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The Ubyssey Jan 10, 1967

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Array THE U8YSS
Vol.  XLVIII,  No.  33
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  TUESDAY,  JANUARY  10,   1967
Mar
cry arts profs
By MURRAY McMILLAN
Dean of arts, Dennis Healy has asked arts departments to review
their marking methods because of the faculty's low percentage of first
class marks.
— powell hargrave photo
"HERE WE GO 'round the basketball net, basketball net, basketball
net ..." So singeth UBC Thunderbirds and University of Alberta Golden
Bears in first WCIAA game of the season.
Each department was asked to submit a report on its marking system.
"There is no reason for the lack
of marks over 90 per cent in arts
courses," said Healy's assistant, assistant political science prof Walter
Young.
"Students in the sciences often
achieve marks of 97, 98, and 99 per
cent."
"We tend to apply standards in arts
which are extremely subjective,"
Young said.
"The faculty's concern resulted
from students difficulty in obtaining
scholarships in competition with
students in more empirical disciplines."
'LOWER SCALE THAN OTHERS'
Political science professor E. R.
Black said: "UBC uses a lower scale
than American colleges, and arts uses
a lower scale than other faculties.
"Even the best students, because of
the nature of the courses and professors' conservatism in marking, may
receive 85 per cent at UBC, but 95
per cent at another university.
"My personal feeling is that marks
should be extended upwards. The
best students in arts are equal to the
best in other faculties," he said.
There were mixed feeling in the
various department polled by The
Ubyssey.
Roger Seamon, an instructor in
English said: "I think the percentage
of firsts were extremely low in English."
INCOMPATIBLE   SYSTEM
Arthur Reber of the psychology
department felt the entire system was
due for revision.
"I think the 150 point system is
bizarre because it is incompatible to
other schools.
"Students going into grad studies
at other universities have difficulty
in communicating their marks—they
are painfully arbitrary," he said.
One of the few departments in the
arts   faculty   where   exams   can   be
PRESIDENTIAL RACE
UBC stakes draw four more
The presidential race is yet to begin
as participants still come to the gates.
According to a downtown newspaper, four more "dark horses" have
appeared in the contest for the position UBC president John MacDonald
will vacate July 1.
They are Carleton University president Davidson Dunton, civil service
commission chairman Dr. John Carson, Coast-Capilano Liberal member
of parliament Jack Davis, and McMaster University principal Dr. Henry
Thode.
The process of selection is centered
on two four-man committees: the
board of governors and faculty, committees.
Chairman of the faculty committee
Dr. Benjamin Moyles has instructed
all faculty to submit suggestions on
who they would recommend for president.
Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan, one of
the fifteen candidates nominated, expressed surprise that word of his
nomination appeared so soon.
"I was away over the weekend and
am surprised that my name appeared
in the paper as a possible candidate,
he said.
He admitted giving permission to
his admirers to submit his name.
"I'm satisfied with my job at present and am not casting about for
anything else," he said.
"The presidency would be an interesting and important job. Right now
I regard my teaching role as largely
administrative."
Cowan also claimed he suggested
two "top Canadians" for the committee to consider.
UBC academic planner and econo
mic professor Dr. Robert Clark who
received "secondary mention" in
newspaper reports refused to comment on his own nomination because
he is a member of the faculty selection committee.
Chairman of the Board's selection
committee Mr. Justice Nathan Nemetz
claimed his group was taking an active role in the search.
He said all names mentioned at
this time are based on guess-work
but he complimented The Ubyssey on
its excellent coverage of the presidential contest.
The Ubyssey traced "light horse"
candidate and economist John Galbraith from Harvard University to
Switzerland and Dr. James Deutsch,
chairman of the Economic Council of
Canada from Ottawa to Toronto and
back in the air between the two cities.
graded scientifically is math.
Dr. Ronald C. Riddell, an assistant
professor in that department said
math could be graded accurately, and
was less subject to changing standards
within a department.
Dr. R. W. Ingram, associate professor of English added: "It's pointless
making comparisons without consideration of qaulity. Poor universities will mark on a poorer scale.
COMPARISON DIFFICULT
"It's hard to compare, even within
one's own department."
Professor William Dusing of the
classics department disagreed with
opponents of the present system.
"Every marking system is relative
to what is determined to be the passing or failing percentage. I think this
system is as fair as any.
"A first class at UBC would be a
first at another university, and vice
versa," he stated.
No decisions have been made on
the future of arts marking.
Socred Les
smiles, files
hike protest
Leslie Peterson is grateful.
In a letter to AMS president Peter
Braund the provincial education minister expressed his thanks for an AMS
letter protesting the recent residence
fee hike.
Braund said Monday that Peterson
wrote: "Thank you for your letter.
I am submitting your requests to my
department for study.''
Braund said the fee hike of $8 a
month poses more problems to out-
of-town students who already have
financial difficulty.
"I wrote a second time, reminding
him that the seriousness of the problem merited immediate action,"
Braund said.
"To this letter I have received no
answer."
Medicine U.S. president Hubert
Williston criticized Braund's concern
with rising costs of education.
"Look at all the shiny new cars on
campus. Where do all those kids get
money for cars?" he said.
Williston cited the crowds at the
Whistler Mountain ski runs as evidence that students have plenty of
money.
Education president Wayne Wiebe
objected to this statement.
"A majority of dorm students are
concerned with the rise, and some will
be unable to return," he said.
MORALMAN
IN PANGO PANGO
(See  Page   3) Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1967
Flynn's  revisions axe
overworked  presidents
— kurt hilger photo
AW, COME ON gang. I can't let my girlfriend see me
with this purse. No, it's not hers. Of course I didn't steal
it. How did I get the purse ? Well, you see. it was like
this  ...
Board  OK's  millions
for capital  spending
By BONILEE
Science undergraduate society president, Frank Flynn has
jumped on the constitution revision bandwagon and countered Charlie Boylan's revisions.
"I don't think it'll work,"
he said of AMS vice-president
Boylan's student council upper
and lower assembly proposals.
"There will be too much
confusion. There's a conflict
between the responsibilities of
the executive and those of the
assembly,"   Flynn   declared.
Flynn's proposals represent
a committee of forestry, agriculture, commerce, law, and
science undergrad societies.
Flynn proposed the undergrad society president's council duties be taken over by a
society representative.
"There's too much of a
workload on the president," he
said.
Flynn further proposed that
a fund of $1 for each active
member of AMS be set up in
an undergraduate societies
grants fund to be distributed
to the undergrad societies.
Flynn  also  suggested:
• addition of a non-voting
representative from the university clubs committee.
• nominations for election
of the executive of students
council ibe signed by 25 rather
than 10 active members of the
AMS.
• elections of student councillors other than members of
the
IPI-lll-SS
FILE
the executive be completed
within four, rather than two,
weeks of completion of the
last elections of the student
council executive.
• two   thirds   majority   re
quired for a binding referendum be replaced with 60 per
cent majority.
"I suggest the committee's
revisions are better than Charlie Boylan's," Flynn said.
UBC's board of governors
capital spending budget for the
The budget is split into three
catagories.
$4,400,000 will go to the continuation and completion of
five building projects already
underway, $1,600,000 for new
buildings, and $2,300,000 for
planning costs and continuing
projects in field development
and campus improvements.
Buildings to receive funds
for completion include dentistry and expansion of basic
medical sciences forestry-agriculture, music, metallurgy,
Thunderbird stadium, and
stage two of the Health Sciences Center.
New projects include basic
medical sciences expansion
and conversion of the old forestry-geology building for use
by the mathematics department.
THE"   PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
The Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try   our   delicious  T-bone
Steak $1.35
It's Really Good!
Full course meals
within  your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
has approved an $8,500,000 I     Thursday - Auditorium
1967-68 fiscal year. "	
PAYMENT
of Second-Term Fees
Students are   reminded   that  second-term   fees   are
now due and  payable and should  be paid to the
ACCOUNTING OFFICE
on or before MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 1967
B.C. HYDRO & POWER AUTHORITY
requires
COMMERCE and SCIENCE
(MATHS. MAJORS)
for  the  following  CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
- COMMERCE GRADUATE IN TRAINING (ONE)
— Accounting Option
- SYSTEMS ANALYST -  PROGRAMMER (ONE)
for our  DATA  PROCESSING  DEPT.  -
FINANCIAL  DIVISION
- COMPUTER   SERVICES   PROGRAMMER   (ONE)
for our ENGINEERING DIVISION
Campus Interviews — January 16, 17
Please contact the Student Services Office for an
interview appointment.
OLD TOTEMS
FOR SALE
AT REDUCED PRICES
'66 Grad  Books Now Only $2.00
'65's# '63's, '62's Now Only $1.00
Campus Life's - any year - Only 50c
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
BROCK HALL
B.C. CORRECTIONS BRANCH
SOCIAL WORK SUPERVISOR
MALE
For the Department of the Attorney-General.
Correction Branch, Correctional Institute, Haney.
SALARY: $570, $590, $610, $635, $660, $690.
DUTIES To train and supervise social workers and
and to assume other related duties.
QUALIFICATIONS: Applicants should possess preferably either a B.S.W. or M.S.W. degree
and   have   some   supervisory   experience.
Applications to be made in writing, and must
be submitted to The Warden, Haney Correctional
Institute, Box 1000, Haney, BC.
Mark evenlope - "SOCIAL WORK SUPERVISOR"
GRADUATE  FELLOWSHIPS
Value
Fields
of Study
Tenure
Purpose
Eligibility
Application
Deadline
The J. W. McConnell
Memorial Fellowships
for Graduate Study
at McGill University
$3,000 average per annum
(Depending on need, fees, travel expenses,
etc.)
Any department in the Humanities, Social,
Biological or Physical Sciences offering
Graduate programmes leading to the
Master or the Ph.D. degrees.
Tenable from 1 to 5 years (inclusire)
To enable outstanding students to undertake
Graduate Studies, with the ultimate aim of
strengthening teaching and research in
Canadian universities.
Awards will be made to University Graduates
who are Canadian citizens, or who intend
to become Canadian citizens and to remain
in Canada.
1 February.	
Application Forms and more detailed
information may readily be obtained by
writing to the Associate Dean, Faculty of
Graduate Studies and Research, McGill
University, Montreal 2, Que., Canada. Tuesday,  January   10,   1967
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
"VIVE LA FRANCE and to the guillotine—off with their heads!" Words of warning to
those fool enough to buy oranges instead of apples on aggies apple day. Other
aggie week, activities  include cow milking  and  girls' hay pitching.
Geography 'mess' creates
colossal marks mix-up
Did you write someone else's
geography exam?
There are three geography
100 sections and some students
got in on the wrong section.
"The exact number of students who did this will not be
known until after we meet
students in practials this
week," said Sam Copley, assistant prof, of geography.
"Many students change sections early in the year, without notifying the registrar's office," he said.
Dixie Brimacombe, claiming
to speak for all other geography students who wrote in
the armory, told of farcial
exam conditions.
In a letter to the editor in
last Friday's Ubyssey, Miss
Brimacombe referred to the
exams as "a nerve-wracking
race."
"There were different exams
for each section but not many
of us knew this. There were
no signs or arrows as we entered," she wrote.
"We didn't have nice blue or
Farmer frenzy hits
Braund and camps
Shouts of "two, four, six,
rate"  brought intellectualism
Classes as usual
honor Sir John A.
It will be classes as usual
at UBC Wednesday.
Minister of Education Les
Peterson announced Tuesday that B.C. schools honor
Sir John A. Macdonald's
birthday, but not with cancelled classes.
UBC officials said the
same holds for the university.
Public schools in Ontario
will close Wednesday in
memory of Macdonald, Canada's   first   prime   minister.
eight, who're we gonna cast-
and "aggie week'- to UBC
Monday.
Be-crapped aggies kidnapped
AMS president Peter Braund
at shot-gun point noon Monday, dressed him in old overalls, and made him declare aggie week to the world.
He was dumped on a tractor-pulled wagon and made to
tour the campus under armed
guard.
Like a true farmer, Braund
braved the straw and soggy
grass in his bare, brown feet.
The aggies later announced
that today would be apple day
in support of crippled children.
Further activities this week
will include a boat race, cow
milking contest, and a girls
hay pitching competition.
pink pointers to different sections, but the section number
was clearly marked at the top
of each paper," said Dr. Alfred Siemens, assistant geography prof.
"Preparations for geography 100 began just minutes
before the exam was scheduled. This limit on time for preparation is the basic trouble,"
said Siemans.
"Many desks had been neglected the special magnetic
IBM pencils," wrote Brima
combe.
"We ran out of the pencils
at the start but it is almost impossible to make announcements in the armory," said
Siemens.
"I use a bull horn, but they
didn't use one this time. In
structions had to be repeated
several times because the
people at the back heard just
enough to be disturbed but not
enough to know what was going on."
"When 700 students rush in
to write an exam it is hard to
have any kind of control," he
said.
"Some are so disoriented
they aren't even clear on their
own section number."
"As an emergency measure
each person had to be checked.
This turned up all sorts of
cases."
"Some wrote the wrong
exam and were not discovered
until the papers reached the
markers and of course it was
too  late then,"  Siemens  said.
UNFOUNDED'
Flynn hits
red' tag
By BONI LEE
Chairman Frank Flynn Monday denied charges that
the B.C. Assembly of Students is associated with communist or totalitarian organizations.
"BCAS policy is established
at the annual congress and is
controlled by the students and
no one else," said Flynn in a
statement issued Monday.
Thursday Burnaby school
trustee Bill Daly accused BCAS
of being a "questionable organization using communist tactics."
Daly said: "the whole thing
arouses strong suspicions in my
mind."
"I am surprised,' said Flynn,
"that a person with such a responsible position would make
an unfounded accusation without proper investigation.
"No one on the Burnaby
school board has approached
me."
Daly admitted he did not
contact Flynn or anyone at
BCAS before releasing his
statement.
He said he was contacted by
parents disturbed over literature mailed from the assembly
to certain Burnaby high school
students.
The literature referred to is
a program outline sent to members instructing them on the
establishment of a "local secretariat" to effect "local" and
"central" action.
Daly said he strongly objected to the content of the
literature.
Of his communist accusation,
Daly told The Ubyssey, "That's
what I read into it."
"The emphasis is not just on
obtaining more money for education but on a questioning of
the whole structure of the educational system," Daly said.
"I've seen enough of this in
the past and I view things like
this with  suspicion,"  he  con
tinued.
"This could very readily be I Tarzan    were
a   tool   to   use   student   news-   Flynn said
Kjm^mW    W-    -_*
CHAIRMAN FLYNN
. . . he's no Mao
papers for propaganda of any
description."
(Membership on BCAS secretariat includes the editor of the
student newspaper.)
Daly said he also objected to
the term 'secretariat'.
"It is a term used in communist countries and is foreign
to our way of life."
He said parents of a student
who received the program outline were "puzzled, amazed,
and shocked". Flynn explained
that secretariat is just a convenient word.
Flynn said he has received
no word from parents who are
puzzled, amazed, or shocked.
He paralleled Daly's attitude
to that of a Californian mother
a few years ago.
"She  felt  stories  of  Tarzan
should be  removed  from  the
local library because Jane and
not    married,"
Seek student senators
or not—AMS waffles
The AMS council may ask
an MLA to present a private
bill to change the Universities
Act to allow student representation on the senate.
No motion was made, but
president Peter Braund promised to consider the matter
further.
Council moved to seek observer's status on the Senate
in order to present their brief
on student representation.
Second - vice president Caro-
si'
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.MATTER.'-
lyn Tate reported on planned
Education Action Week, Jan.
23-27, which will culminate in
a student trip to the Victoria
legislature to discuss student
aims. During the week, student pledges promising to go
to Victoria will be collected.
A student rally will inform
students of the aims of program's aims:
• Lowering and elimination
of tuition fees
• An independent grants
committee to allocate federal
grants on a non-political basis
• Equalization grants for
out-of-town  students
• Changes in the Universities Act to permit student representation of the Senate and
Board of Governors.
"Buses will leave Brock on
Friday, Jan. 27 in time to catch
the 11 a.m. ferry to Victoria. mimsssr
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout th* university year
by the'Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorised
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Pag*
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press Trophies for general
excellence and editorial cartoons.
One of the benefits of a college education is
to show the boy its little avail.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson
JANUARY 10, 1967
Confederation?
Happy Birthday, Canada.
In case you didn't know it, Canada is celebrating
its 100th birthday this year. In 1867 the aims of the
Fathers of Confederation were achieved with the Confederation of the British North American provinces.
Historians even concede that it was a great step
in Canada's history. Some even say it was the greatest.
To honor this event cities, towns and villages
throughout Canada are planning giant celebrations.
Federal, local and municipal governments are pouring money into the celebrations in an attempt to make
1967 a year to be remembered.
Hundreds of public relations men across Canada
are sitting at their typewriters pouring out thousands
of poignant words about the coming events in this Great
Birthday Year.
And what is the Alma Mater Society at the University of B.C. doing to celebrate this momentous occasion.
Not a damn thing.
In fact, to judge from their apathy, it is questionable
whether the AMS—allegedly supposed to represent the
UBC students—is even aware that British Columbia is
part of Canada.
If their apathy towards confederation is truly representative of the average UBC students' then the
future of Canada is a bleak one indeed.
Congratulations
Congratulations of a rather dubious nature are in
order for those responsible for creating the conditions
under which students taking geography 100 were forced
to write their Christmas exam.
It appears from a letter written Thursday to The
Ubyssey by one disgruntled student that the organizers
went out of their way to complicate the relatively simple
process of writing an exam.
They failed to provide the special magnetic IBM
pencils needed to fill out the exams, gave few or no
instructions, and distributed the wrong exam papers —
all of which went to confuse and discourage the
hundreds of students writing the exam in the armoury,
that over-sized echo chamber.
However the first-year students who underwent this
gruelling experience, will soon learn that the organization—or lack of it—that went into producing the conditions under which they wrote their exam prevails
throughout the university system.
The problem lies primarily with the large number
of students who are crammed at Christmas and April
into the armoury and field house, resulting, naturally,
in both confusion and noise.
If those responsible for these arrangements were
themselves forced to write and think under the conditions they subject the students, it is conceivable that
the problem would be remedied quickly.
The remedy is simple and involves splitting those
writing a particular exam into small groups and assigning them to smaller and hence more controllable rooms.
This would involve the use of more supervisory staff
on the part of the university, but, when one considers
the high failure rate in some of the larger courses such
as geography 100 or english 200, it is evident that the
administration should at least be willing to try this
alternative.
EDITOR: John Kelsey Marksman   Murray   McMillan
paced  Buchanan  halls.  Val Thorn,
Managing     Richard Blair eyed  with  interest  by a northern
News                    Carol Wilson scribe,   wrote.   So   did   Boni   Lee,
City  Danny Stoffman Dave   Cursons,   Cook   Hrushoway,
Photo-            Powell Hargrove Rod Wilczak, Mary Ussner,  Char-
Page Friday ..        Claudia Gwinn lotte Haire and Kurt Hilger.
Focus  Rosemary Hyman After   athletics  went   Pio   Uran,
Sports Sue Gransby MIke    jessen,    Jim    Maddin    and
Ass|t News    Pat Hrushowy Tony Hoge-
Ass'tCity Tom Morris Fotomen    were    Hilger,    Dennis
CUP Bert Hill Gans,  Al Harvey and John Tilley.
VIVA MARDI GRAS
BY GABOR MATE
Favors drunken charity
The poor little rich kids in
the fraternities and sororities
are organizing their annual
"Let's Get Drunk And Call
It Charity" Ball.
Floats, parade, dances,
floorshow, booze, sex, fun,
fun, fun — and it's all for
charity, Viva Mardi Gras.
The climax of the three-day
doodah will be the choosing
of a crew-cut, square-jawed
paragon of all-American manhood as king, and of a sweet-
and-wholesome-and-dignified-
and-sexy debutante daughter
of the local Vancouver Life
society as queen. (Requiescens
in pacem).
Far from criticizing any aspect of Mardi Gras, however,
we do not understand why
other groups on campus do
not show the same civic spirit
and social responsibility that
the Greek societies so nobly
exemplify.
The campus hippies, for example, have long shown an
execrable indifference towards charitable events. It is
high time they, too, organized
something to indicate that
they are as concerned about
crippled children and the der-
ilicts on Skid Row as the
fraternities and sororities are.
Yes, we can see it now. A
giant dance. A parade. The
choosing of the Head and the
Headmistress. A mass advertising campaign. Banners exhorting the public to "Have
A Puff For The Poor," and
"Have A Drag For The Distressed."
Perhaps the whole thing
could be called, say, Mardi
Grass.
Or the Engineers. When
was the last time they got
drunk for charity? They took
part in the chariot race, it is
true, and have held leg-auctions and the like, but when
was the last time they actually got smashed to aid the
cause of suffering humanity?
Perhaps they could convert
their annual stag party into a
charitable event, and call it
Mardi Arse.
Or the Aggies. They have
also been busy advertising
their Farmer's Frolic, but
there has been no hint that
the main purpose of the event
is charity.
On the contrary, Aggies
have had the audacity to suggest that the purpose of their
annual agricultural orgy is
simply a good time.
To dance, to get drunk, to
lay your girlfriend, to blow
your mind. As far as they are
concerned, when it comes to
having a good time on a Saturday or a Friday night, charity can go to hell.
But far be it from us to
sound a sour note amidst all
the joyous preparations for
Mardi Gras. If the poor dears
wish to live it up once a year,
far be it from us to wish
them anything but a wonderful time.
In fact, we may even join
in. After all, how often has
one the opportunity to say to
one's girlfriend: "Have another drink, dear, and take
your panties. Its the least you
can do for the poor people of
the world."
LETTERS
Fishy Friday
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Although I am an easy
going individual by nature, I
feel the time has finally come
to write to your paper. The
reason for this letter is the
Friday menu at the residences.
For years now I have faced
fish every Friday and have
reached a point where I can
stand it no longer. Since it is
no longer compulsory to eat
fish on Friday, why should
the majority of the students
suffer for a minority?
I have tried talking to the
dietitian, but to no avail —
apparently she is from the old
school. I know that many
other residents are equally annoyed.
It would seem that the only
(MORE LETTERS: PAGE 5)
QJ§LD sJ-^^-J^9^
litis Wa£f>o*£$ Tuesday,  January  10,   1967
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
mixERs coMPmmm
recourse is opening this affair to the puiblc. What can be
done to eliminate fish for
good?
MARY HANSEN
Acadia Camp
Premature
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The recent discovery and
exposure of the rat farm near
one of the higher class residences was unfortunately
somewhat premature, and,
frankly, bore close resemblance to the propaganda of
some rival establishment.
I would like to make clear
that the farm maintains the
rigid standards set by the
Fraser Valley Rat Farmers'
Institute, and our livestock
are 'bred and raised under
ideal conditions.
They are allowed to run
free over a large expanse of
unfenced rangeland, and enjoy conditions unmatched by
those on any other ranch in
this area.
The photo on the front page
of Friday's issue showed one
of the livestock which had
just been slaughtered. We do
this by the simple, inexpensive, and, we believe, humane
method of feeding the animals a small quantity of an
inferior alcoholic product.
We do all our own butchering, and the carcases are sold
to various outlets in the neighborhood. If you wish to
place an order, please call our
wholesale agent, Mr. Stephen
Antoinette. He will be most
happy to do business with you.
St. Mark's Ranch
SLIM JIM
'Aggravating'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
News has reached Montreal about a group at SFA
and UBC which is helping
draft-dodgers in the U.S. to
emigrate to Canada, and presumably find work here too.
Perhaps someone should
point out to them that in
doing so, they are either aggravating Canada's u n e m -
ployment situation, which is
bad enough already, or imposing another burden on the
Canadian taxpayer if the
draft-dodgers turn out to be
work-dodgers too.
As things are now, Canadians looking for work are
sometimes forced to consider
emigrating to the U.S. By all
accounts, emigrating from
Canada to the U.S. is a much
more complicated business
than coming the other way.
Also, once there, they become eligible for the draft if
they are male and born after
1925. (But in that case, perhaps they would be eligible
for aid from the aforementioned group if they should
wish to return to Canada.)
Helping one's neighbours
across the border may be a
fine thing, but should it be
done at the expense of one's
fellow countrymen? If the
draft-dodgers think their government's action is immoral,
why don't they do something
about it at home, where they
have the vote, and where
their actions might have
some effect, instead of running away from their responsibilities?
Meanwhile the group in
B.C. could devote its activity
to the noble cause of finding
work for jobless Canadians.
Less glamorous, maybe, but
shouldn't charity begin at
home?
NORMAN   THYER
Montreal
Applause
Editor, The Ubyssey:
From the latest fab issues
of The Ubyssey, I gather that
life on the home campus is
far from dull.
Swinging   mini-skirts,   you
lot, keep up the good work.
MIKE GRENBY
London, England
More Applause
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Congratulations to all
Ubyssey staffers for proving
what UBC has known for five,
and now six, straight years—
that The Ubyssey is the greatest student newspaper in Canada.
May we wish you and your
staff continued success in the
New Year.
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ASSOCIATION
UBC Student Branch
Disturbing
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is most disturbing that
with all the controversy raging about the unification of
armed forces there has been
no word, nor a stand taken by
WUMyp*
Talk aboufc o»
madte-fo-few bra:
the University Students of
Canada, instead they are busying themselves with organizations for legalizing marajuana.
Unification of armed
forces, I think, should be of
prime importance to all students of high learning because of the fact that they
have all been free to follow
the studies of their choice
without thought or worry
about toeing drafted into the
armed forces.
Canada is in a unique position, which few people appreciate, of having been able
to keep her forces at strength
with volunteers. It was only
during the last world war that
conscription was introduced
for home defence. Conscripted men did not have to go
overseas.
When one reads about an
Australian school teacher who
was dragged from his home
by the police because he
wouldn't answer the call for
military duty and about U.S.
draftees burning their draft
cards and fleeing their country it makes one wonder why
our young men and women
sit by so smugly and watch
our proud services wrecked.
Now that Mr. Hellyer has
admitted that it will take
about $60 million to change
into single uniform, so we
can't look for savings in defence bill, it is difficult to
understand why the government is proceeding to this end.
Most Canadians are in agreement with combining administration but with highly skilled
warfare and equipment these
days it is clear that the fellow that learns to handle
ground equipment couldn't
possibly fly and be an expert
in ships too. So why the one
unit?
Surely a student ibody of
your size if it voiced its opinion to the government might
persuade them to have a second look. Because I foresee
that if this bill is passed as it
stands we are going to lose
our proud professional service men and will be faced
with some system of conscription.
N. J. DAVIDSON
Powell River
Move  Mate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Just read your last effort
Dec. 5 — my son brought it
home. Terrible. Please do the
adult readers a favor and get
that stupid bastard Gabor
Mate off your paper. What
drivel.
How in hell you win an
award — any award — I'll
never know.
R.G.B.
U.ofT.
Puce  blorgs
Bm^^tzKmmmmfmmm* «moows»w?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
With regard to the unusually loathesome head cut of
jolly AMS president Peter
Braund which has desecrated
certain front pages recently:
Couldn't you use a picture
of a puce blorg instead?
DONNA MASON,
Reporter.
The Province
FILMSOC PRESENTS
'The Thinking Man's Goldfinger"
Thursday, Jan. 12 in the Auditorium 50c
Showtimes:  12:30. 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
(§) Westinghouse
Will be on camp.us January 12, 13 & 16
To interview 1967 Engineering Graduates
A well-defined training programme is offered to prepare candidates for positions   of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
QUALITY CONTROL AND TEST
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career
development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on
performance as well as excellent employee fringe
benefit plans. Contact the Placement Office for detailed
information,   brochures   and   interviews   appointment.
CANADA PACKERS INVITE GRADUATING STUDENTS in
Arts, Commerce, Business, Engineering, Chemistry
and Agriculture to discuss plans for an interesting
career in a leading Canadian industry.
STUDENT INTERVIEWS
with Canada Packers' Representative will be held on
January 17th and 18th
at times arranged through the University Placement
Office. For further information, Canada Packers'
Annual Report and brochure are available at the
Placement office.
0
CANADA ID* PACKERS
CANADA'S LARGEST FOOD PROCESSOR Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1967
WE'RE SERIOUS'
Blue Guard gets glum
The Blue Guard has gone
serious.
"Blue Guard has been
treated up till now as a
farce," Geoff Flack, Guard
treasurer, said Monday.
"From now on we plan to
be politically active in organizing right-wing student opinion.
"Campus politics have
been dominated by left-
r wingers because they are organized. We feel most students are more conservative
but are too apathetic to state
their views.
"We hope to be the voice
of right-wing opinion, providing a working alterative
Worker falls
from  building
A construction worker escaped serious injury Friday
in a 25-foot fall from the
new music building.
Sing Yee, a rod reinforcing worker, fell while working on the south side of the
new building. He was taken
to Vancouver General Hospital but later released after
examination.
Yee is employed by Bear
Reinforcing, a sub-contractor on the Burns and Dutton
project.
New Year -
New Look - New You!
An exciting Mart to 1967-
_ daringly glamorous new coiffure!
And, at a very -pecial
January Sale Price!
MM LAWRENCE
UM    bnfetalf Saltt     Sq_«r Uh     tuna S-w
niUU MH231 W1-7271
The Spanish House
FABULOUS SALE
Shipment delayed by
Dock Strike.
Now on SALE
at great reductions
eg. Coffee table, value $79
Sale Price $50.
Clairtone Infanta Stereo
List Price $669.50
Sale Price $569.50
and  many more great
bargains
Sale Starts Today
Open until 9 p.m. tonight
We can arrange financing
The Spanish House
4456 W.   10th Ave.
(Near UBC Gates)
to the leftist thought."
Flack said the Blue Guard,
while not actively running
AMS candidates, would support anyone they agreed
with.
"If Charlie Boylan ran for
president, we would support
the opposition, unless it was
Gaibor Mate or somebody like
that," he said.
"We are not attempting to
create a political force but a
political alternative," he
said.
"We would support candidates for the AMS election
that represent a majority of
student opinion rather than
that of an organized minority who are out for political
gain.
"We recognize that with
the noisy minorities the center of political thought is
moving  toward  the  left.
Other student bodies besides
ourselves feel that if the
other side were presented,
we could check the gradual
slide to the left."
Flack said the Blue Guard
has corresponded with other
interested universities, and
has been contacted by right-
wing hate groups in the
United States.
The Guard will welcome
suggestions and inquiries
from interested students at a
meeting Wednesday in Bu.
214.
THE
IPCI1I.S&
JUj
Thursday — Auditorium
a new production by Playhouse
Theatre Company
Tickets en sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St., MU 3-3255;
all Eaton's Stores (charge them); and Town & Country Home Furnishings
in Kerrisdale and Richmond.
STUDENT  SPECIAL:
HALF-PRICE   FOR ALL  EVENING
PERFORMANCES.
$1.00 FOR SATURDAY MATINEE
Fifty years ago we only made 'aeroplanes'.
(See what's happening now!)
Engineers & Scientists:
NASA Saturn V
Campus Interviews, Thursday and Friday, January 12 and 13
In 1916 The Boeing Company's career
was launched on the wings of a small seaplane. Its top speed was 75 mph.
Now, half a century later, we can help
you launch your career in the dynamic environment of jet airplanes, spacecraft, missiles, rockets, helicopters, or even seacraft.
, Pick your spot in applied research, design, test, manufacturing, service or facilities engineering, or computer technology. You can become part of a Boeing
program-in-being, at the leading edge of
aerospace technology. Or you might want
to get in on the ground floor of a pioneering new project.
You'll work in small groups where
initiative and ability get maximum exposure. And if you desire an advanced
degree and qualify, Boeing will help you
financially with its Graduate Study Program at leading universities and colleges
near company facilities.
Often it will be sheer hard work. But
we think you'll want it that way when
you're helping to create something unique
—while building a solid career. Visit your
college placement office and schedule an
interview with our representative. Boeing
is an equal opportunity employer.
Divisions: Commercial Airplane • Missile __
Information Systems • Space • Supersonic
Transport • Vertol • Wichita • Also, Boeing
Scientific Research Laboratories Tuesday, January  10,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Spuds spur  sporadic  spots
PANGO PANGO (UNS)—A
week - long New Year's truce
between opalescent tangerine
blorg   and   hairy   grey   blorg
factions warring for control of
this island paradise's sweet
potato industry has ended abruptly. Both sides claim foreign intervention.
"IT MAY BE (GRUNT) hard
says leg-swinging co-ed in
Sport breaks scores of UBC
— al harvey photo
work  now,  but wait until I (hup) get my skis (ouch) on,"
special   gym   class for getting  in shape for snowy season,
student legs annually.
Profs join
anti-bomb
bandwagon
TORONTO (CUP) — More
than 25 per cent of the 1,100-
member University of Toronto
faculty have signed a statement protesting United States
bombing in Vietnam.
A delegation representing
the 338 members is seeking an
appointment with Prime Minister Lester Pearson to urge
the federal government demand an immediate end to the
bombing and the earliest pos-
sible withdrawal of U.S.
forces.
The statement also asks that
Canada "consider following
the example of Sweden in refusing to sell arms to the U.S."
History professor Kenneth
McNaught said the group will
approach faculties at other
Canadian universities.
ri.E
IPCRI-SS /
my
Thursday — Auditorium
Too busy
to write
lately?
They'd like to hear
from you - phone tonight!
B.O.TEL^)
GRAD CLASS
Positions to be filled:
if VALEDICTORIAN
* HISTORIAN
* POET
if PROPHET
if WILL WRITTER
APPLICANTS MUST BE GRAD CLASS MEMBERS.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SENT TO GRAD CLASS SECRETARY
BOX 44 A.M.S. BY JANUARY 18th.
Grad Class Members are Invited to Nominate People for
the Honorary Positions.
EATON'S
offers interesting and challenging positions to men and
women graduates in:
* COMMERCE
* ARTS
* SCIENCE
Opportunities for exciting retailing careers exist in:
* SALES
* MERCHANDISING
* OPERATING
9  RESEARCH
* PERSONNEL
9 FINANCE AND CONTROL
Campus interviews will be held at U.B.C. on
January 19th and 20th, 1967
Make an appointment now at your Placement Office.
Powerful Drama Of a Tortured Family
Eugene O'Neill's Autobiographical Masterpiece
LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT
with Alma Thery, Barney O'Sullivan, Lee Taylor, and Eric Schneiler
Directed by Stanley Weese
JANUARY 13.-21
STUDENT TICKETS AT 75 CENTS AVAILABLE ALL PERFORMANCES
This production is presented by the Department of Theatre especially for the
students of English 100. You are advised to get your tickets early. Hundreds
were unable to see Marat/Sade. Don't be left out of Vancouver's Leading
Theatre this time by leaving it to the last minute.
EARLY  CURTAIN  7:30 p.m. nightly
BOX OFFICE   —   ROOM 207   —
FREDEBIC WOOD THEATRE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
(Advertisement)
Tuesday, January  10,  1967
METHODIST  TALKS ON   "HOLY   FIRE"
The Rev. Tommy Tyson returns today
to Buchanan 202 for another in his lecture
series on the strange phenomenon currently
sweeping churches and making headlines over
the country, "The Charismatic Renewal." The
Tyson lecture series which is sponsored by the
Full Gospel Students continues this week
through Wednesday and Thursday, with informal prayer services immediately afterward in St.  Andrew's Chapel.
In addition to serving as chaplain at
O.R.U., Mr. Tyson finds time to travel widely
across the U.S.A. and Canada to speak to
many interdenominational groups. Mr. Tyson's
role as the Director of the Department of
Spiritual Life in the new $50,000,000 southern
Christian university in Oklahoma involves him
in a cross-denominational project which is the
first of its kind historically.
Tommy Tyson attended Guilford College
in North Carolina and Duke University in Durham before ordination to the ministry of the
Methodist Church. He says that a highlight in
his chaplaincy role was his recent experience
with a team of ten O.R.U. undergrads in physics,
psychology, sociology and theology in an area-
wide evangelism crusade in Rio de Janeiro. The
students not only participated in the distribution of gospel literature, in television programmes, open air services and the large
auditorium rallies, but also worked in personal
witnessing and praying for the sick.  The  stu
dents report that first-hand experience in seeing
persons healed was a great stimulus to their
own faith, and tended to change their views on
the church and its role in society.
Mr. Tyson's noon-hour lecture series on
"The Charismatic Renewal" will contribute a
great deal toward understanding of the current
tongue speaking movement in the Episcopal,
Lutheran, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches.
The prayer sessions which follow St. Andrew's
Chapel will be action-oriented. Having spoken
to an inter-denominational student group about
the work of the Holy Spirit, Mr. Tyson will
remain to talk with students individually and
to pray.
.fe"-:-?^
•Lt   f
TOMMY TYSON and a team of O.R.U. students are shown as they left for Brazil last summer. The ten students worked
with the Oral Roberts team in the Rio de Janeiro crusade. Tyson (centre) is the guest speaker at a series of meetings
this week sponsored by the Associated Full Gospel Students.
Paperbacks
Available
Want to be up-to-date on
church history? Raise your
Christian education literacy
level?
Copies of the books listed
below may be obtained without
charge at the Tyson lecture
series this week (except Friday)
in Bu 202 at noon.
They Speak with Tongues
John Sherril
The  Cross  and Ibe Switchblade, David Wilkerson.
They Speak with Tongues is
an account of Sherrils attempt
to see what the tongues movement is all about.
The Cross and the Switch
blade deals with the miraculous
cure to drug addiction.
UBC ARTSMAN CLAIMS
TO   HAVE   MET   GOD
By BURKE MADDAFORD
Four years ago this month,
I met God in such a way that
I was forced to abandon agnosticism forever. Like any isolated experience, however, it
faded into the past and became
a memory; a memory which
continued to guide my life, but
still a memory. God was not
always relevant to my daily
life.
One year ago, after a number of unsettling discoveries,
I met God again and the outward sign of this meeting was
a special gift for which the
technical term is "glossalalia"
(speaking with other tongues).
God gave me the ability to
speak a language I had never
learned and which may or may
not be recognizable. The uses
of my language are diverse but
it's essential purpose is for
communicating with God whenever my native tongue is seemingly ineffective or insufficient.
Not only has the language
proved permanent, but with it
has come a continuous sense of
God's immanence. Jesus Christ
is no longer just a historical
figure nor a vague transcendental toeing. He has come and
touched me and given me a
unique gift which is a constant
evidence of His presence and
love.
Unfortunately, the language
itself has received the greatest
attention from all sides. It is a
psychological curiosity. It is
paranoia? Psychologists in California, where this gift is wide
spread in the ."old-line" churches, have found a complete ab
sence of neurotic and psychotic
symptoms in the people involved. Linguists have acknowledged the presence of
definite linguistic structure
which cannot be faked by anyone who has not received a
tongue. An explanation has not
been forthcoming.
Gospel Club Open
Interested in joining the Full
Gospel Students?
To do this or to get further
information about the activities
of the Associated Full Gospel
Students, please call:
Rick Bowering ....224-9065
Ken Gaglardi 228-8615
Bernice Gerard.. 266-9275
Rev. Tommy Tyson
of
Oral Roberts
University
speaks on
the
CHARISMATIC
RENEWAL
Monday to Thursday
Bu. 202    All Welcome
ADVT. Tuesday, January  10,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Governors provide funds
for political newspaper
Four UBC board of governors members have dipped into their own pockets to provide  funds for  a  student-run
organization.
The four, board chairman
Nathan Nemetz and members
Walter   Koerner,   A.   M.   Mc-
McTAGGART-COWAN:
'Rodents reside
all over town'
By NORMAN GIDNEY
The rats at St. Mark's College are not the only rats at
UBC.
Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan,
zoology department head, said
Monday there are wild rats
all over the Lower Mainland.
"They live wherever food's
exposed," he said.
Residents at St. Mark's College Monday reported up to
15 rats at one time on the college's lawn.
One rat was caught in a
trap set by residents.
McTaggart-Cowan  said
Police grab
obscene film
at McMaster
HAMILTON (UNS) — A student-produced film at McMaster University was seized by
morality squad police in Toronto Thursday.
The sequence that was seized was part of a film sent from
the Hamilton university to a
professor in Toronto for the
addition of some special effects.
The clip that caused the
problems showed a partially
clothed woman in bed with
two men.
McMaster's dean of students
Dr. Ivor Wynne said he was
not aware of the content of the
film and that he would wait
for a report before commenting.
Toronto police later released
the clip after being advised
that the matter must be passed on to the Ontario Board of
Censors.
Peter Rowe, the president of
the student film board, claims
the whole affair was a misunderstanding and said the disputed segment was only a part
of the finished product and
that it might be edited out before the film is released.
there are two kinds of rats at
UBC.
"The Norway rat, white-
bellied with brown fur, usually lives in association with
man," he said. "They live on
seeds, fruit and animal matter. It's the main garbage
dump rat."
"Then there is the Alexandrian or roof-rat, a rather
beautiful gun-metal gray," he
said. 'It goes wild with the
greatest of ease."
McTaggart-Cowan said it
climbs trees and lives like a
squirrel, eating the same kind
of food.
Antoinette Stephen, secretary at St. Mark's, said Friday she has seen rats climbing the trees around St.
Mark's.
McTaggart-Cowan said that
"most certainly" these were
the Alexandrian rats.
He was unable to estimate
the number of rats at UBC.
"Whether there is one per
acre or 10 I don't know."
Nude newsman
METROPOLIS (UNS)—
Authorities announced today
they found an aged man, discovered semi-nude wearing
red and blue tights in a downtown newspaper clothes closet. No name was released, but
he is said to have been succeeded in his business by his
son, -whereabouts unknown.
Gavin and Arthur Foulks, donated $300 to the Internationalists, a student-faculty discussion group.
The organization had originally asked for the money from
the board at large.
The group's chairman, Rod
Wilczak, arts 2, said the money
will be used to publish a newspaper of political and philosophical opinion.
The paper, called Words,
will appear every two weeks
and will be sold for five cents
on campus at UBC and Simon
Fraser Academy.
Wilczak said he was grateful to the board members for
their donation.
"This money will help foster political and cultural
awareness on both campuses,"
he said.
Internationalists has about
180 members from both institutions and holds weekly discussion meetings in private
homes.
Wilczak said the first issue
of the paper will appear next
week.
Do You Know
"Your Canada" For
Visitors This Year?
They're coming with questions!
All kinds in '67. Where's the
tallest building in Canada?
What province is showing most
of the economic boom? How
much did Montreal's Place
Ville Marie cost? Who did that
piece of sculpture in Toronto?
Which product accounts for the
biggest percent of Canada's exports to the United States?
You can't be a walking encyclopedia of information about
your country but... you can
be inspired with a proud enthusiasm for talking about
Canada when you read "Canada: A Booming Salute for '67"
in January Reader's Digest,
now on sale.
MARDI GRAS
goes
COMIC
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
MEMBERS FOR HOST COMMITTEE,
TENTH ANNUAL C.U.S. SEMINAR
Members will make arrangements for the Tenth
Seminar, to be held in late August or early September in the Lower Mainland area. The position would
involve work on one of the following sub-committees:
Finance, Facilities, Public Relations, Transportation,
Entertainment, or Clerical. Some tasks will require
more participation during the school term than in the
summer; others will require little activity until the
summertime. Experience in related work is helpful,
but not essential. Members will attend the Seminar
as part of their duties. Further inquiries and/or
applications should be directed to Box 153, Brock
Hall, or phone 224-6965.
CINEMA 16
Tickets still available for all film series from Cinema 16,
Brock Hall.
International Cinema Series   -------    $2.50
Smiles of a Summer Night January 23
The Organizer February 13
The Haunted Palace/The Raven March 7
American Offbeat Series -    $2.50
The Manchurian Candidate January 10
The Trouble with Harry January 31
Barabbas February 27
Hud March 13
Trilogies Series   ---- $3.50
Pather Panchali January 9
Aparajito January 16
The World of Apu January 30
Directed by Satyajit Ray
L'Avventura February 20
La Notte March 6
L'Eclisse March 20
Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni
ALL SHOWINGS IN THE UBC AUDITORIUM
@ Westinghouse
Will be on campus January 12, 13 & 16
To interview 1967 Commerce Graduates
A well-defined training programme is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility   in:
PRODUCTION
MARKETING
COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS
These positions will afford opportunity for career
development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on
performance as well as excellent employee fringe
benefit  plan.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information,
brochures and interview appointment.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON ff DRUGS
LI ml ted
rWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONIY
Vantouvar —      -,- ■ —,-———■■   New We«tmin.t.r
677 Granville     I |TI \< <J * | Ii \" 'I " I      67S Columbia
Opp. THE BAY    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^Opp. Army A Navy
681-6174 -_-_---■_-■■■■•»•■■■■ w lm075) Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1967
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds enter WCIAA play Friday.
Ice hockey men end tour
and enter WCIAA tourneys
The future looks bright as the UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds return from an exhibition tour to enter WCIAA
competition.
The Birds returned Jan. 3
with a two win, two loss, and
one tie record. On Dec. 27 the
Birds played Rossland at
Grand Forks. Al McLean led
the Birds to a 5-2 victory with
two goals. Kevin McGladery,
Glen Richards and Maurice
Lambert scored singles.
The next day, in Trail, the
Birds downed Rossland 4-3
with Ron Morris scoring the
winning goal in the last 20
seconds of play. Glen Richards
scored the first goal of the
game and Bob Apps scored
two in the second period.
The Birds lost their third
exhibition game to Cranbrook
on Dec. 29. The score was 9-6.
Two goals each went to Bob
Apps and Dave Chambers.
Wayne Hunter and Kevin McGladery added singles.
A strong Notre Dame team
tied 3-3 with UBC at Nelson
Jan. 3 and downed the Birds
10-5  the  second time  around.
There were 62 shots on the
goal in the first game. Miles
Desharnais scored two and
Dave Chambers added the
third. Desharnais picked up an
assist on Chamber's goal and
Bob Apps picked up two assists. It was a good game for
goalkeeper Russ Kirk.
Previous to the tour, the
Birds recorded six straight
wins in exhibition play. The
return of two former National
Team members, Dave Chambers and Al McLean, has added strength to the Birds this
season.
Wayne Hunter played a
steady defensive game with
one goal when the teams met
again. Glen Richards scored
two goals. The latest team
member,  Shelley   Atwell   got
the only UBC goal in the third
period.
The Birds open their
WCIAA season at home this
weekend against the University of Saskatchewan. Ice
hockey coach Bob Hindmarch
is looking forward to an opening win which will give the
Birds a solid footing in 1967
league play.
Hindmarch was pleased with
the Bird's showing against the
three senior teams they faced
in the Western International
Hockey League.
The first game begins at 8:30
p.m. Friday night and the
second at 2:30 p.m. Saturday
in the  Winter Sports  Centre.
Toronto's trophy
without trouble
TORONTO  (CUP)  — Should Toronto Varsity Blues
fail  to  repeat   as   national   collegiate  hockey   champions,
Montreal fans might be excused for wondering if the team
should not be investigated for corruption.
The   powerful   Blues,
BOB HINDMARCH
. . . optimistic
who
excel in fast skating, positional
hockey, outscored their opposition 29-10 over three games
last week in the Montreal
forum to win the three-day
first annual centennial college
hockey tournament.
Saint Dunstan's Albertans
and Sir George Williams universities gave fans precious few
tense moments as they fell 13-1,
8-5 and 8-4 respectively before
the undefeated, nationally top-
rated University of Toronto.
Only for a few minutes
Thursday night during the second period of Toronto's semifinal game with Alberta was
there any serious doubt the
Blues might not win the tournament's top prize, the J. David
Molson trophy.
After spotting Toronto four
goals within five minutes in
the> first period, Alberta battled
back to a 5-5 tie in the second
period. However, two glaring
errors and a brilliant goal
scored toy Steve Monteith while
lying on his back put the game
beyond reach of the leg-weary
Albertans mid-way through the
final period.
Sir George Williams proved
themselves capable of skating
with Toronto in the final game
Friday night, but were unable
to match the shooting ability
of the positional play of the
Blues. Toronto jumped on
goaler Brian Chapman for
three goals in the opening period, added one in the second
and then slowly pulled away
from the determined but outclassed Georgians.
Friday night's victory was
the fourth tournament win for
the Blues in two years. Last
year they won two against top
United States competition, as
well as the national championships.
The post-game scene in the
Toronto dressing room fell
short of a celebration. Players
congratulated one another and
took turns peering inside the
spanking-new  $400   Molson
trophy carried around by team
captain Ward Passi, but they
did not act as though they had
anything to be exuberant
about.
Outside the dressing room a
smiling coach, Tom Watt, was
generous to his opposition and
talked freely aibout his team,
much as though the Blues were
on post-season exhibit rather
than part way through a busy
schedule.
"Alberta was the best team
we saw, I guess, but those
Georgians were sure full of
spirit.
"You know this was the first
time we've been outscored in
a period this year," he said,
referring to the second period
of tooth the Alberta and Georgian games.
"Of course that doesn't incl u d e the Czechoslovakian
game (lost by Toronto 9-2 three
weeks ago). I'd like to play
that one again. They're maybe
three goals better than we are,
but not seven.
"This tournament wasn't too
tough for us . . . but thingr
could get a little rougher for
the rest of the year. We have
to win our league over Western
Ontario and they're pretty
tough you know."
But Watt showed little reluctance to discuss the national
finals to toe played this year
in Edmonton during Second
Century Week.
"We like to skate and move
around and they have a much
smaller ice surface, out there.
'That could really hurt us
against a team like Alberta,"
he said, still smiling.
Results:
Wednesday—Alberta 5, Laval 1; McGill 5, U. of Montreal 4; Toronto 13, St. Dunstan's 1; Sir George 5, Loyola
4.
Thursday—St. Dunstan's 6,
Loyola 5; Laval 5, U. of M. 3;
Toronto 8, Alberta 5; Sir
George 4, McGill 2.
Friday — Toronto 8, Sir
George 4.
Puget Sound swimmers
skim by Thunderbirds
The UBC Swimming Birds went down to defeat in a
close dual meet against the University of Puggt Sound on
Friday night.
— dsnnis gans photo
TAKING THE PLUNGE are three contestants in the U6C-
Puget Soupd dual swim meet. Result of the competition
was a close 51-46 score in favour of our guests.
The score was very close all
night and going into the last
event of the meet, the 400
meter freestyle relay the Birds
were ahead by two points, and
in losing this relay, they lost
the meet, 51-46.
A major upset for the Birds
was scored by Bill Storey, a
freshman breaststroker, when
he won his event, the 200
meter breaststroke — the first
time since 1964 that UBC has
won this event.
Individual event winners for
UBC were Storey, Phil Winch,
another freshman who copped
the 500 meter freestyle, second
year man Jim Maddin who
won the 200 meter backstroke
and Bill Gillespie a four year
veteran who took the 50 metre
freestyle.
Winch, Maddin and Gillespie
all placed second in other
events also. These were the
1000 metre freestyle, the 200
metre freestyle and the 100
metre   freestyle  respectively.
Other team members who
swam or dived in the meet
were; swimmers Mark Le-
Meuse, Dave Goodman, Martin
McLaren, Dave Brine, Rudy
Ingerhorst, Keith McDonald
and diver Dwight Brown.
Although the team's coach
Jack Pomfret was back from
Hawaii in time for the meet,
team captain Rick Mansel did
not make it. Tuesday, January 10,  1967
THE      UBYSSET
Page 11
— powell hargrave photo
IT LOOKS LIKE an even match between UBC's Ian Dixon
and his opponent from University of Alberta. Neil Murray
stands  by to assist. Below, a prancing pair come to a
screeching halt as ball bounces over foul line.
Falcons swoop on
struggling wrestlers
The Seattle Pacific Falcons took their revenge on the
UBC Thunderbird wrestling team Saturday.
The Birds were held down
to a meagre three points while
Seattle marked up 34. Last
year the Birds landed on top,
beating Seattle 33-5.
Wrestling coach Paul
Nemeth said UBC was "hit
hard by the loss of four wrestlers. We had to forfeit 15
points at the start of the
match."
Nemeth said also that two
bouts were lost because Seattle fights according to the
American rules with which his
men are unfamiliar. The UBC
wrestlers follow International
rules.
Chuck Tasaka won the three
points for the Birds. Chris
Nemeth and Ron Turner both
lost close bouts.
The Birds also paid the cost
of not qualifying in all of the
weight divisions.
On Jan. 14 the Thunderbirds will host the University
of Puget Sound in the Education gym. Nemeth feels that
"we will be stronger this weekend but it will take some time
to readjust the weight divisions."
Birds and Bears
beat each other
By MIKE JESSEN
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds bounced back from
an 85-77 loss Friday to beat the University of Alberta Golden
Bears 72-59 Saturday.
Both were home games,
marking the Birds' return to
the WCIAA after a two-year
absence.
The first match was a disappointment for the Birds as
they lost the lead twice in the
double overtime contest —
once late in regulation time
and again in the first over-time.
Coach Peter Mullins said of
that game: "We blew it."
The story of the second game
was shooting. The Birds shot
48 per cent from the field and
67 per cent from the foul line.
This compared favorably
with the Bears' showing—39
per cent from the field and 50
per cent from the foul line.
The first half was fairly
even. The Birds emerged with
a 30-28 lead. And they came
out running in the second half,
completely dominating play as
they out-hustled the Bears.
Guard Phil Langley said of
the Birds: "We're a second
half team."
The Birds also played excellent defensive ball as they alternated from a man-to-man to
a full court press defense.
The Birds will play WCIAA
teams from now until the season ends in February. Both
Lanley and Mullins said that
the competition will not be as
tough from now on.
Mullins said: "The team is
getting better and better the
more experience it gets." The
Birds have picked up valuable
experience in the exhibition
contests.
Top scorer for UBC in the
two games was Neil Murray
with 18 points in the first and
17 in the second.
Points per player in each of
the weekend games were:
Player Fri.    Sat.
R. Blumenscheit _
2
2
Phil  Langley   _-_
17
8
Neil Murray ...    _
18
17
Ian Dixon 	
11
14
Dave Rice -
9
4
Morris Douglas
10
13
Bob Molinski __  _
8
13
Ken Kern 	
2
0
Vic Rahn -    	
0
1
Up   until   these
two
games
the Birds had been playing ex
hibition games with top-flight
U.S. teams.
The speedy Birds, who feature a fast break attack and
zone press defence, compiled a
2-2 won-loss record on their
tuneup road trip, which started with appearances in a Holiday Invitational Tournament
in Nampa, Idaho, Dec. 28-29.
UBC lost 75-59 to host Northwest Nazarene College in the
opening round of the four-team
competition, then went on to
defeat Eastern Oregon 76-65
in the consolation round, taking third place.
The Birds then squeezed past
Cascade College 78-74 on Jan.
2 in Portland. In the final
Tournament game UBC lost
101-80 to Portland State.
The Birds' previous game results follow:
NEIL MURRAY
. .   . top scorer
Opponent UBC
Grads  64 59
White Spots St. "A" 59 63
Alberni Athletics  _ 57 78
Gonzaga University 89 73
Portland  State   .      81 69
Portland State     .__ 93 71
Australia  ,  69 58
Victoria Macs            53 63
Net results  of
UBC Thunderettes
UBC's second annual Thunderette volleyball tournament,
held January 6, was dominated by Marpole women.
Marpole took first and third
place in the "A" division, and
came second to Victoria College in the "B" division.
Seattle "A's" won second
place in the tournament and
UBC Thunderettes placed
fourth. The UBC Jayvees grabbed third spot in the second
division.
The over-all standings were
decided on a total point system.
Several players on the top
tournament teams also represent the B.C. All Stars and
next weekend will see action
against the Puruvian National
team.
— powell hargrave photo
A UBC THUNDERETTE shows her team mate how it's
done in the volleyball tourney Saturday (above). Below,
Thunderettes duck as a member of the winning Marpole-
Oakridge team smashes that ball down for yet another
point. Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
AND ALL  THAT
Bains  blasts (almost)  everything
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Hardial Bains discusses why
Negroes have to conk their
hair, why the Viet Cong do not
love LBJ, blind faith and the
cold war, faculty opportunism
and back Mac, today at noon
in the auditorium. Admission
35 cents.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Bu. 225. Miss Vickie Davis
of    the    library   school    will
speak.
IRC AND  PRE LAW
Panel discussion on injunction and labor disputes Thursday at noon in Ang. 110.
COMMERCE   UNDERGRADS
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Ang. 407 to plan Apex Ski
weekend Jan.  21.
FENCING CLUB
Lessons continue Wednesday
SFA snarls back
over CUS status
Simon Fraser's CUS chairman, Dave York, says the
mountain-top university is still a CUS member because a
quorum was not present at the Dec. 5 council meeting which
voted SFA out of the nationa
Selkirk goes
Friday 13th
CASTLEGAR (UNS) — Moving on Friday the 13th won't
faze 400 students of Selkirk
College.
The students will make a
four-mile trek Friday from
their old Cookhouse Campus in
Castlegar to a new $3 million
college.
The new site is on a promontory overlooking the junction
of the Columbia and Kootenay
rivers.
A flagpole erected at the
temporary campus last September will be put on the new site
at noon and the first student
government will be sworn in
at the same time.
body.
But CUS president Doug
Ward says: SFA will continue
to remain outside the Canadian
Union of Students unless its
students council votes to rejoin the union.
York says he is "completely
unreconciled by the student
executive council action".
"I don't believe Simon Fraser Academy has left CUS,
and I will remain as CUS
chairman until I am ousted,"
he said.
Ward said council president
John Mynott, who resigned his
position Dec. 31, requested all
CUS services toe withdrawn
from SFA.
Until council asks that services be resumed, SFA is out
of CUS, Ward said.
at 8 p.m. in the women's gym.
BRIDGE   CLUB
First session (open pairs) of
the national intercollegiate par
bridge championship Wednesday at 7:30 in the lower lounge
of the grad centre. Open to
all students, fee $1.
ONTOLOGY
Ron    Polack   discusses   the
Quest for Love Wednesday at
noon in Bu. 223.
CIASP
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Bu. 2244.
WORLD FEDERALISTS
Those  interested   in   formation of a World Federalist Club
please meet in Mildred Brock
Wednesday at noon.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting Wednesday at noon
in Bu. 1221.
BLUE   GUARD
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
214.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
College Life resumes Thurs-
WHEN  THE  NIGHT  BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE   SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
LIVE BAND
NO COVER CHARGE
SPECIAL
U.B.C.  STUDENT DISCOUNT
10%  to  15%  en weekdays
ITALIAN PARADISE
CABARET
1047 Granville       685-9412
presents
Hardial Bains
T
O
D
A
Y
JAN. 10
A
U
D
12:30
35c
"SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY"
Liberals, Maoists, pot heads, acid heads, activists, student bureaucrats, Kurtz
people. East Indian Lotharios, weekend clergymen, poets, trots, engineers, Viet-
nicks, faculty buffons, academic dilettantes, and creative administrators.
or
"BLIND FAITH and THE COLD WAR"
or
Why a billion hungry people will cheer when Sartre and Russel point the finger
and Johnson shrivels.
TODAY
day at 9:01 p.m. in the lounge
of Nootka House, Totem Park.
GERMAN   DEPT.
The   film,  Herr  und   Hund
will toe shown Thursday at 2:30
in Bu. 104.
BALKAN DANCING
Dancing every Wednesday at
8 p.m. in hut L-5.
MARKETING CLUB
Dr. Rolph C. Hook of Arizona State University speaks
at the annual American Marketing   Association   dinner
Wednesday at 5:30 at the faculty   club.   Tickets,   $3.50   at
the door, drinks 50 cents.
SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Meeting with  slides  Thursday at noon in Chem. 250.
UN   CLUB
The   film China's  700   Million will be shown today at
noon in Bu. 106.
LSM
Rev. Jim McKibbon discusses a psychedelic affair Wednesday at noon in Ang. 110.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
MIDO WATCH FOUND ED. 100.
Phone FA 5-5616. After 6 p.m.
Thursday.	
LOST: BLUE CLOTH BAG. LEFT
in car at 19th Dunbar. Before
Xmas.  Phone Jack.  224-9016.
FOUND JUST ONE LADIES WRIST
watch. Phone 6-6:30 p.m. 224-4940.
Alec.
LOST, PAIR OF BLACK GLASSES
between Sasamat and UBC. Phone
224-4856.
FOUND MAN'S GOLD RING OUT-
side library Fri. aft. Phone WA
2-8439.
Coming Dances
12A
Special Notices
13
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
HUXLEY NEVER HAD IT SO
good! The brave new world,
Thursday noon in Brock. Girls
free!
COW MILKING CONTEST THURS-
DAY noon in front of the Library.
SCIENCE FORMAL CRYSTAL
Ball this Saturday at the Coach
House Inn, 9:00 to 1:00. Tickets
$3.75 from A.M.S. office or S.U.S.
Exec.
Transportation
14
RIDERS AND driver wanted vie. of
45th Ave. and Blvd., phone Ralph,
AM  1-1281.
RIDE WANTED RICHMOND
Francis and Heather. Phone Sandy
277-7928.
RIDER WANTED. VTC. OF SIMP-
son's-Sears, Bby. via 41st. 8:30
classes.Phone Bob, 435-1311.	
DRIVER "NEEDED FOR WEST
Van Carpool. Taylor Way area.
Call   Pam.   922-7379.
RIDE WANTED: TWO STUDENTS
need ride—vicinity of 41st and
Knight. Classes 8:30-5:30, Mon.-
Fri.   Call  Dave,  FA  5-3931.	
DEMOCRATIC FUN-LOVING IN-
telligent Eastern West Vancouver carpool needs driver. Pete 922-
7778.
WANTED RIDE FROM MIDDLE-
gate Shopping Centre in time for
8:30 classes—leaving UBC at 5': 30
Mon.-Friday. Phone Brian 224-
4915.
TWO DRIVERS WANTED FOR
carpool vicinity Capilano Highlands, North Vancouver. Phone:
988-1925.
Travel Opportunities
16
AVAILABLE ONE RETURN
ticket from London Aug. 25. Phone
Dave FA 1-8405.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1958 PONTIAC 6-cyl. auto., excellent
cond., w.w.'s, radio (rear spk.),
$450',   Mike,   731-6295.
1957 HILLMAN MINX MUST SELL
immediately very good condition.
$125 Phone Ron AM 6-2602 after
5 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
IF YOU'RE STILL RECOVERING
from your marks, come to SUS's
mixer at noon Thursday in Brock.
Brave New World Plays. Men
25c; women free.
PAPA BULLS, MAMA BULLS,
and Baby Bulls Are All Coming
to the Farmers' Frolic on Jan. 14
in the Armouries.
THE   IPCRESS   FILE   —   THURS.
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,  8:30   Auditorium.
SEWING • ALTERATIONS    40
REMODELLING, SKIRTS, SEP-
arates, sheath dresses, etc. Special attention to wedding gowns.
CA  4-6471.
Typing
43
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4630
TYPING      (home):      ALL     KINDS.
Call  Mrs.  Wood,   985-5086.
STUDENTS!
Am once again free to accept your
typing   requirements.   Elec.   Typewriter.  Inger  872-7380.
WILL TYPE FOR STUDENTS. Vicinity 4th and Alma. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-2962.  Mrs. Booth.
TYPING FAST, ACCURATE, EFFI-
cient.   Anytime  224-5621.	
PROFESSORS
Fully   exp.   in   the   typing   of  your
theses.  Reas.  rates.  Ref.  Inger 872-
7380.	
TYPING   FAST,    ACCURATE,   EF-
ficient anytime 224-5621.
ESSAYS REPORTS THESES TYP-
ed. Phone 738-2663 after 6:00 p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FEMALE ASSISTANT FOR DOWN-
town dental office. Apply in writing to: Dr. J. A. Folkins, 907-925
West Georgia,  Vancouver 1,  B.C.
WANTED: BABYSITTER FOR 3
yr. old girl. 4:30 to midnight approx. Live-in. Call Mrs. Lu Hal-
lick 738-1203.
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts.  736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
EXPO     ANYONE?    LARGE     CON-
verted   bus-camper   complete.
Sleeps 6 plus. 434-1577.
ELECTRIC BASS GUITAR MUST
sell! Worth $170.00. Sell for $100.00
Phone CA 4-5584. Gord.
FARMERS' FROLIC TICKETS FOR
sale from any Aggie or from
A.M.S. office. $3.00 couple. Jan.
14,  Armouries  8:30  -  1 a.m.	
FOR SALE: OXFORD UNIVER-
sal Dictionary $10.00, Complete
Yale Shakespeare 40 volumes
$25.00. Both as new. Phone 681-
1944  eves.
RENTALS  &  REAL EST A.
Rooms
81
QUIET, COMFORTABLE room in
apartment, kit. privileges. Close
to  express  trans.,  phone 266-7663.
TWO QUIET AND PRIVATE
rooms for rent. Phone 731-9437 between 8 and 9.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND board on campus at
ZBT Fraternity House, phone 224-
9660, after 5 p.m.	
ROOM AND BOARD FOR STU-
dent plus salary, in return for
babysitting, household duties—own
room  AM 6-9784.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
WANTED, MALE senior student to
share West End apartment, immediate occupancy, phone "Ed"
681-8761,  after 5 p.m.	
3 MEN WANT A FOURTH -TO
share house at 15th and Burrard.
Must be over 21. Phone 738-3033
after 5 p.m.

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