UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 25, 1986

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127459.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127459.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127459-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127459-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127459-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127459-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127459-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127459-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127459-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127459.ris

Full Text

 SP
THE UBYSSEY
Mn. 47 V,     Vancouver. B.C. Tuesday. March 25.1986 ®<agjf!Sit
Vol. LXVIII, No. 47
228-2301
Budget cuts threaten services
By EVELYN JACOB
An AMS demand that UBC service organizations make 20 per cent
cuts in their budgets for next year
has left the service organizations
angry and confused.
Jamie Collins, AMS Director of
Finance, explained that the budget
cut is "not anticipated" to be a cut
in service expenditures but is aimed
at making service organizations
"justify their financial needs."
But most service organizations do
not how seriously to take the
finance director's requests.
Linda Scholten, president of
CITR, said she is not sure of how to
interpret the cuts.
Said Scholten: "If the director of
finance is doing this to ensure stu
dent money is spent wisely, I can accept what he wants. But he must be
aware that there are areas which we
cannot cut, and in fact, plan to expand."
Nine service organizations were
told this month to either make cuts
in their overall budgets or to drop
"certain specific expenditures that
amount to twenty per cent of their
operating AMS subsidy of last year.
The organizations affected by the
cuts include: The Ubyssey, CITR,
Speakeasy, Gays and Lesbians of
UBC, The Women's Committee,
The Ombudsoffice, Intermurals,
First year student's office, and
Volunteer Connections.
In addition to the cuts,' each
organizations must include a list of
additional necessities ranked in
order of priority.
"This way, both myself and
budget committee can see what the
service organizations consider their
core in terms of financial need,"
said Collins.
The finance director did not say
whether the budget committee
would enforce the 20 per cent cut
next year.
• Tina Matysiak, outgoing coordinator of Speakeasy, is also confused over the budget cuts.
"I am unhappy with the cuts, but
I like the idea of necessities priority
lists. This makes both our and the
budget committee's job easier. It
tells us what we have to do and
why."
She    added    however    that
Speakeasy has always had budget
increases in the past and needs them
See page 11: CUTS
Debts create jobs
"UNIVERSAL PRIMORIDIAL ARCHETYPES lie
at the deepest darkest base of my subconscious"
thinks outgoing student. "Transmission of neural impulses completely explain the existence of cultural
mythology" thinks incoming  student.   Little does
either know that they are presently passing through
the Doors of Perception. This time no violence
erupts out of the simultaneous opposite ephiphanies.
The AMS continues to monitor the situation careful-
ly.
Katimavik cancellation still irks
By KEN MAGOR
of Canadian University Press
TORONTO (CUP) — Katimavik
supporters would have resented the
federal government's move to close
the youth programme no matter
when it was announced, but they
say the Jan. 28 cancellation came at
a particularly bad time.
According to Paul Phaneuf,
Katimavik executive director, half
of the recruitment for next year's
programme had already been completed. And $330,000 had been
spent on advertising and hiring 30
to 35 Katimavik alumni to promote
the programme in high schools.
Though Sen. Jacques Hebert's
hunger strike has made most people
aware that Katimavik is gone,
Toronto subway riders are still
greeted with appeals to sign up for
Katimavik, advertising bought
before the cancellation.
"It's a lot of waste of public
money," said Phaneuf, still bitter
about the federal government's
cancellation of the nine-year old
project. Katimavik allowed about
1600 young people a year to work
on community projects in three different   provinces,   and   promised
them better comprehension of the
other national language. Participants received $1 a day and
$1000 if they completed their nine-
month tenure.
Marie-Josse Lapointe, press attache for Secretary of State Benoit
Bouchard, called the $20 million
Katimavik "a Cadillac
programme" and said the government would funnel the money into
an employment or youth programme that would better serve
young people.
"If we knew last fall, say, we
wouldn't have hired people and had
to pay their salaries and lay them
off. And we wouldn't have had to
buy that space," said organizer
Barry Bloom of Katimavik's
Toronto office.
Katimavik officials used to plan
the programme's activities six months in advance and by the time of
the January announcement, much
of the recruitment budget had
already been spent.
However, Phaneuf said even if
the government had advised him
sooner, that wouldn't have softened
the blow.
"It's not a question of timing;
it's a question of preoccupation by
the government. What have they
got to offer young people (now that
both Katimavik and the Ministry of
Youth have been terminated)?" he
asked.
There are still 1,000 participants
working at projects across Canada.
Some will finish this month and all
will have finished by June 4.
Katimavik's 350 staff are being
phased out and all operations will
cease as of June 30.
On Wednesday March 26 Canadians from across, the country will
be able to participate in a nationally
coordinated campaign in support of
Katimavik. Rallies will take place in
many Canadian cities including
Montreal, Ottawa, Windsor,
Toronto and Vancouver.
Vancouver Friends of Katimavic
member Terry Brennan said they
want to "show concern for the way
the government has been treating
youth issues."
The Vancouver rally will be held
at Robson square at 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday to coincide with those
taking place in other Canadian centres.
By JOHN GUSHUE
OTTAWA (CUP)—Business is
booming for the credit agencies the
federal government employs to collect outstanding student loan debts.
The number of students who
have failed to make payments has
doubled since 1982, when 12,000
defaulted on their loans. According
to Ted Kubacki, manager of the
Canada Student Loans Programme, as many as 25,000
students could default this year
alone.
To retrieve missing payments, the
government uses three collection
agencies — Associated Credit
Bureaus of Canada, FCS International Limited, and Canadian
Bonded Credits — to track down
defaulting students and ask them to
come up with the money.
With fewer grants, higher loans,
increased costs, and slimmer job
prospects upon graduation, the
situation for students threatens to
become worse.
But for Kevin Belgrave, manager
of Associated Credit Bureaus' head
office in Toronto, business is brisk.
"We're probably dealing with
about 13,000 cases right now. We
have at least one person, and maybe
two or three in larger centres,
handling Canada Student Loans in
each of our 114 offices. Things are
working out very well for us
indeed," he said.
Because the federal government
guarantees its loans, banks are less
interested in helping debtors pay off
an outstanding balance. Instead,
says Hugh O'Reilly, assistant to
NDP MP Dan Heap, "the banks
seem a little trigger happy, in turning the loans over to a collection
agency."
As soon as a bank turns a student's account over to a collection
agency, the bank collects its money
from the government.
The federal government sets
guidelines that collection agencies
must respect when dealing with debtors. "First o^all, they have to gain
the co-operation of the debtor,"
Kubacki said. Students cannot be
verbally harassed, called at work,
called at parents' homes, or encouraged to take out more loans.
But Barb Donaldson, chair of the
Canadian Federation of Students,
said collection agencies are
repeatedly profiting at the expense
of students.
"At the best of times, they
operate on this side of the law,"
said Donaldson, who worked for a
credit company one summer.
"Yet they somehow manage to
get away with those things because
students don't know their rights
under the law," she said.
Donaldson said a common violation many credit companies make is
listing a client's student loan history
in her or his credit file. "They're
not supposed to do that, and they
know it," she said.
In the House of Commons March
11, Liberal MP Lloyd Axworthy
(Winnipeg-Fort Gary) asked if the
government endorses "a general
pattern of harassment of those who
are benefitting from student
loans."
Youth minister Andree Cham-
pagnee said, "I am not aware of
this being a policy in any way," and
promised to bring matter to
Secretary of State Benoit
Bouchard's attention.
Axworthy heard several cases of
debtor harassment, including a
complaint laid by "a young woman
with a small child (who) had
repeatedly tried to negotiate a long-
term loan payment schedule with
the bank and collection agency"
but was still being harassed.
"This is not an isolated case,"
Axworthy told the House.
See page 8: LARGER
Summer sffucfents lose B-fof to EXPO fovrisfs
By JIM NEVIN and
MARGARET BANHAM
This summer UBC will have more
than the Expo Spirit — it will have
at least 5,000 cars belonging to
tourists unable to park at the
downtown fair site. At an in-
camera meeting, the board of
governors agreed to Expo president Jimmy Pattison's request to
turn over all of B-Lot to the
world's fair corporation. UBC's
action will alleviate the critical
shortage of parking spaces, currently estimated at 11,000.
"We felt it  was in the best
future interests of the university to
co-operate fully with Mr. Pattison
and the provincial government on
this matter," board chairman
William Sauder said Monday
night.
UBC students will be able to
park in A, C, L, R and E lots as
well as the two parkades.
However, unless stickers are obtained, normal parking rates of $4
per day will apply. Only a limited
number of stickers are available
for accredited students.
To make things more equitable,
traffic and security director Al
Hutchinson said a lottery for the
2,000 parkade stickers will be
held. "We find this system works
well in the fall, so it seems appropriate to use it now," Hutchinson said Monday. Due to exam
pressure, names can be phoned in
rather than the usual in-person
registration.
Applications will be accepted
between 9a.m. and 3 p.m. beginning today, Tuesday, through April
4. Lottery winners will be notified
by April 18 and parking stickers
must be picked up by April 30.
Traffic and security have set up
special phone lines to accomodate
the anticipated rush and ask
students to call the number listed
for their alphabetical category:
A-E, 228-2121; F-M, 228-3751;
N-S, 228-6171; and f-Z,
228-3972. If these lines are busy,
overflow calls can be placed to
228-2307.
Parkade stickers will be valid
until mid-October. As for
students returning in September
for Winter Session, Hutchinson
says: "Buy a bike this summer
and get into shape because there
won't be any parking until the fair
is over."
Sauder said UBC will gain
financially from the arrangement.
"In addition to monies received
from Expo, we expect a lot of
spin-off revenue generated by
tourists taking in the sights of our
lovely campus.
"Students should be grateful
for this arrangement."
Commerce Undergraduate
Society financier Bert Smeg announced plans for a student-run
ferry service to shuttle tired
tourists from the backwater of
B^lot to tinsel-town.
See page 3: JUST Page 2
THE    U BYS S E Y
<JU\
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
Paper papered
REGINA (CUP)—Smoking was
banned February 27 from the student newspaper office at the
University of Regina, but not for
social considerations.
Carillon and student staff were
confronted with shredded paper piled waist-high in the newspaper office and dark room, the result of a
carefully engineered paper-chase by
a university student group.
Regina city police combed the office for clues to the break-in, forcing the closure of the office for two
days.
The culprits left a calling card
reading "you think we read your
newspaper? No fucking way!" No
charges have yet been laid.
"There are lots of theories (about
who is responsible) but no one is
guilty until proven so," said Cheryl
Konanz, Carillon general coordinator. "The people who will do
that are the city police, not us or
council."
The incident is the second time
since September 1985 the Carillon
has been victimized. The Oct. 30,
1985 edition of the paper was illegally stuffed with a four-page insert    not    produced    by   the
Oooooops
The Ubyssey, March 18 incorrectly reported that arts student
council representative Barbara
Waldern was physically removed
from SUB after disrupting a speech
by a Soviet diplomat.
Waldern was not removed from
SUB but a woman did make an attempt to pull her toward the door.
Waldern left the meeting shortly
after this on her own accord.
Waldern did not disrupt the
speech but disrupted the question
period. She insisted on giving her
views beyond the given thirty second time limit on questions and
would not stop when requested to
do so by the chair.
The reporter responsible has been
dragged out of the newsroom and
buried beneath a large pile of rocks.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuismv
228-9114
10°'r DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
V....  Fr,    11   30 « 00 I    !•■
ClOStO SATURDAYS
ITS
POUH
FREE LUNCH
TODAY!
HAMAN
TASCHEN
MEGILLAH
HILITES
12:30 p.m.
HILLEL HOUSE
224-4748
newspaper's staff. On that occasion
the Carillon staff approached the U
of R student council for action and
compensation. This time police
were called immediately.
The Regina media took a
humourous view of the incident,
but Carillon staff were not amused.
Although publication of the paper
was not interrupted, the office was
closed for two days and students
will have to foot a $300-$400 bill for
cleaning out the office.
Those responsible attempted to
cover most of the office's electrical
outlets, but the paper-strewn office
was described by student council
members as a tinder box.
"I can see the humour of filling a
newspaper office with paper - that's
funny," Konanz said, but added
the potential for a major fire or
preventing the Carillon from
publishing is where the humour
stops.
"Obviously you play practical
jokes on your friends, but I hardly
think that's the case with the
office," Konanz said.
The paper shreds were composed
of the Regina Leader Post and the
Globe and Mail.
Follow The Flock To The Fogg
For The "Shear" Fun Of It!
Each time you visit Fogg n' Suds til April 6th,you get a
chance to win a $5200.00 trip for two to Auckland, N.Z.
Courtesy of £ air HELU zeaLano
We'll See Ewes At The Fogg
Qar_on,9ouzth.     £h_:07it/iL.Qcu/
3293 W. 4th
Kitsilano
ph. 73-BEERS
1215 Bidwell
English Bay
ph. 669-9297
-SfMd
Mi
GRADUATION,
iiUGOUUIBE^^
THE AMERICAN EXPRESS CARD
If you're graduating this year and you've
■ accepted career-oriented employment
at an annual salary of $10,000 or more
and have a clean credit record, you can get
the American Express Card.
That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
good up to 12 months after you
graduate.)
Why is American Express
making it easier for you to
get the Card right now? Well,
simply stated, we recognize
your achievement and we
'A !h» tr.ide marks owned by Am
believe in your future. And as you go up the
ladder, we can help-m a lot of ways.
The Card can help you begin to establish
a credit reference. And, for business, the
Card is invaluable for travel and restaurants.
As well as shopping for yourself.
Of course, the American Express Card
is recognized around the world.
So you are too.
So call 1-800-387-9666 and
ask to have a Special Student
Application sent to you. Or look
for one on campus.
The American Express Card.
Don't leave school without it™
an Express Companv <• Copyright American Express Canada, Inc 1986 All Riyh^ Reseived Tuesday, March 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
McGill students oust news staff
MONTREAL (CUP)—The entire staff of the McGill Daily, one
of Canada's oldest student
newspapers, was impeached in a
campus-wide referendum last week,
after a campaign of charges the
paper has been racist, anti-semitic,
one-sided and irresponsible.
The impeachment was the
culmination of a series of attacks
against the 75-year old newspaper
including internal impeachment
motions against five editors, student council attempts to change the
paper's constitution, and a one-day
occupation of Daily offices by
about 50 McGill students in
January.
About 20 per cent of students
. turned out to vote. 1562 voted in
favour with 989 opposed. 151
students had no opinion.
Jeffrey Edwards, one of the initiators of the referendum, said the
Daily now has a clean slate and can
begin again.
"Our objective has always been
to make the paper open to different
points of view," Edwards said.
"The Daily as it is now, is run by a
clique, which students don't want
to conform to."
Since the 1960s, the McGill Daily
has fought a campus hostile to its
ideas. Since the paper became
autonomous from the student
council in 1981, students have attempted yearly campaigns to permit
them to opt out of their fees. None
went to a ballot.
Ironically,   the   paper's   10-year
old campaign against apartheid
resulted in the university completely
divesting its holdings in companies
which do business with South
Africa, last November.
Pro-impeachment pamphlets accused the editors of "showing contempt and total disregard for the
concerns of students.
"The staff is the only body the
constitution allows us by referendum to dismiss, in order to
show pur dissatisfaction with the
poor quality of the paper," the
pamphlet said.
Daily editor Melinda Wittstock,
impeached in the vote, pointed out
that the constitution includes other
amendment procedures, including
referenda and complaints to the
Daily judicial committee of three
law students. These complaints can
result in dismissal of one or more
staff.
Edwards doesn't believe anyone
on the staff is racist, but "either
sheer negligence, or unprofes-
sionalism lets articles appear in the
paper which were anti-semitic and
racist," he said.
The Daily staff contested the
referendum before ballots were
counted, saying that the Yes committee's campaign was unfair,
libellous and slanderous Wittstock
said. "We felt this campaign would
unfairly prejudice the voter," she
said.
"No one would ever vote in
favour of an accused anti-semite
and racist," said Adam Quastel, a
Train 'em for jobs
By MARK McCARVILL
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada's
post-secondary education system
would better prepare the country to
meet the challenges of the future if
market forces determined the
make-up of university and college
programmes, the Senate National
Finance Committee was told this
week.
Michael Walker, director of the
Vancouver-based Fraser Institute, a
privately funded think tank on national issues, told the senators that
student demand, not the university
bureaucracy, should decide which
courses are offered and which are
eliminated. "Under normal circumstances, and in the case of most
products and services, we rely on
the demand side to discipline the
production process," Walker said.
According to his proposal,
students would be administered a
family income test. If their family
income is less than a set limit — he
suggested $40,000 — they would be
given the money the federal and
provincial governments presently
spend per student on PSE. This
system of "vouchers" was recommended last year by the Macdonald
Royal Commission on the
economy.
Walker said universities would
have to "cancel courses and
eliminate departments in response
to changes in society." He mentioned the recent closing of the school
of architecture at the university of
Toronto as a good example of
"market forces" at work.
"To see the central issue here,
one need only contemplate what
would be the variety and distribution of post-secondary institutions
in Canada if, for the past 10 years,
the budgets for all of our national
education institutions had been
distributed first to the students,
who would have had freedom to
dispense this to institutions as they
saw fit," Walker said. He said there
would be many universities of varying standards, all offering degrees.
In addition to "distorting the
market", Walker told the senators
that the present funding arrangement contributes to the economic
stratification of society, not to
equal access to education. "About
seventy per cent of all (government)
spending on post-secondary institutions is done on behalf of individuals whose family income is
above the national average," he
said. Since persons with university
degrees tend to have higher incomes, Walker argued, "it appears
that, to a considerable extent,
(government PSE spending involves
transferring money from those
whose incomes are average or below
average to those who are now or
will be wealthy."
Senator Henry Hicks, former
president of Dalhousie University,
said he was "appalled that Walker
had put the whole thing, as we
might have expected from an
economist, on a dollar and cents
basis." He said society has an
obligation to provide its young with
a liberal education, not to simply
"train them for a job."
Sen. John Stewart, also from
Nova Scotia, summed up the
presentation, saying "Mr. Walker
is giving us virtually the same
analysis in 1986 that Adam Smith
gave us in 1776."
The Senate Committee plans to
write its report on post-secondary
financing in the summer for release
in the fall.
news editor before the vote and
himself Jewish.
The Daily's judicial committee
ruled against the paper, saying in its
. report that "the finding of truth in
campaign representations is better
left to the forum of public arena
and the wisdom of students than to
this committee."
The Daily staff also accused the
referendum initiators of slander
and libel against the staff and the
paper itself. Ex-senior news editor
Brendan Weston said the staff
thought about a suit but decided it
was too expensive to bring the matter to court.
The paper does plan to appeal the
Yes campaign to the university's
discipline code.
In a special impeachment issue,
Wittstock wrote, "I thought
witch burnings ended in the 16th
century." Other staff wrote comments including "Fuck you all"
and "I find it offensive that I worked hard but got dismissed for my
volunteer labour."
An interim editorial board will be
appointed by the four student
representatives to the Daily Board
of Directors elected in campus-wide
elections this week. Outgoing staff
members will not be discouraged
from applying.
Next year's editorial board,
elected by the former staff before
the referendum, will assume its
responsibilities as of May 1, said
Wittstock.
— steve wou photo
FOREWARNED OF RECENT plan to utilize Blot for overflow Expo parking, lucky student secured lottery entry
by phoning in quickly. Astounded by her fortune, this stare-case blissfully clambers up staircase, proclaiming to
all passerby that Jim Pattison is really God. Asked if this is true, Pattison said "If the shoe fits . . ."
Just load 'em up at Wreck Beach
From page 1
"We figure it'll be pretty simple
— just blast an easy access route
down to Wreck Beach, load 'em up,
have another pick-up point at the
new Kits Point Marina and then
drop them off at the McBarge," he
said.
"We're also considering charging
for the view."
Pattison was ecstatic over the
decision: "Gee, I'm just thrilled by
Rising cost hurts libraries
end it's got to hurt the library.
UBC libraries conducted a public
survey Saturday to help establish a
strong case for increased library
funding.
"The UBC library is being
seriously affected by inflation and
devaluation," the questionnaire
said. "In seeking funds necessary to
avoid drastic reductions in purchases, we need information to support a case for the library as an important community resource."
The library's costs are "rising
through inflation and through the
devaluation of the Canadian dollar
. . . but the money we're getting is
not increasing," said assistant
librarian William Watson.
"We can't buy as many books as
we could before," he said. "In the
Watson hopes the survey will
help convince the government to
provide more money for university
libraries. "If the province has
money to put into the universities
some of it may come to the libraries
for collections if we make a good
enough case for it," he said.
The survey will assist in determining how to spend the money the
library has, said Watson. "Whether
it results in more money or not, it's
a useful thing to have done."
The library will conduct another
survey on Wednesday to find out
who asks what of library staff.
Watson said the results of the
surveys will be known in about two
weeks.
UBC's attitude and their willingness
to help this great fair is just great.
Golly, if every Vancouver resident
could turn over a parking space,
we'd have no problem at all!"
UBC administration president
David Strangway also favored the
move, but with some reservations.
"Our motto is now truer than ever:
Tuum est — it's up to you — when
it comes to finding a parking
space."
UBC has secured a promise from
Expo that students will be given top
priority for the minimum wage jobs
on the shuttle-bus service between
UBC and B.C. Place. Job applications can be obtained at the Canada
Employment Centre or by calling
732-2445.
Reached at his temporary Ottawa
abode, starving senator Jacques
Hebert suggested the UBC senators
should follow his example if they
feel strongly about their cause.
"After all, it was a fast decision."
But Super Socred Grade McCarthy poo-poo'd dissent. "The UBC
spirit makes good fiscal sense.
Students can divert money normally
spent on cars to cover the even
higher costs of public transit."
The board also considered converting Gage, Vanier and Totem
residences  into  hotels to comple
ment the Fairview complex as Expo
accomodation, former board chair
David MacLean mixed the idea,
saying the recent flood of competition from comparable rooms on the
downtown east side would have
reduced profits to negligible levels.
"Let's see how those wimps in
the ivory towers cope now that their
240's are homeless," chortled
DERA's Jim Green.
Reached at the Libyan War
Room, Mommar Qu'adaffi refused
to deny that this action would make
UBC a prime target for terrorist activity.
Prominent American and 1988
U.S. Presidential candidate Lee lac-
coca said: "Personally, I'm disappointed that cars — whether tourist
or student driven — are not fully
accomodated. Why don't you just
bulldoze down a few more of those
stupid trees and make a bigger
parking lot?"
Universities minister Russ Fraser
is expected to announce later this
week the creation of a new education fund, the EXPOnents of
Education Contingency Fund,
which will release discretionary
amounts to deserving institutions.
The endowment should be enough
to purchase at least 100 extra textbooks. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
Madness
War.
It's more than a job . . . it's rhetoric gone mad.
Off the Libyan coast at least 27 Libyans have made their leader's imaginary "line
of death" a reality. In the process they have advanced their nation's cause not one
iota. Libya is 27 men poorer and 27 martyrs richer.
The United States has once more flexed its muscles and cemented another international relationship into the only position it finds comfortable; hate. The mindless
"way to kick ass Ronnie!" won't last long. The reprisals will come. Americans and
others will die. If the fighting escalates Quadaffi will eventually lose his popularity at
home, and much more.
We say Quadaffi must be mad to say and do what he does. If this is the case
Reagan too must be mad to needlessly taunt a madman.
It has been said that war is the only time people know what they are doing. With
almost 40 armed conflicts happening who can argue.
During the fighting, everything worked well. The SA-5 long range missile worked
at long range, the short range SA-2 missiles worked at short range, the A-7 attack
jet flew problem free and, best of all, the HARM missile proved harmful.'
Iran, Grenada, Nicaragua, Libya ... it will be surprising if Reagan doesn't get the
$100 million he wants for the Contras. It will be an even bigger shock if the Pentagon
is forced to make the huge cuts proposed. The armies always seem to find a way to
use the damn arms.
Christers obnoxious
I'd like to respond to Jim
Tucker's letter "World Needs
Spiritual Music", (Ubyssey, Mar.
21). Tucker seems to be claiming
that Ron Stewart's article about the
Maranathas and rock music is invalid because "each of the bands
which Stewart holds up as being a
'quality act' and 'challenging' has
some connection with Christianity.
There are two kinds of people
99
Senate urged
to "catch up
I was pleased to learn from your
March 21 edition that there was
finally some movement in the UBC
Senate to change our obsolete
grading system. Like the British
system of measurements, our
grading system assigns marks out of
totally irrational numbers like 50,
75 and 150! At least, we should be
giving all marks as a percentage.
It was reported that some old
guards in the Senate staunchly
defended our system with
arguments like "Wise conservatism
and the institution of national individuality should be our goal".
Well, even the British dropped their
system long ago for the metric.
Closer to home, UVic which had
basically our obsolete system
changed to a four point grading
system in 1965. When will UBC
catch up to modern times?
Dr. William Hsieh
oceanography
who believe in Jesus Christ. There
are Christians, who are capable of
being faithful to and glorifying their
religion without being obnoxious
about it. I don't believe Ron
Stewart had anything to complain
about as far as they're concerned.
Then there are Christers. That's
my term to denote people like
Brother Jed, Sister Cindy and the
Maranathas, who believe in a certain way and aren't going to sleep at
night until everyone else believes in
exactly the same way.
Christers can generally be identified by their vehement condemnations of anyone who oversteps the
moral and spiritual lines that they
themselves have drawn. Such
Biblical references as "Judge not,
that ye be not judged" (Matthew
7.1) are ignored by this vicious
group of raving fanatics.
Christians, on the other hand„ try
to display the virtues that Jesus
displayed, such as tolerance,
mildness, gentleness,- mercy and
compassion. "... By their fruits ye
shall know them." (Matthew 7.20)
They may disagree with your taste
in music, but they won't revile you
for it.
The methods of Christers are
destructive, while the Christians
seek to build. You'll find the
Christers running rock n' roll
"seminars". You'll find the Christians running food banks.
Carol Pedlar
AMS external affairs coordinator
(another soul lost to rock 'n roll)
Thumpers add color and diversity
The bible-thumpers at the SUB
Thursday and Friday were the best
entertainment I've had all year. I
wish people like that would visit us
more often.
Many of the spectators there took
the whole thing far too seriously,
however. These demagogues aren't
a threat to anyone. Even in the
southern states they're a fringe
group. On the contrary: they add
color and diversity to out otherwise
bland population.
These rare creatures should be
preserved in a kind of sociological
zoo where they could harangue and
rant against anything or anyone
they wanted to. Their vitriolic
language only drives people away
from their point of view (I think
that any discrediting of religion is a
step forward for humankind: we
should all worship science and the
dollar bill).
Maybe the AMS could sponsor
an annual event where demagogues
would be invited to present their
views to public spectators. We had
a fundamentalist right-winger this
year, so next year we could have an
anarcho-syndicalist or a communist
on a soapbox.
The year after that we could even
have a democratic socialist present
his views on the world (although
there is a threat that the naive and
gullible would take them seriously).
We would have to change one
thing, however: the speaker would
have to stand above the audience in
order to give him stature, and to
allow him to go on a power trip. On
Friday Jed was on ground level,
physically enclosed by hecklers.
This made him a little sheepish and
modest.
Perhaps he should have been
given a microphone and allowed to
stand on the second floor balcony
like Mussolini liked to do. A banner
with a political symbol could be
draped over the wall to create the
perfect atmosphere.
All in all, though, people like Jed
Marxist accuses Ubyssey and others of commie bashing
The editorial staff of The
Ubyssey responsible for the story,
"Speech Disrupted", March 18,
1986, have committed a grave violation of journalistic ethics.
The story claims that I was
"dragged from an audience" and
that "Barbara Waldern . . .was
physically removed from SUB after
repeatedly disrupting a speech given
by Alexey Makarov ..."
Both these statements are blatant
lies. Neither I nor anyone else at the
meeting was "dragged" or
"physically removed" from the
meeting, nor did anyone "repeatedly disrupt" Makarov's speech.
The question comes to mind: why
would those responsible for this
cynical and grave violation of journalistic ethics do such a thing? Why
was the opposition to the political
stands of both Soviet and American
representatives at this meeting
presented in such a perverse light?
Why are the students being told
an outright lie about my behaviour
in order to portray Marxist-Leninist
opinions as being those of raving
fanatics who "disrupt" and are
"dragged off" even though no such
thing happened?
When  Ronald   Reagan  portrays
the Sandanista government of
Nicaragua as a threat to the security
of the United States of America,
and presents the cut-throat Contras
as "freedom fighters", enlightened
world opinion knows that these lies
have the self-serving aim of the
Reagan administration to overthrow the revolutionary government of this small country.
When Soviet officials state that
the armed resistance of Afghan
patriots is the work of the CIA,
again enlightened opinion sees
through this lie as a cover-up of a
new kind of imperialism no less aggressive and violent than that of the
United States, even though it
postures as being "communist".
What then are we to think about
my opposition to the sophistry and
demagogy of the two superpowers?
The UBC Marxist-Leninists have
published leaflets and widely
distributed them at recent meetings
attended by Stephen Lewis, Canadian ambassador to the United Nations, and by Makarov, a Soviet official. The leaflets present
arguments to persuade students not
to be deceived by the "peace talks"
and "negotiations" between the
two superpowers.
By analyzing facts from the contemporary world of international
affairs, cogent arguments have been
made that only the world's peoples
relying on their unity and self-
sacrificing efforts can prevent the
catastrophe of another world war
by opposing the war preparations
of both superpowers and all warmongering states.
Unable to refute our logic or
arguments (and Makarov opened
his speech by referring to the leaflet
written against Soviet and U.S. aggression), our detractors have
resorted to the cowardly act of telling lies and slanders.
The goal of this activity is, in my
opinion, an effort to paralyze the
students from taking any action
against the superpowers and their
war preparations. The superpowers
are in effect trying to take over the
peace movement and render it
harmless to themselves.
An opinion is created that only
"rational" and "democratic" people like Makarov, Arbatov, Admiral Carroll, Paul Warnke,
Stephen Lewis, etc. comprise the
"legitimate" peace movement and
must monopolize the podium.
Those   of   us   who   expose   the
superpowers as the main danger
and source of war and call upon the
people to unite in demonstrations
and other actions to oppose their
war preparations are labelled as
"fanatics", "violent", and so on.
This is part of the psychological
warfare of the superpowers to stop
the people from activating
themselves, from gathering the
courage and determination to go into action, uniting with one another,
against all war preparations.
Barbara Waldern
unclassified student
and Cindy are a constructive force
in society. Unfortunately they tend
to give anti-communism a bad
name.
Peter Von Maydell
commerce 2
Gospel gab
converts grad
Anti-red Jed and unlusty Cindy
drew crowds of students all week.
"Why are you all getting so emotional" Cindy screeched before
elaborating on the horror of premarital kissing (a sin which I personally do not indulge in before
breakfast).
The text they were using was the
Bible. Apart from the entertaining
hecklers, the main opposition came
from the assorted Christian element
on campus who were competing to
reenlighten the many new Jed and
Cindy converts. The text for these
Christian students was naturally
also the Bible (not the Handbook of
Chemistry and Physics, even
though one possibly religious
fanatic was defiantly holding his
1980 edition towards the heavens).
What with the ever increasing
popularity of Gospel TV, my
favourite shows of the week I
hasten to add, and the exponentially increasing interpretations of the
same old Bible passages, 1 am
thinking of giving up atheism, and
chemistry, and joining the highlife
of the Christian comedians.
Nevil Pendleton
chem. grad.
U" w ^5t ■
March 25, 1986
The Ubyssey is pub 'ay and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Anna Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
In trie beginning, God created the heavens a"d me earth, a',:1, the Ubyssey A;-o to populate the
Ubyssey God created in her own image Eve I. yn J.icon. When Ev-' l.yi grew Imv!, God created from
her rib Steve Chan to keep her company. And Eve and Steve begat Sheila Dawn who begat Connne
Bjorge who begat Laura Mallen who begat David Ferman who met Camile Dionne and together they
begat Martin de Jonge who begat Jennifer Lyall who begat James Young who begat Stephen Wisen
thai who knew Janice Irving and they together begat Neil Lucente who begat Ed Mou who lay with
Debbie Lo. And it was good. They begat Michael Groberman. And this was jusi O.K. And then it
started to rain. Heavily.
v; Tuesday, March 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Crap collects flies
By MARTIN DE JONGE
Students crowded around
Brother Jed and Sister Cindy like
flies crowding around crap last
week, responding to the fundamentalist fire-and-brimstoners'
dogmatic rhetoric with an endless
stream of chants, insults, and invectives.
It was the usual thing that happens when the self-professed
upholders of public morality clash
verbally with the self-obsessed
general public. A great deal of
human energy was wasted on a
shouting match, leaving each side
more convinced of their original
convictions than before.
Even though some students did
attempt to engage in high-strung
ideological debate with these people, they were only met with incessant warnings about the evils of fornication and homosexuality, and
repeated threats of eternal damnation and hell.
But as competitive ridicule at the
expense of the campus preachers
became a sport for the spectators,
one had to wonder why these
masochistic mercenaries were able
to command such consistent interest for so many days. Some
students were just killing time between classes, but others actually
skipped classes to take in the spectacle. At times the crowd would be
content to sit and listen, but at
other times, they resembled a lynch
mob, ready to get out the hammer
and nails.
It seems to me that if someone
stood up on a soap-box on campus
and began spouting off about some
other topic, such as the imperative
necessity for everyone in Vancouver
to become a slave labourer at Expo
'86, the reaction would not nearly
be as pronounced as it was for last
week's bible-thumpers.
•TV*
But there is something about the
content and delivery of this modern
evangelicalism that obviously raises
the ire of many. There is something
about the forcing of indegestible
ideas down peoples' throats that
goes against the grain of university
students, who are hopefully accustomed to the dialectical exchange of ideas as a method of dealing with controversial issues.
It is questionable whether Jed
and Cindy fairly represent Christianity. In St. Matthew 5:9, Jesus
says "Blessed are the peacemakers:
for they shall be called the children
of God." Jed, on the other hand,
believes that killing commies is a
good thing.
In St. Matthew 6:19, Jesus says
"lay not up yourselves treasures
upon earth, where moth and rust
doth corrupt, and where thieves
break through and steal." On the
contrary, Jed says "If you're a
good Christian, you'll be a good
capitalist."
The reason why two strangers,
obviously out of touch with their
own faith, caused such a stir on
campus by merely shouting sensationalist dogma is not exactly that
difficult to pin down.
To grab our atlention, Jed and
Cindy used the oldest trick in the
book; they used the same technique
used by the ad agencies that sell cars
for GM and market sugared fizz for
Pepsi-Cola: they sold sex.
Sex is an effective sales pitch
because it can attract attention even
to something with no substance of
its own. Consequently, listening to
these irrational zealots was like
jumping into bed with a moron.
The doomsday duo told us the
shocking story of their own unnaturally frigid relationship, and
they entertained and angered us
with their animated denunciations
of fornicators and homosexuals.
We were shocked, we were amused,
we were angry, but either way, we
were hooked. We were there. We
listened.
After having successfully communicated their message Friday,
our beloved brother and sister probably returned home to their hotel
room, enjoyed an uplifting episode
of Dallas, and retired in separate
beds, content in their belief that
they had served God correctly one
more day.
Martin de Jonge is a Ubyssey
staffer who enjoys competitive
ridicule and jumping into bed with
morons.
0)
>
co
CO
ob
Q.
u
Letters
Vancouver harbors warships
On April 19 the Vancouver Peace
Festival begins. The day before, on
April 18, six U.S. warships including two destroyers and four
frigates, are due to dock in Vancouver.
Five of these are nuclear and
capable and most likely nuclear
armed. Several of these warships,
like many others which have come
to Vancouver in recent years, will
probably have arrived directly from
Holy week humor misplaced
Beginning on Palm Sunday,
March 23, Christendom celebrates
its most special season of the year:
Holy Week. Some hundreds of
millions of people join in weeping
with Christ during the week of his
Passion and rejoicing with Him on
the morning of his Resurrection.
The week is precious to Christians.
Accordingly it is with singular in-
sensitivity and remarkable lack of
tact that The Ubyssey decided to
run its "Jesus of Nazareth — Ernie
of Detroit" cartoon one week
before the remembrance of Christ's
death. Good Friday.
We want your wonderfully wise'
words of wovely wit written (typed
triple space on a 70 character line).
Please, no racist sexist or
homophobic stuff. The Ubyssey
maintains the right to edit for brevity and libel. Deadlines for letters
are noon on press day and are extremely painful.
I like to think that I have a sense
of humour. A trademark of
fanaticism is a lack of being able to
look at one's cause in a light vein.
To satirize what needs satirizing, to
point up eccentricities extant in any
group of people, and just to laugh
at oneself are healthy and productive forms of self-criticism.
Yet there is a place for humour.
The Church has justifiably been the
object of satire and the butt of
jokes for two millennia. But that's
the Church.
To satirize the King of Kings is
another matter altogether. Christians must welcome the criticism of
the world if we are to respond in
compassionate obedience to
Christ's command. Christians may
not, however, tolerate the mocking
of God the Son, the Prince of
Peace.
The Ubyssey, sadly, has once
again shown its journalistic irresponsibility — this time by
denigrating the Creator and
Redeemer of life.
Phil George
law 3
CITR volunteers support Ham radio
In the article Svetozar Kontic
quoted AMS Finance Director,
Jamie Collins, as stating that Student Council recently gave CITR an
increase in revenue of $7,500. This
is the first we have heard of it!
CITR's budget was cut this year by
approximately $30,000. An increase
as substantial as the one quoted in
.The Ubyssey would certainly be
noticed. It is true that CITR has increased its revenue significantly this
year, but that was due to the hard
work of CITR volunteers and staff.
It was not given to us by the AMS.
Hamsoc didn't get their service
organization status, but please
don't blame us. We radio types
share the airwaves. CITR extends a
helping hand to Hamsoc. Let us
know how we can help your
organization!
Linda Scholten
CITR president
testing their weapons systems at the
Nanoose Bay naval weapons range,
just a few miles north of Nanaimo.
The presence of the U.S. warships in Vancouver harbour shows
us precisely what the superpowers
have in mind for smaller states.
Here is the gunboat diplomacy of
one of the the two superpowers, the
U.S., dictating to its so called ally.
If the people of Vancouver are to
make a practical contribution to
peace, they must direct their actions
against the specific war preparations going on in our ports and
waterways.
How can the Vancouver city
council proclaim Vancouver to be a
"nuclear free zone" and then
welcome the officers of U.S. warships armed to the teeth with
nuclear weapons? How can these
politicians who call for the closure
of Nanoose Bay base, then host a
peace festival here, welcome U.S.
warships and their naval personnel
which come to Vancouver for
"visits" or even as guests to the annual Sea Festival. Such a policy is,
to say the least, hypocritical.
Certainly no warships armed with
nuclear weapons should be allowed
in our waters. But we cannot forget
the terrible conventional naval
bombardment of Lebanon by a
U.S. battleship, and that massive
destruction of Vietnam and
Afghanistan and so on, have been
carried out by conventional
weapons of the U.S and the Soviet
Union.
Therefore it is perfectly just and
practical for the peace movement to
take up the task of stopping all
U.S., Soviet and other aggressive
warships from using Vancouver
harbour. We look to the example of
New Zealand to take the positive
step of banning nuclear armed and
powered warships from their waters
and harbours.
Barbara Waldern
unclassified student
F RE E -v-Stmdio
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
•   For Grad Photography That Is Different  •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1986
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
•  UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1986 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
2111 West 16th Ave.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
TUDI° 736-7281 or 731-1412.
O
■5"
£P
(/>
<
CD
~tp&*C£i> ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co. ltd.
SUNTANNING
10 Sessions 20 Sessions
UIMTANNING S>-}9        Y'W
Volf Beds -     Share Sessions with a friend
ALSO AVAILABLE 1 BED WITH
SPECIAL FACE TANNER $1.00 EXTRA PER SESSION
HAIR STYLING
15% Discount
on any hair care services
or
pay regular price for your hair service
and receive TWO FREE TANNING SESSIONS
5784 University Blvd.
(in UBC Village) % Blk. away
Valid with presentation of this ad
224 1922
224-9116
Expires April 15, 1986
EASTER'S ON ITS WA Y
CHOCOLA TE EGGS
**v*
EASTER CARDS
Luis of Plush Bunnies c? Rabbits
Lower Leval Hours: Mon.-Fri Telephone: 224-1911
Student Union       8:00 am. 7:00 p.m      Vita h Mastercharge
Building. UBC.   Sat. 10 am  5:00 p.m. Accepted
fB
M&:
&
»*.
&Uf4
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
OPEN T DAYS A WEEK
872-2822
436 W. 2nd Avenue, Vancouver
(Cambie & 2nd Avenue)
NOOHBOURHOOO MINI STOHS-ALL INC.
"&t*A Otci <£<>* &4t  7K<uM«r} & Stonaqt "Ratt*"
MOVING &
l££*=S   CARTONS Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
eavy Metal has a strange androgyny. Within the
punk/new wave movement, androgyny is futuristic,
the beginning of an egalitarian society in which roles
are not defined on the basis of gender. But, in Heavy
Metal, the androgyny seems to regress to neanderthal
days where all look primitive.
' 'Beat her mistreat her do anything that you please
Bite her excite her make her get down on her knees
Abuse her misuse her she can take all that you 9ve got
Caress her molest her she always does what you want.''
— "22 Acadia Avenue," Iron Maiden, 1985.
By NAIRNE HOLTZ For Canadian University Press
I ale and female Heavy Metal fans alike have long manes of
hair, heavy black eye make-up, black studded jewelry and
skin-tight pants — be they spandex, leather or jean. Dee
Snyder of Twisted Sister, with his frizzed blonde hair, colourful
make-up and black beauty spot, looks like a caricature of a drag
queen.
Snyder and other Heavy Metal men borrow the image of the achtypal whore or
'woman as sex object.' On stage or on
posters, these men always pose with their
crotches thrust out, aimed at women. The
message is simple: "We wanna get fucked."
But, in the industry and the culture, it's the
women who get fucked.
Although Lee Aaron says she thinks her
videos, which feature her bound in chains,
are not sexist, she does admit that it is difficult for women to break into the hard rock
or Heavy Metal industry. In an interview
with Music Express, Aaron said she finds it
hard to get a male band to back her vocals
because men don't like her to be the centre
attention.
Carole Pope of Rough Trade says she has
to deal with a lot of sexism because of her
lyrics. "Women just don't write sexually aggressive lyrics," she said.
Pope says she has always had problems
with record companies, and calls a lot of rock
videos sexist. "Heavy metal videos are annoying because the woman is an object. So
we do parodies of that in videos like "Crime
of Passion," she said.
There's no place for women in Heavy
Metal — except as submissive groupies. A
tures of men and only two of women; in
Metallion, the ratio is 101 to seven.
Female Heavy Metal fans interviewed at
Toronto's Hard Rock Cafe and at subway
stations, say they also have had problems
with the sexist music and culture. From fresh-
faced giggling and drunk teens to two older
women who, midway through the interview
said, "what are you talkin' to us for? We're
just a bunch of hookers," the pervading attitude was cynicism.
"Women are treated like shit anyway, so
why pick on Heavy Metal," said one teen.
Another said, "Listen to things like Madonna and it's the same thing."
"When they're saying things like 'beat us,
mistreat us,' I think they're talking about
men too, like S & M," said one of the
women.
"Guys are all the same despite the music
they listen to," said her friend while looking
at a man who was pawing my girlfriend in an
attempt to be interviewed.
"When my girlfriend and I left the Hard
Rock Cafe, the bouncer who had asked me
for I.D. and then let us in after my we-
wouldn't-be-caught-dead-in-here-we're-just-
doing-sociological-research spiel, said 'You
girls should go up to the Gasworks tomorrow
quick look at the April  1986 issue of Hit night. There's all kinds of Heavy Metal sluts
Parader revealed only one story on female up there.' "
performers; in the latest edition of Metallion, "What d'ya mean, sluts?" I asked,
there are none. Hit Parader features 87 pic- "Well, you know, they wear those tight
Spandex pants and all," he replied.
Musically, the line between hard core and
Heavy Metal may have narrowed, but
whereas hardcore bands are often political
and take stands against racism, sexism and
war, Heavy Metal has followed a different
path.
One such musical cross-over, Piledriver,
sums up their philosophy in the latest issue of
Metallion: "If you ain't a metalhead, you
might as well be dead." Famed for their
songs "Sex with Satan" and "Sodomize the
Dead," lead vocalist "Pile" elaborated on
their themes in Metallion.
"Sex with Satan" came from us wanting to
do not just another satan song, but a satanic
song with something everybody can get into
— sex. So we said, 'Well, if someone is really
into satan that means they love him, so if
they really love him, why not go down and
fuck him?' I mean there are a lot of twisted
metal chicks that I can just imagine with the
little red horns in between."
"... If she can fill a '£>' cup
It's good enough to keep me up
Get down on your backside
I wanna see your wares
Gonna mount you for a good ride
Nothing else compares
Takin' one in each hand
Do as I command.''
— "Butter-Bust Jerky,"
Anvil, 1983.
"Pile" also said a further career ambition
of his was to make sex toys. "I'd like to start
the Piledriver line of sex toys. Can you see it?
The   'Piledriver   Anal    Intruder'    with
'Piledriver' embossed on the side in little
studs so when the broad sticks it in she'll
think of "Sex with Satan" or "Sodomize the
Dead," he said.
Women in Heavy Metal are few and far
between. Christie Knight, a D.J. at
Toronto's Q107, suggested some reasons
why.
"Men play keyboards, guitars, and drums
better than women. Women just don't have it
in them. I've often wondered why — I guess
women don't have the guts to do it," she
said.
"There are a lot of good female vocalists
— it's cute to hear a woman sing. The band
the Go-Go's succeeded because they were
marketed as girls — you know, on the album
cover they're in bubble bath — that's why the
public accepted them," she said.
"Men still want to see women as feminine.
People look at Appleviper (a female Heavy
Metal band) in their black leather, screaming
and think 'I don't want to see that'. I saw
Jade in concert and I thought she looked —
well, I don't like to use the word — cheap.
She yelled 'Toronto can fucking rock 'n roll'
and I thought c'mon, you can rock 'n roll but
you can be a lady too."
Christie Knight can rock 'n roll. She plays
guitar, bass and drums, but she says she
didn't have to deal with sexism because "I
lived in a small town and the guys really needed people who could play" but added, "if I
was to try and get into a band here in Toronto, I'd probably have a hard time."
She said she remembered watching a
talented woman audition for lead vocals, but
the guys in the band wouldn't take her on
because they said she would be the centre of
attention.
Heavy Metal. If you're a woman, it's like
banging your head against a brick wall. Tuesday, March 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
rawford Kilian is a veteran.
***     Author, teacher, regular Province columnist on education,
Kilian, the man who called former Universities Minister Pat
McGeer "just another alligator" in his recent book School Wars:
The Assault on B.C. Education, is soft-spoken, funny and fighting for
the future of education in British Columbia.
In his small office, covers of his books Icequake, Tsunami, Brother
Jonathan, Eyas, and School Wars decorate his walls. Writing and education books line his shelves. A calendar picture of Simon Fraser University
hangs by his desk.
But the real reason for Kilian's activism on behalf
of beleaguered B.C. education sits on his desk.
Photographs of his two children; "both in public
school," he says.
School Wars:
The Assault on B.C. Education
By Crawford Kilian
New Star Books Ltd.
Elected in 1980 to the North Vancouver school
council, Kilian feels "things were beginning to go
sour even then" as a result of the Education Interim
Finance Act which took commercial tax revenue out
of school council control.
"Like any other discredited politician, I went to
the media." Kilian says when speaking of his defeat
at re-election as a trustee and his subsequent column
in the Province.
School Wars grew out of his weekly column. "It
was easier to contemplate writing such a book with
the research I had accumulated," he says, feeling
also that as education is one of the major public expenditures in B.C., it deserved greater public
awareness. "No-one seemed to be keeping track of
what was happening."
He says he has experienced few negative responses
to his open activism, although he admits "I don't
think I have many friends within the Socred caucus."
"Presumably the Socreds run polls which tell them
university-bashing isn't popular, yet they do it
anyway — just as the Wacky Bennett Socreds did.
The government seemed trapped in a feedback loop:
it attacks an institution like the universities, is
criticized for it, and in revenge renews its attacks."
Kilian says in School Wars.
"I heard from one UBC professor that three top
people he knows will leave the university if the
Socreds are re-elected," says Kilian, "They will leave
rather than being consigned to mediocrity."
Since 1976 UBC has seen budget reductions every
year. In 1982-83 the university was cut by $7.5
million, which meant the elimination of 67 full-time
academic positions and 94 full-time support-staff
jobs. In August 1983 UBC faced a shortfall of $4.5
million.
"Like SFU and UVic, UBC was soon driven into
such self-defeating measures as a 33 per cent increase
in student tuition fees," Kilian says in School Wars.
In School Wars, Kilian also uses SFU as an example of the problems universities now face. Between
January 1982 and May 1984, SFU's enrolment increased by 10.8 per cent with budget shortfalls totalling $12 million. "This was accomplished in a fiscal
version of the death of a thousand cuts." Kilian
states.
Kilian is not impressed with Bennett's $110 million
fund for excellence in education. "Its bogus; a
scam," he says. "After years of hearing about how
SCHOOL WARS
"One of the things you begin to discover is what
little influence you have," he says when referring to
taking on the government over education policies.
"Your best bet is simply to ruffle the feathers of
some officials," says Kilian.
He equates B.C. education today with Third
World standards. "B.C. could become like Peru,"
he says. "It might mean cheap labour, but we can't
let anyone drop-out." The value of scarcity, of less
students currently enrolled in school, could be used
to redesign the school structure rather than "just patching it up," Kilian says.
Each drop-out from education might cost the
government $200,000 in social services, says Kilian,
yet, as he states in School Wars, instead of saving
money with the university cutbacks, the Socreds have
increased overall social costs.
"They would rather spend money to keep a young
person on unemployment than spend less money to
put that person in a classroom."
Kilian feels "it's not the best and the brightest —
it's the people with money," who are successful
students today. Take student aid — according to
Kilian in 1982-83 the provincial total budget for it
was $33 million, including bursaries and grants. In
1984/85 it was down to $2.5 million, mainly in the
form of student loans. It was raised to $4.6 million in
the 1985/86 fiscal year, but bursaries and grants remained scarce.
In colleges, Kilian feels there is a trend to phase out
university-transfer students.
"The powers in the Socred government feel
university-transfer programs in colleges are an indulgence — only 10 per cent of the students in colleges are taking these courses. Career students are
worth 6 per cent more than university-transfer
students in colleges."
Or, as he states in his book: "Pressure therefore
falls on colleges to discourage university-transfer
students because they simply don't bring in enough
money."
Kilian feels the Socreds have not just cut back on
university funds but attacked them.
we educators waste money on frills, they're giving us
money for frills."
Kilian thinks the problem is not in sustaining a frill
program, but the core curriculum itself. "Giving
B.C. education the $110 million is like a man with
gangrene up to his elbows being offered a
manicure," he says.
He thinks the teaching community has become
more political out of necessity. "They see there is no
hope for the profession while the Socreds are in
power," he says.
The New Democratic Party seem to be seriously
developing ideas for the restoration and improvement of education, Kilian thinks, although traditionally "the NDP tends to look at universities as
strongholds of privilege," he says.
Kilian's forecasts for post-secondary education are
bleak. If the Socred restraint policies continue, he
thinks that colleges will wind up being merely trade
schools, something they were never intended to be.
For survival purposes, UBC and SFU could begin
to handle different levels of students. SFU would
take all undergraduate students, UBC the graduate-
level students. "SFU could become like Los Angeles
State College," Kilian says, "and UBC Like Berkley
or UCLA."
If restraint had not been implemented? "We
would have a much less demoralized system, probably a lot of political pressure about costs, but we'd
be keeping up with inflation," says Kilian.
Kilian was educated in California public schools
and British and American private schools in Mexico
City. He graduated from Santa Monica High School
in Southern California, and then from Columbia
University in 1962 with a B.A. in English. In 1967 he
began teaching at Vancouver Community College
and then joined Capilano College in 1968, where he
now teaches communication courses.
"Education could help to get us out of our current
economic mess," Kilian says, "If we want to help
education."
■2&x!d„
''■"<■ M Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
Larger loans increase defaults
From page 1
Donaldson said most banks are
intolerant of student clients.
"There are a few banks I can name
that are very patient, but I think the
majority would rather not give you
the time of day, let alone the same
amount of counselling you'd
receive if you were someone else,"
she said.
A former York University student who asked not to be identified
said one collector tracked her down
to an office where she was working,
although she said she had "absolutely no idea how they found
that one out."
Belgrave said his collectors "find
telephone work elicits the best
response. It's long and tedious
work, and the largest hurdle is to
locate the debtor. That's our big
problem."
Belgrave insisted his collectors remain within legal jurisdiction.
"They have guidelines over what we
can and can not do," he said.
Kubacki said it's "unfortunate"
when a collector harasses a debtor,
but "it's not a common problem. It
happens from time to time (and
when it does) we conduct ourselves
in the proper manner."
According to Belgrave, collection
agencies are working to everyone's
benefit.   "Things have  improved,
COMF. & KXPKR1KNCK (iRKAT INDIAN CUISINK
20%
OFF OF TOTAL BILL
Mondays thru Thursdays
(with UBC student card)
I \pno April 10/X6
The discount is good also for I guest!
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
5:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
Reservations Recommended
Flavour
^N^"of
India
Ljourmet Cuisine
2953 W. 4th Ave.
(At Bayswater)
738-2122
Send Your Furniture and
Persona/ Belongings Home
through the
jHA,V))LE: ..,  Vlw..al.naal(|  'W^,^
V'I'lH
(AH1'
I For one stop shipping
We will pick up, package, insure and send your books, computers, typewriters, stereos, furniture, sports equipment,
clothes, etc. . . . door to door ... in B.C., across Canada,
U.S.A. and Worldwide.
Examples: 70 lbs. Books to Prince George    $21.96
12 lbs. Paintings to Calgary. $26.84
35 lbs. Stereo & Speakers to Vernon $29.34
50 lbs. Clothes to Edmonton $32.59
Come In or Call Us:
5524 CAMBIE STREET    ^_   ^^
Opposite Liquor Store and <*/E    QQfifi
next to Rogers Cablevision       OfcW*" w%n# Vw
SUPER SALE
DOUBLE SIZE FUTON
1
^
$88.00
Basic Frame
$100.0°
WESTERN FUTON & FABRIC
4388 WEST 10th (at Trimble)
Phone 222-1277
certainly because the government
has put this in the hands of private
industry, which in the long run
benefits everybody."
He said even debtors are helped.
"The graduating student today has
a much bigger loan than five years
ago, and has a much greater debt to
pay. The cost of everything has
risen ... but things are happening
very well right now," he said.
Donaldson said student leaders
don't like to talk about defaulters
"because it makes students look
bad. But it can be connected to
other things — unemployment, low
income jobs, and enormous debt
loans.
SefVicf
(sur#viss)n. 1. work done for others
2. helpful or useful action 3. benefit,
advantage 4. friendly help 5. Kinko's
FREE SELF-SERVICE TYPING AVAILABLE
FOR A LIMITED TIME
IBM-SELECTRIC
kinko's
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9  F 8-6  Sat 10-6  Sun 11-6
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1986 SPRING LECTURES
ARTHUR KLEINMAN
Dr. Arthur Kleinman is a distinguished Professor of Medical Anthropology and Psychiatry at
Harvard University well-known for his expertise on cross-cultural aspects of illness. In clarifying the borderland between anthropology and medicine, he has shown just how complex and
interactive is the relationship between disease and society. Dr. Kleinman's critical thinking and
broad knowledge in the fields of psychiatry, medicine, anthropology and related behavioral
social science is very evident in his impressive list of publications, including seven books.
EXPLAINING AND INTERPRETING DISORDER: Handling discrepant views of disease/illness in the
health care system.
Thursday, March 27       In Lecture Hall 6, Instructional Resources Centre, at 12:30 PM
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE—PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented
JOB OPPORTUNITIES FOR
GOOD SPORTS IN 1986-87
If you area UBC student during the 1986-87 year and you are looking for a
place to make some extra money while gathering career-related experience in a
variety of fields (from business to journalism to sport and recreation
management), then come see us at the Intramural Sports Program.
We are looking for a few creative and dynamic people to work in the following areas:
*■ Advertising & Promotions
*■ Sport Journalism
* Intramural Business Enterprises
*■ Finance
* Marketing
* Sport Management —Hockey League
— Runners' Program
— Cycles Program
—Volleyball League
— Co-Recreation Program
— Basketball League
—Tournaments & Special Events
— Soccer League
— Floor Hockey League
— Squash
— Badminton
—Tennis
If you possess the qualities of leadership and innovation, we want to talk to
you.
A detailed job description of available positions can be obtained from the
UBC Intramural Sports office.
Room 66
Lower SUB Concourse
Student Union Building
Deadline for applications: Tuesday, April 1, 1986
vfoG mmoAa&...&i, aood Mtnti! Tuesday, March 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Students swim, run,
bike, and climb wall
STORM THE WALL
FINALS - THURSDAY. MARCH 20. 1988
Heat #1  - 12:40 p.m. Men's Faculty
1. EUS III (246)21:48:39
2. Medicine (2611 22:02:60
3. Flintstone 1200) 22:29:96
4. EUS Frat 1 (237) 22:48:88
6  EUS 1220) 23:23:92
6. Forestry (221) 25:38:89
7. Medicine (204) 25:44:14
8. Commerce A (214) 25:58:85
Heat   #2   —   12:52.   Men's   Varsity/Faculty   and
Staff/Independent
(Indepl 1. Chariots of Manure (293) 20:06:09
(Indepl 2. 3rd Salish Alumni (272) 20:07:1)
(Indepl 3. Cycling Club (295) 20:29:20
(Varsity) 4. Rowing I (315) 20:32:40
5. Ski Team (314) 21:43:25 (Varsity)
6. CVC (3131 22:15:89 (Indep)
7. Angus and the Herffers (312) 25:04:90 (Indepl
8. Physiology (449) 30:12 (Faculty/Staff)
Heat t/3 - 1:04 Women's Faculty
1. EUS Fast (378) 23:34:89
2. P.E. Phast (3001 24:35:70
3. P.E. Fun (393) 24:48:63
4. Forestry 1 (372) 26:26:34
5. P.E. Flamingos (3711 26:43:58
6. Rehab Med 1370) 27:04:31
7. Geology (389) 27:40:89
Heat ffA — 1:16 Sororities
1. Gamma Phi Beta (4081 25:17:07
2. Alpha Gamma Delta (404) 26:19:81
3. Kappa Gamma (452) 27:26:58
4. Alpha Phi 2 (411) 30:00:89
5. Alpha Phi 1 (410) 31:09:02
6. Gamma Phi Beta (409) 33:52:32
7. Alpha Delta Pi (407) 34:58:26
Heat #5 — 1:28 Fraternities
1. Beta Quick 1345) 20:27:24
2. Fiji Charleston Chiefs (324) 20:40:77
3. Dekes Daboub (361) 21:26:81
4. FijiAdirondacks (326) 22:24:60
5. Fiji Flyers (3301 22:39:60
6. Kappa Sigma 1 (348) 26:36:57
7. Alpha Delts 1 13331 27:34:84
8. Detas Speed (3431 29:32:56
Heat c; — 1:28 p.m.   Fraternities
1. Beta Quick (345) 20:27:24
2. Fi|i Charleston Chiefs 1324) 20:40:77
3. Dekes Dabous (361) 21:25:81
4. Fiji Adirondacks (3261 22:24:60
5. Fiji Flyers (330) 22:39:60
6. Kappa Sigma I (348) 26:36:47
7. Alpha Delts I (3331 27:34:84
8. Betas Speed 13431 29:32:56
Heat #6 — 1:40 p.m. Women's Residence
1. VST A 14431 24:32:98
2. Nootka Nuns (4001 25:02:26
3. 2nd Dene (4801 25:11:47
4. 4th Dene (479) 25:42:58
5. 2nd Kwak (476) 26:24:59
6. 2nd OK (403I 26:27:38
7..VST B (444) 26:57:29
8. 4th Kwak (478) 28:26:08
Heat#7      —      1:52     p.m.     Women's
dependent/Women's Varsity
1. Swim Team 14251 23:14:64
2. Rowing I (426) 23:34:75
3. Rowing A (428) 24:19:14
4. Women's Soccer (424) 26:47:19
5. Swim Team II (430) 27:52:40
6. IM Independent (429) 27:43:21
7. Phrateres V (418) 27:44:22
8. 5th Nootka (423) 30:10:43
Heat #8 - 2:04 p.m   Co-Rec
1. TANATADS 14711 20:36:77
2. Science (462) 20:54:64
3. Chariots of Manure (465) 21:11:96
4. Subterraneans '- Ind (459) 21:40:41
5. UBC Aquatic Centre (473) 21:55:49
6. VST (453) 22:38:50
7. PE Grads (439) 22:42:04
8. Kootney I (468) 22:50:10
Heat #9 — 2:16 p.m. Men's Residence
1. Carey Hall (499) 21:13:95
2. 4th Nootka (271) 21:15:70
3. VST I (498) 21:21:48
4. Gage Terminators (281) 21:23:68
5. Gage Gumbies (287) 21:32:13
6. Sherwood Lett I (289) 22:29:34
7. 3rd Salish (275) 23:21:89
8   1st Nootka Knights 1270) 24:09:03
Heat #10 - 2:28 p.m. Faculty Men
1. EUS 11224) 19:15:57:
2. Geology I (228) 19:43:01
3. Blondies Bunch (242) 20:28:50
4. Phys Ed Wallcats (217) 20:33:67
5. EUS II (245) 20:35:99
6. Forestry (Joe Namith) (240) 20:54:66
7. Aggie I (252121:21:73
8. 2nd Physsoc Wall Crawlers 1213) 21:59:24
STORM THE WALL
WOMEN'S OVERALL FINALS
1. Swim Team (425) 23:14:64
2. EUS Fast (3781 23:34:89
3. Rowing I (426) 23:34:75
4. Rowing A (428) 24:19:14
5. VST A (443) 24:32:98
6. PE Phast (300) 24:35:70
7. PE Fun (393) 24:48:63
8. Nootka Nuns (400) 25:02:26
9. 2nd Dene (480) 25:11:47
10. Gamma Phi Beta 1408) 25:11:47
11. 4th Dene 14791 25:42:58
12. Alpha Gamma Delta (404) 26:18:81
13. 2nd Kwak (476) 26:24:59
14. Forestry I (372) 26:26:34
15. 2nd OK (403) 26:27:38
16. PE Flamingo (3711 26:43:58
17. Women's Soccer 26:47:19
18. VST B (444) 26:57:29
19. Rehab Medicine (370) 27:04:31
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Simon Fraser University
;rf.   w #M:;/% ^W.#
•■■    \ ^yj,..' ■%
■'■■■:■■-■-■■■,/ <&_%_$&?■'
■■<•-       r^V-v^W^
- -f^y
'.;.-.■.:%   "'                                   •
• One year program
• Teaching Assistantships
possible if you have a
and Scholarships
BBA or B. Comm.
Available
• Specialization in
• Excellent location
Accouting
overlooking Vancouver
Finance
harbor
Marketing
For detailed information
Organization Behavior
on the SFU, MBA write to:
Management Science/
The Director
Decision Support
M.B.A. Program
Systems
Simon Fraser University
• Small classes, work
Burnaby, B.C.
closely with Faculty
V5A1S6
20. Swim Team II (430I 27:52:40
21. Geology (389127:40:89
22. IM Independent (429) 27:43:21
23. Phrateres V (418) 27:44:22
24. 4th Kwak (4781 28:26:08
25. Kappa Gamma (4521 27:26 58
26. 5th Nootka (423) 30:10:43
27. Alpha Phi 2 (411) 30:00:89
28. Alpha Phi 1 (410) 31:09:02
29. Gamma Phi Beta (409) 33:52:32
30. Alpha Delta Phi (4071 34:53:26
STORM THE WALL
FINALS - THURSDAY, MARCH 20. 1986
TOP MEN'S OVERALL TIMES
1. EUS I (224) 19:15:67
2. Geology I 1228) 19:43:01
3. Chariots of Manure (293) 20:06:09
4. 3rd Salish Alumni (272) 2C 07 11
5   Beta Quick (345) 20:27:24
6. Blondies Bunch (242) 20:28:50
7   Cycle Club (295) 20:29:20
8. Rowing I (315) 20:32 40
9. PE Wild Cats (217) 20:33:1:7
10. EUS II (245) 20:35:99
11. Fiji Charleston Chiefs (324' 20:40:77
12. Forestry (Joe Namith) (240) 20:54:66
13   Carey Hall (4991 21:13:95
14. 4th Nootka (271) 21:15:70
15. VST I (498) 21:21:48
16   Aggies I (252) 21:21:73
17. Gage Terminators 1281) 21:23:68
18   Dekes Dabous (361) 21:25:81
19. Gage Gumbies (287) 21:32:13
20. Ski Team (3141 21:43:25
21. EUS III (2461 21:48:39
22. 2nd Physsoc Wall Crawlers 1213) 21:59:24
23. Medicine 1261) 22:02:60
24. CVC (313) 22:15:89
25 Fiji Adirondacks (326) 22:24:60
26. Sherwood Lett I (289) 22:29:34
27   Flintstone (200) 22:29:34
28. Fiji Flyers (3301 22:39:60
29. EUS Frat I (237) 22:48:88
30. 3rd Salish (2751 23:21:89
31. EUS (2201 23:23:92
32. 1st Nootka Knights I270I 24:09:03
33. Angus and the Herffers (3121 25:04:90
34. Forestry (2211 25:38:89
35. Medicine (2041 25:44:14
36. Commerce AI214I 25:58:85
37. Kappa Sigma I (348) 26:36:47
38. Alpha Delts I (333I 27:34:84
39. Betas Speed I343I 29:32:56
40. Physiology (449) 30:12
UBC
T(E-X-C-~E
H E
L- L-E-N -T) xr
EATERl
1 FREE DINNER
DAILY
SPECIAL
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, purchase 2 of
the daily specials and receive the least expensive one FREE.
This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for takeout or with any other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
**^dm - <w<
Eyeg/ass Boutique
3305 WEST BROADWAY
(at Blenheim)
VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
Single Vision Glasses ...ow.
\\ Soft Contact Lenses
i  Extended Wear
! Contact Lenses
*179
I     $10 OFF ON DAILY & EXTENDED WEAR CONTACT LENSES     I
I WITH THIS COUPON I
j STORE HOURS:
j Monday/Thursday 9 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
I Friday 9 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
I Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED
lOffer Valid Until Apr  30  1986)
GRADUATE STUDENT
SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
AGENDA
Friday, April 4, 1986 at 3:00 p.m. in the Graduate Student Centre
1. Presentation of the 1985 financial statements
2. Report of Council for 1985
3. Proposed amendment of the GSS Constitution
"Moved by special resolution of the members, that Section 2 of the Constitution be amended so as to
read as follows (changes in italics):
The Purposes of the Society are:
a) to promote and serve the academic, social, intellectual, cultural and recreational interests of its
members, the University of British Columbia, and persons associated therewith, and without
restricting the generality of the foregoing, in particular, to promote inter-departmental
activities within the University.
b) to promote the principle and practise of graduate student representation at all levels of decision
making at the University of British Columbia and on all agencies or other bodies which
deliberate on the affairs of graduate students,
c) to provide, maintain and operate the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre as a centre
for the recreation and convenience of members of the Society and their guests,
d) to do everything incidental and necessary to promote and attain the foregoing purposes, and
e) to carry out the foregoing without purpose of gain for its members, and
f) to use any and all profits or accretions to the Society for the promotion and attainment of the
foregoing purposes. "
4. Proposed amendments to the Bylaws.
a) "Moved, by special resolution of the members, that an additional Executive Officer, the External
Affairs Director, be established, and therefore that the following:
g) the External Affair Director" be added to the list of Executive Officer in Bylaw 6.1, and that
the following duties:
"g) The External Affairs Director shall:
i)   be the chairperson of the External Affairs Committee,
ii)    be responsible for the representation of the Society to external organizations,
iii)    develop and maintain contacts with organizations that deliberate on the affairs of
graduate students, and
ivi    perform such other duties as directed by the Council or members."
be added to the Duties of Executive in Bylaw 6.6.
b)Moved by special resolution of the members, that Bylaw 2.9(a), under Fees, be amended to read as
follows:
"a) Fees for ordinary members may be set from time to time by ordinary resolution of the ordinary
members through referendum and subject to the approval of the Board of Governors of the
University."
5. Any other business and motions from the floor
6. Invited talk to the members by Dr. David Strangway, the President of UBC.
ALL GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND,
AND THERE WILL BE A RECEPTION AFTERWARD Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
%^£y2&&?
TODAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in at $6, 8:30-10 a.m. and 2:30-4:30 p.m.,
SUB partyroom.
THE UBYSSEY BANQUET COMMITTEE
Organizational meeting to plan the year end banquet, 11:30 a.m., SUB241K.
AMS ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Art education show, ceramics, drawing, print-
making, AMS art gallery, SUB.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting and bzzr garden,  7:30 p.m.,
SUB 205.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall 304.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Special campaign on South Africa, film and
discussion focusing on Amnesty International's
concerns regarding the widespread abuses of
fundamental human rights in South Africa, 7:15
p.m., Bayview community school, 2251 Collingwood St.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Ground   school/general   meeting,   everyone   is
welcome, 6 p.m., SUB 125.
WEDNESDAY
FINANCE CLUB
BBQ — softball va marketing, 4:30-7 p.m., field
behind Osborne gym.
CAMPUS DANCE COMPANV
Spring dance show, 8:30 p.m., sharp, Frederick
Wood theatre.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Ground  school/general  meeting,  everyone is
welcome, SUB 128.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, featuring Avi Gross, 8:30-11 p.m.,
Graduate student centre. Garden room lounge.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture:   "Attunement   with   life   —   the  experience," guest speaker. Bill Wilkinson, noon,
Buch B221.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in at $5, 8:30-10 a.m. and 3:30-5 p.m., SUB
partyroom.
THE UBYSSEY
Elections for sub-editorial positions, all day, SUB
241K.
FRIENDS OF KATIMAVIK
Rally in support of Jacques Hebert and to protest
the cancellation of Katimavik, 4:30 p.m.. Robson
Square.
POLITICAL   SCIENCE   STUDENTS'   ASSOCIATION
Prof. A. Cairns: "The Macdonald Commission,"
noon, Buch B323.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m.. Gallery lounge.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, slide show on climbing Mount
Rainier, noon, Chem 150.
"Friends of Katimavik" is
organizing a rally in support of Jacques Hebert and to protest the
cancellation of Katimavik. Rally is at
4:30 p.m. Wednesday at Robson
Square. Come and protest government cutbacks.
The Ubyssey is pleased to announce local activist Brenda Milne
will give a seminar on "How the
Province covers disarmament and
other important issues." Milne is a
former coordinator for the local
branches Psychologists for Social
Responsibility and the United Nations Association and currently on
the media committee of End the
Arms Race. Mark your calendar
now: Wed., March 26, noon, The
Ubyssey office, SUB 241K. Here is
your chance to check out Vancouver's best newspaper and get
media smart. All welcome.
THE UBYSSEY
Seminar on "How the Province covers disarmament and other important issues," with Brenda
Milne, noon, SUB 241K.
THURSDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, noon, Asian centre 604.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
No meeting, best of luck with finals, see you in
September.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox
Rd.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Meeting with invited guest speaker on peace
march in Central America, noon, SUB 205.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Last meeting, pick up latest newsletter, noon,
Hebb 12.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Bible reading and testimony meeting, everyone
welcome, noon, SUB 211.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop ins at $5, 8:30-10 a.m., noon, 2:30-4 p.m.,
SUB partyroom.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
"Jesus" film showing, two hour documentary of
the life of Christ, 12:25 p.m., Buch A100.
POLITICAL   SCIENCE   STUDENTS'   ASSOCIATION
Svend Robinson, noon, Buch A106.
FRIDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Last day of classes, drop ins at $5, 8:30-10 a.m.
— SUB partyroom, noon — SUB plaza south.
•#• i% tfc m
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(One block from campus in the Village)
Mon.-Fri. 11:00 a.m.-lO p.m.
Sat., Sun. & Holidays 4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
224-1313
NOTICE OF CLOSURE
THE CUSO-UBC LOCAL COMMITTEE OFFICE IN
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EFFECTIVE MARCH 31. 1986
During the past 25 years, UBC has provided facilities for a CUSO office at International House. During that time the UBC President's CUSO Committee
has placed hundreds of volunteer workers in Third World countries for two
years terms of service. As well, the office has been a focus for fundraising
and education about international development. Due to a change in CUSO's
priorities, the national office is no longer prepared to fund the half-time
secretarial position on campus. We regret to inform you that as of March 31,
1986 the CUSO office will cease operation. Please direct future enquiries to
CUSO Regional Office - 2524 Cypress St. - Phone: 732-1814. We take this
opportunity to thank the faculty, students and administration of the University for their generous support during the past quarter century.
The CUSO-UBC Local Committee
THE CLASSIFIEDS
: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
~ Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
35 - LOST
85 - TYPING
SUMMER JOBS
with
College Pro
• Painters and Foremen
• Interior and Exterior Painting
• Earn $5.50-$7.50/hour
• Full training provided
• Opportunities for advancement
Apply Now
At your Campus Placement Center
or Head Office 316 E. 1st, Vancouver
METRO TYPEWRITER
RENTALS
You Can Rent:
DAILY
WEEKLY
MONTHLY
You are invited
to a performance of
Sir John Stainer's
THE    CRUCIFIXION
at West Point Grey United Church
(Tolmie and W. 8th Ave.)
on GOOD FRIDAY, March 28th
at 7:30 p.m.
Sung by a combined choir: West Point
Grey United Church, West Point Grey
Presbyterian Church and Saint James
United Church. Soloists: Sharon Acton,
Donald Brown, Karen Olinyk, Michael
Williams. Organist: Dorothy Martin. Conductor: Dr. Ottomar F. Cypris.
LOST: Silver compact case (shell-shaped).
Sentimental value. Reward: undying
gratitude, first-born. Blanka, 736-0930.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
40 - MESSAGES
GURDJIEFF OUSPENSKY CENTRES now
accepting students. 988-2097.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t papers, fac
turns, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
PLEASE HELP! Anyone witnessing the car
accident on Wed., Mar. 19/86 at approx.
4:45 p.m. in the intersection of East Mall &
Thunderbird Blvd. between a BMW & a
Chevette please contact Joyce at 946-9303.
JOIN THE UBC GO JU RYU KARATE
CLUB. Be introduced to this sport by one
of the finest black belt instructors from
Japan. All men and women students and
staff welcome. Karina 272-1001.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879 2027.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222 2661.
10 — FOR SALE — Commercial     -jq _ SERVICES
"SHAME THE DEVIL" by Lyn Morrow is a
career woman's novel: inside government,
press gallery, politics, publicity, using well-
known characters. ISBN 0-9692-0-2820-1,
$15.95 postpaid. Lynmor Publishing,
Osoyoos, B.C. V0H 1V0.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
IBM-APPLE-MAC PROG. $5-$20/disc.
Academy Software. #17-712 Robson St.
681-4184.
ONE-WAY FLIGHT - Vancouver to Toronto
leaving April 30. $150. Call Mike at
224-9431.
10 SP. BICYCLE with fenders, men's 23"
frame — good condition. $100 obo.
875-8549.
PREGNANT?? 731-1122
-free tests - confidential help 731-1122.
MOTHER OF 1 CHILD available to babysit
evenings or days, my home. Also avail, thru
May to Oct. Refs. 876-7775.
SPEAKEASY has pamphlets and posters
on bus routes, health, movies, campus
events . . . drop by SUB Concourse.
YOUR PARTIES got no hum to their
drums? Pick up the beat by calling
228-3017. CITR mobile sound delivers the
best dance music & rock 'n roll cheap.
75 - WANTED
20 - HOUSING
ARE YOU LOOKING for a quiet rural summer retreat? Consider: delightful cottage,
all amenities, on 50 acre hobby farm, 30
miles north of Kamloops. $60/month; occassional caretaking duties. Available June
to Oct. May consider monthly renter also.
Ph. 1-672-5540.
EARN EXTRA INCOME!
Self motivated individuals required to assist
in developing our expanding fashion
hosiery business. Excellent commissions &
bonuses. Phone 432-7957.
80 - TUTORING
30 - JOBS
m
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
SUPPLIES TO ALL MAKES
VISA
1553 W. BROADWAY
(1/2 Block off Granville)
731-5295
HOURS:
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
SUMMER JOB TREE PLANTING.
Nomadic Silviculture is hiring for this summer. May 1-July 1 and Aug. 1-30. Camp
and Cooks, Avg. price 12c/tree. Experience
preferred. Ph. 733-6975.
"NANNIES" temp. pos. available 2-5 mos.
Call for info. Greater Vancouver Nanny
Network, 273-7222.
SUMMER PAINTING: Male & female
enthusiastic, pleasant personality, will train,
must have car. $5-7/hr. Ph. Drew,
732-6292, 5-7 p.m.
SUMMER WORK: Make $2000/month.
Call for interview, info, at 926-5651.
TUTORING IN
ENGLISH
Private Assistance for students
at all levels.
W.S
Parker, B.A.. M.A.
733-4534
85 - TYPING
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
Alf work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333       Ihrs. 9-4:30 p.m.I
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years ex
perience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD    WEAVERS Word    Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew Si. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for ail your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U El- Del. on
campus. Stud, rates. Mastercard/Visa.
985-4250.
WORDSWORTH wordprocessing. Hardware: IBM. Software: WordPerfect. Call
Kerry Rigby. 876-2895. 12th & Commercial.
ACCENT word processing / translation
French - English - Italian — $18/hr. Del. on
campus. 536-7172/536-9214.
YEARAROUND EXPERT essay, theses
typing from legible wk. Spelling/grammar
corrected. 738-7829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. King
Ed. bus route.
TYPING — Fast, accurate — reasonable
rates, MacDonald Ef4th location. 734-8451.
NETWORD   ENTERPRISES   INC.   GUILD
of professional writers, editors & proofers
for your: manuscripts, theses, scientific/technical reports, proposals, papers,
etc., working in unison with the latest IBM
WORD PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY
AND LASER PRINTING. 689-9931 after
hrs., wkeds. 688-5211.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reason
able rates. 261-2337.
WORD PROCESSING IBM essays, letters,
term papers, days, eves., wkends. Phone
872-3263.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reason
able rates. Call Gail, 732-8311 or 266-2879.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Electronic typing
25 yrs. exp. Theses, mscpts., reports,
resumes, statisticl. 271-6755 Richmond.
THE BLUE PARROT Cappuccino Bar in
Granville Island Public Mkt. is looking for
employees for possible summer or part-time
work. Students who are returning to UBC
next Sept. are invited to send resumes to:
1689 Johnston St., Box 108, Vane, B.C.
V6R
WORD PROCESSING, TYPING. Special
rates for student. Terra Business Service,
731 9273 or 732-6653.
SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resumes,
mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wkends.
731-1252.
GET RESULTS
IN THE
UBYSSEY —*
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Cuts confusing
From page 1
now. Matysiak noted the cutbacks
are not directed specifically at
Speakeasy but at other organizations which have not accounted for
AMS money.
Leonard Kwan, treasurer of
Volunteer Connections, said if his
organization is forced to make the
cut, they will have to make cuts in
advertisements, which is the
organization's main medium of attracting potential volunteers. Kwan
said that with student enrollment on
the rise, service organizations
should not have to make the cuts.
Stephen Wisenthal, co-editor of
The Ubyssey, was reluctant to commit his approval to the budget cuts.
"1 agree with the form of the
budget because it encourages
organizations to justify their spending," but he added that "he (Collins) could have avoided a lot of
confusion among the organizations
by making it clear from the outset
that the purpose of the budget cuts
was to make organizations more accountable to AMS, rather than saying it was a 20 per cent cut."
Wisenthal added he only hoped
Collins does not decide to go
through with the cuts.
Course aids natives
CALGARY (CUP)—The
University of Calgary is offering an
18-month programme designed to
help adult natives qualify for
university entrance.
"We want to create people who
will be successful when they get to
university," said programme instructor Fern Thompson. "We
want to give them all the skills they
will need to be successful in basic
biology, math, chemistry and com
munications skills."
Thompson said native students
receive no special consideration
when they apply for university in
Alberta.
"They will have to compete for
entrance just like any other
student," Thompson said. "They'll
have to be good because no special
consideration will be made for
them. They'll have to do it
themselves."
UBC Thunderbird
Winter Sporrs Center
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus
228-6121
CASUAL
HOCKEY
April 7th 'til May 2nd
Mon.-Fri. Only —
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
$1.50 Per Hour
EVERYONE WELCOME
««*%
V
.*•
, ,.-•*«**:,
*
1 i^MII HIAWIUW tti—I »U»» >
>**s
PARKING AT
REAR
"To thank all our customers for
Iheir support in past years, we
.ire offering a once in a life
time
SALE
20% OFF
ALL NEW
SPRING
MERCHANDISE
"Limited Time Offer
Cnda c£. cSasfiicm
YOUR NATURAL FIBRE FASHION SHOP
4325 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver, B.C. 228-1214
OPEN DAILY 10-6, THURS.-FRI. 10-9, SUNDAYS 12-5
OPEN GOOD FRIDAY 10-6, EASTER SUNDAY 12-5
Mi«KHJa8ritew^frim'«wM^^ cmi^tt^fewoiSgv»ih'«it##^
il*/M«OTtQ#<*«tw*dMM^.towsf   --   - - -
H»w corrupt thofcliilium. tfrnHH)iBli« »pai
K> M, mAM ttciMy mwmjjNs *» China* Ma.
Illllll.lHlllillll „  1,111.
frufli-fifitiHwiL w&l
o^^fe«hn»^ii»tjfo*lifr«
at Supreme
500
FREE
MEMBERSHIPS
After finals
re-energize at
the Supreme Court!
The first 250 men &
women UBC students
(19 & over) presenting
positive I.D. will
receive two week
no obligation
trial memberships
absolutely free!
SUPREME COURT
1114 ALBERNI ST. at Thuriow
SUPREME COURT
RACQUETBALL
"The fastest track
to fitness!"
The Complete Exercise
a> Outstanding cardio vascular exercise
a> Burn up 12 calories per minute
a> Improves hand-eye coordination •
motor muscular skills
a> High intensity — generates a long lasting fitness high
+ Improves flexibility * agility
a> Improves body definition
a> A very fast workout
a> Easiest Racket Sport to learn
FREE ^$fV
V„^.?>^as
K<*Z
FREE LESSONS & LICENSED LOUNGE TOO!
CALL
NOW
669-CLUB ■^BHBBHBBjF
Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 25, 1986
• ••••••••••••••••••"A-******
**   AMS CONCERTS presents * *
**     * J
J J      this is it dance       it
+ + with + *
Council faces axe
By PETER KUITENBROUWER
FREDERICTON (CUP) — The
president of the University of New
Brunswick says his administration
may refuse to collect student fees
next fall as a means of destroying a
student council it thinks has gone
too far.
Without fees, the council would
have no operating budget.
In retaliation, the council is planning to go to the New Brunswick
legislature next month with proposed amendments to the UNB Act,
which governs the province's largest
educational institution. The
students want the 10 board of
governors members currently appointed by the provincial legislature
to be elected directly by New
Brunswick voters.
The controversy pits UNB president James Downey, the suave,
soft-spoken public relation man's
dream, against John Bosnitch —
abrasive, unrelenting, and intensely
political.
The final battle this spring between the two men could have far-
reaching implications for student
power across Canada.
During the summer of 1984, the
student union building board called
for open tenders on all the stores in
the building, and accepted bids
from students to take over the
businesses.
The council also set up a convenience store to compete with the
privately run store.
In a series of swift moves 18 months ago, the UNB administration
siezed control of the building, closed down the store, abolished the
SUB board, and took over control
of bar services. Shortly after that,
Bosnitch was trounced in council
elections.
The UNB administration restructured the SUB board, taking away
its decision-making power. Now the
board simply advises the UNB
board of governors, which has the
final say.
Bosnitch wants control of the
building back, and argues that as
student money was used to build the
SUB, subject to an oral agreement,
students could run it.
Downey disagrees. "The SUB is
owned by the Board of
Governors," he said. "Mr.
Bosnitch creates fiction."
Downey said he refuses to give
control of the building to Bosnitch
and those around him because they
have proved themselves incompetent.
Although the university has collected student fees since 1939, the
council has no legal guarantee this
will continue. Bosnitch has a three-
step plan for survival: sign a contract with the administration for fee
collection, strike a campus
buildings committee of students to
take back control of the space, and
gain student support through a
massive school-wide public relations campaign.
At the last meeting, the council
agreed that every councillor must
wear a gold pin with their last name
and position. Photos of the councillors with home phone numbers
will be posted all over the university. The council will hold an open
forum for all students once a
month.
The council also bought four new
photocopiers for students, which
offer the best quality copies on
campus at the cheapest price — five
cents each.
Also to rally students, the council
has pulled its money, up to
$310,000, out of the Bank of Montreal because of that bank's heavy
investments in South Africa, and
has ordered all campus clubs to do
the same.
Downey claims Bosnitch has lost
support of the community and of
students. But Tony English, the
council vice-president academic,
who ran for election independent of
Bosnich, said he and many others
have come to see that they have to
stick together for student rights.
"If students want to take control
of their own affairs, that seems
reasonable providing they take the
financial and administrative accountability that goes with it," said
Alan Sharp, a physics professor and
the head of the Association of
University of New Brunswick
Teachers.
Neil McGill, a philosophy professor and for 25 years at UNB resident fellow at the university's
Bridges House, said "the administration does have a slight
tendency to take things over," mentioning the takeover of the school's
faculty club three years ago.
But McGill also criticized
Bosnitch's style. "He tends to
politicize everything . . . and get
directly involved with everything
himself," he said.
Bosnitch thinks if he can
galvanize student support and
"short-circuit the power of the
board (of governors)," students
will be on their way to new power
over the facilities their money supports.
However students may lose
everything. "University years are a
glorious time for students to get involved in politics.
"But," Downey said, "the
primary purpose of students in the
university is to pursue an education.
Occasionally some students think
Senate and the council are some
kind of model parliament.
CHILLIWACK
plus guests VERTIGO
This Easter Saturday
Sat. March 29, 8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Tix: $4 Advance, AMS Box Office
$6 at Door, no minors please
3
WATCH FOR UPCOMING EASTER CONTEST
•••••*•••••••••*•••••*••*
*t
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
736-7516
The GM Graduate Program. A money-saving way
for you to drive a great GM vehicle.
Graduating this year? Congratulations!
If you haven't yet received details of the GM       Assuming you meet some simple requirements,
Graduate Program, phone this toll-free
number. It could save you hundreds of dollars,   we 'd like to help you take advantage of the
CALL NOW:
1-800-268-1121
GM Graduate Program which applies to
buying or leasing a new GM vehicle. For full
details, call the toll-free number today.
Now that you've graduated, graduate to GM.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127459/manifest

Comment

Related Items