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The Ubyssey Mar 9, 1972

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Array 'U.S.-based unions
play on insecurity'
Vol. UH, No. 59
VANCOUVER, B.C.,
THURSDAY,
MARCH 9, 1972
48 228-2301
MADELEINE PARENT ... 'Canadian workers can organize themselves.'
kini mcdonald photo
Socreds stall daycare drive
By MIKE SASGES
The provincial government, in an attempt
to wreck an organizing drive of daycare centre
workers, wants community service centres
turned over to private operators, a local
organizer charged Wednesday.
"I really think the provincial government
wants to halt our drive," said Larissa Tarwick,
president of Local 2 of the Social Services
Employees Union of B.C.
"The government is going to have to pick
up the discrepancy between what parents pay
and the real bill when we begin to negotiate
' for new contracts," she said.
The cost of daycare for parents is paid by
the provincial government, which gets 50 per
cent back from the federal government.
"The money is going to have to come or
the centres will go broke," said Tarwick.
The union is already certified in 22
Lower Mainland centres, she said, and is
beginning to organize in a number of other
centres, including UBC's.
B.C. superintendent of child welfare
suggested recently that the Family and
Children's Service, a Victoria-based
community service, turn its operation over to
non-profit or private operators.
FCS executive director Gordon Wright
said at the time that the salary scale set by the
agency for centre teachers was the reason
behind the government's action.
"The teachers at daycare centres are not
associated with the education departmennt,
but with the department of health and
welfare," said Tarwick.
"Learning is great and should happen at
the centres but there are higher priorities,
such as the growth of the child and his or her
individual awareness," said Tarwick.
She said a centre supervisor of 60
children is currently making between $450
and $500 and teachers make between $300
and $360 per month.
"Assistants who may be short one course
in the government's training program may
make about $250," she said.
"If the teachers are paid better and work
under better conditions it follows that they
will be more enthusiastic," said Tarwick.
"We had to do something to protect the
teachers and also to protect the children."
By LESLEY KRUEGER
American-based international
unions are playing on the
insecurities of Canadian workers
for the American leaders' benefit,
a labor leader said Wednesday.
"The American union bosses
tell us we need the security of
their huge strike funds. And yet a
federal government report shows
that from 1962-69 there was a net
profit of $90 million after all
expenses — including strikes — on
dues Canadian workers paid to the
unions in the States," Madeleine
Parent told an audience of 150
persons in the SUB ballroom.
"We can't afford a gift of $90
million to American bureaucrats,"
she said.
Parent said many unions in
Quebec are under the jurisdiction
of the U.S.-based labor central,
the AFIX.IO.
"Yet these unions receive not
one cent from the Americans.
"They pay only a per capita
tax, which is really a payment for
the privilege of carrying their
charter," she said.
But to get this money, she
added, the AFL-CIO deliberately
spreads the myth that Canadian
workers are too stupid to organize
without American money.
"This is not true. Canadian
workers both can and have
organized with our own efforts,"
she said.
These Canadian unions are
better than the American ones
because they are motivated to
change a situation they must live
with daily, while the Americans
are more removed from the scene,
Parent said.
"When the management is
cornered by the workers the
leaders of the American unions
are brought up from Washington
to sign a yellow-paper contract to
break a strike," said Parent.
Parent cited the case of the
Quebec women's clothing sewing
machine operators. They struck
during the Second World War and
had the management in a position
where it was willing to negotiate
when the parent union, the
Ladies' Garment Workers Union,
signed a contract and the strike
was declared illegal. The workers
were forced to return to the
factories.
She said it was significant that
these workers experience the
highest pay differential between
men and women employees in
Canadian industry. Women
workers in the garment trade in
Montreal and Toronto receive 74
See page 3: THIS IS
koytw
* -J& *t #««■
Plugs sought
Groups and projects asking for
funding from the 1972 grad class
are to have statements detailing
their requests in to The Ubyssey
by Friday. Statements are to be
typewritten, double-spaced and
not more than 200 words in
length.
They will be published in The
Ubyssey prior to the Feb. 15 grad
class vote on money allocations.
Elsewhere in the news, another
letters edition takes up pages 4, 5
and 8 in today's rag. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9, 1972
Engineers seek election of editor
By BERTON WOODWARD
The Alma Mater Society spring general
meeting will be asked March 16 to vote on a
constitutional amendment which would have
the editor of The Ubyssey elected by UBC
students.
About 600 students have signed a
petition asking that the question be put to the
meeting and that a referendum be held asking
students: "In view of the performance of The
Ubyssey staff this year, are you in favor of a
cut in the present budget allotment of
$36,500?"
The Ubyssey editor is currently elected
by the staff, whose decision is traditionally
ratified by council.
Notice for the two votes was given at
Wednesday night's AMS council meeting.
Tight-lipped Ubyssey editor Leslie
Plommer Wednesday would only say that of a
more ridiculous thing she thought she'd never
hear.
AMS president Grant Burnyeat after the
meeting termed the proposals "interesting".
The Engineering Undergraduate Society is
believed to be spearheading the drive against
the award-winning newspaper but the whole
EUS executive has left for New Brunswick
and could not be reached for comment.
EUS president-elect Harold Cunliffe said
he had heard nothing about the move, adding
that he had been very busy in the past few
days.
However, he said, "I think it's partially
justified but it doesn't seem quite right.
Students should have a bit tighter control of
The Ubyssey although I suppose that falls
under freedom of the press.
"I don't think the editorship should be a
political position."
In other business, council approved a
motion on behalf of AMS ombudswoman
Joan Campana to hold a referendum March 22
asking students if they are in favor of repeal
of those sections of the federal criminal code
dealing with abortions.
AMS external affairs officer Adrian
Belshaw announced that a $19,800 Local
Initiatives Program grant has been approved
for the AMS to place logs in some of the paths
leading down to the university beaches as an
experiment in stopping erosion and to build
steps to the beaches similar to those leading to
Towers Beach below Cecil Green park.
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
Whafs up, doc?
After a short absence. Doc
returns to answer a popular
question.
I'm not eating or sleeping
properly. What are the bad effects
of this?
Medical teaching is very vague
about questions like this.
Certainly there are dozens of
vitamin deficiency states, but real
deficiency diseases are very rarely
seen. The typical case of scurvy,
for instance, is seen in a
non-white, foreign-born baby
surviving on mother's milk, whose
mother is too poor to buy fresh
fruits and vegetables. Sailors used
to get it in the days when there
was nothing to eat for months but
hardtack and bacon. Old people in
cheap nursing homes occasionally
survive for long periods on just tea
and toast, and they can get
vitamin deficiencies.
You and I however, are pretty
sure to get by just on the lettuce
leaf in our hamburger and the
token enrichment in our white
bread. Young kids never get severe
dietary deficiency diseases, even
on a diet of brockburgers and
coke.
You may once have been
exposed to charts telling you to
get 15 servings of green leafy
vegetables a week, 47 slices of
brown bread, 300 glasses of water
and so on. Have you ever met
anybody who could afford it?
Have you ever met anybody who
could stand having liver three
times a week? No. And yet we're
all still alive, even those
working-class people who live on
Wonder Bread and spaghetti with
the occasional bologna.
Some diets can get you into
trouble — strict macrobiotic diets,
for instance, and strict vegetarian
diets, can lead to protein
deficiency. Animal protein is a
necessary part ofl the diet and
vegetarians must eat plenty of
nuts and legumes to make up for
its absence.
However, when you think of
Eskimos thriving on nothing but
raw meat, and Indians thriving on
vegetable soup and chapattis, it
reassures you. Remember, Dr.
Spock says if your kid wants
hamburgers and spaghetti every
day of the year, that's all right, as
INTERNATIONAL FAIR AND DANCE
^tM^W
♦*»'        .   ___v j
lnternational=Between Nations
FRI. & SAT.
MAR. 10 & 11
Displays and "Goodies'
from:
AFRICA— Short dramatic pantomimes, poetry, displays and
soul food.
CARIBBEAN— Steelband  demonstration,   calypso  dancing  and
food.
CHINA— Slide   and   photo  show,   live  demonstration  of
Chinese painting, craft displays and a movie on
acupuncture.
GERMANY—    Bavarian Garten, food and music.
ITALY— Slide show, games and crafts.
MALAYSIA-SINGAPORE-Handicraft displays.
JAPAN— Tea ceremony and displays.
PAKISTAN-    Slide show and handicrafts.
SPAIN— Music, displays, Mexican refreshments.
Friday 4 to 10p.m. Sat. noon to 5p.m.
Community & Faculty. 75c, Students. 50c
DANCE
Saturday, March 11,9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
SERENADERS STEELBAND
STREETLIGHT (ROCK)
DON'T MISS IT!
ONLY $1.50
long as it gets some fresh fruit
now and then. No one food is
absolutely necessary for health.
Women can get into iron
deficiency on marginal diets. Try
to get plenty of green vegetables,
red meat, liver (ugh), wine or
Geritol or something you like
with iron in it.
People like Adelle Davis will
tell you that minor degrees of
vitamin or mineral deficiency can
make you tired, get more colds
and pimples, make you fail your
exams and whatnot. She may be
right. Huge amounts of extra
vitamins can make you good and
sick, but vitamin supplements in
normal amounts will not hurt
you. Wouldn't it be nice if we
could all get enough nutrients
from good cheap unrefined food?
As for sleep, again there's
nothing really solid. Some people
only need four hours of sleep. I
like about nine or ten. I suspect
not getting enough sleep slows
down your mind a little, which is
why doctors lose all their idealism
after the intern year.
If you have trouble getting to
sleep, you might want to see a
doctor.   Sleeplessness is often a
sign of depression. Do not ^et
started on sleeping pills.
Remember, the cheapest
effective sleep-producing drug is
booze. Take two tablespoons of
rum and call me in the morning.
Feeling rotten? Got problems
with your body? This column,
written by someone who knows,
attempts to provide information
about aches and pains common
among students and dispel some
common myths. It is strictly
informational and doesn't attempt
to prescribe or advise, except to
say when a doctor should be
consulted.
Send questions and letters to
■Room 241-K, SUB, UBC.
L
RECORDING ARTISTS
MARTY GILLAN
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Appearing Nightly
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with THE
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FPR UBC 47 Thursday, March 9, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Organizers query their international union
Madeleine Parent has played an
influential role in the current
union organizing drive for campus
staff.
Three Office and Technical
Employees Union organizers
admitted Wednesday afternoon at
a panel discussion on the merits of
UBC non-aeademic staff
unionization that they have not
seen the constitution of the
international union.
Parent, in a speech earlier in
the afternoon at a Women's Week
function, said international unions
often constitutionally prevent any
union official except a member of
This is
not for us'
From page 1
per   cent   less  than   their  male
counterparts.
Parent said these constitute the
reasons for her support of unions
such as the Canadian Union of
Public Employees rather than the
Office and Technical Employees
Union.
"Although I have respect for
the women organizing OTEU here
on campus I must suggest you
look and see if it is in your best
interests to join this union.
"A union like CUPE at least
has the means of making change
in Canada with Canadians."
She said she is not
anti-American, but for world
solidarity. However, she said,
before this can be achieved there
must be strong workers in each
country.
"We have got to speak out for
ourselves in all discussions,"
Parent said.
"But [president] George
Meany of the AFLrCIO said, when
questioned on this: Til give you
independence. If you want
autonomy, get out'."
Meany and other union bosses
"have themselves become
businessmen, she said. Meany
earns a $75,000 salary and others
in the male-dominated union
boards earn comparable amounts.
"There is no  woman on the
executive of a union in the States,
and  few  real leaders. They are
weeded out," Parent said.
.    "This is not for us."
the international executive from
signing cheques even when the
Canadian contributions are
banked in Canada.
Organizers  Bobbi  Gegenberg,
Eve Hamilton and Laurie
Whitehead said if Parent's
statements held true for the
OTEU they would have to
seriously reconsider their position.
MUTILATED CHILD is one of 'The Gooks' featured in free film to be
shown Friday noon in SUB auditorium. Brutally realistic film by Pierre
Gaisseau examines effects of U.S. war against Vietnam on children.
They said they had asked local
OTEU officials for a copy of "the
constitution" and had received
only the local constitution.
Parent," who attended the
meeting, warned the audience of
about 60 that if the international
has control of the funds or can
constitutionally    invoke
SUB cans
open to all
SUB washrooms will be
liberated Friday.
Guided tours to open the
washrooms to everyone are
scheduled in conjunction with a
women's week display of graffitti
from local washrooms in the SUB
art gallery.
"Hopefully, the act of
liberating washrooms to a certain
extent will help demystify
sexuality and lessen sexual
anxiety as it arises in the
segregated situation of men and
women," said Fran Issacs, the
organizer of Friday's day on
sexuality.
"The point in having the
liberated graffitti display is to
draw attention to the question of
what graffitti means, why sexual
jokes are found on washroom
walls and what connection these
have on sexual oppression," said
Issacs.
Today at noon in the SUB
ballroom there will be two hours
of readings, dance and song by
women artists: actress Jackie
Crossland, novelist Alice Munro,
poet Judith Copithorne and
others.
A 35-cent hot lunch will be
served by alternate food service.
Also today there will be an
experimental Workshop of women
through history by Crista Preus;
Part I, 10:30 a.m to 2:30 p.m.;
Part II, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the
SUB art gallery.
A discussion of female
sexuality by Arts I instructor
Shelagh Day and law student
Diana Moore will take place in the
SUB ballroom at noon Friday.
Three short stories written by
Jane Rule will be read by Helen
Sontoff and Shelagh Day in the
blue room of the Arts I building
at 2:30 p.m. on Friday.
Ex-UBC dean vetos student rep
LENNOXVILLE, Que. (CUPI) - A
former UBC arts dean has surfaced here as one
of the protagonists in an attempt by the
administration of Bishop's University to bar a
student senator from office.
In the latest of a series of actions against
student representation, administration
president Dennis Healy and registrar J. P.
Dawson notified student councilofficialsthat
' Paul Trollope, elected to senate Feb. 25 by an
overwhelming   majority    of   students   was
unacceptable as a student representative.
There are five students on the 20-member
senate.
Healy was arts dean at UBC from 1965 to
1968, when ,he resigned and became
vice-president of York University in Toronto.
From there he went to Bishop's two years
ago.
Trollope is a second-year student and
, editor of the student newspaper. He sat on a
number of university bodies.
Alarm brings cops to SUB
A short circuit in the SUB Bank of
Montreal's fire alarm wiring brought four
armed RCMP, one wielding a shotgun, to the
bank Wednesday afternoon.
RCMP said any alarm is treated as real
until police are satisfied it is false. They would
not comment on the procedure followed in
robbery cases.
A bank spokesman said the police
handled the situation "very coolly", adding
that a robber would have to be out of the
bank in 45 seconds to beat police.
Because it was a fire alarm, fire trucks
also came to the scene.
Observers in a crowd that gathered to
watch the spectacle identified a grinning
plainclothes, RCMP, who carried a shotgun
over his shoulder and occasionally swung it
along the ground as Constable S. F. (Secret
Squirrel) Leach.
Leach, it may be remembered, bungled
his big chance to graduate to Alexis Creek last
year when he was upstaged by the fire
department in The Case of the Stolen
Ubysseys.
Student representatives speculate that the
move is a response to a board of governors
subcommittee recommendation for increased
student representation at all levels, an increase
in the power of the senate and abolition of
the board of governors as it is presently
constituted.
The board is currently composed of
prominent Montreal financiers, corporation
executives and chartered accountants who
view with distaste the subcommittee
recommendations.
In addition, under Trollope's editorship,
the student newspaper, The Campus, has
severely criticized the workings of the campus
administration.
Healy and Dawson claim that Trollope is
not considered to be in good academic
standing although he has passed all semester
examinations. They also contend that
students from the year in which Trollope is
enrolled are ineligible for election to senate.
Yet, according to the university's
constitution: "Student senators shall be
elected by and from the full-time student
body, in such a manner and with such
academic divisional representation as the
student body shall see fit."
trusteeship on any local then local
autonomy is meaningless since,
she said, international union
executives are dominated by
Americans.
Towards the end of the
meeting OTEU vice-president and
regional manager Bill Lowe
admitted that the OTEU
international constitution allows
only the executive's
secretary-treasurer to sign cheques
for Canadian international money
although the money is banked in
Canada.
Lowe was asked to speak by an
audience member who recognized
him. He said he had not planned
to speak because he believed the
meeting should be run by the
workers concerned.
Several in the audience charged
he    was avoiding   the question.
The meeting failed to come to
any consensus on the question of
what type of union to join
although most seemed to agree
unionization is necessary.
SCULPTURE
... stolen last week
Glassware
removed
A valuable piece of blown
glassware was stolen Thursday
from the physics showcase and
unless it is returned there will be
no more displays.
Physics researcher John Lees,
who made all the pieces in the
display, said Wednesday that
because the showcase lock was
picked the works are no longer
safe there. He has removed the
pieces from the open case, located
in the passageway between the
Hennings and Hebb buildings and
left a note asking tor the return of
the piece.
If it is returned, he said, he will
take that as an indication that ik>
more thefts will occur and the
displays will then be resumed. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9, 1972
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 9,1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
All the anamans showed up to play guns but the big crewcut kid in
the plain clothes mowed them all down with his shotgun. Nobody told me
it was loaded, wailed Mike Sasges as he expired gracefully on a mound of
pink feathers and Kent Spencer. Paul Knox picked off Evan and Timothy
before being felled by a deadly blow while Lesley Krueger and Leslie
Plommer materialized out of nowhere. Jan O'Brien ricocheted off Berton
Woodward— who wrote most of today's history himself— with Mike
Finlay pumping bullets and other things into Mike Gidora's thing. Gord
Gibson threw pies at Kini McDonald (and missed) and Til Nawatzki and
Tom MacKinnon arrived just in time for the masthed.
The Baloney Blorgs reminded everyone in their usual puce fashion to
turn up today at 1:30 for the big election.
U.S. apron strings
Madeleine Parent's comments on
U.S.-based international unions, reported on
the front page of today's Ubyssey, should
give UBC employees now in the throes of
unionizing some food for thought.
The same holds true for students who
are, or will likely become members of a
union.
The U.S.-versus-Canadian union debate
has been going on for some time in this
country — and for good reasons.
In the same way that U.S. corporations
bleed money and resources out of Canada,
many U.S.-based unions have extracted dues
out of Canadian workers and have given
back a disproportionately small return.
At the same time, Canadian workers
have been told they could not successfully
organize or strike without aid from the
international unions.
Canadian workers are, however,
increasingly realizing that they are not as
poor and helpless as some of the U.S. labor
magnates would have them believe.
It is true that an American-run union is
probably better than no union at all - which
is why many people in the Canadian labor
force have been reluctant to declare war on
U.S.-based unions.
However, it is becoming more and more
obvious that the Canadian labor movement
has no long-range future while it remains
subservient to U.S. union dictates.
Livers
The gnarled, decrepit individuals who
thrice weekly pen editorials for The
Ubyssey wish to take this opportunity to
applaud the sentiments expressed on page 2
of today's rag by Doc.
This genial individual, wrio writes the
paper's medical column, has finally said
what no doctor or nutritionist has dared to
say: liver tastes foul.
You can dress it up with bacon, smother
it in onions or mash it up and give it a fancy
name like pate de foie gras, but liver,
nonetheless, is liver.
It may be full of iron, it may teem with
vitamins and minerals, but no amount of,
nutrition can erase the centuries of
oppression undergone by defenceless
children, and adults who should know
better, at the hands of the livers of cows.
This organ, however, takes a more
sinister form in the human body.
Were it not for the hidden danger
inherent in the mere possession of a liver by
humans, we might be tempted to pour our
editorial bile on another ignominious organ,
the pancreas. Or we could vent our spleen
on, naturally enough, the spleen.
But how often is it emphasized that the
human liver is potentially fatal to human life.
For when combined with enough liquor, this
wretched creation of nature becomes an
unbearable burden on the body, a mass of
cirrhotic pulp that sucks life from innocent
alcoholic degenerates.
Such a poisonous organ should not be
allowed to exist, and medical science should
take as its number one priority finding the
quickest path to the liver's obliteration.
-P.K.
Letters Edition
Yum
As a somewhat representative
member of the apathetic mass
attending UBC with intentions of
becoming a rather erudite master
of the vernacular particular
(peculiar?) to my chosen
profession, I am hesitant to
participate in any situation within
the public forum.
However a recent occurrence
has aroused my curiosity to the
extent that I may now have to
acknowledge myself as a latent
shit-disturber. You see Grant
Burnyeat, our esteemed AMS
Prez, was recently seen eating at
the prestigious Faculty Club along
with a date and two other
couples. The socializing, however,
was not limited to dining, but
included the essential
b e f ore-and-after liquid
refreshments.
What aroused my interest was
the fact that the cost of the
evening's partaking was signed for
under an AMS account at the
club. Several questions have
prodded me to write this letter:
1. Why does the AMS have an
account at the club?;
2. As a member of the society,
and thus a partial payer for the
evening, I would like to know
what the occasion was;
3. Since the AMS is in such
difficult financial problems, how
can it afford such little "extras"?;
4. Finally, who is in charge of
the account and okays its usage,
in other words, what type of
control is kept on to avoid abuse?
I'm sure Mr. Burnyeat would
be concerned about any
misgivings a student has about this
occasion, and will promptly
clarify the situation.
I have been told that bringing
this issue to public attention
resembles mudslinging because I
am delving into the executive's
private affairs. However I feel that
since I am a contributor to AMS
funds, as are all students, I have a
right to be informed about the
particulars.
Name withheld
Understudy
First, let me explain that while
1 haven't worked out all the
details, I'm writing to you about
my project now because time is
running out. The spring term is
nearly over and we'll have to work
fast if we want to begin in
September.
I must confess that while the
project is my own idea, it never
would have come to me if it
hadn't been for the development
of the essay-writing service and
the insightful comments which
followed from your readers and
your editorial writers.
I wanted to call the project
Opportunities for Youth, but
since that name has already been
taken, my present working title
(and I am open to suggestion on
this) is UnderStudy.
This is how UnderStudy works.
We'll recruit a number of high
school graduates who really want
a university education but can't
afford it, and hire them to register
at the university in the name of a
sponsor-student. For four years
they will attend classes and labs,
write essays and take exams in the
sponsor's name. At the end of
that time, the sponsor will come
out to the university, for the first
time, to collect his or her degree.
I believe that this is an
equitable arrangement. The
understudy will get a university
education but not a degree.
However, if truly educated, he or
she doesn't need the degree
anyhow. The sponsor will get a
degree, which he or she needs,
because he or she doesn't have a
university education.
To be honest, the cost to the
sponsor will be considerable. He
or she will have to be responsible
for the understudy's fees, room
and board plus a small monthly
allowance. However, before
somebody yells rip off, let me
point out that no matter how you
do it, it costs a lot to get a degree
and this way will probably be
cheaper than most.
As I said before, there are a
few details to be worked out. We
will expect the understudy to
write to the sponsor once a month
and send copies of The Ubyssey
and UBC Reports so that the
sponsor can keep up with all the
campus gossip and build up that
fund of memories and anecdotes
about his or her college days
which will be so useful in the
years to come.
We have yet to decide what to
do if the understudy wins a
scholarship (I suggest a 50-50 split
with the sponsor) and what fee
should be charged if the sponsor
wants the  understudy  to join a
fraternity, play on a team, run for
student office, write for The
Ubyssey, etc.
In any case, time is of the
essence. I have applied for a
$29,775 Canada Council grant to
begin the recruiting — easily the
most important part of the
project — and I am anxious to
hear from other faculty members
and students who would like to
help me get UnderStudy off the
ground.
Don Allison,
Assistant professor,
Faculty of education
Medicine
The following letter, written to
Ken Piter, president of the
third-year medicine class, was
inspired by your March 3
editorial I am withholding my
name, as I do not wish to be the
subject of individual chastisement
by the administration.
I am a second-year medical
student at this university, and am
therefore very disturbed to learn
that fourth-year students will
probably not receive "stipends"
next year as compensation for the
loss of summer income.
I certainly hope that the
students in your class will not
accept or tolerate this situation.
Polite discussions and committee
meetings may be somewhat
successful when one is seeking
reform in the fourth-year teaching
program, but they are virtually
useless' in dealing with the
government. Members of the
government     are     political
"animals", they do not respect
the rights of the meek
(governments never do). If one
sincerely believes in the
preservation of his rights, he must;
be sensible and realistic in
defending them. If we cannot
agree upon a pragmatic position,
future medical students may even
see themselves being billed for the
privilege of night duty!
If the third-year class is similar
to our class, it is probably
composed of people from
different socio-economic
backgrounds. In our class, there
are some affluent students from
medical families, who will never
miss the stipend and are often
reluctant to support the class in
any protest action. Then there are
the sheep, who are terribly afraid
of offending the government or
the medical faculty. They would-
sell their souls for that MD degree,
and are easily taken advantage of
by those who perceive this
vulnerability of "character".
It is often difficult to enlist the
support of these people, for they
have not developed a sense of
responsibility for the needs of the
class as a whole, and for the needs
of future medical students, who
may not be as well endowed
financially. These people often
cloak their self-centredness in
high-toned phrases, stating that
"we don't want to appear
greedy", or "strong protest is
unprofessional and reveals lack of
dedication."
To enlist the support of these '
people, they should be reminded
that    medical    students    must
preserve the rights of the entire Thursday, March 9, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters Edition
class. Do we want to create a
medical school in which only the
upper middle class, supported
often by their parents, can afford
to attend? Is it really just and
equitable in medical school if the
poorer students are forced to
accumulate thousands of dollars
in federal loan debt? The
elimination of the "stipend" (that
word, along with "honorarium",
should be thrown out, as it
implies an undeserved gift, a frill)
will increase the level of debt of
the average medical student by
about $2,500.
This is fine with Mr. Loffmark,
for it gives him more leverage in
sending graduates to God-forsaken
places in this province such as
Skeena River Junction or
Telegraph Creek. The poorer
students will be in such debt that
they will be forced to accept any
position. Of course, the students
who really didn't care about the
stipend will graduate as more
mobile individuals, free to travel
or pursue a specialty if they wish.
Students who fail to
meaningfully oppose the
elimination of the stipend
implicitly support financial
discrimination within their own
class, and should be reminded of
it. Any student who attempts to
self-righteously moralize to the
class about dedication, etc.,
should be told to stuff it.
I also feel that all four medical
years should demand a statement
of full support from the faculty
and its administration. It is
obvious that [medicine dean] Dr.
McCreary sympathizes, but does
not want to offend anybody, so
he adopts the safe position of
"hoping" that the stipend will not
be eliminated. Unlike many other
medical schools in the U.S. and
Canada, the administration of the
UBC school has been timid in is
dealings with the government, and
has preferred to remain rather
distant in its relations with
students, very reluctant to really
embrace and support them as
future colleagues.
A strong statement is needed
from Dr. McCreary and he should
be challenged on this point.
Finally, I would like to outline
some proposals which will achieve
tangible results for the third-year
class and others to come:
1. The third-year class
members should send letters to
Mr. Loffmark, the VGH
administrator, and Dr. McCreary,
expressing their regret at the loss
of the stipend. They should state
that this is indeed unfortunate,
for students will now have to seek
summer employment during Phase
IV.
Accordingly, the class will
leave the clerkship from June 1,
1972 until Sept. 1, to seek income
for tKe expenses of the following
year, unless a sound financial
alternative can be found (and I
don't mean further loans and
debt). Students from first and
second year should sign petitions
stating that they will adopt the
same policy in Phase IV if the
problem is not resolved. Any
hollow threats by the dean,
stating that he will fail the entire
class, should be treated with the
levity they deserve.
Copies of this notification
should also be sent to the
Vancouver Sun and the Province,
as well as radio and TV stations.
The statement should include an
expression of concern for the loss
of patient care during this period,
and regret that the situation has
deteriorated to this point. The
onus then falls upon the above
authorities.
This action will be very
effective. Of course it requires the
unanimous support of the class.
People who do not support their
classmates should be continually
reminded of their self-centred
callousness. These people are
scabs (what an unprofessional
word!) and nothing more.
2. A protest march of medical
students from first, second and
third years to Victoria. This could
be held perhaps in March (exams
are no excuse for first and second
year). Buses would be chartered,
and Mr. Loffmark, Pat McGeer,
Dave Barrett and other MLAs
should be notified that the
students will be coming over to
inform the legislature of their
plight.
These people should be asked
to speak out on the matter.
Students should not attend classes
on this day, sending a letter of
explanation to Dr. McCreary.
Students should occupy Mr.
Loffmark's office until he will see
them. Believe me, politeness just
won't work in this province; it
gets you nowhere.
I believe that these and other
actions will guarantee results for
your class, including a full
restoration of the stipend. These
tactics play the game as it must be
played to win. Any lack of
unanimous support is, of course,
disgraceful and disastrous. Finally,
if Dr. McCreary, Sidney
Friedman, or any other faculty
member implicitly defends the
present inequitable situation by
stating that many other medical
schools in Canada pay no
stipends, they should be chastised
for their comfortable lack of real
concern. These stipends are easy
to  make when you have tenure
and a good salary.
I am equally concerned about
the lack of teaching in fourth
year. However, I feel that we can
obtain changed through
discussions with faculty. We
would expect that they exist as
part of an educational system, not
a vocational school.
Name withheld,
Medicine 2
War Act
As one of those who did speak
out against the proclamation of
the War Measures Act in 1970, I
would like to correct some
erroneous impressions left by the
recent flurry of letters and articles
in The Ubyssey.
First, I don't believe it is
accurate to say that the scarcity
of academic opposition that
October was due to fear or
insecurity. At that time I had
conversations with many faculty
and it seemed to me that most did
not speak up because they either
actively supported the Trudeau
mini-coup, or at least were of two
minds on the issue. Thus, the
charge of cowardice is both unfair
and beside the point.
What was distressing was not
that academics lacked the courage
of their convictions, but that they
were so ready to support the use
of totalitarian power by the state
on so flimsy a pretext.
Second, whatever criticisms
may be brought against faculty
conduct during the crisis, student
behavior was far worse.
While the Faculty Association
was able at least to bring itself to
condemn the infamous Peterson
Order-in-Council calling for the
firing of teachers who supported
revolutionary movements, the
AMS council actually sent a
telegram of support to the prime
minister.
See page 8: LETTERS
rig
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AMS OFFICIAL NOTICE RE:
Meeting of Students' Court
(1)     Students'  Court  will  convene in   rooms 205 STUDENT
UNION  BUILDING on March 13, 1972 at 5:30 p.m. to
hear   the   question   raised   by David   S.   Dick,   Arts   IV
regarding:
The elegibility of the present three Graduate
Student Association's representatives to have
voted at the December 6, 1971 Student Council
Meeting and to vote at any further meetings.
The number of voting representatives the
Graduate Student Association is presently
entitled to have on council.
(b)
JIM BROWN, Court Clerk
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
.FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.
1972
CHARTER FLIGHTS
RETURN FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON - VANCOUVER
MAY 1-AUG. 25 $250.00
MAY 2-JUNE 26    250.00
MAY 10-SEPT. 3        250.00
MAY 15-AUG. 25    250.00
MAY 28-JULY 14     250.00
ONE-WAY FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON
MAY 15    r. $145.00
SEPT. 7     145.00
SEPT. 11     145.00
EDMONTON - LONDON
MAY 15 ^ $140.00
CALGARY- LONDON
SEPT. 30 S140.00
STUDENT GUIDE TO EUROPE
NOW ON SALE $1.95
EURAIL AND BRITRAIL PASSES AND
INTRA-EUROPEAN FLIGHTS NOW BOOKING
AMS Travel Office Room 226 SUS
OPEN - 1:00 - 4 P.M. Mon. - Thurs. - 1:00 - 3 P.M. Fr>
Phone 228-2980
Graduate Students
Notice of Extraordinary Resolution
On behalf of the graduate student body, the Graduate Student Association
Executive will present the following extraordinary resolution at the annual
general meeting of the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre,
12:30 p.m. March 16, 1972 at the centre.
Move:
That by-law 12 clause 2 of the constitution of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre be amended to read: "two faculty members
appointed by the Graduate Students Association"
That the words "and one for a term of three years," be deleted from
by-law 12 clause 2 subsection (a).
That the words "three years" be replaced by "two year^' in by-law 12
clause 2 subsection (b).
That by-law 12 clause 3 of the constitution of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre be amended to read: "two persons appointed
annually by the president of the university during the month of but prior
to the annual general meeting of the centre, who shall hold office until the
anniversary of their respective appointment."
That clause 4 be added to by-law 12 of the constitution of the Thea
Koerner House Graduate Student Centre to read: "The president and the
internal affairs officer of the Graduate Students Association, to serve on
the board for the duration of their term as members of the executive of the
Graduate Students Association."
GSA Executive. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9, 1972
Hot flashes
Student sings
in art gallery
Well-known songwriter and
guitarist Fred Cawsey will
perform all by himself today at
noon in the Vancouver Art
Gallery.
Cawsey, a UBC student and
former member of the local folk
group The Wanderers, has a wide
variety of experience in the local
music and drinking scene.
His songs deal with the age-old
themes of life, love and the
pursuit of unconsciousness.
Clean-up
'Tween classes
TODAY
HILLEL CLUB
Rabbi Marvin Hier on Talmudic
Laws of Marriage, noon, Hillel
House.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Opening of exhibition: Duver, his
contemporaries and successors, 8
p.m.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
ECO
Dr. Patrick McTaggart-Cowan on
Chedabucto Oil Spill Cleanup,
noon, Hebb theatre.
CCF
Election and report, noon, SUB
211.
VST and SCM
Dr. Rober Collier on The West End
Report, 8 p.m., SCM lounge— room
39, Westminster House, 6000 Iona
Dr.
WEST COAST TRAIL
Those interested in hiking in late
April, meet to decide date and
participants. Transportation    is
arranged, Thursday noon, see
Ubyssey office bulletin board for
room number.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
COMMITTEE
Panel: Foreign Ownership of
Canada. Fred Ferdman, profs Walter
Young and Gideon Rosenbluth,
noon, SUB 207-209.
BAHA'I CLUB
The significance of fasting, noon,
Bu. 230.
VCF
The Power and Light Co., noon,
SUB plaza.
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Final dinner, 7:00 p.m., El Matador,
3135 W. Broadway.
AUCM
Get-away      weekend.      Phone
224-1614 for details.
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Ian Adams, The Politics of Poverty,
noon, party room.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Young     interesting     speaker    from
Gordon     Neighborhood     House,
noon, SUB 130.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Co-operation Yes — Castration No,
discussion   of   student   government,
noon, SUB 111.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International fair with booths from
nine countries, 4-10 p.m.
SATURDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Fair continues noon - 5 p.m. Dance
9 p.m. - 1 a.m., with two bands.
HILLEL HOUSE
Film: A Tale of Two Cities, starring
Ronald    Colman.    Beer    and    free
popcorn,   8:30   p.m.,   Hillel   House
(behind Brock).
VOC
Trip to Ipsoot Glacier, Saturday and
Sunday.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Mission  of the Church,  10 a.m.   in
the centre.
MONDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting: guest speaker Len
Marchand, MP, noon, SUB 125.
TUESDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Guru    Janardan
ajapa yoga, 8 p.m.
Dr. P. D. McTaggart-Cowan,
executive director of the Science
Council of Canada, will discuss
the clean-up of the Chedabucto
Bay oil spill today in Hebb
Theatre at 12:30. Dr. McTaggart-
Cowan was appointed by the
federal government to supervise
clean-up operations. The free
meeting is sponsored by
Environmental   Crisis  Operation.
De€isions
Newsweek foreign affairs
editor Edward Klein will speak on
Candidate Nixon— Between
Peking and Moscow in Buchanan
104 noon today.
Klein will discuss
behind-the-scenes decision-making
in the U.S. relationships with
China and Russia at the Centre for
Continuing Education talk.
MARCH 16
KUNG FU
General   election,
205.
MARCH 17
VOC
Banquet at Coach
soon.
Paramahansa    on
, SUB 20.7-209.
4:30   p.m.,  SUB
House: get tickets
Political science head Walter
Young, economics prof Gideon
Rosenbluth and math grad Fred
Ferdman will discuss foreign
ownership in Canada noon today
in SUB 207-209.
The panel discussion is part of
the academic activities committee
program.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day From Friday
4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. 4:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
ws*»adiw
GENERAL MEETING
THURSDAY,
MARCH 16th 12:30
SUNNY DAY: S.U.B. MALL
ORDINARY DAY: GYM
REPORTS (ONLY A FEW)
SPEECHES (NONE)
HARANGUES (USUAL NUMBER)
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS (ONLY TWO)
AND
A BAND ("SUNSHINE")
4000 Students Needed for a Quorum
NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Thea Koerner House
The Graduate Student Centre
The Annual General Meeting will be held on Thursday, March 16,
1972 at 12:30 p.m. in the Ballroom at the Centre.
All Members are invited to attend.
CLASSIFIED
Rot**: Campus — 3 lines,  1  day $1.00; 3 days $3.f0
Cemmardaf - 3 lines,  1  day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., tha day batata publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Danc.f
11
INTERNATIONAL FAIR DANCE
Saturday 9-1, Seranaders Steel
Band & Streetlight (Rock) Band
$1.50   I.H.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LACE-UP SKI BOOTS WITH RED
socks. Lost March 4 near 16th
on campus. Phone M Feller, 224-
9818.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite  Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
ASIAN CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
Photo and Art Exhibit March
13th   to      18th.   SUB   Art   Gallery.
FILM EXPERIENCE? COULD BE
worth $1,000. Phone 684-4887 after
5   p.m.	
INTERNATIONAL  FAIR 4-10 FRI-   .
day,  noon  to  5  Saturday.  I.H.
Travel Opportunities
IS
LEARN HOW TO TRAVEL OVERSEAS ON A LIMITED BUDGET
A meeting will be held at 7:45
p.m. on Monday, March 20th in
the auditorium of Eric Hamber
School, 5025 Willow, Vancouver
33rd & Oak) to help all those
travelling abroad on a limited
budget. Bring along your questions and learn how to travel on
a   shoestring.
A panel of experts, including a
qualified agent, who have travelled to all parts of the world
will be on hand to talk to you and
answer all your questions on
foreign travel. Free checklist will
be   handed   out.
No admission charge —• so bring
your friends who are interested
in travel and learn how to save
hundreds of dollars!
Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway, Vancouver    9,    B.C.,    Telephone:    738-
3128.	
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up Special homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone  684-8638.
Wanted—Information 17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
FOR SALE OR TRADE 64 VW
Window Van Will accept 65 BUG
or better. Phone 874-3729.	
   1965  SUNBEAM  $225   	
Good running condition. Very economical ideal for students. 684-
5763  evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Daycare
32
AFFECTIONATE PERSON TO
care for Jackie (4) and Peter (1)
Monday-Friday 8:30-1:30 p.m.
Blenheim & 32pd. Light housework. Phone  266-8575 after 2 p.m.
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
ASIAN CANADIAN EXPERIENCE,
Photo and Art Exhibit March
13th   to   18th   SUB   Art   Gallery.
TODAY A MAN NEEDS A GOOD
reason to walk a mile. Start
walking to Corky's Men's Hair
Styling,  4th   &  Alma,   731-4717.
Typing
40
ESSAY TYPING 19th AND DUN-
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my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.
Typing—Coni.
40
WILL DO TYPING MY HOME.
Reasonable rates. 985-8891. North
Vancouver.	
ESSAYS, PAPERS TYPED 25c
page.   Barb,   732-9985  after  6.
ESSAYS, PAPERS. THESIS,
assignments, fast, efficient. Near
41st   Marine   Dr.   266-5053.	
TYPING DONE — I.B.M. ELEC-
tric — Elite type, essays, term
Papers, Thesis etc. Stencils and
Mimeograph.   My   home   327-5381.
PROFESSIONAL BILINGUAL
typing, IBM Selectric. Open days
evenings, weekends. Phone
Madeleine at 738-3827. Reasonable rates. <
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION  &  SCHOOLS
Special Classes 62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early Litnited enrollment.  G|' Alfred,  261-4764.
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT EXAMS? THE
UBC Tutoring Center has tutors
in nearly every course. Register
in   SUB   228   12:00-2:00   weekdays.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
PIONEER 3-MAN TRAIL PACK
tent $50 Black's Icelandic Special
(large) down si. bag $30. As new
Ph.   526-0105   after   6.	
MCB CRESCENT SPECIAL
(men's) Campagnolo gear, Reynold's tubing, brand new $175.
Offers, phone 266-9009.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM, KITCHEN. $60/MO. ON
campus 5745 Agronomy Road, 224-
9549. Live on campus, exams are
corning.
Room 8c Board
82
IT'S NEW—STAY AT THE D.K.E.
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi - private washrooms, full
laundry facilities, color T.V., and
excellent food 5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
83
PRIVATE SEMI-FURNISHED
suite for one non-smoker available now. 263-8441. Near univ.
Quiet,   washer/dryer,   sep.   ent.
ROOMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom furnished apartment
in Kits for May-Sept, with gay
male. $90/mo., Box 6572, Station
"Gv   Vancouver  8.
Unit. Apts.
84
UNFURNISHED 1-BDRM. UPPER
dupl. Priv. ent. Kits. nr. Alma
Beach. Tennis area Third Ave.
Frig., stove, drapes, carpets,
Cablevis., parking, balcony, heat
incl. Prefer single, no pets. Refs.
req.,   $175.   Call   731-3028.	
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. 8c Unfurn.       86
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, March 9, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Basketball — in retrospect
After it was over, Wally Gage gave each of the
UBC Thunderbirds a CIAU championship plaque.
Then, he walked across the court and shook hands
with the Acadia Axemen.
And that, roughly, was the story of last
Saturday's CIAU basketball championship game; the
winners got the hardware and the losers got a
handshake.
It didn't look that far apart on the score-board.
In fact 87-80 is a close game as basketball goes, but
those seven points were the difference between a
handshake and a piece of hardware.
And there was also a world of difference
between the two teams. Acadia is a team that
revolves around two men, Coach 'Gib' Chapman and
guard Steve Pound.
Chapman runs the team in much the same
manner as a general waging war. He's constantly
shouting cryptic numbers and giving signals from
the bench, all the time squeezing the life from a
limp, white towel His team responds almost
.automatically to every shout.
Pound's role is much simpler. All he has to do is
score points. Pound has consistently been the top
Acadia point getter, and over the weekend we had
an excellent example of why.
Acadia's offence is designed with Steve Pound
in mind. They give him the ball, set a screen for
him, and he shoots.
And when he shoots, the odds are a bit better
than even, money that he scores also. Saturday he
scored to the tune of 29 points, nearly all of them
off of that same regimented offence.
Ron Thorsen has been looked on by most as
the key to the 'Birds winning or losing. The rumour
goes that if Thorsen is hot, the 'Birds are unbeatable
and vice versa.
Saturday's game showed that one as having the
same merit as most rumours; very little.
Saturday Thorsen did not play the best game he
has played in four years at UBC. But he found lots
of people willing and able to help out.
John Mills, the 'Birds' unbelievably improved
centre, typified the UBC effort Saturday.
He scored 27 points in one of the best
individual efforts ever witnessed at UBC.
Stan Callegari, who missed out on the last 'Bird
championship team because a knee injury, made the
most of his second chance Saturday. He was deadly
with what has become his trade mark; a thirty-foot
jump shot from the corner. Net result: 22 points.
This championship was a result of hustle and
complete team play more than anything else.
Saturday's game was typical of that.
UBC took an early lead, but every time they
seemed ready to pull away, Acadia came storming
back. The half closed with UBC ahead by one point,
48-47.
The second half was much tighter defensively,
and the 'Birds stymied every Acadia effort, holding
them to just 33 points for the half.
This game was the peak of a UBC drive that
seemed to start after the Buchanan Trophy loss to
SFU.
Up to then, the 'Birds had played on again-off
again basketball, and were at times lazy on the
floor. They were taking poor shots, and generally
not working well as a unit.
Whatever Peter Mullins said to them after that
loss seems to have taken effect, because there was
absolutely no resemblance between the UBC team
that won on Saturday and the one that was playing
back in January.
Mullins agreed saying, "It was after the last four
league games that I began thinking that we would
get this far. I knew then that we'd be as close as
anyone."
In truth, there was no-one closer than the
'Birds.
Saturday was Thorsen's last game in a UBC
uniform and he leaves a record that will be hard to
top. His last nine points raised his total to 2,059 in
four years with the 'Birds, the highest total ever by
a Canadian collegiate player.
Thorsen is the only member of the 'Birds who
will not be back next year. Make what you will of
that.
Ruggers slowed by mud and ref
UBC's rugby 'Birds suffered
through mud and bad refereeing
Saturday to squeak past Western
Washington 10-7.
The 'Birds, minus Rod
Holloway, Eric Lillie and Garth
Henrikson on the sick list, never
played up to their potential and
had to rely on the toe of Flay
Banks for the margin of victory.
"It was our worst game in two
years," said coach Donn Spence.
With a wet ball and muddy
field of irregular size, the game
was a slow, slogging affair. Banks
provided the only scoring of the
first half with a 40 yard penalty
goal at the 10 minute mark.
Neither team held an edge in
play. The 'Birds' front row
enjoyed some success striking for
several Washington sets, but
lineouts developed evenly. In the
loose, the Canadians slight
advantage was negated by the
referee's failure to call numerous
off-sides.
UBC's 3-0 edge ended 10
minutes into the second half with
a Washington penalty goal.
Minutes later good loose
rucking gave 'Birds possession and
Banks kicked over the Washington
3 line. Chasing the kick ahead,
Spence McTavish and John
Mitchell dribbled 40 yards to the
defending end where McTavish
scored.
Fighting back, the Washington
scrum scored a try at the 25
minute mark. The convert missed.
Only a 40 yard penalty goal by
Banks five minutes from the
whistle provided the victory for
the Canadians.
Final score, 10-7 'Birds.
Back in Vancouver, the Frosh,
playing their third game in the
2nd Division, lost a heart-breaker
RUGBY IS A GAME in which 30 men set out to worry one little ball.
This one seems to be doing a good job of keeping out of their reach.
to the Trojans. Leading 6-0 at the
half, the frosh made a ' few
mistakes and lost 9-15.
For almost the entire first half,
the Frosh pressed the opposition
in their own end. Playing fast,
heady football, they mounted
several penetrating attacks. Only
aggressive, high tackling and a
strong fullback saved the game for
the Trojans.
The Frosh dominated most of
the loose and sets, yielding only in
the lineouts. Compensating for
their lack of height, the forwards
penetrated the lineouts well,
continually pressing the Trojan
stand-off.
The only score of the first half
saw a fullback-in with Brian
Holden the extra man, send
winger Bill Rasmussen over for
the try. Rob Adams converted.
A see-saw affair developed in
the second half as first the Frosh,
and then the Trojans took the
advantage.
The Frosh scored first on a 35
yard penalty by Rob Adams, but
they were unable to finish off
their running attacks.
UBC forwards made several
lengthy dribbling rushes, and the
backs ran well, but neither
succeeded in beating the Trojan
fullback.
The advantage soon changed
with the Trojans scoring two
unanswered scrum and back tries.
Final score, 15-9 Trojans.
In other games, 'Squeaker'
Sque,o broke an eight year scoring
drought with a dazzling 12 yard
run to glory to lead the Totems to
a 4-3 victory over the Trojans.
Burnaby downed the Tomahawks
11-0.
The 'Birds play UVic, Saturday
at UBC. Game time is 2:30 p.m.
at Thunderbird Stadium.
NCSC honors ski team
Guy Woods of the Thunderbird
ski team was named Ski Meister of
the Northwest Collegiate Ski
Conference for having the best
all-around performances for the
past season.
Crystal Mountain, Washington
was the site of last weekend's final
ski meet of the season and in
competition against teams from
Washington, Oregon and Alaska,
UBC men's team finished second
in both the slalom and giant
slalom.
Coupled with their other
performances throughout the
season, this was good enough to
assure the Thunderbird team of a
second place finish in the final
standings.
All-star selections were also
announced during the meet, with
Ed Day of UBC placing on the
nordic team and Bruce Goldsmid
winning a spot on the Alpine
team.
In the World Student Games
skiing at Lake Placid, N.Y., Ed
Day finished twentieth in the 30
kilometre cross-country skiing.
Bruce Goldsmid was thirty-fifth in
the Alpine downhill
Intramurals
Monsoon-like weather failed to
put the damper on the men's
intramural cross-country cycle
race held Sunday afternooji.
In the judge's mind, all 20
participants should have received
awards of merit for braving the
pelting rain and strong
cross-winds throughout the 10
mile race.
There had to be a winner
though, and the honours go to
Steve Blackburn of dentistry who
finished the course in 27 min.
11.5 sec. to take first place.
Second place went to Dan Irwin
also of dentistry who finished the
course in 28 min. 43.6 sec Stuart
Ellis of forestry came in third.
The dentistry team finished
first overall, with Fort Camp
coming second and forestry third.
The big Awards Night is only
four days away. This year's MC
will be Frank Gnup who will get
some help from Ray Herbert.
MEN'S INTRAMURALS
AWARDS
BANQUET
MONDAY, MARCH 13th
5:00 p.m. SUB BALLROOM
MC.'s
"FRANK
GNUP''
&
RAY HERBERT'
There's a plan that
can solve more than
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worries.
It's called the
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It's a plan that pays
your tuition expenses
while you earn your
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Sciences. Or Arts.
It's a plan that solves
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every summer while you
train to become an officer.
It's a plan that
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when you graduate. As a
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It's a plan that gives
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Consider ROTP. Contact your local Canadian
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Vancouver, B.C.
Ph: 666-3136
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9, 1972
Letters Edition
From page 5
As far as I could tell from the
teach-in I held that week in my
class, their action had the support
of most of the student body.
Indeed, general student
understanding of Quebec
problems was (and, I think,
remains) on the "why-don't-they-
speak-English" level.
Finally, while I cannot but
agree with my colleague Professor
Smiley that opposing the War
Measures Act in Ontario or B.C.
scarcely entailed any sacrifice, the
same cannot be said for
opposition in Quebec.
Ever since the October crisis,
there has been a near-total
silencing (either by firings or
intimidation) of radical and
independentiste voices in the
major Quebec newspapers, radio,
television and cultural agencies.
The witch-hunt atmosphere has
spread to most junior colleges and
even many universities, severely
threatening academic freedom.
Perhaps if English-Canaadian
academics demonstrated
somewhat more concern over the
plight of their Francophone
colleagues there would be fewer
radicals (both French and English)
who despise the "liberal
university".
Michael D. Wallace,
Assistant professor,
Political science
Davis
The exchange of articles and
letters in The Ubyssey concerning
the recent campus appearance of
the mother of Angela Davis may
appear to have provided a balance
of conflicting views. However,
none of these contributions
offered comments on the
important public issues which are
involved in this case.
At the risk of belaboring what
may be obvious to may of your
readers,    I    think    it    may   be
worthwhile to make these
explicit.
I believe the history of the
present century shows that a
ruling establishment which feels
seriously challenged, will seek to
silence its opposition and stifle
dissent by discrediting its critics,
particularly those whose radical
visions made them vulnerable to
the adverse opinion of a
misinformed public.
A useful technique for this
purpose is to charge one or more
representatives or spokesmen of
such groups with criminal acts of
a reprehensible nature. This
tendency is illustrated by the
frame-up of the U.S. anarchists
Sacco and Vanzetti as murderers
in the 1920s, the effort of the
Nazis to implicate the Rumanian
communist leader Georgi Dmitrov
in the Reichstag fire episode in
the 1930s, and the espionage trial
of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg
during the heyday of
McCarthyism in the U.S., to cite
enly a few typical examples.
In trials of this kind, the
outcome has an important bearing
on the ease with which usual civil
liberties can be suspended and
repressive measures taken against
those who are regarded as real or
potential threats to the
established order. Hence, the
effort to defend those so charged
extends beyond the courtroom
and becomes the focus of a
widespread public campaign.
In my opinion the trial of
Angela Davis must be seen in this
light.
The cause which Angela has
come to symbolize is the injustice
which often is meted out to
America's black community. Not
only do underprivilege,
deprivation and blatant
discrimination result in a
disproportionately high incidence
of crimes among American blacks,
they also commonly result in
penalties of inordinate severity.
The personal history of George
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Jackson whose case was
championed by Angela Davis is a
typical example of the violent
consequences which frequently
flow from this pattern of
degradation and brutalization.
The Attica prison riot furnished
further insights into this situation.
In spite of her recent prolonged
physical confinement, Angela
Davis seems determined not only
to vindicate herself, but also to
carry on the struggle to win
freedom for the many other
victims of racial injustice who
populate American prisons.
Not having been present at the
meeting, I cannot contest Pat
Moan's personal impressions of
Sallye Davis (The Ubyssey, Feb.
10). If they were accurate in every
respect, they would remain an
unfortunate and irrelevant
digression from the important
substantive matters which are
raised by the cause of Angela
Davis.
Whether or not Angela's
mother was disingenuous in her
approach to her daughter's case,
praised Angela more highly than
she deserves, or was deceitful in
minimizing her own personal fears
is of little consequence.
During a recent London
appearance, in which she
addressed a massive audience,
Fania Davis Jordan (Angela's
sister) was emphatic in her
contention that: "What we are
fighting for is not the personality
cult of Angela. What we are
aiming at is to stop fascism in the
U.S."
To advance this aim,
information about the case of
Angela Davis and its broader
implications are being
disseminated on a world-wide
basis. The primary motivation
behind Sallye Davis' Vancouver
appearance presumably was to
reach beyond her immediate
audience, and by means of the
communications media to take
advantage of the opportunity to
publicize her daughter's position.
The prospects for an easing of
political persecution and racial
injustice will inevitably be
strongly influenced by the events
surrounding her trial, and the
impact of their image in the
public mind. Dignified, perceptive
and objective journalism has a
vital role to play in this crucial
struggle.
While the course of this
particular case may not have
immediate implications for
Canada, we are unlikely to remain
immune from the impact of the
political atmosphere developing in
the U.S. The implementation of
the War Measures Act following
the political kidnapping in Quebec
last year, a step which had
widespread popular support,
reflects Canadian susceptibility to
this pattern of reaction.
James G. Foulks,
Professor, pharmacology
on leave at
Royal College of Surgeons,
London, England.
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Friday, March  10th — 8:30 p.m.
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