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The Ubyssey Nov 1, 1983

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Array u****"-8"*4'*
Vol. LXVI, No. 15
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 1,1983
228-2301
Job action to shut down campus
By HOLLY NATHAN
Campus unions will "definitely"
not shutdown university operations
completely this week, an unofficial
B.C. Government Employees
Union spokesperson said Monday.
But the university will virtually
close if campus employees join
province wide action Nov. 8 in the
proposed second stage of Operation
Solidarity's escalating job action.
Government operations including
the firehall, land, parks and housing offices, the forestry ministry
and fish and wildlife research facility, will be picketed today.
But all unions on campus are
meeting today to develop a strategy
and determine support for BCGEU
pickets.
"If picket lines are up, we're
honoring them," said a member of
the Association of University and
College Employees after meeting
with union members. But she said
members were faced with a difficult
decision.
"People don't want to go on
strike because they can't afford it;
but if we let the government do this
then we lose everything," she said.
A representative of AUCE said
the union supports Operation
Solidarity and will join in its job action plan on Nov. 8.
Canadian Union of Public
Employees representatives were
unavailable for comment.
Gary Kroker, International
Union of Operating Engineers
member, said he feels Bill 3 — The
Public Sector Restraint Act extends
beyond organized labor and affects
"everybody in the whole
province."
"Any dispute creates economic
hardship but the majority of B.C.
people are open enough to read the
writing on the walls and come out in
support of their neighbour," he
said. Kroker indicated the union
will honor BCGEU picket lines and
support a general strike.
The teachers assistance union are
not obliged to honor BCGEU
picket lines, said union member
Horacio de la Cueva.
"People will still be thinking
about what it means to support the
BCGEU," he said but added union
members he had spoken to will
respect the pickets.
If the strike escalates and the
government invokes back to work
legislation and the Essential Services Act, the B.C. Federation of
Labour intends to disobey the order
— a stance it has taken since 1977.
"Should the legislation be invoked and our union leaders thrown in
jail, the private sector has indicated
to us that it will come out 100 per
cent in support of the public
sector," said a BCGEU member.
alar oHjum photo
Students supporting strike to retain course credits
It appears students refusing to
cross picket lines if they are set up
on campus will not be penalized
academically, but the administration still has to formulate a policy
on the issue.
In interviews with faculty
members and the administration
Monday, a tentative picture emerged which illustrates the university's
willingness to respect students' right
not to cross picket lines and to
make allowances for missed
midterms and late papers.
Andrew Brockett, faculty
association executive officer, said
he doubts that any professors will
penalize students for missing important class time.
A UBC law professor who requested anonymity said he expects
the university to be "fairly
generous" in allowing students to
take supplemental exams in place of
missed midterms and to hand late
term papers.
"I can't see faculty really hammering a student because he or she
failed to cross a picket line. I can't
see professors deprive a student a
course credit in those circumstances," he said.
And a student would probably be
granted a "reasonable concession"
if he or she appealed a professor's
decision to deny an academic credit,
he added.
"It would be recognized that the
student acted out as a matter of
conscience."
Vice-provost Neil Risebrough
said professors could easily
schedule a midterm a week after a
strike or could disregard the exam
entirely. "But if the strike lasts for
three weeks, students are really
behind the eight ball."
The administration currently has
a policy of granting faculty
members the right to choose
whether or not to cross picket lines,
he said. An administration memo
dated Oct. 27 stated that professors
refusing to cross picket lines will
not be paid for the period during
which services are withheld, even if
they reschedule ro relocate their
classes.
See page 2: ADMIN
Selkirk faculty cross union picket lines
Students risk penalties
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students
who miss classes, skip exams or fail
to hand in papers during a strike
may be penalized by their professors.
McGill students were told this
during a recent strike support
meeting while maintenance staff
picketed outside.
The University Senate, during a
1980 strike, endorsed the students'
right to boycott classes without being penalized. Now, the administration says there is no written policy
to protect students.
Academic vice-president Samuel
Freedman backed up his statement
before the support meeting with a
letter to Students' Society president
Bruce Hicks, confirming students
have no guaranteed rights of this
kind.
CASTLEGAR (CUP) — Selkirk
college faculty returned to their
classrooms Monday despite a continuing strike by support staff which
closed several campuses in the West
Kootenays a week ago.
The Faculty association at a
meeting Sunday voted 60 per cent to
return to work, because negotiations had resumed between the administration and the Pulp, Paper
and Woodworkers of Canada, local
26.
"We felt the general intent was to
force people back to the bargaining
table," faculty association president Gordon Gibson said. "We felt
that had been done by our withdrawal of services."
Gibson said faculty did not want
to stay out for the duration of the
strike because students would be
adversely affected. He added some
faculty felt pressure could be ap
plied to both sides from within the
college as well as outside to resolve
the dispute.
Most faculty members have
returned to classes — "except for
the odd instructor," said student
society president Ramone
Hagemeyer said.
"Instructors are around. The majority are. Some won't cross until
the pickets come down.
"I don't think their students will
be able to catch up," said
Hagemeyer.
"For students it's a real pain.
They pay for an education and
they're not getting it," she said.
The PPWC went on strike at
Selkirk Oct. 25 over job security
and contracting out. The union
wants the college to guarantee it
won't lay off workers under the
Social Credit government's Public
Sector Restraint Act and will not
give union work to outside contractors.
The day before the strike students
occupied the college's Castlegar
campus to demonstrate they want
classes instead of a strike. They left
the campus Thursday when negotiations resumed.
Both students and faculty say
they'll resume action if negotiations
break down again.
Students and faculty have taken a
"neutral" stand in the dispute.
The administration says the college is bound by the government
restraint program.
"Right now we are dealing with a
certain kind of government whether
we agree with it or not," said college principal Leo Perra, Oct. 20.
The union has been without a
contract since December, 1982. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 1,1983
Admin to decide on
From page 1
"The university will take every
reasonable measure to stay open,"
it says.
Risebrough said the administration should attempt to have an
equal policy for both students and
faculty. "I imagine if you have a
policy giving faculty freedom of
choice, then you have to apply that
to students too," he said.
But he added he is uncertain what
policy the administration will
decide upon, although it will decide
before Nov. 8, the day when university unions plan to join Operation
Solidarity's escalating job action
against the Social Credit budget
legislation.
A random Ubyssey survey shows
that UBC students are likely to
cross picket lines if they are set up
on campus. Ten students out of a
total of 15 interviewed said they
would definitely cross, three said
they definitely wouldn't and two
said they might depending on the
circumstances.
Most of the students who said
they would not respect picket lines
expressed fear of losing class time
or disagreed wih the demands of
several unions affected by the
budget legislation.
"I don't want anyone fooling
around with my education," said
Mark East, arts 2. "I'm not impressed with the unions' motives or
ideals," said Ralph English,
engineering 2.
But students who said they would
honor picket lines sympathized with
Operation Solidarity and
-understood the unions' demands.
"I believe the rights of unions
should be fought for," said an arts
3 student who requested anonymity.
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All the chill
ft
bread you can eat
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on Broadway
2716 W. Broadway
732-9717
Mens' & Ladies Fashions
A SUMMER IN OTTAWA
MVIRSIl Y OF OTTAWA 198 i I NDLKGKADl A I L SI MM IK KINFARCH SCHOLARSHIPS
For students who foresee a career in research, the Summer Research Scholarships will provide
research experience with leading Canadian scientific investigators in one of the fields listed
below.
VAM'1-:   Sl.J(M)   ; minimunn   month.   Travel   allow- PARTICIPATING   DEPARTMENTS
aiue
Anatomy Geography  (physical:
DI'RATION:     i   I   months    i May-August i    19K t Biochemistry             Hieolo^y
Reasonable on-campus accommodation biology                           Kinanthropolo^y
Chemistry Mathematics
REQUIREMENTS:   Canadian   or   permanent   resi- Computer Science      Microbiology
dent      Permanent    add res,    outside    ot    immediate ENGINEERING      'Pharmacology
Ottawa   Hull    area    < Ottawa Thill    residents    should Chemical                     Physic*
apply tor a summer award, such as NSERC, which is Civil                              Physiology
tenable   at    the    University   ot   Ottawa)- Eu ll-time Electrical
under^raduare   students   with   excellent   standing; Mechanical
priority ^iven to   srd year students  (2nd year in the
Province of Quebec I
Psychology   < experimental)
Systems Science
*  Cannot  participate  in   198-1
Forward the required information together with your most recent and complete university transcript before November 15, 198^ to the address below. Also request a reference from one professor
sent to the same address by November   I*),   1983-
198-1 Summer Research Scholarships, School of Graduate Studies and  Research,
University of Ottawa. Ottawa. Ont. KIN  6N5 Tel:  16M) 2sl-58()-l
APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
Name	
Mailing Address
city                   province           postal code        Tel.  (Area)
Permanent Address  	
city province postal code        Tel.  (Area)
Currently enrolled  in   _______
Research field of interest   -
(Attach a brief description)
department
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
Tues. Nov. 1    FREE SALAMI LUNCH - 12:30 p.m.
sponsored by B'nai B'rith Women
Wed. Nov. 2   "Rap with the Rabbi" - 12:30 p.m.
Lunch Available
Thurs. Nov. 3 Network Seminar — 12:30 p.m. — with
guest Mrs. Esther Nobleman, Head of
Vancouver Soviet Jewry Task Force
Topic: "Recent Case Histories of Soviet
Dissidents" — Lunch available.
Sat. Nov. 5     NUTS AND BOLTS PARTY - begins at
 9:00 p.m. at Hillel — cover charge — $1.00
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 50% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
GET A FREE TACO
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF A TACO
TACOV)
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
2028 W. 41st Street, Kerrisdale
Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square Food Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(CLOSED SUNDAYS)
This coupon is good for a
FREE TACO
with the purchase of a Taco
COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED.
One offer per person.
EXPIRES NOV. 13th
I I Tuesday, November 1,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Playboy mocks nurses' concerns
A group of UBC nurses fail to see
how posing in the nude, wearing
high-cut aerobic exercise suits or lying coyly in a bed of grass will help
their profession gain respect.
So 150 students in the fourth year
class plan to protest Playboy
magazine's November cover story.
The nurses sent a letter to
Playboy's advertisers, The
Ubyssey, to the Sun, the Province
and various nursing associations..
"As university students, we are
trying to better state the image of
nursing as a profession," said Sue
Roberts, fourth year class president. "Playboy's article is a perfect
example of stereotyping and it may
contribute to general ignorance of
what nurses really do."
The Playboy article says nurses
are vocal in their demand for more
'Revulsive' profs
welcome to teach
Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie
and former Ugandan prime
minister Idi Amin could be hired to
teach at UBC if they were
academically qualified, a UBC professor said Friday.
Universities should engage in the
"pure pursuit, of knowledge" and
not concern itself with the morality
of its professors, said political
science professor Bob Jackson during a debate on ethics and political
science held in the Buchanan penthouse.
Speaker Phil Resnick charged
that a number of UBC political
science professors were guilty of
"immoral if not amoral behavior."
He was outraged that his colleagues, including professor David
Elkins, had collaberated in the hiring last summer of Polish intellectual Jerzy Wiatr.
Wiatr's appointment to teach two
political science courses prompted
protests led by the UBC Solidarity
Study group. A picket line was conducted outside his first class, and an
information evening on academic
repression in Poland was held.
Educational
Masturbation
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Revenue
Canada and the University of
Manitoba have different views on
male masturbation.
The Winnipeg Free Press
reported last week that an
American made film on male
masturbation, bound for the
university's medical school, was
seized by Revenue Canada.
Revenue Canada's Customs
branch classified the film as "immoral and indecent."
But a Winnipeg judge has
ordered that the film be turned over
to the medical school because it will
be used "for perfectly commendable moral and educational purpose, used in impeccable surroundings, with impeccable motives,"
he said.
"Wiatr is not seen in a flattering
light in Europe. He is seen as an
academic pimp who would sell his
own mother," Resnick said to 18
people attending the debate.
"Personal friendship perhaps
allowed (the department) to ignore
the moral and political implications
(of hiring Wiatr)," he charged.
But professor Jean LaPonce
defended Wiatr's appointment to
UBC.
"Wiatr is an outstanding scholar,
and a very good friend of 15
years," he said.
LaPonce outlined Wiatr's controversial political history, noting
that Wiatr supported the 1968 student movement and opposed the
Gierek regime in Poland.
"Wiatr was always opposed to
Solidarity because he believed
liberalization was possible in
Poland only from above, not from
below," he said.
"The Hungarian model was the
only possibility for change in
Poland according to Wiatr," added
LaPonce.
Political science graduate student
Bill Tieleman supported Resnick's
claim that Wiatr was a "high profile
defender of academic repression."
"Our objection was that Wiatr
left the academic community to join
the government as head of the
Marxist-Leninist institute which
falls under the direct control of the
Polish central committee," said
Tieleman, who is also a member of
the UBC Solidarity study group.
"Wiatr can't claim academic impartiality as an excuse for his
political actions. Wiatr has to take
responsibility for his government's
actions," he said.
Resnick added: "We should
think twice before inviting scoundrels like Wiatr to UBC. There are
thousands of other Polish intellectuals more deserving of our lavish
hospitality.
"We should make explicit our
present implicit criteria of political
acceptability and use that in
deciding on invitations of politically
revulsive academics," concluded
Resnick.
Plans for our body
This is nursing week and the Nursing Undergraduate Society has
vigorous activities planned for the student body.
Monday at the Health Fair, participants measured heart rate,
blood pressure and lung capacity. After the measurement of vital
statistics nurses gave handy health hints. Other information booths
dealt with spiritual health, sexual health, drugs and alcohol, ears and
eyes, blood, nutrition, stress and exercise. There was also a booth on
nursing education.
Today NUS hosts a lecture about their chosen charity, muscular
dystrophy at 12 noon in IRC.
Later there is a Pit Purge with the cover charge donated to MD.
The theme is heakh and people are invited to dress up as health professionals or joggers. Prizes will be offered for best costume.
Wednesday is the third annual Interfaculty Bowling Tournament
in the SUB games room from 7-11 p.m. Teams of five are required to
play.
The T-Cup football game between home economics and nursing
starts Thursday noon at Mclnnis field.
Nursing week finishes with the Intramurals fun run at noon Friday
by the flagpoles near SUB and the Nursing Week dance featuring
The David Raven Band in the SUB ballroom at 7:30 p.m.
respect and less stereotyping but the
UBC group objects to Playboy's
methods.
"I have mixed feelings about the
article. It did bring out a lot of good
points. If we took away the pictures, would we disagree with it as
much as we do?" said Jacquelynn
McGuiness, nursing 4.
Playboy also briefly deals with
the   "stressful   and   demanding"
nature of the profession. They cite
dealing with death, being attacked
by the patient, and the existing sexual tension between doctors and
nurses as the main examples of
stress.
But the UBC nursing students say
those elements are not the most important causes of stress.
The letter states, "Many times
the stress experienced by a nurse is a
— nail luconM photo
PETER PUMPKIN protests proposed plight politely at rally on SUB plaza.
"This is the pits," pumpkin was heard to exclaim before being hauled off
by subversive-looking person. Pumpkin was made to be unwanted participant in annual pagan ritual of demonic worship and stuffing one's face
with candy.
Uncle Sam burns again
By SARAH COX
Protestors draped a blood splattered and torn American flag over a
pedestal at Robson Square Saturday as hundreds of people gathered
in opposition to the U.S. invasion
of Grenada.
They waved placards calling for
U.S. troops to withdraw from the
tiny island, and chanted "Forward
ever, backward never" — a slogan
of Grenada since the bloodless 1979
revolution led by Maurice Bishop.
Speaker Phillipe Ortez told the
cheering crowd that Grenadians as
well as Cubans would continue to
resist the invasion.
"I'm sure that (U.S. president)
Reagan thought he would just walk
in, knock out a few people, and go
back a hero to win the next
election," he said.
"But the Grenadian people, with
the same courage and dedication
they used to construct a just society,
have resisted the invaders."
Another speaker reminded the
crowd that during Bishop's four
years in power, Grenadian
unemployment decreased to 12 per
cent from 49 per cent, health care
and education were made accessible,
for everyone, and the island's
economic growth rate topped that of
neighbouring Caribbean countries.
The U.S. has no right to determine the future direction of
Grenada, said Ortez.
"We want self determination for
these people."
Leighton James, from Dominca,
echoed Ortez's statements and said
Americans should not "transport
their type of democracy" to countries "where people dare to fight for
a new way of life."
"The Reagan administration has
decided to become the policeman of
the world."
The invasion of Grenada could
lead to other invasions and a confrontation between the superpowers, James warned.
"A police action in Grenada, or
Nicaragua, or the Middle East can
quickly lead to something much
larger. All the world wars were
started by invasions."
The demonstration ended with
the crowd singing along with a lively
musician.
Earlier, a man wearing a skull
mask with parts of dolls hanging
from his neck and a woman in a
Hallowe'en mask burned the
American flag while a few people
cheered in support.
result of the lack of control . . .
that is why we as nurses are striving
to achieve unity as a group."
The nursing students also objected to Playboy's concentration
on the physical beauty of nurses
and the overt sexist message contained in the article.
Playboy says: "that (nurses are)
beautiful is almost secondary once
you get to know them. But the fact
is that they are. And they don't
mind you knowing it."
Cruise camp
still strong
Despite frequent arrests, women
from the Greenham Common peace
camp in England continue to protest
the impending deployment of cruise
missiles at a nearby U.S. air force'
base, a camp member said Friday.
Aggie Jakubska, who lived at the
camp for nine months, told 20 people in SUB Auditorium that the
women participate in non-violent
actions against the base, which is
near London.
This includes the occupation of a
guard box at the base's main gate
for an hour, pushing baby carriages
containing the tombstones of
Japanese babies killed during the
Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings,
planting flower bulbs in rows to
spell PEACE, dancing on top of
one of the.concrete missile silos to
celebrate New Year's day, and painting on the sides of costly spy planes.
The biggest protest to date drew
30,000 women who linked hands
and completely circled the base's
nine mile fence last Dec. 12, she
said.
"We had enough women out to
encircle the base three times
around." The protest culminated
when 6,000 women blockaded the
base, Jakubska said.
Charges for the actions ranged
from vandalism to blocking the
road — punishable by five to 12
years in prison, she said. Imprisonment is generally preferred because
of the publicity involved, she added.
Monika Grunberg, who is on a
cross Canada tour with Jakubska,
told the audience about a woman's
peace camp in Cole Bay, Sask.,
which borders on a 1.6 million acre
nuclear testing range.
The range is partially responsible
for local high unemployment
because hunters and fishermen who
once depended on the area for their
livelihoods are now only permitted
to enter it twice a year, said
Grunberg, who visited the camp last
summer as a member of Women
Gathering Against the Cruise.
Eight women, including native
women, are currently living at the
camp, which is about seven miles
from the range, Grunberg said.
Sky's the limit at SFU
Simon Fraser University students
may pay $2,000 per semester in tuition fees in the next three to five
years, according to SFU's administration president.
William Sayweil said tuition fees
must be increased significantly to
compensate for the next year's proposed five per cent decrease in
university funding. The provincial
government has warned that SFU
will receive about $3.5 million less
in funding, he said.
He said he regrets increasing fees.
"However, I have always maintained that it is reasonable over a period
of time to move student tuition up
to a higher proportion to cover true
costs of education," Sayweil said.
An 18 to 25 per cent tuition fee
increase could be implemented as
early as the 1984 summer semester.
The new fee proposal will also
raise the percentage of university
operating costs that fees currently
cover from 11 to 20 to 25 per cent.
Sayweil said fees for foreign
students in the 1984 fall semester
will be ..5 per cent more than regular
tuition fees. He claimed implementing differential fees is a viable solution to SFU's financial crisis.
"It is responsible and morally acceptable to have those students who
are not through normal structures
of income tax paying for the large
subsidy the governments have put
into universities, (paying) a larger
share of the true costs," he said.
At UBC, administration president George Pedersen said differential fees may also be imposed soon.
"But my own preference would be
that there not be an increase for
foreign students," he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 1,1983
About — Face
In the wake of a massive strike that threatens to shutdown the province, UBC administrators seem to be losing sight of the reasons for the
escalating job action.
A memo from administration president George Pedersen clearly
outlines the university's policy in event of picket lines on campus:
"rescheduling or relocation of classes by professors is not acceptable." It
adds that faculty members or employees who choose to honor picket lines
will not be paid while off the job.
The message conveyed by this stern warning is obvious — cross-
picket lines or be penalized. This is a far cry from the stand taken by university officials in the past few months against the Social Credit government's
budget.
Pedersen himself slammed the provincial government for its attack on
tenure and its failure to pass on an eight per cent increase in federal funding for universities.
On T.V., radio and in newspapers, he repeatedly criticised the
Socreds' shortsightedness in education policy and universities minister Pat
McGeer's callous and contradictory attitude towards higher education.
But when given the chance to take concrete action against the
Socreds, he does an about-face. He hypocritically hands out a memo that
discourages professors from not crossing picket lines and developing any
alternative strategy.
The sad thing about his statement is that he is doing something the
Socreds would do — discourage the workers from sympathizing with other
workers and thus splitting support.
Instead Pedersen and the powers that be should display some
understanding and sensitivity towards the unions fighting against Bill 3 and
the other contentious bills. The administration should encourage professors to honor picket lines and to hold classes in their basements if need
be.
And it should be on the front lines with campus workers, leaf letting,
picketing and urging students not to cross.
The likes of Pedersen, vice president academic Robert Smith and the
other vice presidents on the picket lines would bolster support incredibly.
Sure, it's not as comfortable as their spacious presidential offices, but they
should keep in mind those little luxuries may be on the cutting board when
the five per cent decrease in university funding takes effect.
So we urge Pedersen to retract his statement that the administration
will "take every reasonable measure to remain open" and to come up with
plans to take an active role in fighting the Socred's draconian budget.
'Think man, think'
In regard to Holly Nathan's objective front page article (The Sun
eclipses rally coverage, Oct. 28), I
am worried about Roger Boshier.
He thinks the Sun has "... been
on the side of . . . big government
for decades." The Socreds are trying to rationalize big government. If
the Sun were supporting big government they wouldn't have run the
story at all. Universities traditionally house rather vocal (albeit often
naive) pro-socialists. Having always
been provided for, most are not yet
fully autonomous.
Boshier seems unaware that only
300 (100 objectors) of 27,000 (1.1
per cent) students were concerned
enough to participate. He should be
thankful it didn't hit the front page.
Poor Socred marketing aside, I
think most people appreciate the
value of purging a few parasites occasionally. There are weeks
MacMillan-Bloedel fluctuates many
times 1,600 employees.
It is ironic the affected (and
other) B.C. unionists chose to name
themselves after a movement struggling to dismantle big government,
a lifetime of oppression and
mediocrity. Perhaps Boshier can
enlighten   us   on   the  gains   from
political affiliation. I am encouraged he is '.. . still thinking about
how far to go with this.' Think
man, think.
Doug Reid
arts 3
Inaccuracies?
I was astonished, to say the least,
to read in an article written by Alar
OUjum (Strike jeopardizes academic
year, Oct. 25) some totally inaccurate information. He stated that
Stephen Howard was on the Canadian Federation of Students-Pacific
Region executive, and that CFS advocated occupations of MLA's offices.
Stephen Howard, of SFU, is not
on the executive of the Pacific
Region, and though he is a member
of the Federation, as is every student at SFU, he does not speak for
CFS. In addition, the Federation
does not advocate occupations.
Stephen Learey
CFS — Pacific Region Chair
Staff note: Steve Howard is not on
the CFS executive, but he speaks
as the elected representative of
CFS Lower Mainland Caucus to the
Solidarity coalition.
r
\^
THE UBYSSEY
November 1, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Editor-in-chief: H. Raymond Duke. News/religion editor: Muriel Draaisma. Western News
jazz editor: Chris Wong. Layout/design editor: Sarah Cox-Albany. Contributing editors:
Peter Berlin (sports), Monte Stewart (CITR sports commentator), Neil Lucente
(photography), Victor Wong (special naval correspondent), Robby Robertson (special China
correspondent), Arnold Hedstrom (national affairs desk), Patti Flather (tabor), Stephen
Wisenthal (advice to the lovelorn), Ketley Jo Burke (North Shore news correspondent). Additional contributors: Alar Olljum (gardening), Sarah Miltin (tobacco critic), Charlie Fidelman
(gender ambiguities commentator), Hotly Nathan (motoring), Tannis Sawkin* (Wimbledon
correspondent) Betsy Goldberg (no job but a nice person anyway).
There. Now you know who to blame for this issue.
//^^^U»%C
"You must admit, sir, we did sort of set the precedent ..."
Students: support strike!
By F. IAN WENIGER
The new Socred budget, as you
may have heard, severely affects
B.C.'s higher education system.
Student loans are being cut by forty
per cent and eligibility for these
loans has been narrowed so that
fewer students will get loans and the
loans will be smaller than usual for
the lucky ones.
The job security of all university
and college employees is also
threatened. This means fewer
courses will be offered next year,
classes will be larger, and there will
be reduced service at cafeterias,
bookstores, sports complexes,
libraries, resource and counselling
centres and residences on campus,
not to mention the clerical and
maintenance services.
Also, entire departments at community colleges are to be eliminated
in favour of institutes of one concentrated faculty, thus forcing
students to either specialize in the
field offered in their community of
commute (HAH!) between other
colleges for a wider education.
Students at BCIT and other colleges are especially being hit by the
budget with respect to direct cutbacks. Some staff members have
already received layoff notices at
Capilano College, while other
workers with student support at
Selkirk College have legally struck
for wage increases greater than the
final offers of three-tenths of a per
cent for the first year and three per
cent for the second year of the administration's "fair-minded" deal.
The Socred government seems to
be out not only to make higher
education a privilege for those rich
enough to afford it, but also to
make everyone's jobs tougher to get
and keep. The proposed budget
aims at the removal of one in four
government workers from their
posts and thus eliminates or cripples
"non-essential" services such as
medicare, the Rentalsman, and the
Human Rights Branch. Their
removal will be facilitated with excuses such as "insufficient
workloads", "organizational
changes within a department",
"discontinuation or reduction in
service", and the old favorite "just
cause".
Not only are government
workers' rights to their jobs being
directly attacked, but also the rights
of private sector workers to a proper line of defense for health care,
housing and human rights.
Employers and landlords can legally
discriminate in hiring, firing, advertising, rentals and eviction, and
doctors can more easily extra-bill
and leave medicare altogether.
The Socred budget is causing all
this as well as screwing up the
universities. Seems like we students
The Ballad of Bad Boy Bill
JABBER-TALKY
'Twas springtime with the slimy
Bill,
(A liar and nimble, by the way)
All flimsy were his promises:
"Restraint"; 'til election day.
Beware the Jabber-Talk, my son:
The claws that scratch, the jaws
that rip
Fifty bucks from deaf and dumb
Whilst Pouilly-Fuisse sip.
Bill took his closure forms in hand
To pass his legislation.
Dave said "Tis time to take a
stand!"
And was given a vacation.
Sir Bill was on a Socred mission,
No need for loss of Grace.
Where once there was a Rights
Commission
Now stands there B.C. Place.
Poor Bill, in right-wing thought he
stood
While renters wept; of help bereft.
Then Bill, he said "I'll do some
good"
And rights went out: stage left.
Bill 3, Bill 3; well now we see
These closure Bills will bring
restraint.
Because we've won, and the things
I've done,
I'll be a Friedman saint.
And now we have the Jabber-
Talk,
Our Bennett's now in power.
Now our elect, without respect
Worsen by the hour.
Duncan Stewart,
arts 2
will have a tougher time getting a
job in the summer that will pay
enough to get (back) into school in
the fall.
None of this restraint bullshit is
worth listening to. Two-thirds of
B.C.'s economy is based on consumer spending; if no one is spending now, how in the world in NOT
spending money going to help the
"recovery"? And another thing —
when was the last time Bill Bennett
asked you if he could use your tax
dollars and tuition fees to build
some ugly useless stadium and an
equally useless splashy disco rapid
transit system, or anything else the
Socreds have wasted money on? We
didn't make the decisions that
screwed up the economy, so why
should we pay for the mess that
Bennett and his cronies got us in
now? Restrain the Socreds, not our
social services!
So we come to the issue of the
general strike. A general strike is
not a malicious shutdown of the
province by money-grubbing
unions. A general strike is an
organized mass protest whereby
workers maintain basic services to
the public while demonstrating to
the government that B.C. can run
just as well without their repressive
programmes.
For we students, the general
strike means that UBC may be shut
down temporarily until the various
teachers', markers' and service
unions confer and reorganize to
keep UBC open for the duration.
With the imminent threat of
strikebreaking by the Socreds once
the strike is on, the unions will do
this fast.
Students should support the B.C.
general strike because it is the only
way the Socred will lay off and give
us an education we all deserve and
an atmosphere in which we can get
a decent job in the summer and
maybe even after graduation. If the
sleazeballs in Victoria bully us with
threats of annuling our credits during this term we have to go out and
stay with the strike until they give us
what we want and deserve.
Sure, we all have schoolwork this
week. But if we falter and wait now,
some of us won't have homework
or exams or any school next year.
Go for it! Know your enemy and
support the general strike!
F. Ian Weniger is a member of
the UBC International Socialists. Tuesday, November 1,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
^^s5<^?
M*~p
\*S^N
Sy^
Student nurses protest Playboy pictorial
Addressed to Playboy Magazine:
In response to your November
issue, Nurses are People, Too, and
Women in White out of Uniform,
we, a group of 150 concerned
nurses take this opportunity to express our views.
The implied intent of the article is
to promote a better understanding
of nurses in both a professional and
personal context. However, one is
appalled by the blatant discrepancy
between the professed goal of
educating the public and the effective result of distorting and
misrepresenting the image of
nurses. It is proposed that the article will clarify misconceptions: it is
ironic then, that the article serves to
reinforce those very misconceptions.
That nurses are trying to change
the stereotyped images perpetuated
by the media is acknowledged;
however, we fail to see how being
featured pictorially posing in the
nude, lying coyly in a bed of grass,
or wearing high-cut aerobic exercise
suits will aid us in our effort to
"gain more respect and less
stereotyping from the general
public and medical profession."
We believe that these goals can be
partially attained through an accurate media portrayal of the skills
and knowledge interest in the
nature of the profession.
As baccalaureate nurses we have
spent four years of our life in a
university setting, acquiring the
skills and knowledge that are needed  to  be competent  health  care
givers. Our education has equipped
us with skills related to assessment,
teaching, counselling and health
care program development. Our involvement in the health care system
is diverse: we function in hospital,
community and third world settings, we teach and carry out
research and we strive for higher
levels of competency through continual evaluation of our skills and
knowledge. The pictures of nurses
in the work setting featured in the
article were limited in perspective
and at best, superficial.
Another nursing concern superficially addressed is the "stressful
and demanding" nature of the profession. The three examples of
stress were; dealing with death, being attacked by a patient, and existing tension between nurses and
doctors. We acknowledge these
elements contributing to the stress
level; however, many times the
stress experienced by a nurse is a
result of the lack of control over
their professional role. That is why
^^   0S\n ^
Jfor2
from
3 to4
caki \ roiriii: $2.50
'per person)
mi n rv ,v mFFKf-: $1.25
fpt'r person I
or tea of course!
MONDAY   FRIDAY
(cif the back o/ the milage) "AfJl
S.U.B.
BALLROOM
$1.25/
CLASS
OR LESS
.."•Hra
■ ■ ^^^
MON. 3:34* Er 4:46*     WED. 3:45* ft 4:46*
TUES. 3:46* Er 4:46**    THURS. 3:46** Et 4:46*
•DYNA-FIT: TOTAL BODY AEROBIC WORKOUT
■BODY CLASS: NO AEROBIC, IMPROVE MUSCLE TONE. ETC.
The
Price
is Right
hair design ltd
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
When was the last time you
put out $7 °° for a professional
haircut and got change?
Basic cut 6.
we as nurses are striving to achieve
unity as a group and are defining
our roles within the health care
system. By taking action against
this gross misrepresentation, we
assert some control over our own
professional destiny.
Instead of delving into relevant
concerns and issues pertaining to
nursing today it appeared to be
more important, or rather, more
self-serving, to strip the women of
their "ironclad white" uniforms
and reveal their attractive womanly,
attributes. It was highly stressed
that "nurses are people, too"; we
commend you on your astute observation. That nurses are people is
hardly a matter of contention;
rather the pertinent/issue is the
definition and expansion of the
nurse's role within the health care
system. By focusing on such petty
and irrelevant concerns as nurses'
romantic involvement with doctors, you have managed to
disregard, as if in mockery, the relevant concerns of nurses today. The
views of this biased sampling of
"women in white" ranging from
technologist to practical nurse to
stunt women can lead to incorrect
inferences   about   professionally
committed nurses.
Although relevant issues within
nursing were not acknowledged, the
feature did showcase the physical
beauty of some attractive women.
This aesthetic presentation is congruent with the nature of
PLAYBOY material; however, to
present it under the guise of a
serious attempt to enlighten the
public about the nature of nurses
and nursing, is to undermine both
the validity of our professional concerns and our credibility as persons.
nursing undergraduate society
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1983 AUTUMN LECTURES
W.E. (Ted) HILLIS
Professor Hillis. chief research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization in Australia, has
earned an international reputation as an outstanding scientist and wood products specialist. His areas of expertise include the
chemistry and anatomy of wood, properties that influence the use of wood as a material and future demands for wood on an
international level. He has served as president of the International Academy of Wood Science, coordinator of the forest
products division of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations and founding chairman of the Australian Institute'
of Wood Science. His lectures should be of special interest to those in the fields of forestry, chemistry, botany and economics.
THE EFFICIENT USE OF THE WOOD RESOURCE
Tuesday, November 1 In Room 166, H.R. MacMillan Building, at 12:30 PM
FOREST PRODUCTS AND PEOPLE: Some Thoughts on USSR, China and Japan
Thursday, November 3 In Room 166, H.R. MacMillan Building, at 12:30 PM
THE IMPENDING CRISIS IN FORESTRY
Saturday, November 5 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 PM
(Vancouver Institute Lecture)
NOTE: Dr. Hillis will also present lectures to the forest industry
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
1 +
Public Service Commission     Commission de la Fonctlon
of Canada publlque du Canada
V
3621 W. 4th Avenue, Van., 733-3851
Supervisor
Student Employment Centre	
Canada Employment and Immigration Commission
British Columbia	
Are you a recent graduate?
Have you ever looked for summer employment?
You have something that interests us: your degree plus your desire to prove your abilities
as a program manager. You will be faced with the challenge of establishing and
administering a Canada Employment Centre For Students. Satisfaction will be derived
through:
- developing summer employment for students;
- your own management skills;
- your abilities in public relations.
You require recent completion of a degree from an accredited university or a
combination of two or more diplomas acquired through a Post Secondary Institution. On
your application you will have to demonstrate, through work experience including
volunteer work and/or practical studies, evidence of marketing and administrative work
involving public contact. Your knowledge of the local community will be an asset.
Knowledge of the English language is essential.
Your services will be required from January 1984 to August 1984.
The vacancies are most probably in Metro Vancouver (8 positions), Fraser Valley (6),
Okanagan (4), Kootenay (3), Vancouver Island (2), Prince George (1), and Terrace (1).
We offer a salary ranging from 21,767$ to 26,665$ per annum.
Forward your application and/or resume, quoting reference number
83-V-CEIC-043-MGT(2151) to:
Michelle Gagnon-Thomas (604) 666-1930
Public Service Commission of Canada
P.O. Box 10282
Vancouver, British Columbia V7Y 1E8	
Please apply before 18 November 1983.
Tout renseignement est disponible en francais en
s'adressanta lapersonne
ci-haut mentionnee.
Please quote the applicable reference number at all times.
The Public Service of Canada is
an equal opportunity employer
Canada Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 1, 1983
m
bieafi
TODAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khane, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212, all week.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice   aeasiona   every   noon   hour   except
Thursdays, SUB partyroom, all week.
HILLEL
Free salami lunch, noon, Hillel House.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free Legal Advice, noon, SUB 111.
NURSING WEEK
Muscular Dystrophy lecture, noon, IRC 4.
Pit purge, 7-11 p.m.. The Pit.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Guitar and sing along session, noon-2:30 p.m.,
SUB 235.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Fireside discussion:   Dr.   A.   Freeze,  faculty of
grad studies speaking on "financial support for
graduate students," 8 p.m., Fireside Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch. B221.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, everyone invited, noon, SUB
125.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on financing (MOTPI given by captain
Dennis McMahan, noon-1:30 p.m., IRC 1.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting.  12 p.m..  Lutheran Campus
Centre, 5885 University Boulevard, conference
room.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 3:30-4:30p.m., SUB 215.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General   meeting   and   ski   demonstration   by
Sigge's sports store, noon. Chem. 150.
FINE ARTS
Three film showings: Sex as art. "The Miracle of
Life," "Pas de Deux," Angel," (donation at
door), 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 p.m., Lassare 104.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature Table, 11-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class, all levels, noon, Asian Centre,
Chinese department lounge.
UBC SKI CLUB
General meeting, info, prizes and film, noon,
SUB 212.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Noon-hour ride, noon, meet north side of SUB.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE YOUTH CLUB
Social, 6 p.m.. SUB 212.
ROCKERS CO-OP
Mandatory meeting for all members,  discuss
social night (good news), revise constitution,
and   registration,   no  show,   no  membership,
noon, SUB 213.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Genera) meeting, noon, Chem. 150.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice sessions, noon, SUB Partyroom.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Khane, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Meeting to plan Friday's beer garden,  noon,
Buch. A205.
HILLEL
Rap with the Rabbi; lunch available, noon, Hillel
House.
UBYSSEY STAFF MEETING
Fun and games, kinky sex. tuum est, 3:30 SUB
241k.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Noon   celebration,    singing,   sharing,   short
teaching, Buch. A100.
BAHAI'I CLUB
General meeting, 12 p.m., SUB 211.
NURSING WEEK
Bowling tournament, 7-11  p.m., SUB Games
room.
THURSDAY
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Pizza nite, 4:30 p.m., SUB 212.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, everyone welcome,
noon, SUB 212A.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
IN SCRIPTURE (ACTS)
Discussion:' uniqueness of the bible,  part 2,
noon, EMAX 106.
SFU POLITICAL SCIENCE S.U.
Speech, by William Sayweil, SFU president,
"China: Ifs role against time, modernization and
industrialization," 11:30 a.m.. Images Theatre,
SFU.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Our  generation  against  nuclear  war,   Dmitri
Roussopoulos, author, noon, Hebb Theatre.
NURSING WEEK
T-Cup Football, Nursing vs. Home Ec, noon,
Mclnnes Field.
CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
Louis Riel's grandnephew speaking on Louis
Riel: fact or fiction, 8 to 9:30 p.m., Lassare 105.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Discussion group, noon, Buch. D362.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
General   meeting,   recycling   and  film,   noon,
Angus 223.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., SUB
215.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Book table, 11:30 a.m. to2 p.m., SUB main concourse.
EAST INDIA STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, everyone invited, noon, SUB
125.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Speaker Esther Nobleman, head of Vancouver
Soviet-Jewry task force on "recent case
histories of Soviet dissidents," lunch available,
noon, Hillel House.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Special council meeting on the provision of programs and services, all departments are encouraged to elect their representatives, 5:30
p.m.. Committee Room, Graduate Student
Center.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture on orthodontics, noon IRC 1.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Important general meeting, activities to be
discussed: convention, video nights, SUB 215.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, 11:30 a.m., SUB 212A.
Speaker-series meeting, parents and friends of
gays representative, all welcome, noon. Brock
204.
MARANTATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., for info call
FREE
STYLE
For the price of Our
$9.00 HAIRCUT
Ind. wash, conditioning, cut and blow dry
TIN Nov. 16.
HAIRCUT $9.00
Spray wet & blow dry
STYLE $12.00
BEARD TRIM $3.00
SENIORS $6.00
2105 West 16th
at Arbutus
NOT VALID
(SAT.)
Come in
and
meet Liz
For appointment call
734-2343
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Weekly meeting, find out our new club tools,
noon, Angus 421.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Bzzr   garden,   4:30   to   7   p.m.,   Grad   Centre
Ballroom.
FRIDAY
BASKETBALL
UBC Varsity vs. St. Martin's College, 8:30 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
UBC JOURNALISM SCHOOL
Free beer, noon, SUB 241k.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Western Night — Beer garden, 4 to 9 p.m.,
Buch. lounge, A200.
NURSING WEEK
Fun Run, noon, SUB flag poles.
Dance, 7:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
HOLLYWOOD
3123 Wast Broadway
738-3211
Oct. 31 - Nov. 6
It's 1890, the west is dying . .
Lee Marvin
MONTE WALSH
9:45
Alan Ladd in
SHANE
7:30
CLIP THIS AD FOR
ONE FREE ADULT
ADMISSION
When accompanied by one
paid adult admission.
EXPIRES NOV. 3 (Not Valid Friday or Saturday)
TAKE ACTION 0
OVER-
/ like the taste of a cold beer on a hot day,
but I certainly don't think you have to get the gang
together with a couple of cases of beer just to celebrate
the fact you've had
a bit of exercise''
frttf^.
Riel. The very name provokes controversy among Canadian historians
everywhere. Was he a patriot — or an
insane traitor? Find out Thursday at
Lasserre 105 as Louis Riel's grand-
nephew Joseph Riel speaks out on his
famous — or infamous — ancestor,
courtesy of the Centre for Continuing
Education.
♦
Attention Ubyssey staffers! There is
an all-important staff meeting at 3:30
p.m. Wednesday in SUB 241k. Muriel
says there is "lots of stuff" to talk
about, so if you work for this fine
outstanding example of UBC journalistic talents, show up.
And while we are at it . . . have YOU
considered joining The Ubyssey?
y////s///
Y/Y.'/SAY//
Yj
Sylvia's Choice
(your "creative" consignment store)
Merchandise priced
$1 to $200
Consignments very welcome
Come on in and see me
sometime!
HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 9:306 p.m.
Fri. 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
4676 W 10th Ave. 222-1620
2
g
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CHRISTMAS
CHARTERS
EDMONTON $129
SASKATOON $ 159
TORONTO $359
OTTAWA $389
MONTREAL
$399
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% YourirVay!iV+   CUTS %
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K »OIJiA
Siva Time and $ at
kinko's copies!
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1K6
pTHE CLASSIFIEDS'
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 66c Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
85 - TYPING
SOLIDARITY W. PERU
Sat. Nov. 5. 6-9 p.m.
Film. Panel. Refresh.
Dance w COMMUNIQUE
Also: speaker on U.S. Grenada
West End Community Ctr. $5
Info.: 879-3246
SEX AS ART: 3 films: 3 showings. Miracle of
Life; Pas de Deux; Angel. Lasserre 104
Wed. Nov. 2, 12:30, 2:30, 3:30. Donations.
SKI     SEASON     OPENS    NOV.     151
Whistler-Silver Star. Cottage, Bed &
Breakfast Registry. Reserve ahead.
738-7561.
30 - JOBS
DOMINION AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
HAS P/T sales positions available to market
tried tt proven necessary car-care service.
Comm. & bonus paid daily. Earn between
$40-60 per eve. Call Leo 688-1463 or Peter
684-1048.
40 - MESSAGES
A MILLION THANKS to the physical
plant of UBC for the safe return of my keys
and AMS card which I left in Sedg. Rob.
JOHN WOOD
OliMPIC SiLVt- R Ml DAL MS*
80 - TUTORING
Canada
I*
Health Same el
and Welfare    Bien-etre social
Canada Canada
ENGLISH TUTORING - Instruction in all
areas. Speaking & writing, essays, term
papers, reports, theses oral presentations,
etc. Grammar, composition, spelling, punctuation. Brian, 682-1043.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Essays, reports,
projects - $1.00 pr page min. Contact
Louse, after 4 p.m. 731-0594.	
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.	
FAST, ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
10/hr. essays, term papers, letters, etc.
879-5108. Visa accepted.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from
legible work, essays, theses, 738-6829, 10
a.m. - 9 p.m. King Edward bus route.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333.
TYPING: experienced typist; reasonable
rates; all jobs, will pick up and deliver. Tel.
421-0818, Mary Lou.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional results call Audrey. 228-0378.
FAST, ACCURATE typing at reasonable
732-0834 after 6 p.m.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
IMAGE DESIGN, 2331 Main St., 876-5586.
15% discount for students on all reg. priced
items. Full line of drafting, engineering Er
art supplies. SPECIAL Drafting Table
-$139.00 Tuesday, November 1,1983
THE   U BYS S EY
Page 7
UBC women win championships
The UBC women's soccer team
won the inaugural Canada West
championships in Victoria on
Saturday.
They defeated the University of
Alberta 2-1 in the morning and then
beat hosts Victoria 2-0 in the afternoon.
In the morning game, Alberta
scored the only goal of the first half
after 28 minutes. It was a period of
"intense play from both sides,"
said coach Dave Fales.
UBC started the second half with
a ferocious burst and scored twice
in the first five mintues. The
equalizer, in minute 46 was scored
by Kris Sinabic on a long cross from
the right wing.
UBC's second goal was an Alberta    own    goal.    The    Alberta
Rowers 'strong9
The UBC rowers started their
competitive season with a strong
performance in the Elk Lake Invitational regatta in Victoria, Sunday.
The women's boats scored a couple of upsets over University of Victoria crews. The eight beat UVic by
nine seconds over the three and a
half kilometre course, the four
defeated their UVic counterpart by
33 seconds.
The UBC eights were unable to
win their race, but they were competing against teams stacked with
national team members. The Canadian squad is training in B.C. and
they divided into three eights.
The winners, Ontario reps,
finished in a fast 10:16, the UBC
heavy weight eight completed the
course in 11:04 and the lightweights
in 11:16.
goalkeeper misjudged a back-pass
from one of her own defenders and
could only watch in helpless frustration as the ball slid past her into the
net.
"The rest of the half saw Alberta
struggling just to prevent UBC increasing their lead," said Fales.
"Consistent team effort and
superior physical condition paid off
in the second half."
By the time the University of Vic
toria team took the field against
UBC they had already lost to Alberta and were almost out of the running.
UBC started applying pressure in
the first half. Fales said that Jane
Lovell particularly put in good
work on the wing but that the team
could not capitalize on the crosses
she sent over.
In minute 63 UBC broke the
deadlock.   Jacquie  Dennel  broke
away and, although under pressure
from a defender, chipped the ball
over the goalkeeper's head.
Three minutes from the end, Kelly Robinson put the icing on UBC's
victorious cake when she took a
pass from Zabeen Jan Mohammed,
ran past the defense and sent a low
drive into the left corner of the
UVic net.
Fales singled out goalkeeper
Marion Nyberg for her form in
both games. "She made two
brilliant saves" against Alberta and
"throughout   the   game   against
UVic . . . Nyberg showed a very
high calibre of play and consistently
made aggressive saves and sent
UBC back into strong offensive
play."
Soccer 'Birds ready for Vikings
The UBC men's soccer team
plays its biggest game for several
years this afternoon in Victoria
when they take on the University of
Victoria Vikings in the game that
decides who goes on tp play Ontario
Champion Laurentian in the National semi-finals on Saturday.
UBC needs a tie or a win to advance. But it needs a ferry to get
across in the first place. A strike
could put the ferry out, and
postpone the game.
UBC warmed up for the game at
a tournament in Utah. There they
beat Utah State 3-2. Coach Joe
Johnson said Utah were a very
talented team and that UBC were
really pushed in a very high quality
game.
Coach Johnson said he was less
happy with the 'Birds next win, a 6-5
goalfest against Weber State.
Weber had brought along some1
Ogden City players and played with
29 players (not the 16 National Collegiate Athletic Association rules
stipulate). It was impossible for my
players to get an idea of who they
were playing they were switching
their players so often and so fast
said Johnson.
UBC lost their final game 3-0
against Brigham Young. "We
couldn't buy a goal," said Johnson.
The team returned with no new
injuries   and   Johnson   said   that
although defender Bruce Shearer
might not be fully fit everybody is
available for the big game.
"It was a beautiful trip," Johnson
said. "We were treated royally. I
wonder if we would be able to do
the same."
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THE    U BYSS EY
Tuesday, November 1,1983
'Birds fail to Gard against final play
By MONTE STEWART
So close yet so far away.
That was the Thunderbirds on
Saturday in Varsity Stadium Edmonton. In other words, the
Thunderbirds almost — or, should
have — won and the Golden Bears
almost lost.
The Golden Bears defeated the
'Birds 23-20 — thanks to a last-
ditch play that should never have
taken place. With the Thunderbirds
leading 20-16 in the waning seconds
of the game, Alberta quarterback
Darren Brezden passed to Gord
Bolstad to give the 'Bears the win,
which keep alive their playoff
chances.
The 'Birds had led throughout
the game, enjoying quarter leads of
8-1, 15-2, and 16-13.
For the first time in seven games,
Polo players
bob to top
By PETER BERLIN
The UBC men's water polo team
emerged triumphant from their
sternest test of the season with two
wins and a cancellation. The games
were part of a tournament at the
Vancouver Aquatic Centre which
was meant to complete the round
robin part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Northwestern division season. The standings after this tournament
establish seedings in the double
knock-out final to be played in
Oregon next month.
In the first half of the tournament last month UBC had played
the three weakest teams and came
away with a 2-1 record. They
started against the University of
Washington, another 2-1 team on
Saturday morning completely
outplaying them for the first three
quarters. In the final period with
the team 10-4 coach Michel Roy
threw in his second stringers who'd
sent most of the game on the bench.
UBC ended up winning 10-7.
On Sunday morning UBC took
on Oregon State University who are
undefeated having lost only one
game in the last two years. They
started out as if they were going to
bury UBC and were 4-1 up at the
end of the first quarter. It was a
frustrating period for UBC because
they matched OSU for shots but
apart from Clark VanDermyer's
power play goal, they had been able
to force the ball over The line.
UBC nevertheless dominated the
next two quarters. They tied it up at
five just before the half and then
added two more without reply the
third period. Each team scored
twice in the final quarter and UBC
won 9-7.
Their victory owed a lot to some
inspired goalkeeping by Chris
Kellman who stopped several close
in shots and a defence which did not
allow a power-play goal. At the
other end John Montgomery led the
scoring with three goals.
UBC will have to wait until next
Sunday, however, to find out if
they can clinch first place. To save
time the two local teams, UBC and
Simon Fraser University abandoned
their game in the second period on
Saturday (with SFU leading 6-3)
and will play again at the Canada Games pool. Both teams
have 4-1 won-lost records with SFU
having lost to OSU. If UBC win
they finish first with SFU third, if
they lose they are third and SFU second behind OSU.
BCAA    DIV.  XII    WATER POLO    STANDINGS
Jay Gard started and finished at
quarterback. Jordan Leith did not
play a single down. Ironically, Leith
had ousted Gard from the number
one spot in a 33-1 victory over
Alberta at Thunderbird Stadium on
Sept. 23.
Gard threw to Rob Ros for a
63-yard touchdown before the game
was three minutes old. In the second quarter, Glenn Steele ended
his touchdown drought on a 3 yard
run. However, after that
touchdown, Alberta came to life.
Glen Godfrey booted a field goal.
Then, near the end of the quarter,
Scott Smith plunged in for a
touchdown.
Tom Dixon of UBC and Godfrey
footed singles to account for all of
the third quarter scoring.
In   the   fourth   quarter,   Dixon
booted a field goal and two singles
while Godfrey kicked a field goal
and a single to set the stage for the
dramatic finish.
Again the 'Birds paid heavily for
penalties. In the second quarter,
Trent Edwards intercepted a
Brezden pass and pitched out to
Mark Norman. The latter proceded
to romp down field for a
touchdown; however, a needless
holding penalty nullified the major.
Gard threw an interception on the
very next play.
It was a dubious UBC pass interference penalty which enabled
the 'Bears to win. With 19 seconds
remaining in the game, Roger
DesLauriers knocked down a
Brezden pass on a third and 10
situation. However, DesLauriers
was called for interference, moving
SPORTS
the ball to the UBC seven yard line.
Brezden subsequently threw to
Bolstad for the winning marker.
Steele returned to his usual form.
He rushed for 123 yards and caught
six passes for 33 more.
The Ontario-Quebec semi-finals
took place on Saturday. Queen's
defeated Carleton 32-18 while
McGill Wildcats beat Concordia
Stingers 22-31 in a Montreal
showdown.
With one weekend of competition remaining four teams are still
in contention for the two WIFL
playoff berths. Lowly Manitoba,
who lost 18-6 to Calgary, Saturday,
have completed all their games and
are assured of last place.
Calgary lead the standings with
five wins, if they beat Alberta Friday  in  their  last  game they are
assured of a playoff berth. Meanwhile UBC plays host to Saskatchewan on Friday. And, since they
have the better record against
Alberta a win will assure them of
the second play-off berth (even if
Calgary loses UBC cannot take first
place). If Alberta lost or tied on Friday UBC would only need a tie on
Saturday, since they won in Saskatchewan on the teams first meeting a
month ago. UBC then control their
own fate.
CITR FM  102 (cable  100) will
broadcast   Saturday's   game   live
beginning at 1:45 p.m.
WIFL STANDINGS GP    W    L
Calgary                          7   5   2
British Columbia            7   4    3
Saskatchewan              7   4   3
Alberta                             7   4   3
Manitoba                       8   17
T
0
0
0
0
0
F
217
136
168
137
120
A    PTS
115    10
122     8
178     8
166     8
204     2
Feds facilitate?
By NEIL LUCENTE
UBC is vying for a federally-
funded sports complex which will
cost between six and eight million
dollars.
"The federal government has not
yet made up its mind but has shown
interest in funding a high performance fieldhouse for B.C. There
are a number of sports organizations recommending that it be at
UBC but others do not want it
here," said sports services director
Bob Hindmarch.
Two years ago, UBC nearly
received a similar grant to build a
fieldhouse but it was scrapped by
the federal government when other
universities and sports organizations demanded the facility be placed at their sites.
"We are competing with other
universities and organizations to
site it but the feds have indicated a
desire to place it at UBC. The
federal government is also looking
at Simon Fraser University, Swan-
gard and Burnaby Lake," said
Hindmarch.
"We are interested in placing it
here and we are going to present a
proposal to the feds."
The UBC proposal will be in the
form of a feasibility study, said
Hindmarch. The $9,000 study was
funded by the university, which
contributed $5,000, the athletics
department and physical education.
"This is all part of a national
policy to enhance athletics in
Canada. It's also for the overall
development of our own program,"
said administration president
George Pedersen.
UBC's sports program needs
more development said Robert
Morford, Physical Education and
Recreation director. Relative to
other major universities, he said,
"UBC has the lowest number of
athletic facilities available per student in Canada" and that the
fieldhouse will help mend
disparities.
The facility will be administered
by UBC and will have certain times
aside for Olympic and other high
performance athletes, students, intramurals, the school of physical
education and the general public.
The two possible sites are at
Osborne and the field north of
Memorial gym. The fieldhouse will
have indoor facilities for track and
field and racquet sports.
UBC has a number of advantages
in having the facility here, said
Hindmarch. Besides having many
high performance athletes at UBC,
UBC has the best paramedical/para-athletic facilities in
B.C. "We have video analysis of
athletes, a sports hospital, sports
scientists, a sports medicine training
program and dormitory facilities
during the summer," said Hindmarch.
Soccer teams booted
TEAM
G    W    L    F      A    PTS
Oregon Stage
6    5    1    66    44    10
SFU
S    4    1    60    31      8
UBC
-   5    4    1    56   44      8
U of Washington
6   3   3   49   48     6
U of Oregon
6    3    3    46    47      6
Portland
6    1    5    50    70      2
Washington State
6    0   6    30    66    0
— rory alien photo
REACHING FOR THE SKY is just part of funny game played with round
ball on gym floor. Rest of game involves profuse dribbling, preferably little
or no travelling and sometimes slam-dunking. Hoop height is tip-off to
sports that often resembles orchestra conductor training. But one thing is
for sure about funny-looking game, being tall helps — a lot.
The cancellation of an already
shortened intramurals soccer program due to unplayable fields may
only be a sign of things to come.
" A boom is happening," said intramurals director Nestor Korchin-
sky Monday, "and there is nowhere
for it to happen."
Korchinsky explained that with
the increased popularity of recreational sport more and more people
wish to compete. Unfortunately,
UBC does not have enough
facilities to meet demand and outdoor fields were the first to reach
their physical limit, he said.
"We're going to face a crisis of
facilities." The weight room, circuit
training and racquet games as well
as outdoor team sports will be most
affected, Korchinsky said.
The intramurals program has been
restricted to two areas in the last
two years: the Mclnnis field and the
physical education fields behind.the
Osborne Sports centre. Last year,
with a record 140 teams, the fields
rapidly degenerated and soccer
soon resembled what Korchinsky
called "mudball." "We were turning people off the game — nobody
enjoyed it," he said.
"More fields is not the answer.
We could ruin all the fields on campus."
Intramural soccer coordinator
Byron Green said part of the problem is the clay soil on campus
which does not allow water to
drain. But when intramurals were
allowed to use a field hockey field
which was layed on gravel, they
quickly reduced it into a quagmire,
he said. Going indoors is not
necessarily the answer, said Green,
since it would take time away from
a varsity team or from another intramural program.
The result is three divisions of the
soccer program, the women's and
the men's first and the women's
third, have been cancelled without a
ball being kicked.
Intramurals may have to limit
soccer to just 30 teams next year
and shorten it to end in October to
avoid the heaviest rain.
"It means we are denying access
to a tremendous number of individuals, cutting back one of the
most popular programs. The purpose of the (intramurals) program is
to participate and enhance the UBC
experience," said Korchinsky.
'The ideal' would be for the
university to buy an astroturf field
which, at soccer size and with
lights, would cost between $1
million and $1.5 million. It would
last about 10 years.

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