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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1976

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Array Pit Lethe shut
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 15    VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 > 1976
228-2301
By SUE VOHANKA
letter to the LAB outlining
problems at the Pit and recommending it be temporarily closed.
Johnson said the dry up will
attempt to force the majority of
students to realize that attitudes to
liquor must change, and vandalism
must be stopped.
A September report to SUB
building manager Graeme Vance
and SUB proctor Ed Trewin said:
"During the past three years, SUB
has suffered a significant amount
of damage that cannot be classified
as normal wear and tear.
"I feel a lot of this damage is
caused by Pit patrons who are
either waiting in the line-up to get
into the pub or who are leaving the
pub after consuming a significant
amount of beer and or alcohol."
See page 2: AMS
FRENZIED STUDENT ...  as DTs set in
-doug  field  photo
Pit workers to lose wages
Student employees of the Pit
arrived at work Wednesday to find
they were temporarily out of a job.'
Pit manager Tor Svanoe said
Wednesday the employees will get
back to work on a limited basis
Monday when the Pit opens up as a
coffeehouse.
Svanoe said the staff will only be
able to work about half their
regular monthly shifts while the
Pit operates as a coffeehouse
because less employees will be
needed to run it.
Svanoe said Pit employees
scheduled to work this weekend
will be compensated. He also said
some Pit employees will be able to
get jobs at the SUB pizza parlor for
the one month period.
Most of the employees had no
prior warning of the AMS action to
ban liquor sales at the Pit and
expressed concern about lost
wages.
"I pay my rent out of my salary.
It's going tq be pretty hard to get
by," said one Pit employee.
The Pit employees generally felt
the AMS action was unwarranted.
"I don't think such a drastic step
should have been taken," said
Doug Jerome, education 3. People
coming back to UBC from the
downtown pubs could cause just as
much damage as those going home
from the Pit, he said.
Chris Mallaluc, educ 3, said: "If
they're going to close down the Pit
why don't they go downtown and
close down the Blue Horizon and
the Fraser Arms. The other pubs
downtown have the same problems
(as the Pit)."
Other Pit employees said the
AMS should have given them some
warning that the Pit would not be
operating as usual.
Students interviewed Wednesday
afternoon after they found the Pit
closed were surprised and angry.
"Bullshit with a capital B." said
Pete Morrish, commerce 2 after
reading the AMS notice explaining
the Pit's closure.
"I think it's pretty sad because
the Pit is one of the few things that
makes UBC bearable," said Jim
Ferbuson, education 4.
"I think the idiots who vandalize
are going to vandalize a month
from now," said Ferguson.
"I would challenge them (the
AMS) to produce a correlation
between vandalism and the Pit,"
said Hu Wallis, science 4.
"Why should so many pay for so
few?" asked Greg Bonnell, science
5.
"I don't think it's fair at all. It's
temperance union mentality," said
Byron Jang, arts 3. Asked if he
thought drinking at the Pit is
related to vandalism on campus
Jang said, "No. Being drunk and
disorderly is one thing but vandalism is another."
"I think it's a lousy idea. It will
be really hard on people in
residence," said Dan Rodin, arts 3.
All but one of the 17 students
interviewed Wednesday said they
felt banning liquor sales at the Pit
would have no effect on campus
vandalism.
All of the students interviewed
were against banning liquor sales
for theone-month period at the Pit.
Julie Domvile, sciences 2, went
to the Pit Wednesday afternoon
with friends to celebrate her 19th
birthday.
"Those assholes in the SRA have
ruined my birthday party," she
said. "The Pit's not all that great
— at least that's what my friends
have always told me — but at least
it's close."
She said she thinks the AMS is
being arrogant by telling students
they cannot drink for a month.
"Who do they think they are?"
The AMS should hold a
referendum *o decide what todo
about the vandalism problem, she
said. "This issue should be decided
democratically.''
The Pit will not be serving any beer for the next month.
The student representative assembly voted 20-10 Wednesday
night to prohibit liquor from Alma Mater Society functions and
outlets in SUB until Nov. 22.
The decision — which AMS representatives say will curb
vandalism and liquor abuse on campus — closed down the Pit and
the Lethe effective Wednesday, and barred liquor from functions
sponsored by clubs and undergraduate societies in SUB.
The SRA made the decision
because it feared the Liquor Administration Branch would revoke
the Pit's liquor permit unless
students themselves moved to curb
alcohol abuse by Pit patrons
After a lengthy discussion, the
SRA voted to support the student
administrative commission
decision to prevent liquor being
served at student-run functions
and outlets in SUB.
The SRA also voted to compensate undergraduate societies
for expenses already committed to
functions which will be hit by the
dry up, including an engineering
undergrad society Octoberfest
which was to be held Friday and
has already cost the society $1,200
in band contracts and tickets.
The Pit, which was not opened
Wednesday, will remain closed
until Monday, when it will become
a coffeehouse operating from 11:30
a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Mondays
through Fridays.
Pit employees will be working
and paid for half the time they are
normally scheduled to work. The
SRA defeated a motion to pay
employees the wages they will lose
for the duration of the liquor
moratorium.
The SRA also defeated a motion
to ask the university administration to stop serving beer
and wine until Nov. 22 in the SUB
pizza parlor run by food services —
which will remain open and be
serving liquor while the rest of
SUB is dry.
Members of the SAC made the
decision at a Tuesday night
meeting, and met again at noon
Wednesday with RCMP Sgt. Al
Hutchinson.
"He informed us there was a
problem, and he was writing to the
LAB and the intention was to close
down the Pit," said Phil Johnson,
SAC chairman.
Johnson told the SRA that
Hutchinson arfd other local RCMP
were concerned that the Pit has
contributed to vandalism on
campus, drunkenness and drunken
driving.
"We decided to take the matter
into our own hands. We thought it
was better if we took that initiative
(to close the Pit) and exercised our
control — we would rather keep
that control than have it forced on
us," Johnson said.
SRA president Dave Theessen
said  Hutchinson  was   sending   a
First aid
for
alkies
By SHANE McCUNE
So the Pit's closure left you
wanting to cry in your beer — but
your beer is gone. Don't despair
there are several dens of iniquity
on or near campus which show no
signs of closing their doors.
From noon until 4 p.m. Monday
to Friday, the Ponderosa
cafeteria on West Mall serves
beer for 60 cents a bottle
Although there is a "beer and
burger" special, you do not have
to buy food to drink beer.
The SUB cafeteria becomes a
licensed pizza parlor at 8 p.m
each weekday and at 7 p.m.
Saturdays, staying open until
12:30 a.m. six days a week
Although it is necessary to eat in
order to drink, there are evening
"happy hours" which offer free
pizza with a minimum purchase
of wine or beer.
For graduate students — or
elderly looking undergraduates
— the Graduate Student Centre
has a comfortable watering hole,
whichy dispenses all kinds of
alcoholic beverages until midnight.
Even more plush is the Faculty
Club, but the problem there is
finding a faculty member with
whom you don't mind drinking,
and who is willing to pay for at
least one round.
Off campus, the nearest
alehouse is Jerry's Cove, the
neighbourhood pub at Fourth and
Alma. It closes at 11:30 p.m.
weekdays, and 11 p.m. Saturdays. More conventional
establishments nearby are the
Matador, 3135 West Broadway,
and Bimini at Fourth and Maple.
Two commercial pubs that
have long been favorite haunts of
UBC students are the Fraser
Arms, 1450 Southwest Marine
Drive, and the Cecil Hotel, at the
north end of the Granville Street
bridge.
None of these pubs and bars are
as cheap as the Pit, but each of
them has its own particular
ambience, and its own devoted
cult of befuddled patrons.
All this is small solace to those
who live on campus, of course,
but there are always the local
government liquor stores. And if
you want the strongest beer for
the lowest price, make your own.
Or switch to dope. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21, 1976
Pols pan res grub
By VICKI BOOTH
and SHELLY ROBERTS
"The food here is on a par with
the B.C. Pen."
That's what B.C. Conservative
leader Scott Wallace had to say
about a lunch he ate at Place
Vanier residence Wednesday.
Wallace was one of 22 MLAs who
came to UBC to meet with the
university administration and
attend seminars about issues that
affect the province.
The seminars were closed to the
press and public.
The MLAs gathered at Vanier at
noon and ate lunch with students
from their constituencies. MLA
Stephen Rogers (Vancouver
South) said of the meal: "This food
doesn't scare me because I was in
the air force." The lunch Wednesday featured grilled cheese,
potato salad and sauerkraut. For
dessert there were canned
peaches.
In the seminars, various experts
and professors met with the MLAs
to discuss issues which concern
B.C. residents. The seminars were
AMS decision
closes Pit
From page 1
Johnson told the SRA the month
moratorium period was decided on
"to make a significant impression
on students."
"A month is needed for the
discovery and implementation of
new (Pit) policies and to retrain
staff whichever way we go," he
said.
In an interview before the SRA
meeting, Pit manager Tor Svanoe
said the one-month period was
chosen after suggestions that the
Pit and other liquor outlets be
closed for one week, two weeks,
four days, the remainder of the
term and the whole calendar year.
Svanoe said during the month
moratorium, he would be looking
into various ways of controlling
rowdyism and drunkenness in the
Pit.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
about housing, energy, Fraser
River pollution, mental health
services, non-urban land use,
salmon as a resource and transportation and pollution in the
Okanagan valley.
Although he was detained by a
flood in the George Massey tunnel,
human resources minister Bill
Vander Zalm arrived in time for
lunch. He said the day at UBC was
"basically a learning experience.
"I'm not familiar with UBC, and
I like to be informed when the
university is discussed in government," he said. "I see this as an
opportunity to develop connections
and communications."
But when a Ubyssey reporter
tried to ask Vander Zalm about
university funding, UBC information officer Jim Banham
interjected before Vander Zalm
could answer.
"I won't speculate on whether
the MLAs will help with increased
university funding," Banham said.
He refused to allow discussion on
any matters not included on the
MLAs' agenda.
The protection wasn't necessary
— the Vanier students proved to be
receptive and talked agreeably
with the MLAs during lunch.
Environment minister Jim
Nielson attended the Fraser River
seminar and said he agreed with
ideas, investigations and remedies
proposed in the seminar. The information presented in the
seminar was a summary of a four-
year study done by Westwater
Research Centre.
>■
MOVING & TRANSFER
Reasonable
Rates
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
HEWLETT
PACKARD
DAY
TOMORROW
AT
the
bookstore
9:00 a.m.- 11:00 a.m.
12-4 p.m.
A Hewlett-Packard
representation will be
available to answer questions
on Hewlett-Packard
Calculators.
Hewlett-Packard
Exceptional Calculators
for
Exceptional People
"Philosophically, there is no
disagreement. We both want to
cleanup the Fraser," Nielson said.
The afternoon agenda included a
tour of the new Museum of Anthropology and an informal
meeting with UBC administration
president Doug Kenney and other
administration members at Cecil
Green Park.
Although The Ubyssey was not
allowed to attend this meeting,
MLA Scott Wallace said he expected Kenny would bring up the
issue of university funding. "It
would be a very short sighted
administration to have a captive
audience of politicians and not be
lobbying for money," he said.
The general attitude of the MLAs
and professors to the visit was
favorable and all agreed it should
become an annual event.
IS YOUR MIND STILL ON BEACHES
AND NOT IN BOOKS?
call the
UBC TUTORIAL CENTRE
228-4557
Both students and tutors register for $1.00.
Rates arranged between student and tutor.
A program of the UBC Alumni Association.
1ST ANNIVERSARY
SMORGASBORD
at Yueh Yang Palace U.B.C. Village
Lunch-   $2.95     11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
Dinner-  $3.50      4:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Monday Oct. 25th— Friday Oct. 29th
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
NOTICE
TO ALL STUDENTS
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY HAS DECIDED TO SUSPEND ALL SPECIAL OCCASION
PERMIT FUNCTIONS IN THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. THIS INCLUDES ALL EVENTS
SPONSORED BY CLUBS OR UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETIES AT WHICH LIQUOR IS SERVED
AND THE OPERATION OF THE PIT AND LETHE. THIS MORATORIUM ON LIQUOR
FUNCTIONS WILL CONTINUE FOR A ONE MONTH PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 22nd.
This drastic action was taken by the Society to demonstrate its concern about serious
problems with the use and abuse of liquor on the campus. Vandalism, drunkeness and
dangerous driving have increased drastically this year. These abuses have taken on a serious
and malicious nature which appear to be condoned by the student majority.
Before the privileges we now hold as a Student Society are jeopardized, the Alma Mater
Society has taken the initiative to try and implement new programs and policy which we
hope will help change this increasingly dangerous situation. Through this moratorium we
hope to make students aware of the problems with liquor abuse and the consequences that
can result. The actions of a few are jeopardizing the benefits that the majority of students
enjoy., The attitudes of the students on this campus, toward those few who abuse these
drinking privileges, must be changed. Making students aware of the problem is the first step.
So the next time you want to enjoy a drink without going off campus, think about what
you are missing by not having the PIT available. Think about it for the next month. When
the month is over and the PIT is operating again, think about what you missed when you see
students vandalizing your building and your campus. Think about what the campus would
be like without the PIT, without dances in SUB serving beer and liquor, and without
undergrad beernights. Be concerned. It's your PIT, your building, your campus and your
privileges.
THE AMS REGRETS ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED STUDENTS, FACULTY OR STAFF OF
THE UNIVERSITY WHO ENJOY THESE FACILITIES, AND ASKS STUDENTS TO UNDERSTAND THESE MOVES TO MAKE THE CAMPUS AWARE OF THE PROBLEMS.
Respectfully yours
DAVE THEESSEN
President
Student Rep. Assembly
PHIL JOHNSON
Chairman
Student Admin. Comm.
OCTOBER 21st, 1976 Thursday, October 21, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
By CHRIS GAINOR
"We're getting by."
This phrase sums up the attitude of most
students at Simon Fraser University, now in
its seventh week of a strike which has kept
all unionized workers off campus. It's the
longest-ever strike at a B.C. university.
Outwardly, the only sign that there is a
strike at SFU is the picket line located at the
traffic lights a mile below the campus. Bus
drivers refuse to cross the line, and students
are forced to walk the last mile up Burnaby
Mountain.
On Monday, as the strike's sixth week
SFU and the strike:
walking a mile
fer the bus
CLOSED
DUE TO STRIKE
: ywMm»: V'
tf/t)
COMMON SIGHT
. . . sign on washroom door
drew to a close, students sat as usual in the
sunny outdoor plazas, studying and talking.
But inside SFU's buildings, the reality of the
strike was apparent.
Cafeterias are locked and deserted.
Washroom doors are locked and bear signs
saying: "Washroom closed due to strike."
Other signs point to the few open washrooms
on campus.
Other hand-lettered signs on office doors
outline reduced hours and cutback services.
SFU's gymnasium and sports complex is
closed.
The cause of the trouble is the walkout by
71 mechanical trades workers Sept. 8 after
months of fruitless negotiations. All other
campus unions have respected the pickets
set up by the poly-party unions, as they are
known on campus.
Their contract expired in April and union
members rejected a proposed agreement
calling for a 10.8 per cent wage increase. On
Oct. 3, the nine unions'' membership
rejected another administration offer
containing the original wage increase but
giving members a 36 1/4-hour work week
from April 1,1976 and a 35-hour work week
after April 1, 1977.
The unions are staying out to get a 35-hour
work week, and the university is refusing
because they claim it contravenes anti-
inflation guidelines.
The latest SFU vote came a day after
members of the UBC local of the Canadian
Union of Public Employees bowed to the
AIB guidelines and voted to accept a contract giving them a 7.5 per cent wage increase.
Ross Powell, president of the Simon
Fraser Student Society, said many students
are having difficulty getting by.
"They don't like it. Some blame the unions
and some blame the administration,"
Powell said. "The gym is closed, library
hours are cut back, there are no audio-visual
services, courses and labs are being cancelled.
"There have been some students who
have had to withdraw because their courses
have been fucked up."
Powell said processing of admissions is
now behind by one month and is falling
further behind as the strike continues.
Powell became the centre of controversy
earlier in the dispute when it was discovered
that he had authorized full pay for student
society employees who had been respecting
picket lines.
The student council later overturned
Powell's decision.
A student society-organized rally last
week heard representatives from both sides
discuss the strike, but only 400 students
turned out.
To keep the campus running,
management and supervisory personnel are
taking up duties of clerical and maintenance
workers who are respecting picket lines.
"It just means we're getting behind, said
librarian Heather-Ann Tingley, who was
filling in at the library's information desk.
She said services such as interlibrary
loans are not being provided and hours are
being sharply reduced. There is only one
washroom open in the library and librarians
have to keep it clean, Tingley said.
"But things are still running. Basically,
the students have been very good," she
added.
Mike Rittinger, a third-year geography
student, said he is getting by. "It's not affecting many of my classes. My main
complaint is the cutback of library services."
But Mark Jaccard, a fourth-year
geography student, said: "I've had trouble
because I'm in a film-oriented class."
Said Rittinger: "Being a union supporter,
I would blame the administration for not
negotiating. I think the administration is out
to break the union."
Arts student Brenda Fofonove blames the
poly-party unions. "And I think it will last
the whole semester."
• There's a lot of overcrowding in lectures
and tutorials," she said. "Cafeterias are
closed. But the greatest inconvenience is the
lack of washrooms."
Another area which is being hit hard is
residences.
"All the floors except for the sixth floor
are all  filthy,  they  stink,"  said Lindy
Severy, a student senator who lives in
residence.
"People can be found in the kitchen until 4
a.m. disturbing everyone. Students have to
lug big bags of groceries up the last mile to
campus."
Severy said garbage is being heaped in the
bushes behind the residences.
"If the wind is blowing the wrong way,
then the stench goes all over the hill," she
added. "My kitchen sink is plugged and I
can't get it fixed."
assistants and secretaries and management
have kept the university going.
"But they aren't getting extra pay for it.
These people can take their families to
dinner for $50 and charge the university for
it, though," she said.
Profs and management staff are keeping
department and faculty offices going. In
addition to the free dinners, the administration threw a party for the staff in
gratitude for them keeping the university
going.
But the party was interrupted by students
who protested the party for "scabs."
At UBC, the only major strike was last
year's walkout by members of the
Association   of   University   and   College
even Estep to'each other
Kionaird,- former B.C. deputy labor
minister, refused to set a date for
resumption of talks, but changed his mind
L*«M
ffaptte the absence' of office ■ aJtf
maintenance workers, the admtiristratra$t
has managed to keep the university open
for tbe duration of the strike.
Many residence students are withholding
rents until the strike is settled. Severy said
students should have rents reduced by 39 per
cent to compensate for the loss of services
normally provided.
Tuesday, the administration cut rents by
$25 per month for students living in
residence and $10 for students in one-
bedroom apartments, a cut of about six per
cent.
"This does not at all meet the request of
the tenants," she said. A survey of residence
students showed about 70 per cent supported
the rent strike, but the figures may not be
totally accurate, said Severy.
"There was no picture of the students
being   pro-   or   anti-union.   Executive
Employees, which was supported by other
UBC unions.
But the AUCE strike was different in that
AUCE picket lines surrounded the campus
and students were asked not to cross the
picket lines.
But the students did, some of them hurling
abuse at picketers, and the strike was
broken after a week.
The poly-party pickets are intended only
to keep union people off campus.
When one of the SFU picketers was told of
AUCE's tactics, he said, "that's silly."
He said students have co-operated well
and the picket line has not been attacked in
any way, except once by people he believes
are not students.
PICKETS ON THE MOUNT ... end of line for buses
- matt king photos Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21, 1976
Twits9 bullshit dries up Pit
The Alma Mater Society decided Wednesday night to
keep SUB as dry as they can for the next month.
While Ubyssey staffers have naturally reacted with
horror — as we regularly drink in the Pit and the Lethe —
there are reasons beyond our personal deprivation that
lead us to oppose the AMS stand.
The issue of vandalism and drunken driving is much
more complex than those twits seem to realize — you
don't cure the evils on campus by bringing back
prohibition.
Of course there are assholes on campus. Assholes who
break expensive glass doors into SUB (that cost about
$300 apiece to replace), assholes who kick in walls and
windows, assholes who wreck the expensive wood
hoarding that surrounds the covered pool we're spending
piles of money on.
But not all students are assholes. Matter of fact, it's
only a small minority who are assholes.
But by jerking their knees long and hard and shutting
off the glorious flow of liquor in SUB, the people on
council are treating all students as though they were
assholes.
And for what? Does the AMS really think that by
denying students the right to enjoy a facility we spent
some $250,000 to build the problems of vandalism and
overconsumption are going to be solved? How naive. How
simple minded.
If people go downtown and are assholes and do things
like kick in doors, they'll just kick in doors somewhere
else. And if they drink in their residence rooms, and are
assholes, there's still plenty of opportunity to vandalize
the campus.
If you're going to accept the responsibility of doing
something about vandalism — then work at changing
people's attitudes.
Get serious about cleaning up your act. Enforce the
kinds of regulations that can help clean up the Pit. Don't
serve people who are drunk. Boot out people who are
obnoxious.
And don't give us the bullshit story that this will take
a month to organize. Pit manager Tor Svanoe isn't that
inefficient.
Although various AMS types were feeding council the
line that the Pit could be shut down today and never
reopen, we've pinned them down to admit that the RCMP
officer never said he or the LAB wanted to do that. Maybe
the LAB would — sometime in the future, if nothing
changes, and all sorts of other qualifications— temporarily
suspend the Pit's permit. Maybe for a week or so. Maybe
even a month.
C'mon, people. Admit it. You were rash. You
panicked. You overreacted.
You didn't even consult your own lawyers for an
opinion on how seriously you should be taking that RCMP
officer.
You didn't consider working on improving the
current Pit system while keeping it operating. You didn't
think of how much money it's going to cost the AMS to
pick up the tabs for all kinds of contracts that will.never
benefit anyone.
You didn't really think, did you? You knee-jerked.
But all that can change. Reopen the Pit and the Lethe
just as soon as you can. Next week would be fine by us.
Let Tor implement his ideas.
We realize that it'll be hard for you guys to change
your minds since you've finally taken a stand on
something.
But next time you jump off the fence, try and land
on your feet. Okay?
THE UBYSSEY
Published   Tuesdays,   Thursdays   and   Fridays  throughout   the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K  of the Student  Union   Building.  Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertfsing, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"It's the Pits," grumbled Scoop as he dozed off in the back of the
tent. But inside, the throngs gathered around Rev. Chris Gainor as the revival
meeting began. "Brothers, our lesson today is from the book of St. Marcus
of Gee, wherein the prophecies of Ralph the Maurer and Heather the Walker
are visited upon the sins of Shelly Roberts, Doug Rushton, Sue Vohanka. It
matters not how deep the Field is Doug: If a dram or a McCune of beer is
buried, it is Shane upon all of you. Does not McDonald, the wise, Verne us
. of the dangers in a Vicki Booth of rum or a Doug who is McMullin wine?
Many a wise word has been said in Geoff by Wheelwrights who don't know
their Charlies from their Mlcallefs. Were It not for this blessed return of
prohibition, vile merchants of death like Bill TIeleman, Bruce Constantineau
and the dreaded King Matt would continue to rule our world. Temperance
forever, brothers and sisters, and pass the communion wine when you leave
the tent."
^SHexsnKtDji
Letters
Picky, picky,
picky, picky
On arriving at UBC, I was informed in various ways that
student illiteracy was a major
problem here.
I found this difficult to accept at
first, but a recent issue of The
Ubyssey has quite ably demonstrated for me the reality and
extent of the problem.
I think my favorite was page
three. That was the one with the
story about a Toten or Totten who
had escaped from Oakalla or
Okaalla.
It was on that same page that I
was informed that summer
unemployment had not effected
students. Actually, I hadn't really
expected it to.
Again, it was revealed that the
Alma Mater Society "... has
printed a leaflet that charges
Hydro operates with little public
input." No doubt this statement is
more edifying to those who know
what a Hydro operate is.
Rather than bore you with a
blow-by-blow account of my little
adventure, let me leave off by
quoting just one front-page
paragraph.
"And the Registered Nurse's
Association of B.C. has told its
workers to report to work on
Thursday."
Mary Loosmore
arts 1
Couples
International House has always,
to my knowledge, been a leader in
community relations and in
promoting understanding among
people.
It was with some dismay,
therefore, that I learned IH was
charging "couples" prices for their
dances instead of the usual
member or non-member, rates
charged elsewhere and in previous
years at UBC.
This practice is discriminatory
and should be reviewed immediately. No man or woman
should be penalized by paying a
higher price simply because he or
she happened to come alone or in
the company of friends of the same
sex.
This type of reduction is virtually
nonexistent on the campus and in
night clubs on the lower mainland;
the majority of places simply
charge a flat rate or "cover
charge" for individual patrons.
The reason for the traditional
and now outdated "couples" price
used to be for the purpose of either
encouraging couples only or for
discouraging single people,
depending which way one looked at
it.
I would be disturbed to think IH
was following this line of reasoning
since many people who attend
these functions are from out of
town or from outside the country
and they often come to these
dances for the express purpose of
See page 5 Thursday, October 21,  1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
At U of Quebec
Striking faculty face opposition
MONTREAL (CUP) — Faculty
at the University of Quebec at
Montreal went on strike with the
full support of the student
association, but face strikebreaking action from the faculty of
business administration.
UQAM is the Montreal campus of
the U of Q, and is the only one of the
university's campuses where
business administration is taught.
The university's other campuses
are unaffected by the action of the
business administration profs.
Members of QUAM's business
administration faculty along with
22 to 30 business students, were
escorted through picket lines
around the university by the
Montreal police's anti-riot squad
after "a little violence," said
Robert Anderson, spokesman for
the Syndicat des Professeurs of
UQAM.
Finns wrest
right to roast
from bosses
HELSINKI (ENS-CUP) — In
Finland, where sauna bathings on
Sundays xis a tradition, papermill
workers have just negotiated a
"sauna premium" which will force
employers to compensate them for
missing their weekly sauna baths
when they have to work on Sundays.
Each time a paper mill worker
has to miss his or her regular
Sunday sauna session, the company will pay the employee a $3.30
premium which is the cost of two
admissions to a public sauna and
swimming pool.
The Confrontation brings to a
head a seven-year dispute between
the 32 business faculty and the rest
of UQAM's 350 professors over
faculty unionization, administrative sciences Dean Pierre
Simon is quoted as saying in a local
newspaper.
But Anderson said the conflict is
due to the business faculty's
desires toform a separate business
school, and they are using the
current strike — over wages and
faculty representation on decisionmaking bodies — to further this
end.
Simon is quoted as saying the
business faculty wants an independent school attached to the
Ecole Nationale d'Administration
Publique, an autonomous graduate
school at the U of Q with non-
unionized faculty.
In a recent statement, Simon and
other business faculty members
claim the professors' union, an
affiliate of the Confederation of
National Trade Unions, "is led by
leftist extremists who use the union
in their powe struggle to control
the university."
"I don't go for any of that crap,"
said Anderson, adding that as last
year's union president he was often
accused of being "right wing."
The strike, which comes after six
months of unsuccessful
negotiations, is due mainly to
administration-proposed changes
in decision making, and only
marginally involves wages, according to Anderson.
The UQAM administration wants
to remove the right of professors to
choose their own successors on
various academic committees, as
well as the right of departmental
assemblies to set criteria for the
evaluation and tenure of faculty
members, he said.
In taking over these functions,
the administration would also
remove the right of faculty to
appeal decisions affecting their
continued employment with the
university, Anderson said, adding
that tenure and job renewal has
been faculty controlled for five
years.
In negotiating their thrid contract since the syndicat was certified in 1971, the faculty have also
been seeking wage increases,
which have fallen 10 to 11 per cent
behind the public sector, Anderson
said.
The UQAM students' association
has  given   the  faculty   its   "un
conditional support," according to
association president Monique
Audet, and has "actively participated" on the picket line.
The role of the business administration students is less clear.
According to Simon, the 3,000
students voted to cross the picket
lines with the faculty, but Anderson said only 25 to 30 showed up
the first morning of the strike.
He said these students were
being blackmailed — they were
told by their professors that if they
didn't show up for classes, they
were going to fail.
The business students split from
the UQAM students' association
last spring and formed their own
"corporation"        after        the
association gave its support to a
strike by non-academic staff,
according to Audet.
Anderson said the faculty strike
could be either very short or very
long, depending on the platform
the Liberal government of Premier
Robert Bourassa will take in the
upcoming Quebec elections.
Bourassa may want to settle the
dispute quickly to bolster his
government's claim that it is
eliminating strikes, or he may take
a tough "law and order" approach,
Anderson said.
Bourassa announced Oct. 16 that
he was considering tighter
legislative controls over Quebec
unions.
Fee votes set; vendors in
Students will be asked in twin
referenda Nov. 16, 17 and 18 to
approve a $6 increase in Alma
Mater Society fees and a $2 hike in
the UBC athletics fee, the student
representative assembly decided
Wednesday.
If approved, the referenda would
boost AMS fees from $9 to $15
annually and athletic fees to $7
from $5. There has been no increase in AMS general fees since
1949.
But the SRA voted to table a
motion adding an extra $1 increase
to the AMS general levy to pay for
a women's office. The SRA voted
earlier this year not to reconstitute
the women's office, which was
evicted from SUB last summer
after several years of operation.
The   increases   in   the   AMS
general fees are as follows: $1 for
intramural programs, $1 for CITR
student radio, $2 for The Ubyssey
and $2 to cover various service
program deficits.
The AMS fee increase is
necessary to offset a growing
deficit incurred by the student
society over the past two years.
The Athletic fee will be divided to
give $4.20 for men's athletics and
$2.80 for women's athletics.
In other business, the SRA voted
11-3 to allow vendors to sell in SUB,
subject to conditions set down by
the student administrative commission.
The motion, which was passed
after a referendum showed strong
student support for the vendors,
was passed near the end of Wed
nesday's   meeting   with   little
discussion.
The vendors were banned from
SUB last December and a petition
favoring the vendors finally
resulted in a referendum on the
issue.
In the Oct. 1 referendum,
students voted 76.7 per cent in
favor of returning the vendors to
SUB, but the vote was not binding
because the number of students
who voted did not meet the
required 15 per cent student turnout.
SAC member John Swainson
said "not true" to a suggestion that
SAC has already begun laying
down rules under which vendors
would operate when they return to
SUB.
Letters
From page 4
meeting new  friends  and  for
socializing.
Still others may prefer to come
alone for a variety of reasons.
I would prefer to think that the
people responsible for this policy at
IH just didn't give it much thought
one way or the other.
If IH decides to continue with
"couple" admission rates, then the
"couples" of any sort should be
entitled to the reduction.
Or, a more practical way to get
around this restrictive policy
would be for single men and
women to "couple" just outside the
door, then pay the reduced rate
and to treat each other to a drink to
celebrate their combined saving
later in the evening.
N. V. Carson
class of '72
Coffee
If you can't get a cup of coffee
you're really out of luck.
Most campus functions and
activities offer an alternative to
liquor if you're not the drinking
type.
The problem is the alternative is
usually pop. The kind with all that
sugar and calories. If you're on a
strict calorie reduced diet, or a
diabetic, well there's always water
to drink.
There is another solution, diet
pop. None of the food services
outlets on campus serve calorie
free drinks other than coffee. Most
dances, discos and the SUB pizza
parlor only offer the high calorie
stuff.
Some nights you can't even get a
coffee in the Pit.
It can't be all that difficult to
accommodate the needs of a fairly
large number of people.
Make mine sugar free please,
I'm beginning to feel a little silly
brown-bagging diet 7-UP to the
dances.
W. Zemke
-     ed. 4
Parking
So the campus cops are
tightening up on parking infringements, are they? Perhaps
they should first check their yellow
curbs and no parking signs. •
For instance, in B-lot there are
concrete blocks set in u-shapes at
the end of each double line of
parked cars. All last year I and
many other small car owners
parked cars there.
So long as the car is parked close
to the concrete block, there is lots
of room for traffic to go by.
Some of these curbs (at the other
end of the lot) are painted yellow
but most are not. Obviously you
can't park beside a yellow curb,
but what about all the unpainted
ones?
In the beginning of October, I got
back to my car (parked beside an
unpainted curb) on a Friday afternoon, to find a ticket under my
wiper.
So I drove over to the campus
cop office to find out why I was
given one. The reason was that I
was parked on the roadway. I
pointed out the confusion with
some curbs painted yellow and
others not, but he ignored this.
(Keep in mind they consider it a
roadway).
I resolved to park in a proper
space from now on, so the next
week I parked in the row of cars
along the edge of B-lot closest to C-
lot.
One morning I pulled into a
space near the corner only to have
a campus cop come to my window
and say no you can't park here.
You were here yesterday and we
nearly towed you away.
There are no yellow curbs or
signs saying no parking past this
point in this corner.
There is nothing to say you
cannot park in these spots.
However, the cops are
threatening a tow-away. On what
grounds?
If a stationwagon or other large
car parked there, obviously it
would be obstructing traffic and
there would be a reason for not
letting them park there.
But a small car such as a Honda
or Volkswagen can easily fit in
these spaces, leaving lots of room
for other cars to drive by.
But if they don't want anyone to
park there, why don't they indicate
it by painting the curbs yellow or
putting up a no parking sign?
As I was driving off, I saw a cop
motioning to another car to park by
the side of the roadway instead of
in the corner spaces. I thought
parking on a roadway was illegal
by cop standards.
How can a roadway be a roadway and illegal to park on one week
and okey to park on the next?
If they want to have rules where
you can't park — fine.
But have a sign up or the curbs
painted yellow.
People have always parked
beside the concrete blocks and in
the corner spaces — how are they
to know this is now considered
wrong if no sign is put up?
There is a sign at the other end of
the line saying no parking past this
point — why don't they put one in
the other corner too?
Pat Drinnan
home economics 3
More liquor
With respect to the letter entitled
liquor in the Oct. 7 issue of The
Ubyssey, I feel that the present
science undergraduate society
executives would take more of a
real interest in the first year
students they represent only if the
students dressed up as beer bottles.
At present, more than a third of
the SUS consists of first year
students with a majority of them
under 19.
If the SUS organizes events, such
as the Oct. 2 SUS dance, which
excludes these students, then they
cannot be working in the best interest of their student body.
Apparently, the executives could
not arrange to have both the
students and the liquor on the
premises at the same time, so they
took the other alternative which is
to get rid of one or the other —
unfortunately, they chose to keep
the liquor rather than the students.
Therefore, it is not the law which
discriminates against these first
year students, but the executives
themselves.
In the future, I hope that these
people change their policies
because discrimination breeds
anger and contempt which,
inevitably results in violence of
some sort.
So the next time you, the SUS
executives, consider full services,
consider all the people that you
represent just a little bit more.
Michael Juren
science 3
Report
According to your Friday issue
the student representative
assembly has compiled a report on
student costs which shows that
tuition increases are unjustified.
To the best of my knowledge, no
such report yet exists. However,
SRA president Dave Theessen and
I are compiling statistics for a
preliminary study on the subject;
these figures will be used if or
when the SRA commissions a full
report.
As we are still lacking some
essential statistics, we are not yet
in a position to predict what the
study will indicate.
We hope that it will show that
students' costs have risen faster
than student earnings, but our
present statistics are not sufficient
to either prove or disprove this
assertion.
One other point — the project on
which Moe Sihota was quoted in the
same article is a separate report
on student aid, and is only indirectly related to our study.
Aksel HaUin
project co-ordinator
Copies
The library needs twenty copies
of the Sept. 14, 1976 issue of The
Ubyssey. If any readers can spare
us a copy we would be pleased to
have it.
Send the copies to Graham
Elliston, serials bibliographer,
main library; or drop them into the
librarian's office, to my attention.
Thank you.
Graham Elliston
bibliography division
main library
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
, Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB ?41-K. Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21, 1976
•MoJcuhan
you too
The main library has nothing
but books. Right? Wrong.
The main library also has a fine
arts gallery, which is now
showing, until Nov. 13, an
exhibition of Japanese woodcuts,
entitled Mokuhan.
So if you get tired of staring at
books, go and look up something
different.
Slavering
If you can't get back to the
USSR to find out what is
happening     in    the    communist
Hot flashes
motherland, you can have the
next best thing- noon Tuesday in
Bu. 217.
Slavic studies prof Jan Solecki
will analyse (from a rather conservative point of view) the
present-day situation in the USSR,
discussing recent changes with the
aid of slides of Siberia and the
European SSR.
Roof stool
Hey man, want to come listen
to some groovy music?
There will be a Trinidad steel
band playing at the International
House Octoberfest dance Friday
at 9 p.m. in the International
House upper lounge.
IEI§1§1E1SS^1€@E1€1S^]€]S§1€13€1€1S€]§1SISE1§]S€1€IS€1€)€1^1S€ISIE1
i       CANDIA TAVERN A        I
All races, creeds and colors are
welcome. And it's not affected by
the booze ban.
Essays
If you are like many UBC
students and can't write your way
out of a paper bag, the library
term paper clinic may be right up
your alley.
With help from librarians you
can at least learn how to research
your papers well. Librarians will
show individual students how to
locate library materials.
To sign up, go to the
Sedgewick Library information
desk from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. any
weekday from Oct. 25 to Nov. 5.
'Tween classes
TODAY
wusc
Organizational meeting, noon, Buto
297.
CSA
Jack   Say   Yee   on the educational
problems     of     ChineserCanadlan
students, noon, Scarfe 201.
CANADIAN
CROSSROADS INTERNATIONAL
Information meeting about overseas
experience,  8  p.m.,  2524  Cypress.
PSYCHOLOGY
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Orientation, noon, Bu. 106.
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Organizational    meeting,    6    p.m.,
Mildred   Brock  lounge, Brock Hall.
SCI-FI CLUB
Martian   porno   flicks,   noon,   SUB
213.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bruce Waltke on How Do We Know
God,  noon,  Chem.   250.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Regular  meeting  tonight cancelled.
COMMITTEE FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Meeting to discuss national student
day   and   CDU   policy,  noon, SUB
212A.
GAY PEOPLE
Meeting about hike, pot-luck dinner
and dance, noon, SUB 211.
ASSOCIATION FOR
COMPUTING MACHINERY
Organizational  meeting, noon
201.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
An     anti-nuclear     weapons
Hiroshima      1945,      noon,
auditorium.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Talk   by  Sven   Erikson,  noon, SUB
205.
KARATE CLUB
Practice,  7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Winter
Sports centre Gym E.
SQUARE DANCING CLUB
Practice   and   training,   noon,   SUB
212.
FRIDAY
CSA AND CVC
Cantonese class, noon, Bu. 316.
GRAPHICS SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 249.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
POTTERY CLUB
Cleanup party, 7 p.m., SUB 251.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Claire Culhane on prisoners' rights
and conditions in B.C. prisons, 8
p.m., 1208 Granville.
SUNDAY
CSA
Bowling practice, 9 to 11 a.m. every
Sunday, Brentwood Lanes.
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
FRECESTIMATES
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
4861 Kingsway; Burnaby
.» CHINESE STUDENTS'ASS'N
I OF UBC  PRESENTS
*#. J^J sH      **fe
Civil
film
SUB
_ .    ___.••-• m   *
GIRL FRIENDl.
-»■■■■■■■■*„
TIME:
ADMISSION: SOc
THURSDAY (OCT. 21) 4:00 p.m.
SATURDAY (OCT. 23) 2:30 p.m.
PLACE:     S.U.B. AUDITORIUM
"There will be films on every alternate Thursday & Saturday
starting from this week."
FIFTH ANNUAL SERIES
THE WESTERN STATES LSAT STUDY ft PREPARATION SEMINAR
(Law School Admission Test)
A seminar designed to equip the serious LSAT candidate with an understanding of the LSAT and
the skills and techniques necessary to realize his maximum score.
A thorough study and analysis of: • Test Structure: Question types. Skills tested, Task definition,
etc. • Test Taking Methodology: Limiting alternatives, Sequential and Hierarchical answering,
Response Biases. Distractors, etc. • Practice Test Taking: with returned section and total scores.
Faculty: R. J. Shavelson, Ph.D., School of Education, UCLA; W. J. Meredith. Ph.D.. Dept. of
Psychology, UC Berkeley; R. L. Trinchero. Ph.D., Director of Testing & Research, CSU Hayward;
Ml. Southern, Ph.D.. Director of Testing & Evaluation, CSU San Jose; G. R. Gruber, PhD., Simon
& Schuster; Leigh Burnstein, Ph.D., School of Education. UCLA.
San Francisco: Univ. of San Francisco, Oct. 2-3, Nov. 20-21, Jan. 22-23, Apr. 9-10, Jul. 16-
17; Los Angeles: Peppardine Univ., Nov. 13-14, Jan. 29-30, Apr. 9-10, July 16-17; Seattle:
Saattla Univ., Nov. 6-7. Jul 9-10; Honolulu: Hawaii Pacific College, Nov. 27-28, Jul. 9-10.
Administered by I. W. New (J.D., The Univ. of Calif.. Hastings College of Law) and R. E. Kay
(J.D., USF; LL.M., Univ. of London).
Tuition: $85.00. Enrollment by letter with name, telephone, address, school and fee to The Registrar, The
Western States LSAT Study & Preparation Seminar, Room 3600, 50 California St, SF, CA 94111. Tel: 415-398-
3908. Late enrollment by telephone only if seats are available.
THIS NOTICE WILL APPEAR ONCE ONLY
FINE GREEK FOOD
FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY
Call 228-9512/9513
4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m. - 2 a.m.
IS
IS
IS
IS
13
IE!
\S igiaBlalalalala'^IalatalalaBIslalalalalalalala SIsIsIalsIalaSQIsIslsIa 13
' Independent Optician*
Come in and experience good old-fashioned Service!!
U.F.0. SPECIAL       $24.95
Till Oct. 31/76
Plus Lenses
Christian Dior - Silhouette, & others 25% Off
Open 12 -5 p.m. Sundays
44 Water St., Gastown    681-6626
/^OTTEFELLA —TROLL — BONNA -
|       SKI CROSS-COUNTRY
SCHWENDENER — VA
Sales & Rentals   o
SKI SCHOOLS
SKI TOURS
FILM NIGHTS
WAX CLINICS
Phone For Further
Information
J
<
>
V)
o
c
m
THE GREAT ESCAPE
687-1113
1790 W.Georgia
At Denman
CROSS-COUNTRY CLOTHING - SNOW SHOES
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
10 —For Sale — Commercial
LARGEST SELECTION of prints and
posters in B.C. at the GRIN BIN, 3209
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. —
738-2311 (opposite Super Valu).
ITS FUN, FAST AND EASY — complete
instructions — Do-It-Yourself Picture
Framing — 3657 West Broadway.
70 — Servicea
85 — Typing
Community Sports
OCTOBER   SPECIAL
Many Amazing Prices for Racquets
of All Kinds — 50 per cent Discount
on   all   Racquet   Stringing.
3416 W. 4th AVE. — 733-H12
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.   224-1567.
EXPERIENCED ESSAY & thesis typing
from legible work. Phone 738-6829 —
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
EFFICIENT SELECTRIC Typing my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
WANTED TYPIST on campus willing to
discuss rates. Sean, 228-1602. 228-1803.
11 — For Sale — Private
DOUBLE DESK bookcase wall complex
for sale. Ideal for married students.
S100 or best offer. Call 266-6046.
ECONOLINE VAN, paneled, insulated,
shag, FM-8 track, reliable. $450 o.b-o.
Frank, 872-2869.
1964 VOLKS WINDOW VAN, Beaut,
shape, 26 mpg., carpeted, table, bed,
radio, new battery. 876-4780. $1400
OBO.
AKAI   OXC310-D  CASSETTE   DECK —
$350.   Must   sell!   Perfect   condition.
224-5222 after 6 p.m.
20 — Housing
FOR RENT: Self-contained basement
suite. Suit two persons. S225.6o/mo.
Non-smokers only please. Ph. 738-1282
after four p.m.
CAMPUS DROP OFF for fast accurate
work from accurate copy. Reasonable rates. 731-1807 between 11:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
90 - Wanted
UBC ROWING CREW needs manager.
See coach Al Morrow, lunch hours,
(Mon.-FrU, Rm.  315 GYM
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Rent cabin day/week.  732-0174 ere*.
HAWAII CHRISTMAS! Anyone with
extra accommodation available for
one person phone Vic, 876-9148 evenings.
PERSON, FEMALE preferred. Wanted
to share homestead with 29 year old,
ex-college instructor. Should be in
20's, healthy, with university background, no children. Write Anthony
Sims, Box 289, Telkwa, B.C.
WHISTLER CABIN — Nov. 1 - May 31.
Need people to share. Near gondola.
Call Pat after 5.00. 688-5908.
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
KE6 RESTAURANTS LTD. is opening
a new restaurant in downtown Vancouver and is in need of staff .Interested people should be young,
enthusiastic, willing to learn and hard
working. Experience not necessary.
Apply at Keg Regional Offices, Granville Island between 11:00 a.m. sad
2:00 p.m. all this week.	
35 —Lost
BASEMENT SALE: 25c to $10.00 Eves,
to 8:00 P.m., Sat., Oct., 23rd, 10:00
a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 3116 West 12th Ave.,
733-0581.
r=it=ir=i r=Jr=ir=ir=ir=sir=i r=i r==Ti
USE
UBYSSFY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
itzsit=Jt=ir=it=ii=iK=S!=ii=lrs=it= Thursday, October 21, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
UBC law students
like senate move
$*ik&$A
GETTING HER LAST REST befo
sunshine with what becomes by
Buses, incidentally, are best way
watering holes, obligingly listed on
— doug field photo
ire very busy month, bus driver shares
default SUB's best-selling beverage,
of travelling to and fro off-campus
page 1.
The law students association
voted overwhelmingly Wednesday
to support a senate motion calling
for a more academically oriented
bookstore with more law books.
The motion was adopted with
only one dissenting vote at a
meeting attended by about 150 law
students. The resolution is
currently being circulated in
petition form and will be presented
to the UBC administration, senate
and board of governors.
The motion reads: "Resolved:
that the law students and the LSA
support the Belshaw proposal
made to senate that the bookstore
be an academic oriented service to
students rather than the present
textbook dispensary and supply
centre;
"That the law students and LSA
demand bookstore policy be
changed to reflect the special
needs of law students by providing
an adequate supply of legal
reference texts, jurisprudential
writings and federal and provincial
statutory materials."
Senate last week supported a
motion from anthropology
professor Cyril Belshaw calling for
a committee to examine the
bookstore.
McGeer, Petch make up
VICTORIA (CUP) - Howard
Petch, University of Victoria
administration president, believes
education minister Pat McGeer
"has sort of reopened the door" for
construction of new buildings at
the university.
Petch's conclusion, reached
after an hour long meeting with
McGeer Tuesday, at least temporarily tones down a controversy
that erupted when the B.C.
Universities Council cut back
UVic's capital spending.
Petch, who was "furious" with
the council two weeks ago and
visibly angry after a fruitless
meeting with McGeer last week
said after the meeting, "We were
able to explain our case to the full.
He really gave us a good hearing
this time.
"The minister suggested we go
back to the Universities Council
and ask them to reconsider," he
said. "We had not gone back to the
council because they had sent their
recommendations directly to the
minister.
"Now it's clear that the minister
has sort of reopened the door on
this. That's all we asked — the
somebody reconsider the case."
But McGeer indicated after the
meeting that he would not reverse
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the council's recommendation,
which has prevented construction
of a new music building, a new
theatre building and more
classroom space.
"The Universities Council
establishes priorities as to how
money should be spent," he said.
"I think the legislation itself is
explanatory. I wouldn't reflect at
all on the decision of the Universities Council."
McGeer claimed the education
department, which approves
Universities Council recommendations, could do nothing if the
council will not reverse or
reconsider its decision.
"That's right," he said. "The
legislation is there."
McGeer's only suggestion was
that UVic go back to the council.
"We understand their (UVic's)
position very well," he said.
"That's the route that's open to
them."
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TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATORS
There will be a meeting
for all people who have
learned transcendental
meditation on Thurs.
Oct. 21, at 12:30 p.m.
in BUCH. 314
Rendale
Apple bee
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Levi's
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The motion says the bookstore
should be operated as an academic
service with academic and non-
academic books and materials
separated.
"There's no place in the city of
Vancouver where we can get legal
texts," said Sally Hastings, law 3.
"The bookstore's collection is
abysmal."
Money talks
just as loudly
in U.S. senate
NEW YORK (LNS-CUP) —
Premier Bill Bennett's penchant
for having his office rather than
the legislature running B.C. isn't
the only similarity between his
government and the one in
Washington. The U.S. Senate has
no fewer than 22 millionaires in its
ranks.
This tidbit was mentioned in
passing in a New York Times
article on vice-presidential candidate Walter Mondale, who, with
anetworthof $77,000, is "one of the
least wealthy members."
The median family income in the
U.S. is $13,000. Senate supposedly
represents these people.
Hastings said the situation grew
worse Friday when the federal
government bookstore in downtown Vancouver, a source of
statutes and laws, closed.
She said the bookstore's stock is
aimed at the general public and
law students are forced to go to
Victoria or Ottawa for required
books.
"The bookstore doesn't reflect in
its stock that this is the academic
centre of the province," she said.
"I'm sure the bookstore would
question having a standing stock
but I'm sure they would have
demand for them."
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Uz-
bekians probably invented
icebergs, scientists on this tiny
island kingdom have reported.
FOAM!
Mattresses
Bolster
Camper—Boat
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Orthopedic
Wedges
Camping
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9 a.m.-5:30 P.M.
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Maintain that
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Here's how:
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APPOINTMENT SERVICE
3644 WEST 4th AVE., AT ALMA      73 1-4191
NOTICE OF POLL
Polls will be conducted for the
TWO SENATOR-AT-LARGE VACANCIES
at the following locations and times:
ADVANCE POLL
At The Three Campus Residences:
Place Vanier
Totem Park
Gage Towers
ON TUESDAY THE 26th OF OCTOBER
BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 5 p.m. AND 7 p.m.
GENERAL POLL
In The Following Buildings:
Henry Angus
MacMillan Building
Civils Building
Buchanan Building
Woodward Library
SUB
Scarf Building
Sedgewick Library
ON WEDNESDAY THE 27th OF OCTOBER
BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 9 a.m. AND 5 p.m.
VALID A.M.S, CARDS MUST BE PRESENTED IN
ORDER TO VOTE, AND EACH STUDENT WILL BE
ALLOWED ONE VOTE FOR A CANDIDATE TO FILL
EACH POSITION.
BOB GOODWIN
CHIEF RETURNING OFFICER
  AMS ELECTIONS! Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21,  1976
WIN ONE OF THREE
HONDA CIVICS
H
ere's how you enter.
'omplete and send in
the entry form below.
Carefully read the rules and
regulations and answer the four
easy questions on long.distance
calling. The answers to the
questions are contained in the
introductory pages of your
telephone directory. Mail the
completed entry form below in
time to be received by October
31st, 1976, and who knows, you
could be driving around in your own
new Honda Civic before you know it
IN THE
LONG DISTANCE
SWEEPSTAKES.
Trans-Canada Telephone System
I
I
I
I
I
I
Rules & Regulations
I • To enter, complete the official entry form. Mail to:
"LONG DISTANCE SWEEPSTAKES"
Box 8109
TORONTO, Ontario
M5W1S8
Contest closes with entries received as of October 31,1976.
2. There will be three winners determined. Each winner will
receive a 1976 Honda Civic automobile, model SBA, 2-door sedan,
which will incl6de 1237 cc engine, 4 speed all syncromesh transmission, power assisted front disc brakes, full interior carpeting,
tinted glass windows, rear window defroster, 2-speed heavy-duty
heater/defroster, locking fuel filler door, 2-speed wiper washers,
and re-settable trip odometer. Manufacturer's suggested list price
F.O.B. Toronto-S3,159.00. Dealer may sell for less. Price does not
include destination and pre-delivery charges, license, and taxes
because these factors vary from region to region. Prizes must be
accepted as awarded. Only one prize per family. Winners agree to
accept responsibilityfor licenses and insurance. Prizes will be
delivered to the Honda dealership nearest to the winner's
residence in Canada.
3. Selections will be made from eligible entries received by the
contest judges. Entrants whose names are chosen, and whose
questionnaires are completed correctly will be contacted and
required to first correctly answer a time-limited, skill-testing
Question during a pre-arranged telephone interview before being
eclared a winner. Decisions of the judges are final. By entering,
contestants agree to the use of their name and address and photograph in any forthcoming publicity in the event of being declared
a winner.
4. Contest is open only to students who are registered as full-time
or part-time at any accredited Canadian University or College,
except employees and members of their immediate families of
Trans Canada Telephone System, its advertising agencies, or the
independent judging organization. This contest is subject to all  .
Federal, Provincial and Municipal Laws.
Official Entry Form
Print your answers to each question on the entry form. Only one
entry per person. Mail completed entry with name, address and all
other information as requested on the entry form, in time to be
received by midnight, October 31st, 1976.
Here are the easy questions:
1. When placing a long distance call, it is cheaper to:
i ; have the operator place call;     i i direct dial
2. You can save more money on your long distance telephone call
if you:
fj call person-to-person; C! call station-to-station
3. According to your local telephone directory during what hours,
Monday to Saturday, can you save the most money when you
direct dial your call:
from
' from
p.m. p.m
to (location of your choice).
Date of telephone directory you are using
4. What are the two important things to remember in order to
save up to 60% on your long distance calls?
(a)
(°)
Name
Address
City/Town
Postal Code
t I   M      (your own or where
lei. INO.   you can be reached)
University Attending
(your
location)

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