispered, "bang:, bang."
Just then Franz Kafka came in
through the ruined door. "Hey," he
said, "I got this great new entry for
my journal. Wanna hear it?"
"Sure," he shrugged, putting
down the violin.
Kafka smiled. "I want to live on
another planet," he said.
"Not bad, not bad at all," the
Page Friday man replied, "but do
you mean to say you haven't seen
the new Solzhenytsyn paperback?
Here, borrow my copy."
"All romantics meet the same
fate someday," interrupted Joni,
"cynical and drunk and boring
someone in some dark cafe." But
then she wasn't really into politics
Letters
either, and when he looked out of
the window nothing had changed
very much. Except for the
Lithuanians, who were $30 dollars
richer. They looked up and smiled,
and he waved back.
Ron Binns
grad studies
Ubyssey reviewer
and commentator
Binns has been subjected to wild
criticism in recent issues for his
articles and has taken an opportunity to hit back at his
detractors.
Fiasco
I attended the Weekend With
Canadian Novelists (WE3526) on
Sept. 20 and 21.1 became aware of
this weekend through your well-
prepared poster/-
brochure/advertisement.
The chance for "discussions"
with Canadian authors sounded
very appealing as I am planning to
teach English and have a high
regard for Canadian literature
inside the classroom and out of it.
International House seemed like
a fine place to hold such a
weekend: comfortable, yet not too
large. It could hold perhaps 70 or 80
people at the most.
To my surprise, the entire
program was relocated to Brock
Hall, well-known for its informal,
gymnasium-type appeal. Also,
registrations continued until the
first novelist to speak cleared her
throat. Here was not a discussion-
type atmosphere but rather that of
a lecture hall.
Apparently, Continuing
Education is not concerned so
much with quality of education as
much as with turning the greatest
profit they can, at the expense of a
very worthwhile idea.
Your advertising for "A
Weekend With Canadian
Novelists" was, as well as slick,
misleading.
It was poorly organized to the
dismay of both those wishing to
learn the those having something
to teach. It became more an ordeal
to struggle with the timetable than
a pleasure to communicate.
Those who came to make
recordings of this event wasted
miles of film and tape as well as
their dollars and their time. My
loss was only my time and $15.00.
Had you the organizers changed
your plans when it became apparent that so many people were
interested in attending, either by
limiting registration or by dividing
the audience into groups that met
with individual authors to discuss
their ideas, and that rotated between several locations, I am sure
that you would have achieved
greater success. Perhaps you
could suggest such a format to
your programmers and avoid
future fiascos.
Laura E. Howarth
education 5
Penpals
We are in need of co-operation.
We are sure that our wish will be
useful for the students of your
university and for ourselves.
Frankly speaking, we would like
to make friends with students of
your university through
correspondence. We hope you will
insert this in your newspaper.
We will tell you about us. We go
to the same high school and will
graduate from our school next
March.
If you want a pen pal please
write to:
Rieko Yoshikama, 18, 275
Koyasn Joetsn-shi Niigata-ken 943-
01. Hobbies include recording
music, collecting post cards and
playing sports.
Yuko Maruyama, 17, 978-1
Mikatagaoka-Sharoku Ogata-
Machi Nakakubik:-gun Niigata-
ken 949-31. Hobbies included
reading, music (John Denver) and
movies.
We would be obliged to you if you
would grant our request.
Yuko Maruyama
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given. Thursday, September 25, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
socipbox
UBC literacy test needed9
The following article appeared in the
September issue of Compost, the 'composition newsletter' of UBC's English
department on the controversial subject of
literacy at the university level. The article
was written by department lecturer Stevan
Jovanovich.
Below Jovanovich's argument is a
critique by an English 100 teaching
assistant who has asked to remain
anonymous. He has chosen the by-line
Harry Eastman.
By STEVAN JOVANOVICH
A question has often come to my mind
during the last year. It has occurred while
rereading papers for the English 100
steering committee and it has cropped up
while teaching English 100 at Intersession
where a high percentage of the students
were repeating students whose first
language is not English.
The question which I know is not unique to
me is this: what are some obviously
illiterate students doing at the university
level?
The kind of student I am talking about —
and there are many — has serious linguistic
difficulties, does not understand or use the
language well, and his first language is
probably not English.
Anyone who has taught English 100 knows
that the university does admit semi-literate
students and that the English department
has gone through various administrative
contortions to accommodate them by
stressing grammar, by providing basic
composition sections and by providing,
workshops.
A significant number of English 100
sections cater to the less literate members
of the student body, yet last year's statistics
show that in some areas English 100 may be
fighting a losing battle — 70 per cent of
students enrolled in intensive composition
sections failed.
Practically speaking, the intensive
composition sections cannot be termed a
success; they were ineffective in remedying
serious linguistic problems. Most intensive
composition instructors knew full well from
the beginning that the majority of their
students would fail, and I can only imagine
how demoralizing it must have been to teach
the course under those circumstances.
Despite valiant and laudable efforts to
raise the level of literacy at the intensive
composition level, the problem remains
with us.
Why is the failure rate of the intensive
composition sections so high? The reason is
simple: the English department is not
equipped to handle language problems
below a certain level. After all, most of the
members of the English department have
been trained to teach literature, not English
as a second language.
The great number of non-native speakers
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NEW STUDENT . . .comprehension
problem.
provide a perennial problem for the English
department. The attempts to remedy the
problem have been cumbersome, expensive
and largely ineffective. But clearly this does
not indicate a failing of the English
department, which has attempted admirably to cope with a problem which is out
of its sphere; rather it points to a failure of
the university as a whole to establish some
kind of minimal linguistic admission
standards.
The English department ends up being
saddled with a university problem.
I think it is reasonable, indeed proper, for
an academic community to expect a
minimal linguistic competence of all its
members as a convention of higher
education. I do not think it should be the
responsibility of the university or the
English department to make up any
deficiencies below a certain level; that is the
domain of high schools, community colleges
and other pre-university institutions. The
English department, generously'enough,
has attempted to bring deficient students up
to an acceptable level, but it is not succeeding.
The clearest solution to the problem might
be for the university to set an admissions
exam which clearly delineates some
minimal linguistic standards. The presence
of such an exam could have many beneficial
effects. It would save some students the
time and expense of undertaking a program
they could not hope to master in a year. It
would tend to solidify the content of English
100 sections rather than fragmenting them
into special sections, regular sections, intensive sections and workshops. As well, the
academic value of English 100 would be
stabilized. The student who is granted three
units for a pass in a regular section has a
significantly different understanding of
English than the student who is granted
three units for a pass in an intensive section.
We know there is a qualitative difference.
Also, the presence of an admissions exam
would provide pre-university institutions
with the kind of direction they so badly seem
to need. A high school, for instance, would
be obliged to prepare its students for such an
exam out of public responsibility. High
school teachers might even begin to teach
English rather than multimedia and other
such non-verbal stuff.
Some people that I consulted reacted
violently to the proposition of an admissions
exam on the grounds that it could be construed as racist and discriminatory. I would
like to answer those objections.
An admissions exam can hardly be considered racist if everyone is required to take
it. An Anglo-Saxon could fail it as handily as
a Pakistani, a Mexican or an Eskimo.
We also might consider that none of us
would be admitted to French or German
universities if we could not show competence in their languages. In international
terms UBC seems strangely liberal in that it
does not require students to show competence in the language of the university.
An admissions exam would be
discriminatory in the same way that the rest
of the university experience is
discriminatory. The university experience
is composed of a series of calculated intellectual discriminations, whether they be
essays, tests, examinations, projects or
reports.
Intellectual discrimination is the modus
operandi of the university, the only way a
university degree obtains and maintains its
value.
I would like to digress for a moment to
show what sometimes happens when a
student who is linguistically deficient is
admitted to the university and manages to
get through an English 100 intensive section.
Even if a student passes an intensive section
he still has no guarantee that he has
achieved an acceptable linguistic standard
as far as the rest of the community is concerned.
This can be dramatically illustrated by
the use the pharmacy department makes of
English 301. The pharmacy department has
many of its graduates rejected by the B.C.
Pharmaceutical Association because of
language problems. In effect, those
students' degrees are professionally ineffective or held in suspension until they attain a firm understanding of English.
Consequently, the pharmacy department
demands that its students pass English 301
in order to continue in pharmacy. It is no
secret that the pharmacy department uses
English 301 as a "hatchet" course to chop
out linguistically weak students who may be
half way through their university career.
English 301 works very well as a hatchet
course; since the content of the course is
based on business formats and does not
include grammar, linguistically weak
students are almost automatically failed.
That use of the English 301 course
illustrates one of the more serious
ramifications of not initially establishing a
minimal literacy level for the university.
An entrance examination might free the
English department to teach English as it
should be taught at the university level and
put an end to the department's dubious
function as a second language instructor.
+
Jovanovich thesis enrages English TA
By HARRY EASTMAN
Monday is not my favorite day.
Mondays usually start out badly
and end worse. The hours of a
Monday are painfully long and
empty. I usually find Mondays
boring.
I say usually because last
Monday was different. Last
Monday found me full of energy. It
was a different kind of Monday
because something important
happened. Last Monday presented
me with a political, a professional,
and a moral challenge.
I did what I normally do on a
Monday. I took a long bus ride to
school, trudged across campus in
search of coffee, looked for a
diversion, found none, and went to
check my mail box in the English
office on the third floor of the
Buchanan tower. While most of us
are pleased to get mail I am
pleased when I look into my
alphabetically-assigned box and
find none.
Because of the numbers of
notices, forms, memos, and announcements that issue from the
English Department I have begun
to suspect that it is secretly a
major stockholder in Crown-
Zellerbach.
True to form the department had
managed to gush the requisite
reams of paper into my box. These
I grabbed without looking at them,
placed   them   in   my   bag   and
slouched toward my office. Had I
known then what I was carrying
my pace would have been much
more brisk.
Once in my office I began
examining the various bits of
paper I had picked up. Among
them I found a publication of the
English department entitled
Compost. I resisted my original
urge to file it under garbage and
decided I would read it instead.
"Another Alternative", the lead
article by Stevan Jovanovich, had
me enraged before I finished the
first paragraph.
The paragraphs that followed
only added to that anger. I found
the opinions and ideas of
Jovanovich lacking in analysis,
illogical, disagreeable, trite, and
most importantly, racist. The
article makes a number of
statements which I will deal with in
the order in which they are found.
In his opening paragraph
Jovanovich points out that the
class he taught at intersession had
"... a high percentage of
students who were repeating
students whose first language is
not English." From there he
moves on to ask "... what are
some obviously illiterate students
doing at the university level? The
kind of student I am talking
about. . . has serious linguistic
difficulties, does not understand or
use the language well and his first
language is probably not English."
These statements made me ask
myself a number of questions.
What does Jovanovich mean by a
"high percentage"? Does he mean
5 per cent, 10 per cent, 50 per cent,
90 per cent, or can we assume this
purposely vague term is used in
absence of a numerical proportion
which might conflict with his
assertion. I also had to ask myself
what Jovanovich m#ant by
"students whose first language is
not English". Does he mean
students who have stepped off a
boat from some distant land and
miraculously landed in English 100
where they are reduced to communicating in sign language and
pigion English. "Soldier boy want
come my house see sister?"
The sense of the sentence is that
students who have learned English
as a second language present a
serious problem to the English
department. How disheartening to
find out that even those Poles,
Germans, Chinese and Greeks,
that learned to speak English a
youngsters turn out to be dullards
because their first language is not
English.
Can Jovanovich be suggesting
that all non-native speakers of
English are illiterates, able to
neither read nor write? If this is
the case I can not but wonder how
these poor unfortunates made it
through   a   registration   which
seems to have been designed to
weed out the weakest of the species
by rigmarolling them to death. I
suspect that perhaps Jovanovich
himself may have been a non-
native speaker. Does what applies
to his students apply to him as
well?
In his following paragraph
Jovanovich tells us that "Anyone
who has taught English 100 knows
that the university does admit
semi-literate students ... "I noted
with interest that he had gone from
accusing students of being
illiterate to accusing them of being
"semi-literate", a term which
defies definition. Then Jovanovich
tells us that "A significant number
of English 100 sections cater to the
less literate members of the
student body." Again how are we
to determine the value of
significant?
What is its numerical
equivalent? Notice too that
Jovanovich is now calling these
students "less literate."
The first and only real fact I
came across was that " . . .70 per
cent of students enrolled in Intensive composition sections
failed." But what does this mean?
What number of students does this
represent? I assume that those
figures are available; why then
haven't they been used? Could it be
that   they   haven't   been   used
because it suits Jovanovich's onesided article?
Jovanovich further maintains
that high schools would be obliged
to prepare students for this exam
and that high school teachers
would have to teach English instead of " . . . multi-media and
other such non-verbal stuff." I
wonder where Jovanovich
imagines high school teachers
come from if not from universities
such as this one.
I would like to suggest that these
"linguistic deficiencies" exist and
continue to grow because of the
poor training provided by
universities. An undergraduate
degree in English hardly equips
the potential teacher to teach
English literature adequately
much less correct linguistic
problems. I doubt very much
whether post-graduate teacher
preparation is sufficient enough to
remedy this.
The wily Jovanovich tries to
sidestep the obvious criticism of
such an exam by saying "An admissions exam can hardly be
considered racist if everyone is
required to take it".
This presents rather a strange
bit of reasoning. I cannot help but
wonder where Jovanovich has
been for the last few years. Is he
unaware of the conflict in the U.S.
over policies such as the one he
See page 7: JOVANOVICH Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 25, 1975
Blood
and beer
The annual Red Cross campus
blood drive begins Monday and
lucky donors could win a night on
the town.
Donors' names will be entered
in a draw and a number of meal
vouchers for top Vancouver
restaurants will be given away. As
an additional incentive, 25 cases
of beer, that old time blood
thinner, will be offered to the
undergraduate faculty with the
highest proportionate number of
donors.
Hot flashes
The clinic is open 9:30'a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Sept. 29 to Oct. 3 in
SUB 207-209.
Berton
Boring UBC alumnus Pierre
Berton is in town Saturday to
flack his latest book, Hollywood
Canada,
The lecture, sponsored by the
ultra-exclusive Vancouver
Institute, will be 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday, at Instructional
Resources Centre lecture hall 2.
Berton's book examines
Canada's   image   as  seen through
the    distorted    lenses    of    the
American movie industry.
Revolution
How goes the revolution?
Dick Fidler, a writer for Labor
Challenge and Intercontinental
Press, will discuss his recent trip
to Portugal and whether Portugal
is going socialist. He will look at
the significance of the April, 1974
coup and the role of the military
and the communists.
The meeting is being sponsored
by the Young Socialist Forum and
will be held 8 p.m., Thursday, in
Buchanan 104.
Tween classes
TODAY
UBC MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
First practice and registration, all
welcome, 5-7 p.m., Place Vanier
ballroom.
HAPKIDO
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Jim Borger on Science and the Loss
of Transcendence, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Multimedia slide show, noon, and
7:30 p.m., Totem Park ballroom.
'CONSERVATIVE MIDDLE CLASS
NEW STUDENTS' CLUB ^
Juggling,     frisbeeing,     unicycle
workshop,  7  p.m. to 10 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
LIBERALS
Convention orientation meeting for
UBC delegates, noon, SUB 215.
REC UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
General   meeting,   noon,   Armories
208.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Dick Fidler on socialism in Portugal,
8 p.m., Buch. 104.
SHITORYU KARATE CLUB
Practice,     5:30-7:30     p.m.,     SUB
207-208.
INTRAMURALS
Men's   contract   mile,   noon,   Harry
Logan track.
PRE-VET CLUB
Organizational     meeting,     noon,
(vlacmillan 160.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Jim  Berger  lectures on  science and
the   loss   of   transcendence,    noon,
SUB 212.
ART GALLERY
Brock   Hall   collection   of  Canadian
art,   10   a.m.-5   p.m.   until   Oct.   3,
SUB art gallery.
SCI-FI CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
GAY PEOPLE
Meeting, noon, SUB 115.
FRIDAY
ALLtaNCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, upper lounge, International House.
LIBERALS
Provincial convention, all day, Sheraton Landmark.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
Election of student reps for departmental     committees,     noon,     Bu.
3259.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
111.
NDPCLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 211.
CAMPUS CYCLISTS
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE
STUDENT FED
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
COMMITTEE ON
SOCIALIST STUDIES
Poetry reading by Pat Lowther and
Dave Day, noon, Bu. 204.
CURLING CLUB
Meeting   to   sign   up   new   curlers,
noon, SUB 115.
CLASSICS CLUB
First meeting, "thera," 8 p.m., 4524
West Seventh.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Festival party featuring The Reflection, admission $1, members; $2.25
non-members; 9 p.m.-l a-m.K Grad
Student Centre.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting and first jump
course, noon, SUB 215.
MUSIC
Faculty viola recital, music of J. S.
Bach by Hans-Karl Piltz, 8 p.m., 8
p.m., music building recital hall.
galleries
PICTURE FRAMING
PRINTS
ART SUPPLIES
4448 West 10th       224.1833
11  a.m. -5-.30 p.m. Mon-Saf
Attention All Students
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
The following AMS Executive and Students' Council positions are now vacant:
l.AMS Internal Affairs
2. AMS External Affairs
3. AMS Ombudsperson
Nominations for the three AMS Positions will be received from 9:00 a.m. Wednesday October 1,
1975 until 12:00 noon Thursday October 9, 1975.
Nominations and eligibility forms can be obtained and shall be returned to the office of the AMS
Executive Secretary, Rm. 246, SUB. Election rules will be available at the above location also.
The election for all positions will be held Wednesday October 15, 1975.
Ellen Paul
AMS Secretary
PROPOSED CYCLE ROUTE TO
AND FROM CAMPUS
SOME WORK HAS
BEEN DONE ON THIS
ROUTE, BUT MORE
STUDENT PARTICIPATION IS NEEDED TO
COMPETE THIS AND
OTHER CYCLING
PROJECTS ON CAMPUS
(MORE CURB RAMPS,
BETTER BIKE RACKS,
ETC.)
BRING YOUR SUGGESTIONS AND SUPPORT
TO THE NEXT CAMPUS CYCLIST MEETING
SUB 205 FRIDAY, SEPT. 26  12:30
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES;   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
15 — Found
PHOTOSOC SOCIAL NIGHT at 8 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 25 in SUB 212.
All members welcome.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
ENJOY VANCOUVER
NIGHT LIFE
AND SAVE !
Send; for entertainment pack of 25
money-savers. Includes 8 restaurants,
9 nite clubs, many other attractions.
Save as much as half of your dining
& entertainment costs — some freebies too! The perfect way to enjoy
Vancouver on a budget. Send $3.50
& tax to Roadrunner Advertising,
Dept. B, 9—1035 Richards St., Van.
V6B 3E4. Your money cheerfully
refunded if not totally satisfied.
BARGAIN OF THE WEEK at Bargain
Boutique. Skirts from $2.00. 4860
McKenzie & 33rd. 263-7812.
11 — For Sale — Private
MUST SELL SOON. '73 Honda 500-4,
9,000 miles, electric starter. Excellent
condition, 2 helmets included. $1,000
or best offer. 224-9995, ask for John T
FOR SALE: MAN'S CRESCENT Ten-
Speed Bicycle. 1974 model. Excellent
condition. $90.00 firm. 738-8126 after
5;00 p.m.
1974   DATSUN   B-210  H.B.  STANDARD.
Excellent condition. 732-6055, 228-5480.
Offers.
1958 VOLKS. Running, as is, $125.00 or
best offer. 4 new tires. 732-8561.
GARAGE SALE: We are moving. Furniture, plants, clothing, household
items, BBQ, skies, etc., etc. 3561 West
27th. Saturday & Sunday,  10:00 A.M.
SACRIFICE! 1971 HONDA 350 SL. Excellent running condition, basement
stored, 8,000 miles. $550 o.b.o. Dennis,
228-0300.   '
1966 VW FOR SALE. Good engine, city
tested. Phone 228-3935 (or 921-9631
after 7 p.m.)
SUM OF MONEY near Allison Rd. and
University Blvd. Phone 738-9079 after
5 p.m.
20 — Housing
ROOM & BOARD in faculty home for
care of 2 chidren when home from
school and cooking supper. 3:15-7:00.
224-5056.
25 — Instruction
PEG'S PLACE POTTERY
SCHOOL
2780 Alma at 12th
Fall classes start Sept. 20. Morning
and evening classes for wheel throwing. Tuesday afternoon children's
class. Phone and register now! —
738-2912
30 - Jobs
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and nights.
Phone 681-9816  for  appointment
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90 - Wanted
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Ihursday, September 25, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
BCSF lottery set up
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
The B.C. Students Federation
will hold a lottery this winter to
help finance its $23,000 budget for
its first year of operation.
The BCSF hopes to raise money
after that through a $1 per student
per year levy.
Prizes in the lottery include trips
for two to London and Mexico, and
a $1,400 stereo system.
Tickets for the Feb. 15 draw will
go on sale Oct. 15.
Alma Mater Society Dave
Theessen said Wednesday tickets
would probably not be sold through
the AMS offices.
He said the $2 tickets are sold to
salespersons for $1.50 each, but the
Beach closures ignored
Parks board officials are
meeting today in an effort to find a
way to keep people from using
Wreck and Towers beaches, said
board official Derek Laverty
Wednesday.
The board closed the beaches in
August after the Boundary health
unit reported that water samples
taken from the area showed a
coliform count much higher than
levels considered safe for humans.
At the time, the parks board
placed signs on the beaches
warning people of the potential
health hazard, but these signs
quickly disappeared, said Laverty.
ceased
, 1, as it
The     parks     board
patrolling the beaches Sept
does every year, he said.
He said because of the absence of
the signs and patrols the public has
no way of knowing a hazard exists.
He said the board is trying to
devise new methods of informing
the public of the situation.
refund on unsold tickets is only $1.
"The   AMS,    selling    tickets
through our business office, would
have no incentive to sell them."
Theessen said the BCSF will
likely approach campus clubs,
which can earn 50 cents per ticket
sold and thus raise money.
"The clubs and societies, selling
to people on the campus, would
have more sell power," he said.
The BCSF was reorganized out of
the now-defunct B.C. Association
of Student Unions in March and
voted Monday to become incorporated under B.C. law. It is a
lobbying group whose main concerns include student housing and
financial aid.
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
JOpp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS'
Jovanovich polemic
raises ire of colleague
From page 5
advocates? Is he ignorant of the
fact that such tests have been
proven to be culturally determined
and that for the most part they
have been scrapped.
Jovanovich seems unaware of
the nature of Canadian society. We
are a people of diverse
backgrounds; many of us are non-
native speakers. What percentage
of the population is Jovanovich
willing to exclude from the
university's "series of calculated
intellectual discriminations."?
Jovanovich believes that an
entrance exam " . . might free
the English department to teach
English . . . and put an end to the
department's dubious function of a
language instructor." Whose purposes would such a move serve?
Since Compost is a publication of
the English department it would
most certainly seem to serve its
interests; but would it serve the
needs of the students or of the
society?
If the English department cannot
handle a course to teach English
literacy then it should turn it over
to a department that can. Abandoning these students does not
solve their problems. If the English
department does not wish to
respond to the needs of the community they should not accept
funding from that same community.
All concerned faculty and
students should protest any move
in the direction outlined by
Javonovitch. An implementation of
such an admissions exam will have
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far reaching and disastrous effects. The forces of reaction are on
the move and the time to stop them
is now.
If I have misinterpreted
Javonovich's statements it is a
result of his faulty and vague
writing. A polemic such as his
would not even pass English 100.
Javonovich's awkward prose style,
conscious use of euphanism and his
attempts to disguise the predatory
nature of the article, violate the
principles set out in George Orwell's "Politics and the English
Language" which is required
reading for English 100.
Jovanovich surely cannot expect
an intelligent reader to take his
article seriously. Any reader
academic or otherwise could not
help but dismiss his simplistic
solution out of hand. Jovanovich's
lack of analysis is overwhelming.
It has been said that the study of
English offers the only remaining
ivory tower. Jovanovich's faulty
and naive reasoning seem to prove
the point.
Band cancelled
There will be no band in the Pit
this Saturday, despite the fact that
ticket sales began Monday.
Alma Mater Society treasurer
Dave Theessen said Wednesday
the band was cancelled because of
failure to finalize a contract.
Refunds for those who have
already bought tickets will be
available in the AMS business
office until Oct. 3.
U.B.C. A.M.S. Special Events presents....
AHTHteRS
WED. OCT. 1st
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
8 PM
TICKETS: STUDENTS $4.00 A.M.S. OFFICE IN SUB
NON-STUDENTS $5.00 AT ALL CONCERT BOX OFFICES $6.00 AT THE DOOR
Your shoes are trying
to tell you something.
Look at a pair you've lived with for a while and you'll see two
The heels have worn thin.
The soles have become comfortably curved.
Your shoes are actually trying to become Roots*.
Roots' slim heel and rocker sole are made for
the way you were born to walk, which helps _
make them wildly comfortable. ^
And Roots are made in Toronto of top-grain
Canadian leather, which helps make them
beautiful.
Listen to your shoes. Have a chat with your feet.
Then come see us and try a pair of Roots.
You'll find them (in more than a dozen styles) ■*•
only in the Roots store, ^f^ ^^ ,^^.^L -***.  ^ v.
things.
Ill
1975. Don Michael Co,
"Be kind to feel They outnumber people two to one"
Vancouver—766 Robson Street (Across from Eaton's)—(604) 689-9916
Victoria -1202 Wharf Street (Across from Bastion Square) - (604) 383-4811 Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Ihursday, septemDer zo,  iy/o
From page 3
What of politicians today, do they
have brains?
No. None of them. Oh, the odd
one. It's only profit that they're
after. If they have brains they put
humanitarian ideals above greed.
Those looking for gain are not
politicians.
It's not for the gain that I am a
politician. The gain is from what
my people get, because I love my
people. I mean I'm drunk all the
time. I eat cat food all the time just
like an animal. I mean if the
politicians are going to smash our
gears, we'll never get the differential working.
Go Home. You're dead; they told
me out in Shaughnessy Hospital. I
got it cracked all around. (points at
head) I might as- well be a
politician.
WAR
The Viet Nam war is over.
Yes, and the Irish should be
finished too. the Americans found
out the war was not profitable. So
they had to quit. They were
fighting for oil.
Should Canada have participated?
Well, we're neighbors, we have
to help each other.
Did Canada lose the war too?
No. We were just helping. Who
owns the biggest part of Canada?
We had to help.
Should Canada have participated?
Well, we did; and we lost some
lives there.
Should Canada have participated?
Well, to be honest, no. But we had
to. We've got to help our neighbors.
But never share the embarrassment with the Americans.
It was not our war.
Were you relieved when it ended?
I don't like to see no people die
for no good reason. It was useless.
It was for oil. Now god has
resurrected and the most you'll
find in here is the resurrection of
the dead. My mother is hanging
above the lobby. She would agree
with all I've told you. Phone her up.
She'll tell ya.
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
Youth are breaking things and
laws in our society. We have to
imprison many. Mothers and
fathers have to be taught how to
control their children. Without the
mother and father, how is the child
going to make it?
The child needs love and
devotion. The mothers and fathers
need to give it just as much as the
child needs to get it.
How will this teaching be accomplished?
Through a government pamphlet.
Who would write it?
The Queen, because it has to be
read by all.
Why hasn't this been done?
Because I didn't tell her yet,
except by telepathy. The mothers
and fathers have to be taught how
to solve the problem. That is
controlling the adults to look after
the children. First of all its love.
You adore your children.
What if they are bad? (astonishment)
Children shouldn't be bad. Look
to the mother and father. That's
how     you     control     juvenile
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
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From
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874-7932
HELENE
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MARINE
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FOR MEN
SALON
JACQUIE
Ih'U'iw and Jacquie formerly of I.H
V.li.C. to our new huustyling salon
Hasting*.  Why noi drop in the next tit
villagv wish to invite our many friends from
the Murine fiuilding corner of Hurra rd and
•on it re downtown or cull for an appointment.
MARINE HAIRSTYLING
355 A BURRARD (MARINE BLDG.)
Monday    Friday - 9:00 - 5:30
1
HOUR FRAMING
DO-IT-YOURSELF
PICTURE FRAMING
V
Take your picture home in One Hour and save up to
40%
Frames, glass and mats cut to size — and a professional staff to
assist you!
ALSO CUSTOM FRAMING & DRY MOUNTING
DO - IT - YOURSELF FRAMING
3522 W. 41st Ave. 266-8225
& WHITE TOWER PIZZA & SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD. ®
delinquency:   stupidity   of   the
parents.
If you have a tree and it does not
fourish (he quoted a line from the
famous poem) ... If the tree at
home doesn't grow right, how can
the branch flourish? Like cattle in
a barn, if they don't look after their
calf, the child will die.
Did your mother teach you these
things?
No, I'm Royal Command. But
she did teach that you should plant
your seeds into the earth on
Mother's Day. That's when you
should seed your garden.
F.O'.
Kir
Steaks - Pizza - Spaghetti - Lasagna - Ravioli
Lobster - Ribs
GREY
Rigatoni - Chicken
PT.
KITS ■ DUNBAR
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
4:00 p.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4:00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sun.
4:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
738-9520
or 738-1113
3618 W. Broadway
W. VANCOUVER
1 552 Marine Drive
926-8521
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities - Take Out or Home Delivery
"Late delivery call V2 hour before closing time."
DOWNTOWN - WEST END
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11:00 a.m. - 4:00 a.m.
Sunday
00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
688-5491
1 359 Robson
CHARGEX —
MASTER CHARGE
NOTICE OF ELECTION
SCIENCE STUDENTS
This   is  a   call   for   nominations   for   student   representatives   from   the   following
constituencies to participate in meetings and proceedings of the Faculty of Science.
CONSTITUENCIES
1. FIRST YEAR
(ONE to be elected)
2. SECOND YEAR
(TWO to be elected)
3. BOTANY/GENL. BSc.
(ONE to be elected)
4. CHEMISTRY
(TWO to be elected)
5. COMPUTER SCIENCE
(TWO to be elected)
6. GEOLOGICAL SC./GEOGRAPHY
(TWO to be elected)
7.
8.
9.
GEOPHYSICS/ASTRONOMY
(ONE to be elected
MATHEMATICS
(TWO to be elected)
MICROBIOLOGY
(ONE to be elected)
10. PHYSICS
(ONE to be elected)
ZOOLOGY
(THREE to be elected)
BIOLOGY/PSYCHOLOGY
(THREE to be elected)
13. BIOCHEMISTRY/PHYSIOLOGY
(THREE to be elected)
11
12.
ELECTION PROCEDURES
Names of all candidates nominated will be posted in Office of Dean of Science (Hut 0-11) on
Tuesday, October 7, and will also be available through S.U.S. Executive and Department offices.
In those constituencies in which number of candidates nominated exceeds the number of vacancies
elections will be held on:
WEDNESDAY, October 22, 1975
between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
at polling stations listed below:
CONSTITUENCY
POLLING STATION
1 (First Year)
'   Hebb Theatre
2 (Second Year)
Sedgewick Library
3,11, and 12
Zoology (Room 2000)
4 and 10
Chemistry (Room 250)
5
Computer Science (Main Lobby)
6 and 7
Geological Sciences Centre (Room 134)
8
Mathematics (Room 121)
9 and 13
Wesbrook (Room 100)
(Bring your A.M.S. card please)
Students may only participate in the election in their constituency. Students in Combined Honours
programs must select in which constituency they will vote.
NOMINATION PROCEDURES
Nominations were opened on SEPTEMBER 8, 1975, by a notice circulated at Registration.
Close of Nominations: Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar not later than 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1975.
Nominations must be of the following format (may be handwritten in correct format or on forms
obtainable at "Faculty of Science (Hut 0-11), in Department offices, or through S.U.S. Executive).
We, the undersigned, bona fide members of Constituency 10 (Physics) wish to nominate John
Doe (Student number 8734771) for election as a representative of the Physics Majors &
Honours students registered in the Faculty of Science (Constituency 10) to participate in the
meetings and proceedings of the Faculty of Science.
Signed:   George Smith (1234557) (3/60) I am aware of my nomination and am willing
Jim Jones (3445671) (4/60) to run for election:
Mary Smith (4567781) (4/60)
Bill Brown (5678921) (3/60) Signed: JOHN DOE (8734771) (3/60)
Jack Spratt (7891442) (3/60)
Date:    1975
Address:	
Telephone number	
NOTICE FROM OFFICE OF DEAN OF SCIENCE AND SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY

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