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The Ubyssey Apr 9, 2015

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Array  // Page 2
EVENTS        II THISWEEK, CHECK!
THURSDAY  ' 9
March 27th 8pm Koerner Plaza
EVENT POS
WC
Featuring NomNcm. Luc Briede-Caoper and G-silenl (rum UBC EDM
utown@ubc ,
una!
[<^©"RPVRA
BIKE RAVE
8:00 P.M. @ KOERNERPLAZA
Go for a loud and adventurous ride around campus on your decked out
scooter, skateboard or bicycle. Best decorated ride gets a free ticket to
Block Party. Featuring glowsticks, energy drinks and spinnin' local DJs. Free
THURSDAY' 9
STARGAZING
6:30 P.M. @IKB256
Take advantage of U BC's clear skies and both expert and amateur astronomers by joining the U BC Astronomy Club for a night of stargazing and
space facts. A professional-grade telescope will be on site. Free
FRIDAY ' 10
BLOCKPARTY
2:30-9:15 P.M.® 6190 AGRONOMY ROAD
The biggest bash ofthe year is almost here. Featuring Chromeo, Tokyo Police Club and Yukon Blonde (among several other acts!) as well as food carts,
beverages and thousands of your peers — what's not to love? $30; 19+
ON
THE
COVER
Go sports!
- Photo Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*w
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
APRIL.9,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEL
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Photo Editor
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Cherihan Hassun
Natalie Scadden, CJ Pentland, Host;
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss ey.cs
ohoto@ubyssey.es
Elsay. Olamide Olanyan. Lawrence
Neal Garcia, Olivia Law, Tariq Vira,
fpe reira@ubyssey.es
Business Office: SUB 23
Design Editor
Opinions + Blog Editor
-lelley Lin, Jenny Tang, Leo Soh,
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nquiries604.S22.66S1
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gerhardt@ubyssey.es
Jasmine Cheng, Miguel Santa Maria,
a dve rti s i ng @ uby ssey es
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Copy Editor
Sam Fruitman, Bra ed on Atkins or
Dauze,JacobGershkovich,Emm;
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Peter Siemens
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Cartridge, Ben Cook, Ming Wong,
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TamrnyHsieh. Chlce Lai. Mischa
Milne. Aiken Lao. Danni Shanel,
a ccou nts@ u byss eyes
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editor
Distribution Coordinator
-laylan Mackinnon, Elba Gome;
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Twitter: ©ubyssey
Veronika Bondarenko
Lily Cai
news@ubyssey.cs
cai@ubyssey.es
LEGAL
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OUR CAMPUS //
iiwBS
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
The Syrup Trap brings (sometimes not-so) subtle satire to the Canadian masses.
The Syrup Trap wants to take their satire national
Jack Hauen
Sports & Rec Editor
If you're a UBC student, you're
already aware of the Syrup Trap.
And if you aren't, you've almost
definitely heard of their articles.
The talented group of satirists
were the ones who convinced
thousands of people that J.K.
Rowling had bought the Irving
K. Barber Learning Centre,
taught you all about Crack Ford
and covered the entire Peter
Mansbridge clone saga.
Interestingly enough, though,
it didn't start out as a humour
magazine. Founder and former
UBC student Nick Zarzycki originally intended to start a "Canadian version of IvyGate," a gossip and news site for the United
States' Ivy League schools.
"That was fun for a while, but
never really gained any steam,"
said Zarzycki. "But I kept the
name, and then right around
spring of 2013 I was reading
a blog post in The New Yorker
about college humour magazines
in the United States, and I saw
the logo for the Dartmouth Jack-
O-Lantern... so I was like 'oh,
wouldn't it be cool if UBC had a
humour magazine that was similar to that one, I really like that
logo.' So I made the logo, and I
was like 'okay, what would the
website look like?' And I made
the website. And I was like 'okay,
why don't I just write the first
post?' And I wrote the first post.
Then I started talking to funny
friends that I knew."
And it was all smooth sailing
from there. One ofthe newly
minted site's earliest posts
garnered a couple hundred
Facebook shares.
"I was like 'hey, why don't we
do this more?'"
So they did.
Now, the Trappers are widening their scope. They haven't
CONGRATULATIONS    TO    NEXT    YEARS    EDITORIAL    BOARD
abandoned their west coast
roots (just Tuesday afternoon
they published an account of a
41 bus that probably crashed).
But Zarzycki and his crew feel
that they've honed their skills
enough to make a go of becoming Canada's Onion.
This entire thing is
currently completely
running on enthusiasm
and passion."
Nick Zarzycki
Founder ofthe Syrup Trap
"Since we've left campus,
we've started to realize that
Canada is one large UBC, know
what I mean?" said Zarzycki.
"There's a central government
that is very distant from most of
its constituents ... the only way
you make a career and make
friends is by joining a club of
some sort... and, just like UBC
two years ago, I think Canada
needs a humour magazine."
To do that, they've enlisted
the help of Patreon, the popular
crowdfunding website on which
users — or patrons — can donate
a small amount of money each
month to fund projects they
believe in. Currently, their page
sits at $467.69/month, almost
halfway to their first goal of
$1,000, which they'll use simply
to keep themselves afloat. At
$4,000, they promise to pay
their contributors and double
the number of articles they publish and once they hit six grand,
the Syrup Trap will become a
"real humour magazine," complete with an office space.
"This entire thing is currently completely running on
enthusiasm and passion," said
Zarzycki. "But [from] working
on past projects, I know that
projects that are sustained
purely by enthusiasm never last.
"I'm really excited by the idea
of building not just a blog, but a
magazine."
"Time costs money whether
or not you think it costs you
money, you know?" said Paul
Bucci, another founding member ofthe Syrup Trap. "For us,
money feeds creativity because
it feeds us."
The goal ofthe Patreon
campaign is not just to survive, but to progress. The final
goal promises "weekly features," including videos and
cartoons, areas in which the
group has dabbled in the past
(such as with former AMS joke
candidate and Block Party
interviewer Winnie Code), but
for which they've never set a
dedicated schedule.
"Fake news is fun, but we
see ourselves more as a prank
factory," said Bucci. "We're
not exactly here to write fake
news, we're here to play a lot of
pranks."
"I really like this idea of a
publication that doesn't have
one form, that does many
things, that tries different
things all the time and that
plays tricks on people in many
different ways."
Hopefully, we'll get to see it.
If you're interested in contributing to the Syrup Trap, they're always open to new ideas. The best
way to get something published,
according to Zarzycki, is to send
a list of pitches (not a completed
article) to write@syruptrap.ca,
and if the editors like what they
see, they'll work with you to turn
one or more into a story. But
don't send them any thing about
construction at UBC. You're
better than that. Xi
Coordinating Editor       Culture Editor
Will McDonald ~  -■
Print News Editor
Opinions & Blog Editor        Web News Editor
JackHauen MoiraWarburton
Features Editor
Photo Editor
Sports & Rec Editor
Koby Michaels
Video Editor // News
EDITOR VERONIKA BONDARENKO
SAFETY»
Campus Secuity finds over go per cent
of all blue phone calls in last year ruled
accidental or mischief
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Campus Security will be installing cameras to some of the existing blue phones.
Sarah Pribadi
StaffWriter
Campus Security's annual safety
report showed that the majority
of blue phone calls were activated either by accident or as
a prank.
The emergency blue phone
system is intended to connect
students with security in the
case of emergencies, or when
they need directions or assistance at all hours ofthe day.
The report showed that out of
110 blue phone calls received by
a dispatcher in 2014,101 were all
determined to be either mischief
or accidental. In these cases, a
staff member was dispatched to
the phone, but was not able to
locate the person who placed the
call. Out ofthe remaining nine
calls, four were for wayfinding
assistance, three were for safe
transport and two were for
medical assistance.
There are currently 19
blue phones on campus. UBC
launched the phones nearly 20
years ago, with the intention of
complementing existing safety
services provided by UBC and
the RCMP.
"The way how it works was
push the button once and it will
automatically connect to the security dispatcher and responded
by patrol staff," said Barry Eccleton, director of Campus Security. "It's a common thing to use
in universities in North America,
since it's the most effective way
to providing individual assistance in such large community."
Accordingto Eccleton,
emergency blue phones are an essential part of Campus Security
program as they help people who
are under threat or feel unsafe
get help.
"We added blue phone as additional security measure and to
make sure that we will be there
to help," said Eccleton.
Though Eccleton expressed
his concern on the misuse of blue
phones, he thought that it is normal to have such things happen
at universities as large as UBC.
"You know, it's a university.
People do have fun, but I prefer
that they didn't [do the prank
calls]," said Eccleton. "I know
that it's likely to be continued
but we tried our best to encourage them to use the phone as it
supposed to be used."
Campus Security is currently
in the process of replacing the
older blue phones with newer ones with cameras in order
to make it easier to assess the
situation at the time ofthe call.
They will also be adding 18 new
phones across campus. Xi
AMS»
SafeWalk service use increased eightfold
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVICfTHE UBYSSEY
SafeWalk staff conduct an average of 35 walks a night
Olivia Law
News Producer
Student use of SafeWalk services
has increased by a factor of eight
since 2012.
This year, a new table has been
added to Campus Security's annual report recording phone calls
requesting transportation from
SafeWalk to different on-campus
locations. The numbers of individuals using safety transportation
between on-campus locations has
increased significantly since 2012.
In 2012, just 131 safety transports were made around campus.
The number was significantly
higher in 2013 with 603, and again
last year with 906. Campus Secur
ity partners with AMS SafeWalk
to maintain the continuity of this
service outside of SafeWalk's normal operating hours.
Ron Gorodetsky, student
services manager for the AMS,
highlights the impact surrounding
the string of sexual assaults on
campus that occurred in September and October 2013 as the main
cause ofthe increased demands
for SafeWalk services.
"They drew a lot of media attention at the time," he said. "This increased tension and concern about
safety on campus led to a spike
in usage at the AMS SafeWalk, as
well as at Campus Security."
Until April 2014, SafeWalk was,
as the name implies, a walking
service, with teams dispatched
as needed to locations around
campus. In the last year, Safe-
Walk acquired hybrid vehicles,
and began using them alongside
the walking teams.
Accordingto Gorodetsky, the
increased number of calls this
year can be partially attributed
to students' desire for a free ride
to locations around campus late
at night.
"It's been an uphill battle,"
said Gorodetsky. "Last year
people didn't necessarily know
whether they were going to be
dispatched to the walking or
driving team at any given time,
but this year we translated
the service into a fully driving
team."
SafeWalk's capacity is
currently at 70 walks per
night, and on an average shift,
the operators are working at
around half capacity. This
gives staff enough time to
have a break between back to
back journeys.
With recent events, demand
has again spiked and SafeWalk
was operating at around 60
walks per night, costing some
workers overtime. That said,
Gorodetsky is confident that
the service can handle fluctuations in demand.
There are currently no plans
to expand the service to include
more vehicles and SafeWalk
encourages calls from anybody
around campus in need. tJ
CRIME »
RCMP looking into assault
described in anonymous letter
=ILE PHOTO WILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
UBC has reported the attack described in the letter to the RCMP.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
UBC has released a statement
following our publication of an
anonymous letter describing a
racially-motivated attack that occurred following a Pit Night earlier
in the term.
The student described an
incident where a group of six
men surrounded him, called him
racial slurs, ripped off his turban
and threw it to the curbside and
punched him in the stomach and
chest for 20 minutes in the early
hours ofthe morning following a
Pit Night.
In the statement, the university
said that they have reported the
assault to the RCMP.
"Racism and violence are
unacceptable on campus and
UBC takes incidents like the one
described very seriously," reads
the statement. "The safety of all of
our students, staff and faculty is of
paramount importance."
RCMP Sergeant Drew Grainger
said that they were conducting an
investigation into an alleged assault
reported to have occurred on
Thursday, January 29. The RCMP
has spoken to the witness, but was
not able to find any information on
the attackers.
"We are investigating the allegation that a male was assaulted in
the early morning hours of January
29, at West Mall and Agronomy,"
said Grainger. "We have spoken
to a victim of that alleged assault.
We have unfortunately no other
independent witnesses to verify his
account and we have no suspect
information at this time."
Grainger also said that the investigation is ongoing as the RCMP
look for witnesses to the assault.
"The investigation is still open,
it's still being investigated," said
Grainger. "We're just looking for
more witness information."
UBC also said that the university is in the process of finalizing
a new CCTV camera and blue
phone system that was proposed
in the Campus Safety Working
Group report in August 2014 in the
statement." tJ
Want to cover the news? Senc
cin email. news@ubyssey.ca
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E-mail: info@onestepstorage.ca Hotline: (604) 204-0001 NEWS    I   THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2015
PETTY CRIME »
PR»
Man breaks
into The
Moon, walks
away with
cans of pop
=HOTOKOSTAPRODANOVIOTHE UBYSSEY
After a break-in, The Moon had to throw out the
majority oftheirfood.
Olivia Law
News Producer
At approximately 4 a.m. on
Monday, March 30, a break-in
occurred in the SUB.
An unidentified bald white
male, wearing all black, a hat and
a backpack, spent 45 minutes
trying to break into The Moon,
the Chinese restaurant in the
basement ofthe old SUB. He
spent another 45 minutes inside,
trying to pry into cabinets in
the outlet.
Shaun Wilson, head of AMS
Security, said that no major damage was done to equipment and
no major valuables were taken,
but that the cooler doors were
left open, and noodles were all
over the floor.
"Upon viewing the CCTV
footage that we have of security
cameras in the building it was
determined that someone had
broken into the SUB by force in
the morning by forcefully breaking over the door and then broke
into The Moon and spent about
an hour and a half attacking the
place and left with a bunch of
soft drinks," said Wilson.
Wilson said since the coolers
were left open, the restaurant
decided to discard all of the food
kept inside them. The total value
ofthe food is still being calculated.
"We are working with building operations to reinforce the
entry that was broken into," said
Wilson. "There was quite a bit
of force used to break in. We'll
be going forward working with
campus security with more patrols around the SUB after hours
and we're also double-checking
if any other reinforcements can
be given to the doorways ofthe
SUB with the building being so
old."
The cash registers in The
Moon were empty and all valuable equipment was either locked
away or bolted down. Wilson
said the restaurant also received
a special cleaning after the
break in.
Accordingto Wilson, nobody
was harmed and nothing of value
was stolen.
"Unless he was able to get
hold of The Moon's secret wing
recipe, there's not a lot he would
have been able to get away with,"
said Wilson. Xi
UBC REC apologizes for misplaced April Fools joke,
promises to better accomodate students for sporting events
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The UBC REC Centre issued an
apology for an inconsiderate April
Fool's Day joke.
On April 1, UBC REC posted a
joke letter on the UBC REC Point
Blog saying that the wall used in
the annual Storm the Wall intramural event will be lowered from
12 to 10.5 feet in future years. The
letter also said that "a ramp will
also be installed between the two
walls to accommodate differently
abled participants."
After being called out on their
ill use of humour by numerous
Twitter commentators, UBC REC
revised the letter to remove the
line about the ramp and issued
an apology.
Aaron Miu, Marketing & Communications Manager for Athletics and Recreations, is the one
in charge of looking over content
before it is published. He said that
the letter was published before
he had a chance to look at it and
should never have gone out.
"There was commentary that
was included in there that made
light of accessibility and our
programming, a portion around a
ramp and making it accessible for
paraplegic or disabled athletes,"
said Miu. "That's the part that, in
particular, I believe should have
never gone to print."
UBC REC has apologized for an April Fool's comment.
Miu also said that once he
realized that the post had gone
out, he edited the post to cut out
the statement about the ramp and
included an apology.
"The second version that you
see is simply just the edited
version," said Miu. "As soon as I
realized that that had gone out, I
went in, revised it, and included
an apology at the end of it."
Accordingto Miu, UBC REC
will be working with Access &
Diversity and holding discussions
with their own employees to
make sure that future sporting
events are more accessible to
all UBC students. In the past,
they've worked on accessibility
on a case-by-case basis when athletes came up to them with concerns about specific events, but
hope to implement a more structural change in future months.
"It is a piece that should have
never gone to print and it was
=ILE PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
done in error and poor taste,"
said Miu.
"It's not indicative or reflective ofthe programming or the
values.
I recognize that it's not just
about a retraction or a statement,
as much as it around culture
change within program training,
I think both for our program staff
and as well as here at the university."
-With files from Kosta Prodanovic Xi
2015 METRO VANCOUVER
TRANSPORTATION AND
TRANSIT PLEBISCITE
Elections BC is administering the vote-by-mail
plebiscite from March 16 to May 29, 2015.
You can vote if you are:
■ A Canadian citizen
■ 18 years of age or older, on or before May 29, 2015
■ A resident of B.C. for at least six months, on or before May 29, 2015
■ Registered to vote in B.C.
■ Living in Metro Vancouver
You can ask for a voting package to be mailed to you by calling
1-800-661-8683 or online at elections.be.ca/ovr. You can ask for
a voting package until midnight on Friday, May 15, 2015.
Elections BC must receive your completed ballot package before 8 p.m.
on Friday, May 29, 2015.
Visit elections.be.ca or call 1-800-661-8683 for more information.
elections.be.ca
1-800-661-8683
#^# ELECTIONS BC
4Sr   A non-partisan Office of the Legislature THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 2015    |    NEWS
SWIMMING »
FEES»
Aquatic Centre shuts down for regular
maintenance and repairs until May
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTERfTHE UBYSSEY
The Aquatic Centre will be working on lighting
Bill Situ
StaffWriter
The Aquatic Centre has been shut
down for maintenance until May.
With the new Aquatic Centre
scheduled to open in the fall of
2016, the existing pool is supposed to remain open to the public
until the new centre is built.
Accordingto Kavie Toor, facilities and business development
director of UBC Athletics and
Recreation, the centre was shut
down to conduct the maintenance and repairs that are necessary to keep the pool operational
over the next year. Different
parts ofthe centre, including the
indoor pool and the sauna rooms,
have been routinely shut down
over the last year.
"[Our goal is] primarily to
ensure that an important facility
like the Aquatic Centre can
remain open for students and the
community for the entire period
until the new facility is open,"
said Toor.
The maintenance required
includes work on the lighting,
gutter and pumping systems
gutter and water pumping systems in the month-long interval.
along with minor concluding works from the last year's
engineering audit.
The Aquatic Centre launched
an engineering audit last summer
for a number of maintenance
works after experiencing a
series of frequent shutdowns
due to various problems with
its mechanical system. The
facility completed the bulk of
the maintenance entailed in this
audit last fall, concurrently with
its authorization for the current
shutdown.
The facility is scheduled to
reopen on May 4.
Toor also said that the Aquatic
Centre has been in adequately operating condition since
completing the work from the
last engineering audit. This
shutdown is part of their regular
maintenance plan, with this time
period chosen because it is when
the facility generally receives
fewer patrons.
"It's functioned really well
for us in the last nine months
or so without any issues," said
Toor. "We are very pleased [with]
where it's currently at, acknowledging that it's an older facility."
In terms ofthe current progress on the construction of the
new Aquatic Centre, Toor said
that the civil work for the facility
is for the most part complete.
The construction team has now
installed the structure ofthe
basement and is currently in the
process of framing the pools.
Toor also said that he is satisfied with the pace at which the
construction crews have worked.
"We're currently on schedule,
on budget and really pleased
with the work that the construction crew and all our trades are
doing," said Toor.
Toor expects the new Aquatic
Centre to open as scheduled, but
also said that unexpected circumstances may potentially arise
in the construction process.
"There's always the caveat that
this is construction, and there
[are] all these risks that may
occur, but at this point in time,
we're all very confident that
we're going to be opening in fall
2016," said Toor. Xi
Board of Governors delays talk of
fee increases for two weeks
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTERfTHE UBYSSEY
BoG is meeting again on April 14.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The Board of Governors held their
standing committee meeting on
Wednesday, April 1.
The morning meeting started
with a closed session discussion.
Once the public was allowed into
the room, the Board announced
that all talk of tuition and other
fee increases had been postponed
until Tuesday, April 14.
Student representative Chris
Roach said that he was happy the
discussion about fee increases
was moved, as this would give the
Board more time to go over the
student feedback and proposals
that were submitted in detail.
"There was a real concern about
whether the Board is actually
listening to students and the fact
that we are going to take those
extra two weeks to really dive into
that 33 page[s] and read everything
that students are saying is really
important," said Roach.
After that, the Board approved
four new programs, including the
High-Performance Coaching and
Technical Leadership Certificate, the Graduate Certificate in
Global Surgical Care, the Master
of Engineering and the Master of
Health Leadership and Policy.
The two Master's programs will
cost $27,000 for domestic students
and $46,000 for international
students per year.
The Board also approved an
expansion of Totem Park, which
proposes housing 350 additional
residents in the place ofthe current tennis courts. The budget that
has been proposed for the project
is $29.8 million.
"92 per cent of international
students want to live in student
residences, so we think there is
going to be a strong demand,"
said Andrew Parr, managing
director of Student Housing and
Hospitality Services.
The Board also gave approval
to begin designing a new gallery
that features art from the Pacific Northwest at the Museum
of Anthropology. Dean of Arts
Gage Averill said that he was
thrilled about the prospect of such
a project.
"This is well-known work by
well-known recent Northwest
artists," said Averill. "A fabulous
addition to MOA."
David Farrar, provost and VP
academic, John Hepburn, VP
research and international, Lisa
Castle, VP human resources and
David Woodson, managing director Energy and Water Services,
also gave a presentation on the
Bioenergy Research and Demonstration Project currently taking
place at UBC.
This year, there has been a 12
per cent decrease in greenhouse
gas emissions on campus, but
several system upgrades are also
needed to fix equipment used for
biomass syngas cleanup.
Woodson also said that they
will be consulting FortisBC to see
how the university can reduce
the cost of renewable natural
gas alternatives.
"This has been a very exciting
project, but what I want to highlight is that this has been a tremendously challenging project,"
said Woodson.
The next Board of Governors
meeting is scheduled to take place
at Walter Gage on April 14.
-With Files from Joshua Azizi Xi
RESEARCH»
Microbiology team aims to transform vaccines by understanding immune system
Signals from multiple cells affect the body's response to infections.
Sean Sinden
Contributor
Though vaccines may currently
be a polarizing issue, research
to improve their effectiveness is
underway on campus.
A recent discovery made by a
group of researchers at UBC may
change the way we think about how
our bodies fight some infections
and develop autoimmune diseases
and cancers. The team, a collaboration between the departments
of microbiology & immunology,
cellular & physiological sciences and
mathematics, investigated the way
signals from multiple sources in our
cells allow the body to fine tune its
response to invading microbes.
The portion of our immune system that recognizes and responds
to foreign invaders (antigens) are
=ILE PHOTO TIMOTHY HOGGAWHE UBYSSEY
known as B lymphocytes, or B cells.
Proteins on the outside of these B
cells, known as B-cell antigen receptors, differentiate between "self"
molecules — those that are native to
the body — and foreign molecules
and instruct the B cells to respond
by producing protective antibodies.
Another type of cellular receptor,
called Toll-like receptors, help B
cells distinguish between harmful
and non-harmful foreign matter by
sending 'danger signals.'
Researchers at UBC have determined the molecular mechanism by
which these receptors 'talk' to one
another and increase the sensitivity
of our immune system to intruders.
In a resting cell, B-cell antigen
receptors are confined to an area
on the outer membrane by a web
of protein called a cytoskeleton.
Michael Gold, the principal investigator ofthe study and department
head of microbiology & immunology, and his team found that
antigen receptors on cells prepared
by activation of Toll-like receptors
moved around the cell membrane
more quickly and in a wider area.
These B-cell receptors were also
more sensitive to low levels of
foreign microbes. The researchers showed that these changes
occurred because of a breakdown
ofthe cytoskeleton.
"The new thing in this paper is
the way to regulate this activation
state by the confinement ofthe
receptors by the cytoskeleton and
how much they're moving" said
Gold.
Without being confined by the
cytoskeleton, the B-cell receptors are more likely to bump into
one another to form clusters or
encounter foreign microbes, both
of which increase the likelihood of
the receptors sounding the alarm
when intruders are present.
This new understanding of how
our cells detect an infection might
allow doctors to fine-tune their
ability to fight infections through
vaccine development.
"Clinical scientists would think
about how to translate this into
understanding how to make new
vaccines or better vaccine strategies'" said Gold.
Accordingto Gold, the study
will also help scientists further
comprehend how people develop
autoimmune diseases and leuk-
emias.
"That would give you maybe
a way to treat these if you know
the cause, that what's driving
these cells to be proliferated or
activated is that their cytoskeleton
is altered, maybe you can target
the cytoskeleton specifically with
drugs," said Gold.
Gold and his team are currently
moving to confirm these findings
in human blood cells and understand how our cells respond to
invading antigens and these 'danger signals' when they appear at
the same time. This will help them
to more fully understand how our
immune systems respond to infections when they first appear." Xi II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
BC BOOfr
This year, there was an abundance of UBC alumni, and profs
who were shortlisted for this year's BC Book Prize awards.
From children's literature to fiction, alumni and profs have
written some interesting novels. We've rounded up just a few of
the nominees into this year's book supplement.
Gabrielle Prendergast
Paula Duhatschek
Contributor
MFA graduate Gabrielle Prendergast has what you might call a
diverse writing portfolio.
The first work she sold — outside of a short story she wrote in
high school — was Hildegarde,
an Australian children's movie
about a family searching for their
missing pet duck.
Compare that to her most recent project: a two-book series of
provocative young adult novels,
Audacious and Capricious, that
deal with religious prejudice,
eating disorders, drinking and
quite a bit of sex.
"I actually want to get on the
banned books list," said Prendergast. "And not just because it'll
make my books sell better."
If writing honestly about adolescent sexuality doesn't already
sound like a tough literary feat
to pull off, consider the fact that
both Capricious and Audacious
are written in varying styles of
poetic verse.
"I don't know what possessed
me; I just wanted to try it," she
said. "I thought, 'I'll write it in
verse, and I'll just pants it.'"
Accordingto Prendergast,
there are two kinds of writers:
plotters, who plan their work
Aislinn Hunter
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=HOTOCOURTESFGLENN HUNTER
Hunter is nominated for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize.
Prabhi Deol
Contributor
Twelve years in the making and
following her previous novel
that elicited critical acclaim and
a movie deal, Aislinn Hunter's
The World Before Us is off to an
astounding start by being shortlisted for the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize, awarded to the author
of the best work of fiction.
An instructor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University's creative writing department, the writer-in-resi-
dence at the Beaty Biodiversity
museum, and a PhD candidate at
the University of Edinburgh, it's
no wonder Hunter's deeply complex and beautifully written novel
required a little over a decade
to complete.
Wildly ambitious in its scope,
The World Before Us seamlessly intertwines three separate
storylines conveying how isolated
events permeate and connect
together despite differences in
time and location.
When asked to describe her
novel, Hunter responded with:
"The dead are following you
around, but it's not a book about
zombies. It's an examination
of how the past infiltrates the
present and the way it affects
individuals, communities and
institutions on a day-to-day basis,
as though it's alive and vital. Like
a living thing."
Her novel follows the life of
Jane Standen, who at 15 lost the
five year old she was minding
during a walk through the woods.
As an adult, Jane works as an archivist for a British Museum that
will subsequently lose its funding,
and rushes to complete one final
project on a woman who escaped
a Victorian asylum 125 years ago.
"The original title was A
History ofthe Affections'. One of
the things I was trying to stitch
through in the book was how
affection is what matters. And not
like the romantic kind of affection but seeing another human
being as a human being. When
I sift through what matters to
me in this world personally, it's
just kindness and being seen and
being regarded." tJ
from start to finish, and pantsers,
who write by the seat of their
pants. She considers herself to be
one ofthe latter.
Prendergast was inspired to
write the series to fill what she
saw as a lack of realistic female
characters in young adult literature. The books are semi-autobiographical: Ella, the protagonist, is loosely based on herself as
a teenager.
"I felt that all the female characters in young adult books, they
all had a lot of girlfriends, they
all had a really warm relationship with their parents, and they
were all pretty functional," said
Prendergast. "I wanted to write a
character that wasn't that girl."
Prendergast's portrayal of Ella
has resonated with readers and
critics alike: Audacious, released
in 2013 by Orca Books, has won
three awards and was shortlisted
for a fourth. Capricious, which
came out last spring, is currently
in the running for the Sheila A.
Egoff Children's Literature Prize,
one ofthe annual BC Book Prizes
that are presented by the West
Coast Book Prize Society.
As part ofthe BC Book Prize
publicity, Prendergast will spend
part of April touring Northern
and Central B.C. along with two
of her fellow nominees. When she
returns, she has a number of projects to finish up before the end of
the year, including The Boy Who
Fell to Earth, a new young adult
novel inspired in part by Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield.
Although this may seem like
another sharp turn in terms of
subject matter for Prendergast,
there is one unifying thread that
ties her body of work together:
her books are interesting to read.
"I'm interested in writing
things that I've never seen before," said Prendergast. "I want
people to read my books, and I
want people to enjoy them." Xi
Abby Pelaez
Contributor
Many late nights at the Commodore inspired Aaron Chapman,
author and UBC film alumnus, to
document its history.
"It was actually surprising
to me how many people snuck
in underage with fake IDs or
sneaking in behind older people,"
said Chapman.
Aaron Chapman was nominated for the 2015 Bill Duthie
Booksellers' Choice Award for his
new book Live at the Commodore:
The Story ofVancouver's Historic
Commodore Ballroom. Not your
dreadfully dry history tome, Live
at the Commodore delves into the
razzle dazzle, prohibition rebellion, crowdsurfing history of this
nightlife establishment in a prose
Aaron Chapman
akin to cinematic storytelling.
Chapman took on the roles of
historian, musicologist and detective to chronicle a nine-decade
history ofthe establishment. It
highlights much ofthe tumultuous
20th century when it was a cabaret
for the wealthy and powerful, a
venue for UBC Nurses' Dances to
support student soldiers during
World War I, a port for up-and-
coming international bands to land
in Canada and a place to get down
on a Saturday night. Chapman
did inside research, embedding
himself into the topic of his book
to "really discover the clockwork
ofthe Commodore."
On the same stage to which you
might have hollered for Lady Gaga
or seen underground bands out
to make it big, Chapman gained
some of his perspective for Live
at the Commodore as an accompanying musician. "Performing
there has to be the most fun. At the
Commodore I've played about 25
times for one band or another," he
said. He has played mandolin and
Irish whistle for the Town Pants, a
Celtic Rock band and three or four
different instruments with the
Mackenzies, a punk rock band.
Chapman believes the Commodore's greatest impact on Vancouver history is being a cross-generational place that meant so much to
so many people.
"It's a place your grandparents
and parents might've gone to, it's
a place you could go to. I'm not
essentially writing something as an
academic history book, I'm trying to
relate something to the public." tJ
COMMEMORATE
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PHOTO COURTESY NIGHTWOOD EDITIONS
For Your Safety Please Hold On is a collection of poems that can be read as a reflection of the author and other people.
Miguel Santa Maria
Senior StaffWriter
For creative writing MFA student
Kayla Czaga, writing her first
book — nominated for the Dorothy
Liveset Poetry Prize — has been an
interesting ride both figuratively
and literally.
Composed of poetry written
in the span of almost five years,
Czaga describes For Your Safety,
Please Hold On as a coming-of-
age portrait of herself, as well as
reflections of other people.
"It is basically a book that's
trying to figure what it is to be in
the world compared to the people
related to you," said Czaga. "The
experience you have and trying to
learn how to navigate the world is
the core thing that I'm trying to
look at in the book."
Navigate is indeed the key
term; much ofthe book is inspired
from using public transit and
other travelling in general. The
main title itself comes from a sign
usually seen on the bus.
"For some reason, the sense
of moving between places I find
really inspiring and generates a
lot of things," said Czaga, having
written on subjects such as a man
loudly weeping by himself on the
bus, or thoughts on her dad while
on a road trip to visit her hospitalized mother.
That's not to say that the book
is mainly comprised of views on
other people — Czaga herself
is the main subject in plenty of
them.
"The big poem at the end ofthe
book, I wrote fully about a breakup that I had and my thoughts on
spirituality," she said. "I won't
read it out loud at readings because it feels too personal."
The chronology ofthe works
themselves can be a considered
a coming of age story as Czaga
found it hard to write about herself when she initially started.
"The earlier work [within the
book] was less focused on me....
As I [wrote] more and more, it became easier to write specifically
about my own experience, so that
kind of took over."
She also notes that the book
lightens up a bit as it progresses,
reflecting her learnings of incorporating humour while at UBC.
"Before I wasn't very funny, so
the early work tended to be more
serious," she said. "The newer
work had more funny stuff —
though not always — so that was a
progression."
With the book's nomination
for a BC Book Prize, Czaga is
grateful for the recognition.
More importantly, she is glad
to know her expression reaches
others.
"It's not enough for me to just
express and it makes no sense to
anyone else," she said. "When I
was a kid books meant a lot to me
because they spoke a lot to me,
and I guess I'm trying to do that
— to speak to other people."
That said, it does not mean she
is stopping just yet, nor should it
be the reason for other writers.
"I think you'll never be satisfied if you're in this game for the
awards and recognition," she
said. "These [awards] are great...
but ultimately it has to be internally satisfying.... You'll have to
pursue your own vision." Xi
Eileen Kernaghan
Keagan Perlette
StaffWriter
In an endless sea of pale girls
peering out from under dark
bangs plastered on every book
cover in the young adult section
of Chapters, Eileen Kernaghan's
newest novel, Sophie, in Shadow,
stands out against the masses.
It's no secret that young adult
fiction is enjoying the spotlight,
but Kernaghan is an old pro at
weaving intriguing tales that
teens and adults can enjoy.
Kernaghan isn't picky about
her audience. "Somebody, somewhere, wrote an article that I
read that said the secret to why
young adult novels are really
popular is because of the story,
they have to have a strong story,"
she said.
Sophie, in Shadow, is Kernaghan's ninth novel. The captivating story, set in India in 1914, has
earned the book a spot as a finalist
for a BC Book Prize in Children's
Literature. The plot centres
around Sophie, a girl orphaned by
the sinking ofthe Titanic — inspired by Kernaghan's ancestors
missing the fateful voyage. Following a move to India, Sophie finds
that she struggles with a strange
power that emerges from the
hallucinations she has as a result
of post traumatic stress disorder
after losing her family.
Kernaghan says that her main
interests are history and archaeology. "All these years I've been
indulging my fondness for doing
historical research," she said.
"Everything I've written has
been historically as correct as I
could make it but there's a fantasy,
supernatural element to it so it's
kind of hard to put an exact genre
on it."
Kernaghan's career lifted off
while she was living in Burnaby,
raising her young children, with
the publication of The Grey Isles
trilogy. Now settled in New
Westminster, she continues to
work on books that blend her ravenous curiosity and passion for
intense research with her long
standing love of fantasy.
In the case of Sophie, in Shadow, Kernaghan was inspired by
Rudyard Kipling's novel Kim
which, like Sophie, in Shadow,
sees the protagonist through the
Great Game — the network of
spies and terrorist plots which
arose from the conflict between
Britain and Russia — in India
during ofthe 19th century.
Kernaghan is drawn to the
untold stories of history, focusing
on people and events that have
escaped the canonical history
books. Another muse was Alexandra David-Neel.
"[She] was a big source of
inspiration," Kernaghan said.
"[She] ... was a real person, [a]
famous Himalayan traveller Buddhist expert [and an] explorer. I
like using real people, too, there's
quite a few real people in the
book."
Kernaghan hopes that readers
will take a deeper interest in
histories that are often overlooked by popular literature and
would love to see her readers
go back to Kipling's Kim if they
want to read more about the
excitement ofthe Great Game.
Kernaghan's goal is to instil "a
sense of adventure" in her reader.
"I kind of like to take a period
that is not widely known or an
aspect of a period and delve into
it," she said. "You know, find out
what is there to be found." Xi
=HOTO COURTESY EILEEN KERNAGHAN
Kernaghan's Sophie, in Shadow is nominated for a Sheila A. Egoff Children's Literature Prize. 8    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, APRIL 9,2015
ART»
FILM»
Flawless: Beyonce inspired local art show The Devil Operation
shines light on human
rights abuses
11 -'
PHOTO CARL OSTBERG
BBBEYONCE, pictured above, is one of the submissions for the show. Flawless is accepting submissions until April 12.
Olivia Law
News Producer
An art show centred around
Beyonce, entertainment and inclu-
sivity is intriguing to say the least.
For the past four years, Christina
Chant and some friends have been
running springtime art shows
based on different celebrities.
These have ranged from Snoop
Dogg (Drop It Like It's Art) to
Steven Seagal (The Steven Seagal-
lery) to the Spice Girls (The Zig-a-
Zigallery) and began following a
trip to Burning Man festival.
"My friend and I got together
over one summer and found art
of various qualities to put up at
Burning Man," said Chant. "When
we got back with all the leftover
art, we found a venue who would
hold an art show for us, with no
experience whatsoever."
A far cry from the traditional
art show, Chant uses a mixture of
satire and theatricality to produce
these shows each year. According
to the Facebook event, over 900
people are planning on attending
the exhibition entitled Flawless:
A Beyonce Inspired Art Show and
Fundraiser.
Jocelyn Lougheed, a geography
student at UBC, is participating
in the fundraiser, her interest
stemming from the Snoop Dogg-
themed show. "It's pretty great
being able to make art that maybe
isn't the greatest quality," she said.
"But when it gets into the show,
you can tell all your friends, which
is pretty fun."
Lougheed's contribution
to Flawless is a set of playing
card-themed pictures, with a
Beyonce premise worked into
the names of each. Other works
in the show include a mash up
of Beyonce and Sarah Kerrigan from the game StarCraft, a
piece by Patrick Lemoine, a UBC
philosophy student.
"I got involved around the same
time as Jocelyn," said Lemoine.
"It's strictly no talent necessary,
which is probably one ofthe best
things about the show."
Chant is keen to state that the
show is less "no talent necessary,"
than "all talents welcome."
Alongside the varied art,
Flawless is also entertaining some
performances from dance-offs,
to "Beard-once," to monologues.
First-year Arts student Nkirote
Waiganjo is performing a piece
based on Beyonce's music in
spoken form.
"It's based on songs like 'Single
Ladies' and all the songs that
Beyonce has released about female
empowerment, gender equality
and independence," she said.
Waiganjo is passionate about the
cause ofthe fundraiser, the Positive Women's Network. "I think in
many ways she embodies independence, and she's a role model
for many women," Waiganjo said.
"I feel like many times we know
the lyrics to a song but we don't
really listen to them or pay attention because ofthe beat — when
they're spoken we hear things that
we sometimes might miss."
The Positive Women's Network
is Canada's longest-running HIV
organization for women, providing
support, education and resources
for women living with HIV in
British Columbia. All proceeds
from Flawless will go directly to
the organization.
They are accepting submissions until April 12 for all forms
of paintings, short stories, drag,
mixed media, video, sculpture and
anything else — the only catch is
that it must express Beyonce in
some way.
The show is April 18, at Studio
East from 7 p.m. Xi
=HOTO COURTESF GUARANGO ASSOCIATION
Julio Vasquez, pictured, is a journalist covering a march against British-owned Majaz mine.
Vicky Huang
Contributor
"As a Canadian, when you go
overseas, you're used to everybody
hugging you and welcoming you
with open arms," said Stephanie Boyd, director of The Devil
Operation, a documentary film
about the struggle ofthe Peruvian
human rights defenders against
Canadian mining companies.
"In Peru, Canada's image has
been tarnished ... there's this
whole idea ofthe 'ugly Canadian,'
so I felt a responsibility, as a
Canadian, to make some films
that show the communities'
point of view, and the idea was to
bring them back and show them
in North America ... where these
[mining] companies are based."
A collaborative effort by the
UBC Social Justice Centre and
Stop the Institute, The Devil Operation was the last in the series of
events at the UBC Social Justice
Centre Conference 2015. The
two organizations were strong
opponents ofthe $25 million
federal project called the Canadian International Resources and
Development Institute (CIRDI),
which supports mining companies
— some of which commit human
right abuses overseas.
"[CIRDI] is headquartered at
UBC ... 75 per cent ofthe world's
mining companies are headquartered in Canada.... In fact, Canadian mining companies actually
have the world's worst records on
human rights of any country.... So
that's how the mining issue has
become a big issue at the Social
Justice Centre," said this year's
Social Justice Centre Conference
co-chair, Eviatar Bach, a third-
year physics and computer science student. "[We] want to bring
those voices here, where a lot of
people aren't aware ... about all
the human rights violations that
these companies are committing."
Boyd hopes that students can
be more informed and aware of
the social tension inflicted by the
Canadian industry overseas, and
to take active roles in promoting
grass-root equity right here in
Vancouver. "[I would like students
to] think about the difficulties of
having corporate sponsorship of
the university and what that is doing to academic freedom.... I [also]
hope people will get involved with
the local struggles in Vancouver."
Regarding The Devil Operation,
Bach said "this is just one story
of thousands of this industry. It's
a very human story — you can
see what this community went
through... [and to get] some idea
of the violence that is caused by
[the Canadian mining] companies,
and hopefully, for the people who
weren't as informed about these
issues to come to this event, to
become informed about and maybe
get involved with the solidarity
efforts that are happening at the
university and other places in the
city and on the national level." Xi
MUSIC »
Canadian favourite Tokyo Police Club returns to Block Party
=HOTOCOURTESFTOKYO POLICE CLUE
Tokyo Police Club got their name from an internet band name generator.
Olivia Law
News Producer
Newmarket, Ontario isn't a town
known for a lot of things. Aside
from being recognized as one of
the smallest towns in Canada,
it is the hometown of actor Jim
Carrey and comedian John Candy.
Now, however, it is also the birthplace of Block Party headliners in
the shape of Tokyo Police Club.
The band's conception came
about when the four members were
in high school. "We started a band
in high school playing piano-pop
stuff, kind of inspired by Wilko, The
Beatles and the Beach Boys," said
Greg Alsop, drummer for the band.
"That ran its course over a couple
years, and at university we really
started focusing on Tokyo Police
Club, getting together on weekends
and playing music together."
Tokyo Police Club, the unique
name from an internet band name
generator, has played Block Party in
previous years, but got its beginnings following a series of small
Toronto-based shows in 2005.
Signed to Paper Bag Records after
performing at the POP Montreal
Festival the band is known widely
for its festival, appearances.
At Block Party, students can
expect a set containing both old and
new music. "We'll play a good range
of material," said Alsop. "It'll be
a really fun show, we're really
excited to be part of this line up."
Tokyo Police Club's newest
album Forcefield came out in
March 2014 and reached number
17 in the Canadian album charts.
As the band's third album, Alsop
stated the importance of strong
collaborations between band
members. "Ideas just came from
sitting in our rehearsal space for
about two and a half years together every day for up to 10 hours,"
he said. "It was a really long writing process that we really needed
to go through."
The hard work paid off in a
number of successful concerts
around Canada and Europe, and
Alsop cites the collaborative
effort ofthe whole band for this
success. "I think we didn't quite
know what we wanted to do next,
what we wanted our sound to
be," he said. "Holing up together
like that just gave us an opportunity to explore every avenue
that we possibly could for the
record."
This is the concept for Forcefield,
tracks from which can be expected
on Friday's Block Party — "trying
everything and putting out what
works."
Alsop began playing the drums
in the seventh grade as part of his
school band. The selection process
for the band involved a written essay
on the drums and was the beginning
of his career in the music industry.
This has allowed Alsop to travel
around the world with Tokyo
Police Club, and he reminisces
fondly about his experiences performing in the mud at Reading and
Glastonbury Festivals.
For a band beginning in their
parent's basements, Tokyo Police
Club is taking everything as it comes
in their stride.
"It'll be a really fun show," said
Alsop.
"UBC has always treated us really
well and we're psyched to be asked
back for this event." Xi // Opinions
A Place of Min(e)d: The Contradictions
of UBC's Sustainability Discourse
GEOG 395 STUDENTS
Letter
In a place of mind,
Where the fire of
knowledge burns
So bright that it can blind
Humanity on earth.
Waves of cyanide drown
The land of eternal spring
And as it sinks we stand
Complicit in this sin.
A place of mind,
A place,
A mine.
"Sustainability at UBC isn't
just a word to define — it's a
term that defines us and how
we interact with the world." -
UBC Sustainability
The hypocrisy of this statement became apparent to us
when learning about the mining
companies that have funded (and
continue to fund) various UBC
programs and buildings, including the recently completed Earth
Sciences Building featuring the
'Goldcorp Teaching and Learning
Wing'.
UBC is packed with such
hypocrisies. On one hand, it is
considered amongst the leading
institutions in sustainability studies, conveniently located in the
self-proclaimed "world's greenest
city." On the other, the very institutions and programs advocating
for sustainability and social justice
are tainted with 'dirty' funding
originating from mining companies undertaking social and
environmental exploitation in
(mostly) Latin American countries
with lax environmental and social
regulations. To add yet another
layer, we must remember that our
campus is constructed on unceded
Musqueam territories. It seems
like the endless construction
projects on campus are increasingly attempting to bury aboriginal
geographical histories — much like
Goldcorp is attempting to hide its
human rights abuses by donating
undisclosed millions to UBC.
We remember our first campus
tour when we stopped to admire a
small pile of rocks placed on Main
Mall. These rocks commemorate
former UBC students' march —
from the downtown campus to
Point Grey — demanding the accelerated construction ofthe new
campus. There was little mention
of how the Musqueam peoples
were being expropriated from the
land we now call 'our' campus.
Parallels can be drawn between
the histories and land rights of
Indigenous peoples in Canada and
Latin America — both suffered environmental degradation of their
ancestral lands, human rights
abuses and social exclusion. The
companies involved in some ofthe
more contemporary abuses spend
a minuscule percentage of their
marginal profit to "gold-wash," or
spin a positive public image in the
'global north,' while committing
atrocious human rights abuses
in the 'global south', effectively
conditioning us to believe that
the goods and services we enjoy
have no negative consequences
anywhere along the chain of
production. Yet, locals near the
physical mines of these companies
bear witness to the deterioration
of their environments and communities.
Our project aims to bring this
issue to campus, reacquaintingus
with the realities and histories of
the land. Vergangenheitsbewal-
tigung means coming to terms
with the past. At UBC, we must be
continuously involved in a process
of reflection about our past, present
and future, questioning the origins
of funds which might carry the exploitation of indigenous communities not only within Canada, but
globally. The introductory poem
refers to the land of eternal spring,
Guatemala, which has suffered
from Canadian policies for decades.
Let us hold mining companies,
UBC and ourselves accountable for
the human rights abuses and environmental destruction occurring
here and abroad. We aspire to promote a heightened sense of North-
South solidarity by pointing out
that "here" and "there" are more
interconnected than we think.
This letter was written by Michelle
Perez, Manuela Duque, Noor Attar,
Mike Wilgosh, Martin Reyes, students in GEOG 395. "&
Ask Natalie: On getting involved
You might try looking into clubs
that are active over the summer.
The Varsity Outdoor Club and
the Sailing Club both run events
and accept new members for the
summer. The Ubyssey continues
to publish articles online over the
summer, in case you were wondering. If you're staying in the Lower
Mainland over the summer these
clubs can be a great way to start
getting involved on campus and
meeting new people.
But if you're not staying in
the area, look into what clubs
you would want to get into come
September. Club days can be pretty
intimidating if you don't know what
you want. Generally clubs post their
membership fees beforehand so you
can be prepared for club days.
Getting involved on campus is
always possible, it just gets a little
harder the longer the year goes on.
But no worries, clubs are always
happy for new members. It may a
take a while to find the club that
suits you, but once you find your
place on campus, it is well worth
the time and effort it to get there.
You can do it and best of luck!
Need advice? Write to Natalie at ask-
natalie@ubyssey.ca and have your
questions answered. 'tJ
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie, Is it too late to get
involved on campus?"
With less than one month left in
the term, it is a bit late, seeing
as many clubs tend to wind
down over April, but it is not
too late. There are many events
running in the upcoming weeks
that would need volunteers, like
the Bike Rave that's running
this week.
LAST WORDS//
BLUE PHONE "MISCHIEF"
The 19 blue phones were put on
campus with the intention of
complementing the safety services
provided by UBC and the RCMP.
Which brings us to a recently published statistic in Campus Security's
annual report which shows that,
ofthe of 110 blue phone calls made
last year, 101 were determined to
be either mischief or accidental. In
some of these cases, dispatchers
were sent to the scene but couldn't
locate the person who had placed
the call.
Which begs the question: is it
presumptuous to say that these
were all prank calls? It seems
irresponsible to assume that a
case was the result of mischief just
because the caller didn't remain
at the scene ofthe call. And if the
calls were all genuinely pranks or
accidents, perhaps there is something to be said about how we are
using this public safety service.
Sure, stationary call boxes
aren't the most convenient means
of contacting emergency services.
But that doesn't mean we should
be abusing a system that is set up
for our own benefit.
OVER THE MOON
While there's something strangely
comical about a man spending 45
minutes trying to break into The
Moon, another 45 minutes inside
and then walking out with some
cans of pop, the consequences of
that act are no laughing matter:
because the suspect opened all the
refrigerator doors, the restaurant
had to get rid of all the food and
conduct special cleaning.
A man broke into the restaurant, didn't actually steal or break
anything, but still managed (most
likely without even realizing it) to
cause thousands of dollars worth in
damages to the restaurant without
ever being identified. We guess
this is what a not-so-fast getaway
looks like.
BLOCK PARTY BLUES
You'll notice a lack of Block Party
LLUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
coverage in this issue. Traditionally, we try to cover it as much as
possible — interviews with the performers, coverage ofthe plans for
the event, etc. However, this year
there was a distinct lack in communication between us, the AMS
and the public relations representatives from the artists performing.
The artists decided to make it
difficult for us to set up interviews.
Chromeo told us that they're "not
doing press right now" but agreed
to speak with the Syrup Trap —
which will be hilarious, sure, but
wouldn't they also want to speak
with other campus media?
The lack of communication
surrounding Block Party from both
the AMS and the PR representatives was (and still is) frustrating. We, essentially, provide free
promotion for these artists, and
while our readership doesn't quite
match Rolling Stone or The New
York Times, students still care and
want to read about the artists who
will be performing on campus — it
would be nice if PR reps recognized
this. Xi
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PACKAGE
EXPRESS // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
GRADING  THE  THUNDERBIRDS
WRITTEN   BY
INTRO
Who excelled? Who didn't live up to the expectations? We review the second half of the
athletics season by grading the UBC Thunder
bird teams.
SHIMMING
After another dominant performance at
CanadVVestm which the T-Birds missed
the podium in just one of 38 events, the
women's squad battled injuries, illnesses
and disqualifications to come through
with their fourth-straight CIS championship. They narrowly beat out the Montreal
Carabins despite swimming with three
fewer racers on their roster, while the
men's side showed their improved depth to
bring home their first national title since
20WI15
"fifth-line centre"
CJ  PENTLAND
9
Natalie scadden
"IhehuMler"
VARSITY   REPORT   CARD
WjAIEN'S  basketball
BEST   PLAYERS
2012.
MEN'
Coleman Allen | Yuri Kisil | Keegan
Zanatta | Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson |
Jacomie Strydom
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
An already short-handed women's squad
is losing four more graduating swimmers, so recruiting well and having new
faces step up will be key.
UBC won 17 straight games this season
en route to a Canada West championship
and a CIS bronze medal. Their comeback
in the Canada West final was one for the
ages, and then they came heartbreakingly
close to facing off with Windsor — who
won their fifth-straight CIS title — in the
national final, losing the CIS semifinal
against McGill 59-57 in overtime.
BEST   PLAYER
Kris Young
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
Young will be nearly impossible to
replace, and with two other key starters
departing (Harleen Sidhu and Diana
Lee) UBC will need returning players to
continue stepping up.
S     RUGBY
BA
SEBALL
BEST PLAYERS
After regaining their powerhouse status
by going 20-3 last year, UBC has carried on
most of that success this year, albeit in less
dominant fashion. The T-Birds won the
Wightman's Boot again, and they also kept
the World Cup again by giving themselves
enough of a cushion in the first game (19-6)
to mean that a last minute 23-21 home loss
to California only cost them their pride.
However, Victoria got the best of UBC in
the National University 7's tournament, so
there's some room for improvement there.
MEN'S     HOCKEY
Brock Staller | Bryan Tyrer | Sam Jeffries
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
They need to finish strong and close out
games, especially when they're ahead.
A year after winning the NAIA West
Championship but falling just short of
the NAIA World Series, the 'Birds have
again come out ofthe gate strong. They've
won games with both their bats and their
defence, with UBC scoring 40 runs in a
four-game sweep over Oregon Tech, but in
their sweep of Simpson they allowed just
six over the four games.
BEST PLAYERS
Bruce Yari | Curtis Taylor
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
With so many games being played over
such a short timespan, the pitching staff
needs to stay healthy and hope Conor
Lillis-White and Jeremy Newton can
build off their success so far.
Under first-year head coach Tyler Kuntz,
the T-Birds used a mix of old and new to put
together one of their better seasons in recent memory. With strong play throughout
the entire regular season, UBC hosted their
first playoff game since 1971 and took down
Manitoba in a tough quarterfinal series. In
semis they were once again overmatched by
the eventual national champs, Alberta, but
with the team's varsity status still in limbo
this was a strong season for the 'Birds and
an important one for their future.
WOMEN'S     HOCKEY
BEST   PLAYERS
Cole Wilson | Eric Williams
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
That berth at nationals remains elusive.
While they beat the likes of Alberta and
Calgary during the regular season, come
the playoffs it's clear that a great divide
remains between those squads.
It was another up-and-down season for the
'Birds, and unfortunately for them it ended
with a down. UBC won 10 of their 12 games
in the second half ofthe season, giving them
a first-round playoff bye and a home playoff
berth in the semis, but after winning game
one ofthe semis against Manitoba, they
lost the next two to end what looked to be
another promising season. For the second
straight year, a strong regular season
couldn't translate into postseason success.
BEST   PLAYERS
Tatiana Rafter | Sarah Casorso
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
Get it done in the playoffs. UBC has
suffered two-straight defeats in the
Canada West semis.
MEN'S    BASKETBALL      WOMEN'S   VOLLEYBALL
Panic nearly ensued when 'Birds struggled
out ofthe gates and dropped five of their
first "games. However, things quickly
turned around following a weekend sweep.
UBC won 13 of their final 14 regular season
games to earn themselves home court advantage in the Canada West quarterfinal.
They dispatched ofthe UNBC Timberwolves to reach the final four, but suffered
a heartbreaking semifinal loss to the
Huskies — with the winner of that game
heading to nationals.
BEST
1   PLAYERS
Tommy Nixon
NEEDS
IMPROVEMENT
They'll lose Nixon and other key seniors
Tonner Jackson, Brylle Kamen and
Andrew McGuinness. UBC will have lots
of work to do, especially defensively, if
they want to contend with the likes of
the Carleton Ravens.
After coming oh-so-close to a record-setting seventh-straight national title last
year, this year was a bit of a fall from grace
for a once-dominant team. While coming
sixth at nationals would be a dream come
true for other T-Bird teams, this group has
set the bar much higher for themselves.
In a year that saw the T-Birds fall at the
hands of teams they've never lost to before, the "sleeping giants" were unable to
come through at the big stage.
BEST PLAYERS
Danielle Brisbois | Lisa Barclay
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
With senior leaders Abbey Keeping,
Rosie Schlagintweit and Barclay graduating, this team looks to rebuild next
season and will need more players to
step up if they are to find their consistency and reach the top level again.
MEN'S    VOLLEYBALL      SOFTBALL
It was a story we'd seen before: the 'Birds
have a strong regular season, holding
down a spot in the CIS top 10 for most of
the regular season, then make the playoffs in a tough Canada West conference.
They then took down Manitoba in the
quarterfinals, setting up a matchup with
#1 Alberta with the winner advancing to
nationals. But after taking the first set of
that semifinal, UBC lost the next three —
making it another season of'close but no
cigar'.
BEST   PLAYERS
Mac McNicol | Ian Perryt
NEEDS   IMPROVEMENT
This is three straight seasons where
UBC has been on the brink of making nationals but came up short. Quite simply,
they need to step up at crunch time.
It's a bittersweet season for the 'Birds in
what might be their last as a varsity team,
and they have struggled to find success on
the field. They dropped 12 of their first 15
games to start the season — though many
by a close score — but up-and-down play
over the remainder ofthe season leaves
them out of contention.
BEST
PLAYERS
Lindsey Ogilvie
i          NEEDS
IMPROVEMENT          i
In what still remains an unstable future,
the team just needs keep fighting for the
chance to have a team next year. THURSDAY, APRIL 9,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
SPRING STARS
JACK
WILLIAMS
Trackand Field
1. What are your individual and team goals
Individual goals: come
top three and win an
Iftherewasone
outcome goal for the re
Get invited into a
pre-race prayer ritual
To start each weekend
with W's and end each
Ourteamgoalisto
makeittoregionalsin
for this season?
individual title. Team
mainder of theseason.it
bythem southern folk
weekend at The Roxy.
Lawrenceville, Georgia
goals: win NAIAs.win
would be to win the team
down therein good ol'
in May.
Canadians.
NAIA National Championship in May.
Alabama, which should
help me run a personal
best.
2. What's your spirit animal?
A wolf. I am territorial and
loyalty is very important
tome.
Not knowing exactly
what a "spirit animal" is,
would say an eagle because birds of prey are
my favourite animals.
An anteater, because
of its long and skillfu
tongue.
AT-Rex, because it has
short arms.
Wine. Wine is definitely
my spirit animal.
3. If the average human life span was 40 years,
how would you live your life differently?
1 would probably
spend mostofmytime
travelling and meeting
1 would probably spend
as much time as possible exploring the world
1 would make more
chilli in the crock pot
for Reid.
1 would try to red-shirt a
few more times.
If 1 only had 40 years to
live, 1 think 1 would just
stop worrying about the
new people and learning
and seeing as much as
little things.
about the different cul
1 could.
tures around the world.
4. If you had to look at one city skyline for the
rest of your life, which would it be?
would look at
Vancouver. I love
downtown Vancouver.
I've neveractually been
there, but I'd be hard
pressed not to pick
Melbourne, Australia.
Bruges,'cause it's
Bruges.
Grand Forks, B.C. Lots of
good memories there.
The Vancouverskyline
view from Spanish
Banks. Vancouver will
always be my heart and
home.
5. What do you think Victoria's 'secret' is?
1 think Victoria's secret is
Thecityorthe lingerie?
IGoogled this one.
Nottelling.
If a girl's bra and un-
hersecret love for pizza.
1 hearthepeopleinboth
are quite nice...
derwearare matching
it wasn't by chance
that you got lucky. It
was a predetermined
decision.
VOLLEYBALL »
Canadian national sitting volleyball team hosts 'Birds in exhibition
The national team and the T-Birds hug it out after a match.
=HOTOCOURTESFDEREKSTEVENS
Olamide Olaniyan
StaffWriter
Last Friday, amidst the Easter
celebrations, the UBC Thunderbirds
squared off against the Canadian
men's national sitting volleyball
team for a sitting volleyball exhibition match at the Richmond Olympic Oval. Sadly, the west coast has
been largely unexposed to the sport,
and most people are completely
unaware that it even exists.
While similar on a lot of fronts,
sitting volleyball feels like a different sport from traditional volleyball.
It retains most ofthe key features
that make it volleyball such as
having six players on each team and
the goal of making the ball land in
the opponent's side. But unlike traditional volleyball, each player is not
allowed to leave a sitting position.
For this reason, the net is shorter
and the court is smaller.
During the game, players have to
stay alert and need to be able to act
quickly. It can also be more tactical
and precise than the traditional
game, given the smaller court and
the shorter net. It's difficult to hit
the ball without jumping, keep it in
play without slamming it, harder to
dig when you cannot dive after the
ball and harder to set when you are
glued to the floor. This makes each
set fast, nasty and brutish.
"Just like any game that you need
technique, I have a lot of respect for
this game. It is still a very technical
game and I think that the best in the
world play at a very high level," said
T-Birds head coach Richard Schick.
The game last week was a form
of practice for Team Canada as
they prepared for the Toronto 2015
Parapan Am games this August,
which is a qualifier for the 2016
Paralympic games in Rio de Janeiro.
The aim for Team Canada is to
qualify both the men's and women's
teams this year. The game also
served to commemorate the 50th
anniversary of Volleyball BC as well
expose sitting volleyball to the Lower Mainland and the community.
"As a Paralympic sport, sitting
volleyball is apparently quite popular due to the fast-paced game play
and it's an exciting sport to watch,
but it is not well-known among
the general public and currently
there are not a lot of opportunities
available at the grassroots level,"
said Donna Lee, the 50th anniversary initiatives coordinator for
Volleyball BC.
"Hopefully these events spark
some interest in the sport and inspire some community programs."
Both the men's and women's sitting volleyball teams have fared well
— in fact, excelled — in the Parapan
games since they started competing
in the games. Due to expenses, the
teams do not compete in many international competitions, especially as
a lot of them take place in Europe.
But for the ones close to home, both
teams have been impressive.
"In zonal competitions, our men's
national team is two-time Parapan
Am bronze medalists in 2007 and
2011, as well as the 2013 Pan Am
Championship bronze medalists.
Our women's national team won
bronze in the 2011 Pan Am Championships," said Ian Halliday, the
high performance director for
Team Canada.
Schick added that the exhibition
match was also partly a product of a
relationship between Team Canada
and the Thunderbirds. That line of
contact was Austin Hinchey.
Now the current captain of
Team Canada, Hinchey played for
the Thunderbirds as their setter
for two of his years of eligibility,
before heading back to Edmonton
where he graduated this year. And
in that time, he got close to many of
the players and introduced them to
the sport.
He also lived with fifth-year
libero Ian Perry during his time
at UBC.
"We had a couple people that
all lived in the same house togeth
er and it was nice to be able to live
with those people and just develop more of a personal relationship, rather than just a teammate
relationship," said Perry.
Team Canada plays at the
international level in a sport that
anyone would find difficult, so
unsurprisingly thay had the upper
hand, pretty much putting the
'Birds to the wall for the entire
game. However, UBC fought back
at several near-impossible moments
and proved that they were not a
team that could be bullied. In the
end, Team Canada won the game in
five sets, but with a close final set
score of 15-13.
"Anytime you get these guys
together against any university
team, any high level competing
team, and you get them playing
anything, there is going to be a
compete level. Whether [it's] Go
Fish, or if it's memory or whatever,
they all want to win," said Schick. Xi
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Only a few more weeks in the dungeon.
PHOTO NICK ADAMS/THE UBYSSEY
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33-Early Mexican
36- "The Wizard of Oz" studio
39-Dagger of yore
40-Audibly
41- Lanai neighbor
42- Quentin
43-Influential person
44-Works hard
45-For each
46-Creatures
48-Planks
51-Melancholic
52-Capital of Liberia
54- Resembling a miter
59-Not tricked by
60-Get in a hand
62- Currency unit in Nigeria
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COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
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9-Chosen
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11- Preceding, poetically
12-Sausalito's county
13- -a-brac
21-Any person
23-Gator's cousin
25-Toothbrush brand
27-To a smaller extent
28-Editor Wintour
29- Bingo call
30- Bauxite, e.g.
34-Animal park
35-Big brass
36-Mother of Hermes
37-Aquatic bird
38-Fail to hit
40- Large burrowing African
mammal
41-May honoree
43-Fiddling emperor
44-News
45-Conditional release
47- Where some vets served
48-Attractive
49- Dominant
50-Subsequently
52-Champagne name
53- impasse
55-Tense
56-Irritate
57- Composer Khachaturian
58-Falls behind
61-That, in Tijuana:
"Our only limitations are those
which we set up in our own minds,
or permit others to establish for us?
Elizabeth Arden: Self-Made Maven
In a time when women dare not wear make-up or run their own businesses, Elizabeth daringly
did both. She was not a trained chemist, yet she pioneered the concept of scientifically
formulating cosmetics. She was not a business graduate, yet she created a global empire.
Curiosity and drive were her teachers; the world, her classroom.
We think Elizabeth would have simply adored AU, giving people all over the world the chance
to make their mark, on their terms, in their time. Beautiful.

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