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The Ubyssey Oct 7, 1976

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Array SRA says Murray can stay
By CHRIS GAINOR
Rick Murray won his battle
Wednesday to remain as student
representative on the board of
governors after ceasing to be a
student.
The student representative
assembly, after weeks of delay,
voted confidence in Murray after
charges the vote would be decided
in personal terms and after
Murray offered his immediate
resignation if the vote failed.
The SRA then voted to establish
a policy to ensure that non-students
will not again be allowed to
represent students on the board.
The confidence motion passed 16-7
with six abstentions, while the
second motion passed almost
unanimously.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 11    VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY ,OCTOBER 7, 1976
228-2301
The debate on Murray's future
began with a series of wrangles
over what should be decided and
how it should be decided. After a
series of motions and withdrawals,
the SRA decided to vote directly on
Murray and then on long term
policy in the matter.
Murray, who is now working for
the City of Vancouver, read a letter
Med school
plans put off
to the SRA explaining his reasons
for remaining on the board.
He denied he had refused to
resign because, he claimed, he had
not been asked to resign. Murray
said he asked several people about
his status and was told he should
remain on the board.
Referring to a legal opinion
obtained by the Alma Mater
Society from lawyer Donald
Sorochan, Murray said: "His
opinions do not concur with the
opinions of others I have consulted
on this question. It is of course not
surprising that lawyers do not
always agree.
"I feel that the entire question of
whether or not I should resign is
being rather tenaciously pursued
by a small group for what I can
only assume to be personal
reasons.
"Consequently, I would suggest
that the question of my tenure on
the board should be considered
separately from the development
of long term policy for the AMS."
Murray, who read the letter in a
quavering voice, suggested that in
future questions of confidence in
board members, the question be
put to students in the same manner
as for an AMS executive member
under the old constitution. Such a
provision would require a change
in provincial legislation, he said.
Instead of a court battle over the
legality of his status, Murray
suggested a vote of confidence or
non-confidence identical to that
used   for   an   AMS   executive
member under the  current constitution.
"If the SRA at a regular meeting
approves my recall under the
terms of the constitution, I shall
consider myself obliged to immediately offer my resignation to
the chairman of the board of
governors,"   Murrav   concluded.
The vote of confidence was held
on a roll-call basis despite the
objections of some SRA members.
Murray left council chambers
during the vote.
Immediately afterwards,
Murray said he will no longer
function as a voting member of the
SRA since he is no longer a student
and therefore no longer a member
of the AMS. He will continue to
attend SRA meetings, he said.
During a lengthy debate on
Murray's future, several SRA
members endorsed his contention
that the issue was purely personal,
and his backers blocked an effort
to change the motion of confidence
to saying that SRA would not
condone such an action in the
future.
By HEATHER WALKER
UBC's planned medical school
expansion is being delayed
because different groups involved
have not been able to agree on the
conditions for the expansion,
education minister Pat McGeer
said Wednesday.
"A lot of people have set conditions, and it takes time to
hammer out all the details,"
McGeer said.
McGeer said the university, the
provincial government and
representatives of the Vancouver
hospitals are all involved in the
proposed expansion.
He said health minister Bob
McClelland, who said Monday he
would announce his decision on the
hospital within 10 days, has sent
administration president Doug
Kenny a letter expressing the
department's support of the
hospital and expansion plan.
Kenny said Monday UBC has had
to delay plans to expand the school
from 1977 to 1978 because the
government has not yet made a
firm commitment to the program.
"We need sufficient lead time on
a firm guarantee from the
government in order to start
recruiting faculty and updating
and increasing facilities," Kenny
said.
"Going from 80 to 100 students
doesn't seem feasible at this point
in time. It seems the lead time is
insufficient."
Kenny said the university plans
to double the medical school
enrolment in stages.
He said in the original plan, first
year enrolment for 1977 would be
100 students, and would then increase to 120 in 1978 and 160 in 1979.
Now, he said, the plan must be
moved ahead one year, delaying
any increase in medical school
enrolment until 1978, and delaying
a doubling of the school's size until
1980.
Last March McGeer told the
university $50 million was
available in combined provincial
and federal funds to double UBC's
medical school enrolment and
build a new 240-bed teaching
hospital at UBC.
McGeer gave the university 60
days to present a plan to the
government for the expansion or,
he said, the money would go to the
University of Victoria instead.
McGeer said the government
still wants the university to meet
the same commitments it wanted
originally — a teaching hospital at
UBC and the doubling of
enrolment.
"The government hoped the
university would be able to double
enrolment by the coming fall,"
McGeer said. "But they say this
isn't possible."
Kenny said the university
presented its plan to the government May 4.
See page 2: KENNY
£&>.
HAPPY HOOKER ... coming to take you away. See story below
— doug field photo
Computers drafted for vandal war
By DEB van der GRACHT
A computer identification
system to trace stolen goods to
their owners is being installed on
campus, a traffic and security
department spokesman said
Wednesday.
David Hannah, acting
superintendent of the department
said the system is going in because
of increased vandalism on campus
in recent years.
"Vandalism has increased
sufficiently that action must be
taken to stop it. People will be
arrested and will have to take the
consequences."
Both RCMP and UBC campus
patrols will also be increased to
about once an hour, especially
around the residences, Hannah
said.
"These people that come in from
off campus and think they can beat
up the girls, or see the campus as
an easy mark will not get away
with it any more. They will be
taken to the law courts."
Installing the computer system
involves engraving serial numbers
into equipment and furniture,
putting warning stickers  on all
valuables and outside buildings,
and compiling a computerized list
which tells where and to whom the
article belongs according to the
serial number.
Hannah said the system should
be completely installed by
Christmas.
"The serial number of a
recovered article will be fed into
the computer, which will trace it
back to its owner," Hannah said.
"All the chairs, all pieces of
equipment, everything in every
department will be numbered."
The residences will also be included in the system, although
personal belongings of residence
students won't be, Hannah said.
"People will be given instructions on what to do if they
wish to identify their own
belongings," he said.
Quasi-Busters hit
The quasi cops are tightening up on parking infringements by towing
offenders away, Dave Hannah, acting superintendent of UBC traffic and
security department said Wednesday.
After Oct. 12,' 'people who park where there is a no-parking sign, where
there is a yellow curb or in the wrong lots will be towed to the campus
compound," he said. "They will then have to pay a fine and the towing
charge."
Hannah said the tow-away policy is not new, but that it will be more
strongly enforced this year because violations have become so frequent
and because peopledon't pay any attention to tickets.
"People just ignore the tickets," he said. "It's getting worse all the
time. We gave out 384 tickets in one day but it doesn't seem to do any
good. They continually park in places which block other people who have
parked legally." See page 2: DRIVERS
The idea for the computer came
from the Burnaby RCMP Program
Identification. The traffic and
security department will use the
Burnaby detachment's computer
so the cost of installing the system
will be comparatively low.
"All we have to buy is a few
electric engravers, the stickers for
the equipment and buildings, and
of course pay for the man hours."
Each department will be
responsible for allocating people to
identify the equipment. The traffic
and security department has
already marked all their
belongings.
"Everything from chairs to
computers will be marked. It's a
big job, but we think it's worthwhile. The RCMP at Burnaby
have found that the system has
significantly   decreased   losses."
The campus RCMP detachment
and UBC patrol will also be
clamping down on other forms of
vandalism such as sign stealing
and light breaking, Hannah said.
"Vandalism has increased so
much because people have been
See page 2: LIGHTING Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, T976
Kenny wants promises
From page 1
He said the plan outlines what
conditions are needed to double
medical school enrolment.
"We want assurances of monies
on capital funds and assurance of
the necessary operating expenses
to hire more faculty and enable us
to double enrolment," Kenny said.
Kenny said the $50 million would
be needed to build the new hospital
at UBC and to improve off-campus
facilities at Vancouver General
Hospital, St. Paul's Hospital and
Shaughnessy Hospital, where UBC
medical students are currently
trained.
He said the medical school would
also need a one-third increase in its
current operating budget to cover
additional costs of the expanded
program.
"If these assurances are given,
plus the assurance that the grant to
the medical school will in no way
jeopardize the rest of the
university in either its operating or
capital needs, then I will turn
around and present the plan in
detail to the medical school, the
Drivers pay
for towing
From page 1
Previously, cars illegally parked
were given tickets. People whose
cars had to be towed away to
enable other people to get out were,
as long as they were in the correct
lot, not charged for the tow.
Tickets meant fines of $3 to $15
depending on the number of
previous offenses.
"This week we towed B-lot cars
that were blocking other peoples'
way further back into the lot but
from now on they will be towed to
the compound at the owner's expense."
Hannah said the towing fee will
be $12, as opposed to the downtown
fee of $24. No specific towing
company will be called.
"There is ample space on
campus for everyone to park, there
are signs up and yellow cunbs but
because they want to be maybe 100
yards^closer, they park one on top
of the other."
Hannah said it's too bad that the
towing procedure has to be enforced but the parking situation is
getting worse all the time and
something has to be done.
"Some people have to be hit over
the head with a hammer before
anything sinks in. They seem to
think they can park where-ever
they like, and there's no way. I'm
not just talking about the students,
I'm talking about everybody when
I say that anyone who is causing an
obstruction or preventing the flow
of traffic will be towed away."
Lighting
senate and the board of governors," Kenny said.
"We want assurance that the
expense of the medical school will
in no way interfere with the
ongoing progress of other faculties
at the university," he said.
But McGeer said the government's commitment to the medical
school would not interfere with
other university projects.
He said funding for the school
"wouldn't make a penny's difference to any other university
project."
The medical school is a government priority, McGeer said, and
"the government will fund its own
priorities directly."
"Other projects will compete for
funds in the normal way," he said.
"All educational institutions
compete for public funds, which
are limited. But if the government
funds a project like the medical
school, it has no more effect on that
campus' funding than it does on a
crown corporation or on any other
campus."
Kenny said the university's plan
had to be examined by both the
department of education and the
health department.
"There's a lot of money involved
in building a 240-bed hospital on
campus, and therefore both the
departments have to examine the
capital expenses," he said.
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From page 1
getting away with it. This won't be
thecase any more. We are going to
patrol the campus with the objective of stopping and apprehending these people."
Hannah also said the lighting on
campus will be increased this year.
' 'The increased lighting last year
has had a good effect and we're
going to continue that this year,"
he said.
HIS & HER SPECIALISTS
APPOINTMENT
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731-4191
3644 WEST
4th AVE.
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Come in and experience good old-fashioned Service!!
U.F.O. SPECIAL       $24.95
Till Oct. 31/76 Plus Lenses
Christian Dior - Silhouette, & others 25% Off
44 Water St., Gastown    681-6626 ^
Kenny said he did not blame the
government for its delay in
responding to the proposal.
"I can fully appreciate the
government's having to take a long
time to examine the costs, particularly those of the hospital and
updating the older facilities. There
is a delay, but it is fully understandable," he said.
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATORS
There will be a meeting
for all people who have
learned transcendental
meditation on Thurs.
Oct. 21, at 12:30 p.m.
in BUCH. 313
^
FACULTY, STAFF AND GRADUATE STUDENT
INTRAMURAL PROGRAM
For the first time an Intramural Division for Faculty, Staff and Graduate Students has been organized.
This year, volleyball will be the only activity organized. Registration closes on Friday, Sept. 24 with play starting in
early October and continue for the entire year.
For further information and submission of entries contact:     Mr. FRANK MAURER
Hut B-8 Room TOOF
Phone 228-4329
EVENT
Volleyball
DEADLINE
DATE
Friday
Sept. 24
COMPETITION
Round Robin
TIME
6:30-11:30 p.m.
FACILITY
Gym A
8lh ANNUAL PRE-SEASON s^fe*^
SKI SALE
 3 DAYS ONLY	
Thurs.
Oct. 7
Fri.
Oct. 8
Sat.
Oct. 9
For the 3 Day Sale—Take
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SKIS
REG.
NOW
DYNASTAR EASY RIDER
185.00
139.95
ROSSIGNOL ARPEGE
195.00
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HEAD COMP SL
240.00
159.95
KAZAMA BUGABOO
200.00
139.95
KAZAMA EASY RIDER
159.95
110.00
PLUS K2 SKIS Models three, four, five
Values to
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BOOTS
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NORDICA ASTRAL LADY
130.00
90.00
NORDICA GRAND PRIX
235.00
164.50
RAICHLE CARRERA SSL
199.95
139.95
RAICHLE FREESTYLE
179.95
126.00
LANGE FREESTYLE
165.00
115.00
VISIT OUR BARGAIN TABLE OF  NEW AND USED BOOTS
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MODELS AND STYLES WI LL BE AVAILABLE TO
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IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
Open daily till 6 p.m. - Thurs., Fri. till 9 p.m.
LOCATED IN THE
MIDDLE OF
kerrisdale      2120 W. 41 st Ave. — 261-6011 Thursday October 7,  1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
U councillors
step on BoGs
VICTORIA (CUP) — The B.C.
Universities council is trying to
take over the functions of the
boards of governors at B.C.'s three
universities, a member of the
University of Victoria board has
charged.
"They (the council) are going
beyond the scope of the Universities Act," the board member,
who asked to remain anonymous,
said Monday. "I believe they're
doing this because they don't know
what the hell they're supposed to
be doing."
The source charged that the
board is appropriating money to
the University of B.C. and Simon
Fraser University "to get more or
less what they want." '
"UVic is being shafted, pure and
simple," the source said.
The council, established by the
previous NDP government, has
never properly defined its reason
for existence, the source charged.
"It's just not possible for them to
oversee the operations of all three
universities in the province, all of
which are run a bit differently,"
the source said.
"They can't worry about each
university's finances on a line-byline basis. That's the board's job.
There's no point looking at the
faculty of arts and science at SFU
and comparing it to UBC — the two
just can't be compared on the same
basis," he said.
"That's like trying to compare
the operations of the English
department to the physics
department, it just isn't sensible."
The source said the council is
blocking capital grants for the
construction of new UVic buildings
on the basis of "a retroactive set of
criteria which are impossible to
meet."
"Under the rules (introduced in
the middle of September), no
project can pass."
UVic wanted to build a music
Poor turnout
to pizza parlor
causes worries
UBC's new pizza parlor in SUB
cafeteria has been a bit of a flop so
far, its manager said Monday.
Mary Stovell, SUB cafeteria's
assistant director, said 300 people a
night come to the converted
cafeteria to drink wine and beer
and eat cheap pizza but the parlor
needs 500 to 600 patrons a night to
break even.
The poor turnout to the parlor,
opened Sept. 14, is probably due to
the recent good weather which
makes people stay outside, Stovell
said.
But as the weather turns colder
and mid-term exams approach,
attendance will probably increase,
Stovell said.
The pizza parlor, open from 8
p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Tuesday to
Friday and from 7 p.m. to 12:30
a.m. Saturday, will eventually
stage special evenings featuring
Greek or Mexican food to attract
more customers, she said.
The parlor's budget for its first
year of operation is $10,000 and it
must make at least that much to
break even.
But Stovell said the parlor is a
long way from recovering its initial
investment and no one will know
the operation's financial situation
until the end of the year.
Pizza, beer and wine are offered
across the counter at the parlor
and patrons take their booze and
food to candlelit tables.
Student cars must be shown at
«the door but UBC students can sign
in guests.
Pizza parlor manager Denis
Zomar claims the prices at the
parlor are 26 to 46 per cent lower
than off-campus prices.
building wing, add another wing to
another building and make space
for several other projects such as a
new theatre building and law
facilities, the source said.
"The universities council said
'no'," the source said. "But no one
appears to know why." He said the
council has already twice approved the concept of the UVic
buildings.
SRA elects
Theessen
as new pres
Student council Wednesday
elected commerce rep Dave
Theessen as UBC student
president.
He replaces Dave Van Blarcom,
who resigned Sept. 29 after the
student representative assembly
voted against establishing a
women's committee.
Theessen defeated Moe Sihota,
social work rep on council and
external affairs officer, and
engineering rep Steve Creed. On
the first ballot Theessen received
11 votes, Sihota nine and Creed
eight. On the runoff ballot,
Theessen defeated Sihota 19-9.
Under the Alma Mater Society
constitution, the SRA chooses the
student president — who chairs
council meetings but is given little
executive power by the constitution.
Sihota said he was bitter and
disappointed by the defeat, and
indicated he may resign as external affairs officer.
"I won't make that decision until
the Oct. 20 council meeting," he
said. "I will probably run for
president of the (social work)
undergrad society.
"Obviously the SRA is not where
I'm at."
Creed, obviously not a serious
candidate, said lie had only five
minutes advance notice before his
nomination, and when asked by
Van Blarcom to keep his election
speech brief, he said:
"I'm a brief person. Want to see
my briefs?"
Theessen, a veteran student
politico, was AMS treasurer in
1974-75 and internal affairs officer
in 1975-76.
Van Blarcom was AMS vice-
president in 1975-76 when he was a
principal architect of the new AMS
constitution.
Van Blarcom apologized for his
theatrical resignation scene at the
previous council meeting, when he
angrily stalked out of the meeting
immediately after the women's
committee vote.
He admitted after that meeting
he had planned to resign at that
meeting so he could run for senate.
He continues as an arts rep on
council.
- deryl mogg photo
DROBNY AND PULFREY .. . electricity from sunlight
Solar cells suck sunlight
By PETER van der GRACHT
The world's existing energy sources are running
out rapidly and most experts agree alternative
sources must be found.
Solar power may become one of the most important of these sources and UBC electrical
engineering professor David Pulfrey is investigating one way to harness the sun's power:
solar cells.
Most existing solar heating systems convert
sunlight into heat but solar cells convert the sun's
power directly into electricity.
Some work into this new way of trapping the sun's
energy has already been done, and in Phoenix,
Ariz., electricity has been supplied to a house by
lining the roof with solar cells.
In the future solar cells spread over wide areas of
desert or set on huge barges floating on the ocean
may provide power to an entire city.
Solar cells have been in use in spacecraft for 20
years.
The mechanics of solar heating is complex.
Basically, though, incoming light excites electrons
normally held in place by electrons and gives them
enough energy to create a current.
"For use on earth, although a high efficiency is
desirable the important factor becomes the ratio of
cell cost to output power. Presently this figure is
running about $20 per peak watt, principally
because of the use of expensive semiconductor
fabrication processes," Pulfrey said.
Another factor which adds to the cost of solar cells
is their size. They are so small that to generate a lot
of power many of them must be wired together. This
becomes an expensive process.
"To be cost-competitive with conventional
sources of electricity such as thermal plants the
cost of solar cells must be reduced to around 50
cents per peak watt," Pulfrey says.
Absorption by the earth's atmosphere reduces the
power of sunlight. The maximum power available
on earth is one kilowatt a square metre.
"There are two approaches that can be followed
in an effort to make a viable means of producing
electricity for terrestrial use," he said.
The first approach involves concentrating the
sunlight. This requires solar cells, sunlight intensifying reflectors and cooling equipment to stop
the cells from overheating.
Becauseonly a relatively small area of solar cells
is necessary, the cells can be made from expensive
materials, such as highly-processed silicon or
gallium arsenide, which can lead to higher efficiency. The disadvantage is the high cost of the
reflectors and cooling equipment.
The second approach requires a larger solar cell.,
To keep the price down, cheaper semiconductor
materials would be used but this would lead to a
lowering of efficiency.
Solar cells are specially-designed semiconductor
diodes which use expensive materials, equipment
and energy.
To make large area solar cells suitable for use
without concentrators, new ways of preparing
suitable semiconductor materials have to be
developed, as well as different ways of making the
actual diode.
Pulfrey is doing work in both these areas with the
"goal for this line of research being to bring the cost
of solar electric power down to a competitive level."
The semiconductor materials work, jhvolving'
graduate students Vlado Drobny and Blair Russel,
is looking at ways of placing thin semiconductors on
top of large metal sheets which act both as an
electrical contact and could be nailed directly onto a
rooftop.
Another graduate student, Ron McOuat, has been
evaluating a solar cell made by depositing a very
thin metal layer on top of a semiconductor. He has
found this type of structure could be used with the
type of semiconductors resulting from the thin film
semiconductor work.
Pulfrey has just returned from a year's sabbatical leave at the University of Western Australia
where he found plenty of sunshine to test his own
solar cells.
"It would be nice," Pulfrey says, "to be able to
solve all our problems before B.C. Hydro starts
work on their Revelstoke Dam, because then we
could supply the power from a harmless solar cell
,farm in the Okanagan instead."
Student reps decide not to decide
The student representative
assembly voted 12-10 Wednesday
not to take a stand one way or the
other on the Canadian Labor
Congress Oct. 14 day of protest
against wage controls.
But the SRA did overwhelmingly
pass a motion asking the administration and faculty not to
penalize students who participate
in the protest and refuse to come to
classes.
The SRA's refusal to take a stand
came when it voted to table indefinitely a motion from Alma
Mater Society secretary-treasurer
Bill Broddy that the SRA express
its "regret" of the CLC's protest.
Broddy is also an arts senator and
prominent campus Liberal.
Arts rep Dave Van Blarcom
sponsored the second motion and
also the motion to quash Broddy's
motion.
"I don't see the point of this body
passing this kind of motion or the
converse," Van Blarcom said. "We
shouldn't pass these type of airy
fairy motions."
Although only one motion was
quashed, SRA president Dave
Theessen ruled out of order all
other motions pertaining to the day
of protest except for Van Blar-
com's second motion.
Broddy said the SRA should take
a stand because the B.C. Students'
Federation and the National Union
of Students have  endorsed  the
protest, and UBC belongs to both
groups.
He added CLC president Joe
Morris has asked students to
participate in the Oct. 14 strike,
and the SRA should "reply" to his
request.
External affairs officer Moe
Sihota said many students will not
be able to go to class because buses
will not be running and the campus
locals of the Canadian Union of'
Public Employees and the Office
and Technical Employees Union
will support the protest.
Arts rep Pam Willis said Oct. 14
"very much concerns" students
because of soaring costs they face
while under controls for housing,
food and transportation.
But Basil Peters, a student rep
on the board of governors, warned
that the administration had
decided to operate as usual Oct. 14,
and not cancel any classes, labs or
exams.
Van Blarcom said his motion will
guarantee that the AMS upholds
students' rights to free speech.
Those who opposed his motion did
so on the grounds it implicitly
approved the CLC protest.
Ruled out of order were motions
that the SRA condemn the anti-
inflation board and that campus
unions be asked' not to discipline
members who elect to work Oct. 14. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1976
On fence-sitting turkeys
There's not enough controversy on our campus. It's
getting boring these days. Where have all the issues gone?
We know. They're sitting on the nice little carefully
duplicated stacks of paper each student representative
assembly member gets before each SRA meeting.
The problem is, the issues stay right on those pieces of
paper and none of our democratically elected student
representatives ever works up the guts to take a stand on
anything.
Wednesday night provides a classic example.
The SRA meets, each pathetic member clutching his or
her stack of papers. One of the items to be discussed is what
the SRA should decide about the Oct. 14 day of protest
being staged by the Canadian Labor Congress to protest
federal wage controls.
So what do those turkeys do?
They sit there. They look at the floor and the ceiling
and twiddle their thumbs and pick their noses. They whisper
to the turkey next to them about how they can hardly wait
till the meeting ends so they can go to the Pit and gossip.
What they don't do is take a. stand. Those
mealy-mouthed twits hem and haw and snivel and whine a bit
and then decide to not really make any decision at all.
They won't support the day of the protest, but on the
other hand, they won't condemn it. They won't do anything.
Except make some gutless request to the university
administration asking them not to penalize anyone for not
attending classes during the day of protest. As if the
administration ever cared if anybody ever missed a single day
of classes.
When students elected those meat heads they were
probably under the (mistaken) impression they would get
some leadership. They hoped they would hear something
from their representatives about why those representatives
supported or opposed particular issues. They hoped they
would get some direction, or a jumping off place for them to
think about issues themselves.
But the Alma Mater Society is doing anything but
getting people to think about issues. How can it when it
dodges issues consistently itself?
Speaking of issues, there's another one the AMS should
be concerned about. They spent some money sending two
representatives to the National Union of Students conference
in Ottawa last weekend.
One of the main issues that NUS is concerned about
these days is the upcoming National Student Day on Nov. 9.
On Nov. 9, students are supposed to be demonstrating
to draw attention to some of the issues that bug them — like
student loan policies, tuition fee hikes and so on.
But there's been nothing, not even a faint whisper, from
your student society telling you why you should take part in
the Nov. 9 activities — and they haven't, to our knowledge,
done much planning about activities that day. If they have
done any planning, they're certainly not telling anybody.
We could go on and on. Like what has the AMS done to
get students together to oppose tuition fee hikes? Or what
has it done about getting education minister Pat McGeer and
administration president Doug Kenny together on campus to
talk about general education policies and the role of the
university?
Are you hacks out there listening? Have you been
complaining lately that students on campus are apathetic and
don't seem to care about the issues?
Stop your griping. How can you expect students to care
about issues when you are too wishy-washy, spineless,
indecisive and fence-sitting to ever get involved with an issue
yourselves?
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 7, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
In the smoky gloom of the People's Ubyssey the oppressed proletarian
staffers plotted the overthrow of the state. "We must destroy the Imperialist
masters and all their running dogs," Verne McDonald, Steve Howard, Sue
Vohanka and Ralph Maurer muttered. "The blood will run like a river in the
streets." Marcus Gee, Heather Walker and Dave Wilkinson nodded
agreement. "We must use all the weight of our revolutionary zeal to crush
the bourgeois pigs," Chris Gainor grunted. "The lackeys of the capitalist
oppressors will fall to their knees before us," said Jan Nicol as Steve
McClure, Deb van der Gracht, Peter van der Gracht and Matt King painted
slogans from Mao's little red book on the walls. Geof Wheelwright burned
himself In protest and Jerry Eberts, Charlie Micallef, Doug Field and Doug
Rushton roasted marshmallows.
f-IAPP'/  TrtRVttf.&IVtaGfl
_  _ {A  wotJr  ft~T   THE   "PooR./ |
IflRE YOU PN3T Cf  THE,   SouoJTlOr^ , OR   PART OF THE   PftoeUEMrMfi
Letters
Lunchtime
loudmouths
This letter is addressed to those
individuals who insist on using the
SUB listening room as an annex of
the conversation pit.
Today, I was eating my lunch,
listening to music, when I slowly
became aware that I wasn't just
hearing Shawn Phillips.
At least three groups of you
people were jabbering away, most
of you without headphones
anywhere in sight: i.e. you were
not only not using the room for the
purpose for which it was designed,
but you never intended to do so.
Why the hell don't you go to the
conversation pit????
The chairs are no less comfortable than the ones in the
listening room; the only difference
is that in the conversation pit, you
aren't bugging people. You may
not be aware that your lunchtime
chatter bothers people, but it does.
I turned the volume up as far as
it would go, and I could still hear
you. Please people, use some
courtesy, if you know the meaning
the word.
Kathy Ford
arts 4
Liquor
It was good to see the letter
entitled Minor's lot in the Oct. 5
issue of The Ubyssey. This gives
the science undergraduate society,
and I am sure other on-campus
organizations, a chance to explain
the liquor regulations concerning
dances.
First of all, it is legal to admit
persons under the age of 19 into a
function in which alcoholic
beverages are being consumed
under the Special Occasions
Permit.
Following this it could be stated
that "the letter of the law" allows
underage persons to attend dances,
etc. where liquor is being served.
The problem, however, arises
when people under 19 consume
alcohol at such a function. It is
because of this factor that we did
not   allow   underage   persons   to
attend.
It is next to. impossible to stop
minors from drinking. If minors
are found having consumed alcohol
or are consuming alcohol, then the
person who signed the liquor
licence is responsible.
The person who signed the liquor
licence for the Oct. 2 dance is an
SUS executive and the SUS was not
about to take the chance of having
a charge brought against him or
the SUS.
With respect to the idea of serving liquor in one area and the
dance in another, this was tried in
the past, but was not considered
popular.
In addition, I would like to add
that because of the recent
tightening of liquor laws, the SUS
was not prepared to eliminate the
chances of other groups to sponsor
liquor functions on campus.
This may sound phony, but I
recognize the fact that a lot of the
frosh are not part of the campus
scene and it is something that I can
sympathize with.
But, it should be pointed out that
your wish of attending dances in
the future might materialize. This
would happen if liquor licences are
suspended.
You ask, why the talk of
suspension? Well, because of
recent performances in the
residences and elsewhere, the
possibility of dry functions on
campus hangs in the air.
Robert Salkeld
president
science undergrad society
Academic
With respect to the Student
Support Committee's comment in
the Oct. 5 issue of The Ubyssey, I
would like to make my position
clear.
I resigned from my position as
science senator and affiliated
commitments because of the
academic load I am encountering.
This decision was made after
serious consideration.
Any past involvement with
housing or the administration was
not a factor as implied in the Oct. 5
letter. I can categorically state
that  my   resignation  was  for
academic reasons only.
To suggest that external forces
were brought to bear, with respect
to my withdrawal, would be
misleading.
Robert Salkeld
science 3
Vendors
Apathy. The word no longer
stands for a problematic issue but
a joke — and it is treated as such.
It would be far better if we just
forgot about the word completely
and just examined the things going
on around us with a little more care
and concern.
We have all done a great
disservice to a group of people who
are trying to get by just like you
and me. These people are called
vendors.
It is not that we did them a
disserve by saying either yes or no
to them but that we could not even
offer them an answer.
Because at least 3,450 people did
not vote on Friday, the vendors are
now left in limbo — they haven't
received a proper answer.
With a little thought one can see
how they must be feeling at this
point. Not very pleasant.
Even if 15,000 or more people
(and why not?) had voted no they
would have probably felt better
than they do in the present state of
affairs.
We were all asked for a decision
and thus all had the responsibility
of making one.
What did you think about the
vendors? Let's hope for their sake
that the situation is cleared up
soon.
Mike Haines
arts 4
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Thursday October 7, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Canada maintains
money interests
in South Africa
By LINDA BLANCET
and KATY LE ROUGETEL
The following article examines Canada's
presence in South Africa and the activities
of some major Canadian corporations there.
It is reprinted from the Gateway, student
paper at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, and is distributed by Canadian
University Press.
This summer the Republic of South Africa
was shaken by what may have been the
most widespread uprising in the history of
the South African liberation movement.
The oppressive regime of John Vorster
has responded by slaying hundreds of black
and "colored" (mixed race) protestors in a
massive witchhunt campaign.
The riots in Cape Town and Johannesburg
were sparked by several issues, including
language and a new Vorster effort to further
stratify and segregate South African
society.
Blacks, who are taught Afrikaans in
schools, said they wanted to learn English
because if they had to learn one Western
language it might as well be an international
one.
Frustrated by the Vorster regime's apparent indifference, students and workers
from the black township of Soweto rioted
this summer, setting off a chain of
demonstrations which underscored the
frailty of the white supremist regime.
Now that Mozambique and Angola are in
the control of leftist blacks, Vorster and Ian
Smith's white minority Rhodesian government are being forced to compromise before
violence flares up across the continent.
Blacks frustrated
And despite the shuttle-diplomacy of U.S.
secretary of state Henry Kissinger,
calculated to make U.S. president Gerry
Ford look good, it may be too late for
compromise.
Vorster may have signed his own death
warrant by creating several "homelands"
for South Africa's indigenous people and
forcing blacks who live in Cape Town or
Johannesburg to move to areas of their
tribal origin. He is effectively making them
aliens in South Africa.
Growing industrialization and a shortage
of labor have helped develop large black
working-class populations in Soweto and
other black townships. Since the early 1970s
this new layer has shown increasing confidence and militancy, defying state
repression in a series of strikes, demonstrations and other actions.
The recent uprisings are merely an indicator of the explosive social tensions that
have been building in South Africa for
centuries. Black Africans are struggling
against a system that condemns them to
virtual slavery.
They are crowded onto reserves, or
Bantustans, that are kept in utter poverty.
They may not own property or settle in
white areas of the country.
They must carry passes at all times or be
thrown into jail. They may not form or join
trade unions, and strikes by black workers
are banned.
Starvation wages
Black workers' wages, currently
averaging one-twentieth those for whites,
remain at starvation level.
The cornerstone of South Africa's apartheid labor policy is the migrant labor
system, under which blacks contract for
labor in the cities for one year at a time,
usually isolated from their families. This
system ensures a large degree of government control over the movement and employment of black workers, and provides
employers with a regular and inexpensive
supply of labor.
Western Europe and North America
maintain economic and political links with
the Vorster regime. After all, South Africa
offers attractive incentives to foreign investment — including large deposits of gold,
diamonds and other valuable minerals.
The apartheid system gives Canadian and
foreign corporations access to a large pool
of workers whose wages are kept at rock-
bottom levels, promising reduced labor
costs and therefore higher profits.
The Canadian government — though it has
condemned apartheid in South Africa — has
not discouraged Canadian corporations
from taking advantage of trade and investment opportunities there.
Such big-name industrial concerns as
Massey-Ferguson, Alcan and Falconbridge
maintain subsidiaries in South Africa.
The record of Canadian corporate involvement shows that foreign investment
has been anything but a liberating force for
black South Africans. Black workers have
ROBB
(tpJ97fr VCoae IPS W6f If 5 VNiU** D
won a number of concessions as a result of
large upsurges and foreign pressure, but
their status remains abysmally "low.
A study of the activities of Canadian
subsidiaries in South Africa was compiled
by Hugh Nangle and published in the Ottawa
Citizen in 1973.
According to Nangle's study, the total
assets of Massey-Ferguson's South African
subsidiary increased in 10 years from more
than $20.9 million in 1962 to more than $28.5
million in 1972.
But at Massey-Ferguson's plant in
Vereeniging, the overwhelming majority of
black workers were paid less than the
government's official poverty line.
The lowest paid white worker at the
Vereeniging plant earned at least $191
monthly above the poverty line.
This disparity in wages is maintained by
racist laws that deny black workers the
right to form trade unions and protect their
wages and working conditions. These are
determined by government labor councils
controlled by whites.
L.E. Knoll, chief executive of Massey-
Ferguson in South Africa, claims his
Canadian shareholders would be "very
unhappy" if black workers were paid higher
wages. Since the company obviously has the
resources to substantially reduce or close
the wage gap between blacks and whites, it
is evident that Massey-Ferguson intends to
continue operating within the framework of
the racist apartheid system.
According to Nangle's study, the total
assets of Alcan Aluminum's South African
subsidiary are more than $41.3 million.
However, at Alcan's Pietermaritzburg
operation, black workers are paid much
lower wages than white workers.
In addition, they are expected to purchase
their own overalls and safety boots. There is
no assistance to help workers obtain
adequate housing and educate their
children.
The company has no regular bus service
for its black workers to their homes in the
African townships, even though municipal
buses are overcrowded before they reach
the Alcan plant.
Whites do bettor
Alcan maintains expensive in-training
programs for non-white workers but it is
clear they are maintained in the interest of
improved production and profit, not in the
interests of black workers.
Falconbridge of Africa Ltd., a subsidiary
of Falconbridge Nickel Mines Ltd., operates
mines in Namibia and Rhodesia.
The Blanket Mine in Southern Rhodesia
made a profit of $1.3 million in 1972. Yet the
starting wage for blacks at the Blanket Mine
was 56 cents a day in 1973.
Some blacks who had worked for
Falconbridge for more than 20 years
received about $45 per month. But some
white workers doing supervisory and
maintenance work received $810 per month.
Entire black families are crowded into
two-person shanties made of corrugated
asbestos sheeting. Recreation facilities
consist of beerhalls and potholed soccer
fields. Whites, on the other hand, live in
spacious, attractive houses and have access
to a swimming pool, tennis court and
clubhouse.
"It is not unfair," writes Nangle, "to
charge that Falconbridge is operating a
slave labor mine."
Falconbridge also operates a large copper
mine in Namibia, or South West Africa,
illegally administered by Vorster's regime.
Namibia is rich in uranium, copper and
diamonds. South Africa rules Namibia by
virtue of "an international instrument," the
Mandate of the United Nations.
Attempts by South Africa to annex
Namibia formally have been thwarted, but
despite UN declarations the economic exploitation of black workers and plundering
of the country's resources by foreign
capitalists goes unhindered.
South African apartheid laws and practices are enforced in Namibia.
Canada actively encourages Falcon-
bridge's mining operation by granting
corporation tax deductions — in direct
contravention of a 1970 UN resolution
declaring that all member states are obliged
to "discourage" their companies from investing in Namibia.
Canada has repeatedly made statements
condemning apartheid and the Vorster
regime. In 1963, for instance, the UN placed
See page 7: CANADA Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1976
BIood m order—
psychosplatter
Yes, the Red Cross still needs
UBC students to bleed.
So much in fact, that it is
depending on this week's blood
donor   clinic   in  SUB  207,   209,
Hot flashes
211, and ^15 to give them an
entire week's supply of blood for
B.C. hospitals.
The clinic continues today and
Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. In
the first three days of the clinic,
less than 1,000 pints were
donated  and they  need another    Qff#   \\-%
1,000 to meet their goal of 2,000
pints.
So get out there and bleed. As
usual, the faculties which have the
largest number and the largest
percentage of its students bleeding
will win beer.
'Tween classes
TODAY
SAY PEOPLE
Elections and hike, noon, SUB 213.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Gene    Thomas    talks    about    the
parables of Jesus, noon, Chem 250.
UBC MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB .
Practice,   5   p.m.   to  7  p.m.,   Place
Vanier ballroom.
KARATE CLUB
Practice,   7:30  p.m.  to   9:30  p.m.,
winter sports centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Clark  Pinnoch  on  Good   News for
the   Poor,   noon,   Lutheran campus
centre.
UBC LIBERALS
Organizational  meeting,  noon, SUB
119.
SQUARE DANCING
Practice, noon, SUB 212.
EAST  INDIANS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Organizational     meeting,     noon,
International House.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Speaker, noon, SUB 205.
KAYAKAND CANOE CLUB
Meeting to organize trip, noon, SUB
212A.
ASSOCIATION FOR
COMPUTER MACHINERY
A.     G.     Fowler     speaks     about
computing    opportunities    in    the
Vancouver area, noon, Civil 201.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Co-recreational     volleyball,     7:30
p.m.   to  9:30  p.m.,  War  Memorial
Gym.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Speaker  John  Anonby,  7:30  p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Iranian dance workshop, 2:30 p.m.,
SUB ballroom.
FRIDAY
SQUASH CLUB
Practice    and   tryouts   for    squash
team, 3 p.m., winter sports centre.
THE CENTRE COFFEE HOUSE
Canadian  folk  singer Fred Booker,
8:30     p.m.,     Lutheran     Campus
Centre.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General  meeting,  noon, SUB 212..
AUS
All   candidates   meeting,   noon   Bu.
100.
CSA AND CVC
Cantonese class, noon, Bu. 316.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
August     moon     party,     9     p.m.,
graduate student centre.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, International House.
UBC MEDIA GROUP
p.m., IRC B-8.
Instructional   film  fair,  noon  to  6
p.m..   IRC B-8.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
OCT. Ztt
I H.P. DAY
' DECORA TE WITH PRINTS
grin bin!
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
~Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
IDEC0RA TE WITH P0STERS\
SAILING CLUB
Novice     training,     all     weekend,
Jericho sailing centre.
TUESDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
WEDNESDAY
voc
General   meeting   and   slide   show,
noon, Chem 250.
If you want to learn more
about the reasons for the Oct. 14
protest, Vanguard Forum at 1208
Granville will present a series of
speakers- who will talk on the
subject at 8 p.m. Friday.
Speakers include Art Kube,
education director for the
Canadian Labor Congress, NDPer
Harry Singh, Joe Kellner, League
for Socialist Action mayoral
candidate, and B.C. Students'
Federation hack Stew Savard.
L^apri j   i
ipn ^
and
IZZCL
Free \f
Campus Defivery *—  ^'
PHONE
iJJc
i -mum j
224-1720
I 224-6336 |
4450 W. 10th AVE.
eate ^tstoude
Fully Licensed.
Pizza in 29 Styles
Choice of 3 Sizes
Special Italian Dishes
STEAKS - SEA FOODS
Hours: Monday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. - Sunday 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.
INTRAMURAL SPECIAL EVENT
Co-Rec Frisbee Tournament
12:30 Thursday, October 7
WAR MEMORIAL GYM FIELD
ALL WELCOME!!!
NOTE: WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL
[TENNIS TOURNAMENT POSTPONED
UNTIL LATER DATE
CINEAAAWEST
LITERARY SERIES
"BUY NOW, SEE LATER"
1. Thurs., Sept. 14 12:30 & 6:00
Old Aud. — Pygmalion
2. Thurs., Sept. 28 12:30 & 6:00
old Aud. — Wuthering Heights
3. January  A Midsummer Night's
 Dream	
4. January   Othello
$2.50 SERIES PASS AVAILABLE AT A. M. S.
BUSINESS OFFICE, BUTO 397 & SUB 247.
ARTS STUDENTS
S.R.A. Rep. By-Elections
Wednesday, Oct. 13,1976
Polls in Buch & Sedge
Open 9:30 a.m. - Close 4:00 p.m.
All-Candidates Meeting Oct. 8, 1976
Buch 100 at 12:30
Rendale
Apple bee
Wrangler
Lee
Levi's
Big Blue
Seafarers
Brittania
Place for Pants
CANDIA
pizza factory
I 228-9512 I   or   | 228-95131
4510 W. 10th Ave.
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
CUDJOE PRODUCTIONS presents Black
Heritage Music m. featuring (Jazz,
Rhythm & Blues, Steel Band). The
Billy Taylor Ensemble, Soul Survivors Inc., and A Moment's Notice.
At the Peter Pan HalL 1636 W. Broadway, Sunday, Oct. 10th, at 6:00 p.m.
$4.50 per person.
10 - For Sale - Commercial
DO-IT-YOURSELF Picture Framing. For
people with more taste than Money —
3657 West Broadway.
11 - For Sale - Private
MARANTZ 2220 Receiver Dynaco A2S
XL speakers. Ph. 234-1851,
IMS A.H. SPRITE. Fiberglass hardtop,
roU bar, new *■—•—	
TAPE RECORDER. Heel-to-reel Phillips
eight-track. $60. Phone 224-8533, Rm.
408.
DOUBLE DESK bookcase wall complex
for sale. Ideal for married students.
$100 or best offer. Call 266-6046.
'44 PLYMOUTH FURY, 6 cyl., auto.,
new paint. Good cond., snow tires
ind. $425.00. 263-0070.
195? AUSTIN CAMBRIAN. Good body.
Needs engine work. Offers! 7334)181.
'65 VW FOR SALE. Excellent shape.
$500 O.B.O. Must sell, beat offer
Thursday. 224-0617.
15 — Found
L.A. 10-SPEED Sept. 6. Phone if you
know combination for lock, seat make.
224-0476 — 5:30-7:00 p.m.
30-Jobs
EARN $100 plus a month delivering a
Province paper route. Car or bike
necessary. Phone 732-2667.
65 — Scandals
PERSON WHO TOOK Calculator from
open civil locker, please call phone
number on Calculator. I really need
it. Rewardl N.Q.A.
SAY PEOPLE axe alive and well in
SUB 237A. Phone 228-6781. Come on
up and visit!
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.  Reasonable.  224-1567.
EFFICIENT SELECTRIC typing, my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
99 — Miscellaneous
MEDICAL SCHOOLS Interior Mexico
now accepting applicants for 19T7
terms. Contact R. W. Cary, P.O. Box
214313, Sacramento, CA. 85821. Phone
(916) 483-4587.
HANDBALL ANYONE? Between 8:00
and 3:00 p.m. Call Steve, 738-6257,
mornings until 11:00 a.m.
SKI WHISTLER
Rent cabin day/week. 732-0174 eves.
'p=ir=it=lr=Jr=lr=J[=lr=ir=lf=li=J
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Thursday October 7,  1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
In Vorster's Sooth Africa
Canada backs racists
From page 5
an embargo on arms sales to South
Africa. Canada supported the
resolution. Yet military hardware
manufactured by Alcan is used
today against liberation struggles
in Namibia.
The issue of Canadian involvement in South Africa extends
to other southern African countries as well. In December 1960,
Canada voted in favour of a UN
i resolution pledging unconditionally to bring an end to
colonialism.
But in 1973, Mitchell Sharp, then
secretary of state for external
affairs, refused to discuss the
Portuguese liberation wars in the
North Atlantic Treaty
Organization council, writing that
it would be "neither appropriate
nor effective." By allowing Portugal complete freedom to suppress blacks, Sharp was pursuing
the most "effective" means to high
corporate profits and lucrative
exploitation of Angola and
Mozambique.
An important component of
Canadian support for the Vorster
government is Canada's membership in NATO.
Within its network, Canada gives
substantial military support to the
South African regime.
The African continent contains
very strategic cases and resources
which NATO allies are anxious to
use for their own ends.
The U.S. has a guided missile
station and a space tracking
station in South Africa. A naval
surveillance system established
with the help of NATO members at
Silvermine allows South Africa to
keep under surveillance an area
from South America to
Bangladesh. NATO forms and
stock codes were used throughout
this operation enabling South
Africa to function as a de facto
member of NATO.
Pool lottery
selling fast
Lottery tickets to raise money to
build UBC's covered pool went on
sale Monday and they are selling
fast, chief fund raiser Doug
Aldridge said Wednesday.
UBC clubs, undergraduate
societies and students are selling
the $1 tickets. The winners will net
a first prize of $2,500 or one of three
$500 second prizes.
The 15,000 tickets printed for the
lottery are being sold in books of 15
and a commission of $2 a book goes
to sellers, he said.
Money raised by the lottery will
go toward making up the $1.2
million still needed to complete the
$4.7 million pool.
r—	
Good News
For The Poor
A Discussion With Clark
Pinnock of Regent College
Thursday Noon Hour At
The Luthern Campus
Centre. Bring your Lunch,
Coffee Provided. An LSM
Event.
The Lutheran Campus
Centre is open to all
students who seek a place
to study, relax and meet
others. The Coffee is on so
come     by.
L
Defense against the "threat" of
Soviet ships in the Indian Ocean is
a convenient pretext for NATO
collaboration with Vorster's
regime. In reality, these military
agreements represent an attack on
South Africa's black workers.
NATO members are fortifying
their immense economic investments in South Africa against
the country's explosive internal
situation. In return for using South
Africa's strategic bases, NATO
provides the Vorster regime with
arms to protect white racist rule
and western investments.
The Canadian government
remains silent in the face of
western collaboration with
apartheid.    Through    NATO's
longer   willing   to   suffer   these
crimes in silence.
Their protests are shaking the
very foundations of the apartheid
regime. We must support them in
their struggle for freedom.
By putting pressure on Ottawa
through   rallies,   demonstrations, ,
petitions and talks, we can begin t
the task of educating Canadians
about  their  government's   complicity in the Vorster government.
By boycotting products
manufactured in South Africa, we
withdraw support for companies
that exploit black workers. We
must refuse to participate with
South Africa in any athletic,
cultural and similar activities to
destroy the myth of friendly
diplomacy and interchange. ;
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Camping
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common arms pool, Canadian
military hardware frequently finds
its way into the armories of South
Africa.
As members of NATO, as arms
manufacturer, as capitalist power,
as investor in South Africa, Canada
is responsible for supporting the
crimes of Ihe South African
regime.
Black African workers are no
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LIES MY FATHER
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This Thurs., Sun:-7:00  '
& Fri., Sat.-7:00/9:30
Plus Ch. 4 of the Phantom
Creeps-Fri., Sat.-7:00
EDELWEIS
The Ideal
Campus Boot
Regular $39.95   Special $29.95
SALE   20% OFF
OCT. 1ST to 9TH
CAMPING, HIKING EQUIPMENT
Stoves, Cookware & Accessories
EDGER TENTS (Cotton & Nylon)
BT 100      Reg. $68.00.     Now $45.00
BT 120      Reg. $86.00.     Now $60.00
BT 140      Reg. $96.00.     Now $70.00
CARIBOU PACKS
Reg. $90.00
Sale $75.00
NUMBEROUS IN-STORE SPECIALS
BICYCLE DEPT.  USED 5-SPEEDS FROM $50.00
THE GREAT ESCAPE
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When you're drinking
tequila, Sauza's the
shot that counts.
That's why more and
more people are
asking for it by
name.
TEQUILA SAUZA
Number one in Mexico.
Number one in Canada. Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7, 1976
Peaceful end seen to S.A. trouble
By CHRIS GAINOR
The end of race segregation and
minority white rule in South Africa
will come peacefully, a leading
South African politician predicted
Wednesday at UBC.
Harry Schwarz, a member of
South African parliament and
executive chairman of the opposition South African Progressive
Reform party, said in an interview
that current unrest among South
African blacks will not lead to
revolution.
"The current disorders are
protest demonstrations and not
revolution," Schwarz said.
"People are worried but I think it
will make them think."
Schwarz's party holds 11 seats in
the 171-member South African
parliament, dominated by the
National party which instituted the
apartheid policy when it came to
power in 1948.
He described his party's policy
this way: "We are opposed to
apartheid. We oppose all forms of
discrimination and we support a
change in the South African constitution to make it federal.
"We are opposed to the
homeland concept and we believe
the way to solve our problems is to
call a national convention of all
races to change to a more
multiracial basis.
"We're a free-enterprise party
but we believe capitalism must be
reformed if it is to survive in
Africa," Schwarz said. He will
make three speeches at UBC next
week.
Under the current government's
"separate development" policy, he
said, blacks live in separate
"homelands" which are isolated
from industry and form only 13 per
cent of the area of South Africa.
Schwarz said his party advocates a federal system similar to
Canada's, but with more provincial
autonomy. Provinces would not be
set up along racial lines, he said.
South Africa will eventually be
ruled by multiracial parties in
which blacks would be dominant
because they form the majority,
but when asked when this would
occur, Schwarz said "Nobody can
give a timetable in Africa because
things move swiftly there. But I'm
convinced apartheid will collapse."
He said the world media is overreacting to the current disturbances.
"I think South Africa is going
through a difficult period and has
many difficulties ahead. But I am
still optimistic and I think there
are enough people in both the black
and white communities who want
peaceful change to make that a
reasonable possibility."
The current problems will make
AMS drops pretest forum
Plans by the Alma Mater Society to hold an open
forum to get students' views about the Oct. 14 day of
protest have fallen through.
The forum about labor's protest against wage and
price controls would have been held tonight in SUB
conversation pit and would have featured labor
leaders and a representative of the federal government.
The AMS wanted to hold the forum so the student
representative assembly could decide what position
to take on the labor protest.
Dave Theessen, forum organizer and commerce
rep on council, said Wednesday the forum was
cancelled because the date coincided with a federal
cabinet meeting, which prevented the expected
government speakers from appearing.
Theessen said Liberal senator Ray Perrault told
the AMS he would fly to Vancouver especially for the
forum if it could be held this coming Friday, but the
AMS did not know this until Oct. 1, too late to change
the date of the forum.
John Russell, AMS speakers committee chairman,
said a panel discussion Oct. 14 organized by campus
Christian groups will be the only speaking event on
campus connected with the AMS.
The panel for the discussion will include commerce
and economics professors and campus union leaders.
Russell said the speakers committee has yet to
finalize a schedule of speakers who will appear on
campus this year. The list will be ready in about two
weeks, he said.
■■HI
whites   either   more   liberal   or
reactionary, he added.
Whites are not colonists in South
Africa as they are in other areas,
Schwarz said, "they are Africans
the same as blacks but they are
white Africans."
He said the first whites came in
1652, about the same time blacks
were moving into South Africa
from the north.
"The world has changed and
South Africa was left behind."
According to current South African
law, people can be imprisoned
without trial and be subject to
house arrest and internment, Schwarz said.
"We however have a free press
which has only limited restrictions
and the English-speaking press is a
very courageous press in South
Africa." The press cannot report
on police stories without government approval, he said, but it is
completely free to criticize
government policies.
Schwarz, who founded the
Reform Party, a predecessor to the
Progressive Reform Party, said
his party is completely free in its
activities except it cannot be
multiracial.
UVic student council
out to oust president
VICTORIA (CUP) — The student
council at the University of Victoria plans to fire its student
president.
The decision was made Sunday
after council voted to ask for
Alistair Palmer's resignation,
which he refused to submit.
The controversial student
president has raised the ire of a
number of council members by:
• refusing to ask the UVic board
of governors to collect a $1 fee levy
from students for the B.C. Student
Federation, which has already
been passed by a campus referendum;
• missing council meetings
(which he has termed petty and
boring) to watch hockey on
television or attend a rugby function;
• made allegedly false
statements to the press.
After council had voted to ask for
Palmer's resignation he was asked
what action he planned to take.
"Yeah, my action is that I'm not
going to resign," he said.
The main issue is Palmer's
repeated attempts to block UVic
membership in the BCSF despite
the results of the referendum.
"What are we going to have to do
to convince Mr. Palmer we are
members (of BCSF)," asked
council member Casey Rippon.
"Kill him?
"Our constitution has no veto for
the president," said Rippon. "His
refusal constitutes malfeasance in
office. He should get the hell out."
Palmer countered council's
insistence that he comply with its
wishes with respect to BCSF by
introducing a petition, signed by
150 students, calling for another
BCSF referendum.
Council declined an opportunity
to place the issue before students
during a by-election Oct. 15 and
instead drafted another letter for
Palmer to send to the board.
Several members expressed
doubts Palmer would send the
letter and one member who abstained on the resignation vote
indicated he will vote for impeachment if Palmer ignores the
request once again.
But Rippon said he will initiate
dismissal of Palmer at Council's
next meeting Sunday anyway.
Palmer has claimed that the
representative assembly of UVic's
Alma Mater Society has not passed
the formal request for a $1 BCSF
fee levy, even though the students
have in a referendum.
Many students have already paid
their fees without the $1 BCSF levy
added on, and Palmer says he
thinks it is too late to collect the
fees.
iTietftelbetg
ceqtfe
COFFEE
HOUSE
Fridays at 8:30
Oct. 8
FRED BOOKER
Oct. 15
CATHIE & BRUCE WEBSTER
Oct. 22
CANCELLED (octoberfest)
Oct. 29
DENISE, LOC & DANIEL
at the lutheran campus centre
university & wesbrook $1.50
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rm te'yyym^
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B.Cls great tasting beer,
...because it's slow brewed with the pure
spring water from Shannon Falls Park.
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