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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 1978

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Array In science
Ratings ban
hit by hacks
—edmond o'brien photo
CHILEAN SINGERS entertain passers-by on SUB mall Monday as opening event in Chile Week, being held to
publicize oppression and human rights violations in Chile and UBC's indirect involvement. Forum today at
noon in SUB 200 will present discussion on controversy about UBC's investments in Noranda Mines, which
helps prop up Chile's military dictatorship with heavy mining investments.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LX, No. 55
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1978
8    228-2301
Student representatives in the
science faculty said Monday they
are angry and disappointed at the
faculty's refusal to make teaching
evaluations public.
"I'm really pissed off," science
senator Bruce Armstrong said.
"The faculty is always saying we
should have more representation
and then on a simple issue like this
they don't even pass it."
The proposal by science undergraduate society president Anne
Gardner was defeated 20 to 16 at a
science faculty meeting Thursday.
Gardner said the nine students at
the meeting all voted for the
proposal but the six remaining
student representatives were
absent and the motion failed.
"The problem was midterms.
Six of the reps had to write tests at
that time," she said.
Mathematics professor James
Whittaker said he voted against the
motion because releasing the
results of the evaluations would
infringe on the privacy ..of the
professors.
And he said that an evaluation
done one year will not be much use
to students the next year.
"Next year's teachers may not
be teaching the same courses," he
said. "I didn't feel that a strong
New ed bureaucracy recommended
By KATHY FORD
An educational institute should
be set up to develop and coordinate the delivery of different
distance education methods, according to a recommendation in a
recently released report.
The report, prepared by the
distance education planning group,
was completed last November but
not released to the public until
Monday.
The group was established nine
months ago to develop a system for
delivery of educational programs
and services to students
throughout the province participating in some form of distance
education.
The report defines distance
education as "the delivery, by a
Senate c'tee
delays election
decision again
The senate committee investigating allegations about
improper voting procedures in the
Jan. 18 student election to the
board of governors and senate has
postponed making a decision on the
issue until at least the next
meeting.
The senate committee met
Monday to hear individual
testimonies about election improprieties.
The committee is empowered to
decide if a new election is
warranted.
The controversy centres on
evidence of improper voting
procedures at the polling station in
the Civil and Mechanical
Engineering Building.
Engineering students are alleged
to have signed voting sheets giving
away their votes by proxy to other
students.
If the committee finds there
were irregularities it can instruct
registrar Jack Parnall to hold new
elections.
The committee meets again
Wednesday.
Committee member Donald
Hamilton said the committee
might not be able to make a final
decision at Wednesday's meeting.
variety of communication modes
of educational programs designed
to meet the needs of people who are
socially or geographically isolated
from traditional learning institutions."
At a press conference at the
Universities Council of B.C. office
Monday, planning group manager
Pat Carney said a wide range of
talent and resources exists for
distance education, but no coordinating agency is available to
make best use of the resources.
She said the recommended
agency would be a "utility agency"
designed to pull existing resources
together.
"We should use every sort of
communication mode short of
carrier pigeon," she said, adding
that methods could range from
telephone and radio telephone
tutoring to television and computer
instruction to courier service.
"We don't care how it's delivered
as long as it gets to the student,"
Carney said.
Deputy education minister
Walter Hardwick, also attending
the press conference, would not
estimate     how      much      im
plementation of the recommendations might cost.
But he said it would cost no more
than establishing another "bricks
and mortar institution."
The report stresses that although
most people prefer to study at
traditional campuses, educational
opportunities must be expanded to
meet the needs of people who
cannot get to these campuses.
These people include shift and
seasonal workers, high school
dropouts,     immigrants     with
language difficulties, the han-
Seepage2: REPORT
enough case was put forth by the
students."
But science undergraduate
society president Anne Gardner
said the motion was made as mild
as possible to ensure that it would
pass.
"They were concerned that this
would be a repeat of the Black and
Blue, an anticalendar put out by
the SUS in the sixties."
The B and B Review was a
controversial publication with
explicit and extreme comments
about professors.
Assistant science dean Nathan
Divinsky voted for the motion,
calling it a motherhood issue, said
Gardner.
Chemistry professor Robert
Thompson said the results of the
evaluations could be misleading.
"It (the evaluations) might
overstress the personality aspect
of teaching."
Thompson said the evaluations
could be useful only if the
professors concerned see the
evaluations.
Gardner said faculty members
were worried that if a student
evaluation of professors was
published the faculty's guide to
courses would not be used.
"They were also worried about
how we were going to put it
together, where we would get the
money and things like that," said
Gardner.
Armstrong said some faculty
members commented the
evaluation will only be useful if
comments are used instead of
rating the professors with numbers.
In other business, a motion to
refer to the chairman as chair or
chairperson was defeated after
dean George Volkoff voted to break
a 19-19 tie vote.
And the faculty approved a
motion to ask for an increase in the
number of left-handed desks after
Armstrong pointed out that there
was only one such desk for every
200 right-handed desks.
It's back to school for J.V. Clyne
Newly-elected UBC chancellor J. V. Clyne said Monday he has only
a superficial knowledge of university and education issues.
And socialist Stan Persky, who lost the election with 4,275 votes to
Clyne's 10,359, said he is not finished with UBC politics.
"I intend to either be chancellor or president of UBC," Persky said.
"In the meantime I will continue teaching."
Persky, a former UBC student activist now a sociology teacher at
Northwest Community College in Terrace, repeated his challenge to
Clyne to a public debate on education.
But Clyne, former chief executive officer of MacMillan Bloedel,
declined the challenge, saying his knowledge of the issues is too
shallow.
He declined to comment on either the quality of education at UBC or
on tuition fee increases until he learns more about the issues.
Persky criticized the alumni for electing a "capitalist dinosaur,"
but added that he is undetered by the results of the election.
"The stinking pit of privilege will be challenged until it is
eliminated," he said. "I will be back or someone like me will be back.
His voters are dying off and mine are still being born."
Persky said the position of chancellor should be more active than it
is currently.
"The capitalist world views the chancellorship as a gift to Clyne— to
put him out in the pasture,'' Persky said in an interview.
"I don't see this. The chancellorship is an active position."
Persky said he sees a definite role for the chancellor.
"The chancellor should have qualities similar to an ombudsperson.
He should explain to ordinary working people what is happening to the
university."
Clyne said he is honored to have been elected chancellor.
"I am looking forward to working on the board and senate."
He said UBC was "damn good" when he graduated with an arts
degree in 1923 and that he still has a high regard for the university's
educational standards.
Clyne denied he would use his business contacts to help bring
financial aid to the university. When the UBC Alumni Association
nominated Clyne for the chancellorship, members of the alumni
executive said his contacts could help the university financially in a
time of cutbacks in education spending.
"I don't think that is the purpose of the chancellorship," Clyne said.
Clyne, 75, a former B.C. supreme court judge, refused to campaign
for the position, but Persky, 36, worked hard on his campaign, calling
for revolutionary changes in the organization^ the university.
CLYNE . . . election victor admits ignorance Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28, 1978
To open U
Report identifies barriers
From page 1
dicapped or elderly persons who
cannot easily commute and people
who want to learn at their own pace
for whatever reason.
Carney said the recently
proposed open university would be
co-ordinated by the recommended
agency, but will be only one of the
many programs that will be
available.
She said a large proportion of
people using distance education in
the future will be adults taking
vocational, technical or upgrading
courses.
The latter could range from auto
repair to medicine. But academic
programs will also be offered, she
said.
The report identifies several
potential barriers to the implementation of this system, which
will rely heavily on co-operation
with community colleges.
They include:
• Traditional  attitudes   among
college personnel because of a
desire to build up programs with
credit that B.C. universities will
accept. "The pressure of the
university and the conservative
nature of many college administrators and councils led to a
situation in which many colleges
gave distance education programs
a low priority, in terms of funds
expended in this area;"
» Many colleges have also said
development of new programs is
too expensive at present;
t "Some college personnel made
the point that distance education
students lose the opportunity to
interact with other students and
faculty, unless suitable provisions
are built into the delivery system
by adopting a multi-modal approach to program delivery."
•"Many   college   administrators
and faculty members are 'wedded'
to face-to-face instruction."
The   report   also   recommends
Carling beer flows,
ending Molson rule
At 9:15 p.m. Friday the first
Carting's draft was poured through
the taps at the Pit, ending Molson's
six-year monopoly on draft supplies.
Pit manager Tor Svanoe
welcomed the change but he said
there is no way of telling whether
the move will increase sales of
draft in the Pit.
The move followed lengthy
discussions by the student administrative commission about the
rotation of draft suppliers for the
student pub.
Once the rotation proposal had
been passed, rescinded and
reinvestigated by the commission,
the Liquor Administration Branch
decided to revise the Pit's license
to make rotation of suppliers
mandatory.
The LAB decision reached the
SAC commission more than two
weeks ago, but the change was
delayed until previously ordered
stocks of Molson's were sold.
In 1979 the draft will be supplied
by Labatt's and in 1980 it will
revert to Molson's again. SAC
hopes this new policy will end
aggressive lobbying by beer
companies on campus.
The Pit sells an average of 24
kegs of draft beer per week at
prices slightly lower than for
bottled beer.
that planning now proceed toward
the acquisition of educational
channels on cable television
systems, and that adequate funding be provided to carry out
further planning in the distance
education field.
Gardner in,
Mouse out
in SUS vote
Anne Gardner was elected
president of the science undergraduate society Friday. The
former student representative assembly member received 196 votes
to Lloyd Lyson's 66.
Kurt Raynor is the new treasurer
with 135 votes. Dark-horse candidate Mickey Mouse received one
vote.
In the race for seats on the SRA
Sheetal Sapra topped the polls with
139 votes. Robert Shipman, Jim
Bodner and Ed Auersperg were
also elected.
Ron Krause was elected by
acclamation as vice-president and
Leanne Riskie is the new academic
co-ordinator. Brian Knight will be
the public relations officer and
Andrew Kwok was acclaimed as
publications officer. Mike McCann
is now the athletic co-ordinator.
The position of secretary is still
open.
Like to
step into a
teaching job
after
graduation?
SCHOOL DISTRICT
NO. 57
PRINCE
GEORGE
Will have
openings as of
September 1978 for
TEACHERS & ADMINISTRATORS
covering a broad range of the
educational curriculum with
emphasis on special education.
These positions, both in the City of Prince George and
in the surrounding communities of Mackenzie, McBride
and Valemount offer the new graduate the challenge
and the opportunity of becoming involved within the
educational framework of this growing interior region.
Prince George representatives will be on campus to
conduct interviews from Monday, March 20 through
Wednesday, March 22 at the campus Placement Office,
Building F, Ponderosa Annex, near the Ponderosa
Cafeteria.
Students may arrange for an interview by going to the
campus Placement Office and scheduling a time to
meet with one of our representatives.
"*\
Lonesome
Charlie's
lookinTor
a friend
'■■<A  -f--  r^S-?.
^?!'feo,i£RE 7%qica£P\ Tuesday, February 28, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
UVic also invests in oppression
By GENE JAMIESON
This article is reprinted from the
Martlet, the student newspaper at
the University of Victoria.	
The University of Victoria
Foundation is investing university
endowment funds into corporations
which practise discrimination,
exploitation and partnership with
military regimes.
The university is also investing
money in banks which are financially supporting oppressive
regimes.
The endowment fund is the
source of university bursaries and
student loans.
The companies and banks include the International Nickel
Company, the Hudson Bay Company, Canadian Pacific Limited,
Moore Corporation Limited and
the Royal Bank of Canada.
Moore Corporation, through a
subsidiary named Lampson Industries, has extensive interests in
Southern Africa with six subsidiaries in South Africa and two in
Rhodesia.
These two countries practice an
apartheid policy.
The principal commodity
associated with the Southern
Africa operation appears to be
business forms, data information
cards and related products.
UVic holds 200 shares in the
Moore Corporation.
Canadian Pacific, through its
subsidiaries Cominco Mines and
CP Investments, has substantial
investments in South Africa as well
as South West Africa.
South West Africa is literally a
reservation where the South
African government has placed
some of the native blacks.
The scope of CP activities in
South Africa include land, sea-air
transport, telecommunications,
hotels, resources, real estate,
manufacturing, mines, forest
products, and chemicals.
In addition, the chairman and
chief executive officer of Canadian
Pacific Limited, Ian Sinclair, is
also vice-president and director of
the Royal Bank of Canada.
The Royal was involved in a $125
million loan to the military junta of
Chile and a $3 billion loan to the
Vorster regime of South Africa.
UVic owns 800 shares of
Canadian Pacific worth over
$11,000. And the foundation also
owns 300 shares of John Labatt
Ltd.
John Labatt Ltd. is in a joint
directorship with Brascan Ltd.
under J. H. Moore. Moore is
chairman of both boards.
Brascan was a prime financial
backer of the military coup which
overthrew the government of
Brazil in 1964. Brazil is still under a
military regime.
Other foundation investments
include 400 shares in International
Nickel and 1,000 shares in the
Hudson Bay Co.
The Bay has extremely large
interests in Namibia, a country
under the rule of South Africa.
Namibia produces more than
one-half of the world's supply of
karakui, a luxury fur. This fur is
largely marketed through London
by the company. It is cleared out of
Namibia by both black and white
workers for the HBC.
The blacks receive from $14 to
$16 a month, but the whites
working in the same warehouse
receive from $244 to $854 a month.
Food for needy
relief group's aim
By GREG EDWARDS
The problems of Third World
nations are not due to their lack of
ingenuity, the executive director
of Food For The Hungry said
Monday.
Robert Allen said the Taj Mahal
in India, for example, is evidence
of the Indian people's ability to
organize and co-ordinate large
numbers of people and equipment.
Food For The Hungry is a
private, starvation relief agency
that concentrates on providing
food and self-help programs in
Guatemala, Haiti, Bangladesh,
India, Upper Volta, Senegal and
Ghana.
The agency, which was started
seven years ago by people
discouraged by the inability of
child-sponsorship programs to
eradicate the causes of hunger,
assures the effectiveness of its
relief by working closely with the
people it attempts to aid, said
Allen.
Joint decisions are made between the agency and the needy
groups about the kind of relief they
want so as not to waste the agency's efforts and good intentions on
projects not suited to local needs,
he said.
Food For The Hungry provides
food by canvassing agriculture
marketing boards, food
processors, foundations and service clubs.
Allen said the agency ships food
stuffs in container shipping units to
avoid losses due to stealing,
moisture, and rats.
He said their programs in
agriculture, education and
development aim at maximizing
the efforts of the local people to
provide for their own needs.
Desert people are being
discouraged, he said, from their
reliance on cattle and are being
encouraged to grow vegetables
instead.
Cattle can take up to seven years
to develop into an edible product
and tend to overgraze.
Allen said vegetable farming and
raising deer, which do not
overgraze and are an equally good
source of protein, would solve
many of the food problems of the
desert people.
A food-for-work program is
another method the agency uses in
areas where food is scarce, he said.
"We don't want to compete with
local food.markets, so where food
can be used as payment for work
done by craftsmen, we pay with
food," he said.
Another concern of the agency is
the use of manure in India for
heating purposes Allen said. Three
hundred fifty million tons of
manure a year is used in India for
cooking food.
The agency is involved in a
method of taking methane gas
from this manure so that the
methane can be used for cooking
and the rest of the manure can be
returned to the soil as fertilizer, he
said.
"We concentrate our efforts
where the most can be done with
the least money, in the least time,"
he added.
This labor policy of the Bay has
been referred to as being a
"massively discriminatory labor
policy" in a report done at the
University of Winnipeg this past
fall.
INCO has extensive interests in
South Africa as well. This company
also operates a subsidiary in
Guatemala.
Guatemala has not had a
democratic government for more
than 20 years. Amnesty International has estimated that over
20,000 people have been killed by
the government for their political
beliefs over the last 10 years, 826 in
the last year alone.
INCO pays its Guatemalan
workers 90 cents an hour, at a plant
which cost the company over $200
million to finance.
The Guatemalan operation is
losing money now, according to a
report by Richardson Securities.
In another report it was noted
that INCO cannot close down in
Guatemala, no matter how much
they lose due to the "politically
sensitive" atmosphere which
exists in that country.
A result of these losses has been
the laying off of Canadian workers
at INCO mines in Sudbury, Ont.
and Thompson, Man.
Over the past year UVic has
invested over $10.5 million on a
short-term basis into banks which
have loaned money to South Africa
and Chile, two countries with
notably repressive regimes.
One of the banks was the
Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce, a bank with close
financial ties to Falconbridge
Nickel Company.
Falconbridge operates mines in
South Africa and Rhodesia.
The Commerce Bank was also
one of the prime movers behind the
formation of the Canadian-
controlled Brazilian Traction,
Light and Power Company.
That company, now called
Brascan Limited, was involved in
the coup in 1964 which overthrew
the government of Brazil.
The Royal Bank of Canada is
another bank in which UVic invested on a short-term basis.
The UVic foundation also has a
Royal Bank bond amounting to
$16,000 in its. possession.
The Royal Bank in May, 1976,
agreed to participate in a $125
million loan to the military junta in
Chile.
This loan was needed because
European and British banks
refused, for reasons of "moral
outrage" and "economic uncertainty," to reschedule Chile's
debt to them.
The two other banks UVic in-
See page 8: DON'T
—matt king photo
REVOLUTIONARY AIRCRAFT DESIGN is displayed by Ubyssey photog Ed O'Brien after intrepid
hack won science undergraduate society paper plane contest in Hebb lecture theatre Monday. O'Brien won
gliding competition with folding-wing design while othefs competed in contest to hit UBC vice-president
Erich Vogt with planes as he acted as human target.
McGeer snubs university presidents
By JEFF RANKIN
Education minister Pat McGeer again
snubbed the presidents of B.C.'s three
universities by failing to attend their meeting
last Friday.
Howard Petch of the University of Victoria,
Pauline Jewett of Simon Fraser University
and Doug Kenny of UBC discussed the open
university, among other things, at the
meeting.
McGeer is the leading proponent of the open
university concept in B.C. but has failed to
discuss the idea in any detail with the
universities.
"He (McGeer) was invited," said Kenny,
"but whether he didn't have the time to come
or what I don't know."
Kenny said UBC would probably not be
involved with any aspect of the open
university program.
"I suspect that it will be a completely
separate system set up by the government
and run independently, as it is in England."
The open university programs could be
made economically feasible, said Kenny,
especially if they are delivered in the regions
of Vancouver and Victoria. But much depends
on large student enrolment in each course, he
said.
"But as far as employers looking for
graduates in specialized fields," Kenny said,
"I doubt that open university degrees would
be worth as much to them as a degree from a
conventional university."
Employers looking for generally well-
educated people would most likely find a
degree from an open university just as acceptable, said Kenny.
The open university concept makes use of
television, telephone seminars, and a
correspondence system, and its implementation effectively puts an end to the
UBC proposal for mini-arts centres to be
located throughout the province.
UBC's proposal would have provided for
degree-granting facilities of easier access to
the remote areas of B.C.
"Each university had suggested a plan,"
said Kenny, "and I certainly think that ours
was very good, but you can't tell how effective
a system is until you try it.
"The government announcement (about
the open university) has definitely put an end
to our proposal," Kenny said. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28, 1978
Sci f i or
sci facts?
"I'm thinking of taking alchemy 368 next year. What's the
prof like?"
"Musgrave? He's fucked. I've never had a bunch of sillier
assignments, and his marking is just as weird."
An everyday conversation among students. According to
the science faculty, such things are verboten because, as one
faculty member put it after last week's decision, such things
are an invasion of privacy.
Since when is a written evaluation an invasion of privacy
and the everyday verbal evaluations not? Student course
evaluations, which are published for many departments in
arts, have not seriously hurt profs, and are in fact beneficial
to both students and profs. Why should the science faculty
be different?
Word of mouth evaluations are not as reliable as the
opinions of all students in a course, but without written
evaluations, students will use verbal opinions.
Students have a right to know how their peers assess
courses. This not only assures that students won't get stuck
with a 'turkey' prof, but alerts students to good profs and
good courses. This also aids faculties in assessing courses and
profs for their quality, something which should be important
to the science faculty. If it isn't, then there is something
seriously wrong.
In arts evaluations, students haven't had to sign their
names, but they have commented on the whole responsibly.
One suspects an unhealthy case of paranoia in science.
Students on the whole treat their studies and their courses
in a serious way. But when deciding which courses to take,
the terse descriptions in the calendar and faculty publications
won't do.
Too many times in the past, teaching has taken a back seat
to other criteria in tenure decisions. While the over-all
teaching quality is still good, education cutbacks dictate that
course evaluations will become a more valuable tool than ever
to ensure that profs stay on their toes in the classroom both
before and after tenure is granted.
This university operates on the free flow of knowledge.
The science faculty's decision ignores this. Classrooms are
public places serving public functions. Assessments of performance inside classes cannot be taken in any way as an
invasion of privacy.
The faculty's decision is an insult to students and to the
profs who work in that faculty.
Assistant dean Nathan Divinsky called the idea of allowing
publication of students' evaluations motherhood. We share
his bewilderment at the denial of this basic right.
Chile week
The UBC board of governors has ignored repeated pleas
from former member George Hermanson, students, The
Ubyssey, and ignored the examples of other universities over
the issue of its shares in Noranda, which is planning a massive
development in Chile.
We don't want any part of financing a regime which daily
stomps on the human rights of millions and has been
identified as an international outlaw by the United Nations.
This week you get a chance to tell the board to use its
shares in Noranda to oppose further development in Chile.
There are petitions and activities all week in SUB. The
participation of all of us is necessary to wake up the board to
the feelings of students. Let's not blow it.
THE UBYSSEY"
FEBRUARY 28, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Chris Gainor
A tlme-warp shoved the staff 10 years back In time, even little Tom
Hawthorn, whose shrunken frame made him an unmistakable ringer for a
VIetcong. Chris Gainor, true to costume, dumped on the poor peasant with
handshakes all around, while Marcus (viscous) Gee Impressed everyone with
his glasses and artistic skills. Honchos Mike "Che" Bocking and Bill
"Salvadore Humidor" Tieleman prepared for the Inevitable tussle between
the forces of good and In-between. Kathy Ford was invisible, giving a hip but
serious Jan Nicol no one to kibitz, as they said In those days, with. Steve
Howard came In the best outfit — himself, and Carl Vesterback wondered if
the 'Leafs could make it two straight. Jeff Rankin, Greg Edwards, Tom
Barnes, Chris Bocking, Don Mclntyre and Edmond O'Brien remained In that
bummer trip, the 1970s. Matt King was the king of cool and Verne
McDonald, that disgusting hippie, revealed all, true to form. A call was put
out for former news editors and rim men, wherever they may be.
toetL, AT Li=t\ST   I   U/ASN'T
POT  ^T7»  7>ASTU<?£    Uitier*
Letters
Periodicals back Body Politic
As a follow up to Sue Vohanka's
excellent article on the RCMP's
raid on Body Politic (Feb. 16) I
would like to add the views of the
Canadian Periodical Publisher's
Association.
At a press conference convened
by Body Politic following the raid,
CPPA issued a press statement:
"The Canadian Periodical
Publisher's Association, representing approximately 200
Canadian magazines, considers
Body Politic to be a regular
member of the association and has
been a full and active one for
several years. Our current
catalogue includes Body Politic
along with dozens of others in a
wide range of subject interests,
from the arts through sports,
children's magazines and learned
journals.
"The association is concerned
about the police raid on the offices
of the magazine and the seizure of
items such as subscription files.
We are concerned as we would be
about such a seizure at the offices
of any of our members as it effectively prevents a publication
from continuing while the legal
questions are being debated."
Body Politic also received such
support from the Periodical
Writers'  Association of Canada.
At a subsequent board meeting
in Toronto on Jan. 7, CPPA passed
the following motions: CPPA would
render reasonable assistance to
Body Politic to permit it to continue publication; that CPPA
would urge members to donate ad
space or cash to support the
defence fund; that CPPA would
send a letter of support to Body
Board's head in sand
It should have come as no surprise to the UBC community when board
of governors member George Hermanson was not selected for another
term. He was one of the very few, if not the only who was prepared to take
a definite stand against the board's deliberate refusal to recognize the
sinister implications of supporting Noranda's proposed $350 million investment in Chile.
Does 30,000 dead, and continued repression by a vicious military junta
mean nothing to these 'rational' people? Is it not quite obvious what $350
million means to a regime that has been condemned repeatedly by the
world for its notoriously brutal tactics? Are we to stand idly by and allow
such a travesty of justice to take place?
It behooves the UBC community to seek out the real story of what the
board (which incidentally also refused to withdraw university funds from
the Bank of Montreal, in spite of the latter's proven financial ties with the
racist South African government) plans to do with a further $260,000 of
our funds in our name, and then we should demand an explanation why.
Richard Hillson
grad studies
Time to get informed
Last term the question of
the banks' involvement in South
Africa began to concern the
university community and a call
was made for the students to withdraw their accounts from the Bank
of Montreal.
I recall reading in The Ubyssey
(Nov. 25) an interview with Stuart
Clark, the bank's manager. "Clark
defended the bank saying it has to
take a consistent stand. He said it
would be hypocritical to denounce
South Africa without also
criticizing other regimes such as
the dictatorship in Chile." He
dismissed the possibility of being
consistent by criticizing both South
Africa and Chile.
Clark is not alone in his position.
The UBC board of governors has
taken a similar one in refusing to
oppose Noranda's investment in
Chile.
It is however encouraging to
read that there are some Canadian
universities which are not afraid to
take a moral stand on the issue. It
is important for us as students of
UBC to get informed and ask that
the university apply the principle
of socially responsible investment.
M. Sewerin
grad studies
Politic; that we inform the appropriate minister that CPPA
supports repeal of customs tariff
#99201-1 (which reads: "Books,
printed paper, drawings, paintings, prints, photographs or representations of any kind of a
treasonable or seditious, or of an
immoral or indecent character").
CPPA would like to go on record
as opposing censorship within the
Canadian magazine industry.
Geoff Hancock
vice-president, CPPA
Privilege
Last term someone wrote in to
suggest that the roads could be
made safer by revoking the
licenses of those people, like
students, who do not need to drive.
I think that this is too extreme and
would prove to be unworkable and
so I offer this alternative:
The drivers' examinations as
they now stand are jokes. Any
moron can and apparently does
pass them. They should be made
considerably tougher.
Upon passing the examination
the individual should be placed on
probation for a period of not less
than three years. If he is guilty of
any driving offence whatsoever his
license will be revoked for a period
of not less than one year. If he can
succeed in acquiring three consecutive incident-free years, he
will be issued a permanent license.
If after nine years he is unable to
acquire three consecutive incident-
free years he will be barred from
any driving for a period of not less
than 10 years.
Possession of a driver's license is
a privilege not a right and should
be treated as such. If a driver
repeatedly abuses the privilege by
speeding, drinking and driving,
then his license should be revoked
permanently.
First offences should be harshly
dealt with such as one- to three-
month suspensions for speeding.
Being aware of the harsh penalties
involved, the ex-driver can expect
no sympathy by complaining that
his only means of transportation is
lost.
I am sure that most people can
drive safely, once they have the
proper incentive. These
suggestions are meant to be tough
because driving is a deadly serious
business.
Craig McConnell
science 2 Tuesday, February 28, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
Government action
needed to fight
for student jobs
By LORNE ROGERS
It is probably correct to assume that jobs
and exams are prominent in the minds of
most students at this time of the year. By
putting out the required effort most of us
will pass our courses. It might be a bit
harder to score a fair-paying job.
In fact those of us who have not already
submitted a bunch of applications for work
stand a chance of being unemployed come
the spring break.
To illustrate the unemployment rate for
students in post-secondary education, the
following statistics are telling.
In May 1977, the unemployment rate
among people with some post-secondary
education was 20.5 per cent, and their
participation rate in the labor force was 64.2
per cent. In June, the figures were 12.1 per
cent and 78.5 per cent, and by July, the
figures had shifted to 9.4 per cent and 83.2
per cent, according to government
statistics.
As shown in these statistics and in our
personal experiences, quite a number of
students spend over half the break looking
for work. It isn't easy to find work, and
given the competition, we are sometimes
forced to settle for jobs which are grossly
underpaid.
The current job shortage is a reflection of
the over-all economic crisis in Canada
today. It has been widely accepted by
organized labor, student unions, the NDP
and others that economic programs which
try to stimulate the economy through tax
breaks to individuals and corporations are
inadequate. In spite of all the fiddling
around with fiscal and monetary policies,
there's still a spiralling rate of unemployment and inflation.
Declining profits in the private sector
have promoted a series of cost-cutting
programs such as automation with subsequent layoffs and programs of general
austerity. At present the Canadian economy
is using between 60 per cent and 80 per cent
of the available plant and equipment
capacity.
In a recent survey by the Conference
Lome Rogers is a member of the ad-hoc
committee on unemployment, which meets
Thursdays at noonin SUft 115. Perspectives
is open to all members of fhe UBC community. New opinion pieces are needed now.
Board in Canada, it was found 'excess
productive capacity continues to be an
important factor in deterring investment
spending, with about 84 per cent of
respondents indicating that their operations
are currently being run below optimal
productive capacity.' Further, 60 per cent of
these same businessmen saw a weak
market demand as the major factor adversely affecting investment spending.
There is money which can be made
available to take up the excess job capacity
through job creation programs. The money
for a massive job creation program in this
province could be made available by withdrawing the $1.2 billion corporate and investor tax concessions contained in the May
1977 budget. Savings made on unemployment insurance would generate another $1.2
billion.
Currently, the B.C. Students' Federation
and the National Union of Students, in
conjunction with organized labor are involved in a campaign to demand jobs in the
public sector through government financing.
The call for a make work program goes
beyond the scope of demanding more jobs It
also incorporates a need to revamp the
existing summer work program for
students. An example of such a program
(currently the biggest job creation scheme)
is the Young Canada Works program. It is
clearly inadequate.
A NUS statement says, "the 1977 Young
Canada Works program employed about
30,000 students for a maximum of 14 weeks.
This represented less than two per cent of
the population eligible for the program and
slightly less than three per cent of the
students looking for work in July 1977.
The federal government has not indicated
any plans to upgrade the YCW prpgram,
therefore its shortfall will become ever
more apparent in 1978. Not only is YCW
insufficient in terms of numbers employed,
but the wages paid are ridiculously low. The
current allowable wages in the program are
the provincial minimum wages ($100 to $1.26
weekly).
Campaigns around the problem of unemployment have been initiated on various
campuses in B.C. Plans are being implemented at Simon Fraser University, at
Langara and Capilano Colleges, and they
are being organized at Douglas and Cariboo
Colleges. The format for these campaigns
are centred around the 'Citizens' Lobby for
Jobs.' This lobby for jobs was initiated on a
provincial scale by the B.C. Federation of
Labor. The program of this mass campaign
calls for a make-work program at the expense of tax concessions.
The campaign will be informational,
leading up to a rally by workers, students
and the unemployed March 31. The rally will
coincide with the opening of legislature, and
will take place in Victoria outside the
parliament buildings. For students the
demand is the same as that made by labor.
We need work.
Last Wednesday, a group of concerned
students at UBC put forward a proposal to
student representative assembly,
suggesting that an ad-hoc committee be
formed to take up the organization of the
Citizens' Lobby for Jobs at UBC. This
proposal was accepted. Since then the B.C.
Federation of Labor and the BCSF have
both indicated that they will cooperate in
bringing the Citizens' Lobby For Jobs onto
campus.
The success of this campaign depends on
the effort channeled into it. Maybe premier
Bill Bennett has been deaf to the needs of
students and workers all along, but if he sees
thousands of people with a common interest
rallying at the legislature, he may get the
message.
Right now there is but the nucleus of a
committee. If we are to make this campaign
work in our interest we are going to have to
build the committee to a workable size. The
cooperation of a large number of students in
this committee is not only desirable, it is
necessary.
ii2i*iii§ggti^S
'ALL'S I SAID WAS THERE AJR£ MORE
PBOPLt WORKING  NcV THAW ZVkfL
BEFORE. THEKJ / MENTIONED SOMETHING
ABoof GOUERI0HEWT POLICY... AMD SHE
JUST UJENTT &ER5ERIC
■ft     V:
7T   TEAK.
Letters
All conflicts phoney
Okay you activists, listen and listen good.
All the conflicts between one side and another are phoney. This includes
capitalism versus communism, labor vs. management, separatist vs.
federalist, male vs. female and left vs. right.
Who profits from these conflicts? Never, and I repeat, never, have
those engaged in such conflicts profited from them and never shall
anyone so engaged profit from them.
Who profits? Those who sell arms and those who mediate such conflicts. Such profits have been made from arms marketing that is beyond
our imagination.
Those who have become super-rich from this black commerce are not
our enemies. It is the darkness which has shrouded their hearts and
minds and has nearly shrouded our hearts and minds that is our enemy.
Recognize that all humans are brothers and sisters and children of the
same cosmic parent. Recognize this and your motives will grow in purity
and your actions will then become truly liberating.
L.Flagg
ex-activist
DO YOU NEED A TUTOR?
A few hours with a tutor from the Speakeasy Tutorial Centre
could put you back on the right track.
Anyone who feels qualified in any subject may also register as
a tutor.
REGISTER NOW
SPEAKEASY IN SUB,
Any Time We're Open
COSTS YOU $1.00
PAN AM'S
ROUND-THE-WORLD
IN 80 DAYS FARE
U.S- $999
STANDBY BASIS
Fly anywhere on Pan Am's route (in one direction —
you can't retrace your route or visit the same city twice).
U.S. $1199 ADVANCED CONFIRMED RESERVATIONS
NO AGE RESTRICTIONS
EXAMPLE ROUTE: SEATTLE - HONOLULU - TOKYO - HONG KONG
DELHI - TEHRAN - ISTANBUL - FRANKFURT - LONDON - SEATTLE
* Effective March 17, 1978, subject to Government approval
Burke's
World Wide Travel
224-4391
'in The Village'
5700 University Boulevard Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28, 1978
Chile Week
under way
"Noranda invests in Chile and
UBC invests in Noranda," is the
slogan being used to kick off Chile
week, which started Monday.
There will be a forum today at
noon in SUB 200 in response to
recent controversy over the 8,000
shares that UBC holds in that
Canadian-based company.
Hot flashes
Invited are a Noranda representative, William White, UBC
vice-president of financial affairs
and representatives from the committee for the defence of human
rights.
UBC's shares in Noranda are
worth $260,000 dollars.
3rd World week
This week is Third World week
and to observe the occasion the
Alma    Mater    Society    programs
committee is sponsoring five
speakers to deal with the question: "Why should Canadians help
the less developed countries?"
Today a panel composed of
UBC professors Geoffrey Hains-
worth, Graham Johnson and John
Wood will discuss this question at
noon in SUB 212.
And Michel Dupuy, the new
president of the Canadian International Development Agency,
will speak at noon in the SUB
auditorium.
Tween classes
TODAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,     noon,     SUB
224.
COMMITTEE     FOR    THE    DEFENSE
OF HUMAN  RIGHTS IN CHILE
Forum   on   Noranda's  Investment in
Cnlle  ana   UBC's   involvement  as a
shareholder,     with     representatives
from   Noranda,   the   UBC   board   of
governors and churches.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's committee meeting, noon,
SUB 130.
GAY PEOPLE
Discussion     on     gay/straight     Integration  In  society,  noon, SUB 113.
PREMED SOCIETY
Elections  for next year's executive,
noon, IRC 1.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon, SUB 213.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly    student    fellowship,   noon,
SUB 205.
CSA
Guitar class, 4:30 p.m., SUB 125.
PSYCH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Bzzr night, 5-10 p.m., SUB 212.
CSA
Field   trip   to   HMCS   Discovery,   5
p.m., SUB 125.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Volleyball     practice,     5:30     p.m.,
TWSC gym B.
CSA
Choir practice, 8 p.m., International
House.
AMS
Martin    Berlnbaum   and   the   music
dept's  wind  symphony,  noon, SUB
auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
REC UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, RUS
lounge.
SUS
General meeting — wear T-shirts to
win door prize, noon, Hebb theatre.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENSE
OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Chile week: When the people
awake, noon, SUB clubs lounge.
PRE-VET CLUB
Veterinary lecturer, noon, McMI
158.
ECKANKAR
General   meeting,  noon,   Buch. 205.
AUS and SRA
Asian studies students' departmental assoc, noon, Buch. 4276
lounge.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-In, noon, SUB 130.
ENGLISH STUDENTS
Meeting for those Interested in organizing English students Into rabid,
Molotov-cocktail throwing mob —
general   meeting,   noon,  Buch.  225.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN COALITION
Francis    Schaeffer's    film:    episode
eight  Age  of  Fragmentation,  noon,
Scarfe 100.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 SEYMOUR ST.
688-2481
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
presents    B
7   p.m.,   St.   Mark's
UOC
General    meeting   and    slide   show,
noon, chem 250.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
SPEAKEASY
General   meeting for  ratification  of
1978-79    coordinator,    noon,    SUB
215.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Exploring dance, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENSE
OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Chile  week:  Chilean  night — wine,
slides,    music,   7:30   p.m.,    International House.
NEWMAN CLUB
Supper   night,
College.
THURSDAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Love feast, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre conference room.
SUS
Egg dropping contest — make your
own container to drop an egg In,
winner Is fastest drop without
breaking eggs supplied, noon, pendulum In Hebb building.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENSE
OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Chile week: movie, To the Peoples
of the World, noon, SUB 111.
CUSO
Issues in Development In Education
with Derek Hamlet, education team
member from Ottawa, noon, Scarfe
201.
SUS
Beer night, 7-11 p.m., SUB party
room.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
The Christian and his vocation,
noon, SUB 207-209.
PHOTOSOC
General meeting and social evening,
8 p.m., SUB 212.
GAY PEOPLE
March business meeting, noon, SUB
213.
SLAVONIC STUDIES
Meeting to organize any students
Interested in Slavic studies, Russian
or Slavonic studies, noon, Buch.
1256.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, SUB 130.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
OF CANADA
Pre-semlnar conference, Information
about francophones In the West and
general Information on WUSC, 1:30
p.m., SUB 205.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Dr. Irving Hexham — Yoga and
UFOs: The New Mythology, noon,
chem 250.
EAST INDIAN
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Organizational meeting and elections, noon, SUB 211.
FRIDAY
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENSE
OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
Chile    week:     movie    —    Boycott,
noon, SUB auditorium.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
SUS
Boat races, noon, outside SUB.
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
PURPLE DUST
By SEAN O'CASEY
MARCH 3-11
PREVIEWS - MARCH 1 & 2
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $2.50
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
A.M.S.
1978-79
Student Administrative Commission (S.A.C); Student
Representative Assembly (S.R.A.) Commissioners, and A.M.S.
Ombudsperson.
Applications will be received for the positions of:
—Director of Services (SAC)
—Director of Finance (SAC)
—Commissioners of S.A.C. (8 positions)
—Commissioner for Teaching and Academic Standards Committee
(SRA)
—Commissioner for Student Housing Access Committee (SRA)
—Commissioner for Programs Committee (SRA)
—A.M.S. Ombudsperson
at the AMS business office Rm. 266, SUB
Applications close 4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 10, 1978.
Applications may be picked up at Room 246 and 266 SUB
Arnold Hedstrom
Secretary-Treasurer
THE CO-OPERATIVE
CAMPUS MINISTRY
TED SCOTT,
Primate of the Anglican
Church of Canada will speak
at a Banquet
March 4th
In SUB Party Room
For Tickets:
ph: 224-3722
The Primate will aso speak on
"Symbols for Faith Today"
March 7th SUB Aud. at 12:30
DR. MURRAY A. NEWMAN
Director, Vancouver Public Aquarium
"EXPEDITION TO THE HIGH ARCTIC"
12:30 Fri., Mar. 3rd Biol. 2000
Sponsored by the Science Undergraduate Society's Speakers Program
WHEN YOU LOOK GOOD
SO DO WE . . .
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional iines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
CHILEAN NIGHT, Coffee Place, Inter-
national House, 6-10 p.m., with Chilean music and snacks.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
ORGANICALLY GROWN Okanagan
fruit and vegetables. Wholesale prices
in bulk. Free delivery.  738-8828.
'75 HONDA HATCH-BACK, $2,300. 669-
3213, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Dealer No.
526A
35 — Lost
FOREST-GREEN RUCKSACK on aluminum A-frame, papers inside. $10 reward. 2779 or 3039.
RECORDS    LOST    FRIDAY    at   parking
lot. Phone 434-5164 if found.
65 — Scandals
SUBFILMS PRESENTS scenes of blood
and gore (family-style) in weekend
feature  "Rocky". Only 75c.
70 — Services
WE PRINT RESUMES. Our Xerox 9200
prints and sorts in one fast operation.
Low cost ... no wait! Typing service
if needed. Stapling, too. Phone for
prices. Evening and weekend service
by special arrangement. Burnaby In-
staprint, 433-9713, 5487 Kingsway,
Burnaby, B.C.
85 — Typing
TYPING essays, thesis from legible
copy. Fast efficient service. English,
French, Spanish. 321-9414.
85 — Typing (Continued)
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
669-8479.
CAMPUS DROP OFF point for typing
service. Standard rates. Call Liz, after
6:00 p.m., 732-3690.
FAST, accurate typist will do typing at.
home. Standard rates. Please phone
anytime,  263-0286.
EXPERT TYPING of thesis, term papers,
manuscripts, etc. Call Irene, days or
evenings,   734-3170.
YEAR ROUND expert essay, thesis typing from legible work. Phone 738-
6829, 10  a.m.-9 p.m.
90 — Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
=lr=Jt=lt=l^=lr=lr=Jr=l[=J[=J[=Jr Tuesday, February 28, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
Jayvees take B.C. hoop title
UBC wrestlers
shine at meet
The UBC Jayvee basketball
team did on the weekend what the
big boys couldn't, sweeping two
games from Victoria Trilec to
advance to the Canadian championships.
The younger 'Birds added a 68-63
Sunday triumph to their 56-55 win
on Saturday at BCIT to take the
B.C. title. Ross Marshall and Bob
Forsyth with 20 and 18 points led
the UBC scoring parade Sunday,
while Forsyth led all scorers
Saturday with 22 points.
The Jayvees move on to St.
John's, Newfoundland for the
national tournament March 9-12.
UVic leads
Meanwhile, big boy basketball
continued, minus UBC. The
University of Victoria Vikings
knocked off the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs in a best-of-
three series in Victoria to advance
to the national playdowns in
Halifax. Scores of the three games
were 85-77, 80-90, and 107-76.
Puck clash set
The University of Alberta Golden
Bears have returned from Japan
where they won the Pacific Rim
Hockey Tournament, defeating the
Japanese national team in the
final.
The Bears will meet the 'Birds
Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30
in the Winter Sports Centre in a
preview of the Canada West
University Athletic Association
playoffs which will take place in
Edmonton on March 11, 12 and 13
(if necessary).
Even though the 'Birds lost four
times in Edmonton this season,
they beat the Bears twice at UBC
and will be out to repeat that feat to
gain the momentum going into the
playoffs. The winner will represent
the West in the national tournament.
Sabres clash
Old-style weapons stole the show
at the Canadian Forces' Chilliwack
base on the weekend, as 50 men
and women fencers competed at
the B.C. Novice tournament.
UBC's Don Lee won in the epee
and placed third in the sabre, while
Frank Ritcey finished fourth in the
foil and the epee and sixth in the
sabre. Tibor Tusandy finished
tenth in the foil.
In women's foil, Debbie Gujer
finished sixth and Rhona Feldman
eighth.
This weekend UBC competes in
the Seattle Open.
Sisiers kissed
Pressure from South Delta
resulted in a last-minute goal by
Linda Partington to tie the UBC
Thunderettes ice hockey team 2-2
Sunday in the start of playoff action.
Scorers for UBC were Brenda
Donas and Alice Brock, while
Donna Goodwin netted the hosts'
first goal at Ladner Arena in
seven-team, round-robin action in
the second section of the Lower
Mainland 18-and-over division
playoffs of the B.C. women's ice
hockey association. UBC finished
seventh over-all with an 8-11-1
record in their first year of play.
LOND
From VANCOUVER
LONG DURATION FLIGHTS
April 27-June 21	
April 27-July 5	
May 7-August 16	
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May 14-September 5_
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BUDGET STANDBY FARES
SEATTLE to
LONDON   From $202.00 (U.S.) one way *
From $J55.00 (U.S.)    return *
BANGKOK   From $399.00 (U.S.) one way
HONG KONG   From $349.00 (U.S.) one way
AROUND THE WORLD $999.00 (u.s.)
*Subject to Government approval. Ask C.U.T.S. for full details about
above and other discount fares.
C.UXS.
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
TRAVEL SERVICE LIMITED
Student Union Building, Room 100P,
Phone (604) 224-0111
Playoff action continues when
UBC visits Port Coquitlam
Saturday and hosts North Delta at
3:15 p.m. Sunday at the winter
sports centre.
Field hockey
The UBC Thunderbird field
hockey team continued its charge
toward first place in the Vancouver
league first division with a 4-0 win
over Panthers Saturday, pulling to
within three points of league-
leading India with three games
left.
The 'Birds carried the play in the
first half, counting goals by Alan
Hobkirk and Andy Haigh. In a
closer second half Dave Bissett
and Robin Fleming tallied for the
winners.
In other action, the Jayvees lost
2-1 to Indian B in a third-division
match.
Five UBC wrestlers helped the
runner-up Canada West conference
challenge the strength of t h e
Ontario A team at the national
intercollegiate championships
over the weekend, but the West lost
on points while splitting the
matches 6-6.
The West finished with 31 points
at the five-conference Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union
championships at Royal Military
College in Kingston, Ont., Ontario
A winning with 42.
And UBC's Peter Farkas, who
took the 134-pound weight class
with a 7-4 win over Albert Vendetti,
earlier picked as Ontario's outstanding wrestler, tied with
McGill's Howard Stupp for
national outstanding wrestler
honors. Stupp took the 150-pound
title, allowing Quebec to finish
third with 19 points, just ahead of
the Great Plains conference (17)
and Ontario B (16). The Atlantic
trailed with seven.
But in the round-robin competition, the West downed the other
three conferences and Ontario's B
team, before going down on points
35-19 to the winners although tying
6-6 in the 12 weight classes.
A strong performance was
turned in by UBC's Craig Delahunt
(177-pounds), who won four
matches, but lost to ex-Thunder-
bird Clark Davis from Thunder
Bay's Lakehead University, who
was an alternate at the Montreal
Olympics.
UBC's Vance Coan placed third,
but beat over-all 142-pound
champion Leo Reyns from the
University of Guelph 3-1. Other
Thunderbird competitors were
Martin Gleave (126), who placed
third, and Gary Hirose (190), who
finished fifth. UBC wrestling coach
Bob Laycoe was selected as CIAU
coach of the year.
Next wrestling action for UBC
will be the junior Canadian Open in
Toronto March 10-11 and the senior
open in Edmonton on March 18-19.
Tonight. Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28, 1978
'Heart and mind
true camera lens'
Young photographers should be students of the humanities if they are
serious about photography, famous Canadian photographer Yousef
Karsh said Saturday.
"The heart and the mind are the true lens of the camera. Think before
you click," Karsh told an overflow crowd of more than 2,000 at IRC.
A photographer would be well advised to get a bachelor of arts degree
before he begins a professional career, said Karsh, in order to better
understand people.
He also recommended that young photographers train with an expert to
further their knowledge.
"I still believe in apprenticeship with a very fine artist," Karsh said.
The 69-year-old Armenian-born photographer said he does most of his
portraits in a place familiar to the subject rather than in a studio.
"Ideally it is an intimate atmosphere of uninhibited closeness between
the photographer and the sitter," he said.
The Vancouver Institute lecture was illustrated with slides of several of
Karsh's portraits, and Karsh had anecdotes about many of the personalities.
He said one of the most fascinating people he had photographed was
Helen Keller, who had "photographed" Karsh by memorizing his facial
features with her hands.
"She photographs people with her mind's eye," said Karsh.
Some of the people Karsh has wanted to photograph, such as Chinese
leader MaoTse-tung, are now dead, but there are still enough left to keep
his career going for some time.
"The rest that are alive I am still young enough to catch up to," he said.
Karsh said that although there have been great improvements in the
quality of color film, he still prefers black and white photographs because
they enable the photographer to present both positive and negative
moods.
"I get greatest satisfaction from black and white," he said. "The color
is a positive statement."
Karsh said photographing famous people can be very difficult because
they are so well known to the public.
"The more familiar the outer visage, the more elusive the inner spirit,"
he said.
'Don't be guilt-ridden
about oppression'
From page 3
vested in, the Bank of Montreal
and the Toronto Dominion Bank,
along with the Royal Bank and the
Bank of Commerce, were involved
in an international consortium
which loaned over $3 billion to the
South African government in 1976.
UVic administration president
Howard Petch, a member of the
foundation investment advisory
board, said he deplored the
situation in South Africa and Chile,
but that the most important factor
is realizing a good return on investments.
"You shouldn't get too guilt-
ridden over something that is
happening thousands of miles
away," Petch said.
When asked if members of the
advisory board should look into
where the university's money is
ending up, Petch said "personally,
I haven't got the time to look into
where the companies and banks
are using our money."
But Petch said he would be
happy to recommend that the
board set up a policy of taking into
consideration the social
ramifications of future investments.
CHOOSING THE RIGHT
CAREER ISN'T EASY
We'd like to offer you a challenge — a career in
dealing with professionals — a career in Life
insurance sales and/or sales management.
It's one of the few careers that offers you
freedom of action and decision and an
unusually high measure of security and
personal satisfaction.
We know it isn't easy choosing the right career.
Perhaps we at Metropolitan Life can help you
make the right choice. Why not drop by and
see us. We'll be on Campus on:
MONDAY, MARCH 6
ft
Metropolitan Life
Where the future is now
ISRAEL WEEK—UBC
TUESDAY
12:30 SUB 207-9
FALAFEL LUNCH
AND KIBBUTZ: AN
EXPERIMENT THAT
DID NOT FAIL
WEDNESDAY
12:30 SUB 207-9
PROF. WILLIAM BRINNER
Director Centre for
Near Eastern Studies
University of California, Berkeley.
Taught and directed
programs at
Egyptian and Israeli Universities
Mid-East commentator on
PBS program World Press
will speak on
DIFFERENT MEANINGS OF PEACE
THURSDAY
12:30 SUB
auditorium Film
ISRAEL: EYE ON THE PRESENT
a photo exhibit hy Bedrich Grunzweig
MONDAY-FRIDAY AT SUB
What more
could an unhappily
married man want?
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Arnold Smith
The first secretary-general of the Commonwealth, a position he held for 10 years,
Arnold Smith brings a wealth of international experience with him to UBC. His
diplomatic career with the Canadian foreign service sent him to Cairo, Indochina,
London and Moscow Dr Smith has been the Lester B. Pearson Professor of International Affairs at Carleton University in Ottawa since 1975.
CANADA AND THE THIRD WORLD
Thursday, March 2
In Room 100, Mathematics Buifding, at 12:30 p m.
CANADA AND WORLD POLITICS - TODAY AND TOMORROW
Saturday, March 4
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute lecture )
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
sponsored by
iThe Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund*
Dot represents
land occupied by
mining (.013%)
The dot
on the map
that's worth
billions to B.G
On a map of B.C., you'd have a hard time making out the area taken up by our
various mining operations . . . because all of B.C.'s mines together account for
only .013% of our provincial land surface.
By way of comparison, provincial roads and highways take up roughly ten times
that amount of land, and saleable forest reserves occupy 20% of the land.
While mining is a relatively small speck on the map, it looms large in economic
terms. It is B.C.'s second largest industry . .. and contributes about a billion
dollars each year to the provincial economy. That total is made up of mining
payrolls, the purchase of materials and services, plus taxes and dividends. Each
year the mines of the Placer group . .. Craigmont, Gibraltar and Endako . . .
contribute more than $100 million by themselves.
They are part of an industry that may be the biggest little enterprise B.C. ever had!
ra
PLACER
DEVELOPMENT
LIMITED

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