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The Ubyssey Jan 6, 1987

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 tJBC Archives Serial
Vol. LXIX, No. 26
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 6,1987
228-2301J
Pattison degree inappropriate
By PATTI FLATHER
Students should protest against
UBC awarding Jimmy Pattison an
honorary degree because some of
his companies sell pornography, a
student senator says.
"It's really important for
students   to   get   out   and   do
something," Christina Davidson,
law 3, said in a interview Sunday.
"People may think it's just soft-
porn he's distributing but it's not."
Davidson said Pattison is
Canada's second-largest distributor
of pornographic magazines, and
that his companies have been con
victed twice of violating Ontario
obscenity laws.
She will approach the Alma
Mater Society, the UBC faculty
association and other groups to
support protests against the former
chair of Expo at the spring con-
44
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— dan andrews photo
PENGUINS ATTEMPT TO win science scholarship by proving that King Canute's theories on influencing
wave movement are right after all. The cold weather mammals failed in their objective, but the temperature
of the icy New Year's dunking reminded them of their home in sunny Antarctica.
vocation ceremonies, she said.
Senate vice-chair Jean Elder
resigned Nov. 3 over the award and
the four other academic women on
senate sent a protest to UBC's president David Strangway.
Elder, an associate history professor, said in her resignation letter:
"While it is certainly true that
anyone may be in any business
within the law, to honor persons
engaged in businesses which exploit
and humilitate women seems to be
more than 1 can countenance."
Student law senator Paddi Arthur said she is also angry about
UBC senate's decision, approved in
late 1985 and made public at
senate's Dec. 10 meeting. She said
she will work with Davidson and
other students to oppose the award.
Arthur said she spoke against
awarding Pattison the degree when
senate voted on it in 1985 because
she had "difficulty with the university giving an honor to a man whose
business totally degrades women."
Pattison did not accept the award
last year but has accepted it this
year.
Arthur said while the vast majority of the 87 senate members voted
in favor of giving Pattison a degree,
she thought almost all student
senators opposed it.
But the chair of the senate
tributes committee, which makes
the award recommendations, said
he can't recall the pornography
issue ever being raised in connection
with a degree for Pattison.
John Dennison said there was a
motion at the in-camera meeting in
late 1986 to vote on the degrees one
by one and not as a block. It was
defeated, he said.
Dennison said he can sympathize
with people concerned about Pattison's involvement with pornography, but that there are "other
sides" to Pattison such as the fact
he is a major employer in B.C.
Pattison is one of 10 people to be
honored at the spring convocation
for outstanding contributions to
Canada.
Associate education professor
Jane Gaskell, one of four senators
who sent a protest letter dated Nov.
6 to president Strangway, said the
procedures for giving honorary
degrees will be discussd at the next
senate meeting Jan. 21.
One issue discussed will be
whether senators can vote on individual honorary degrees or must
vote for the block, she said. Gaskell
said she thought it was important to
make a statement against Pattison.
"It makes the university a more
difficult place for women," she
said, if Pattison is honored.
But UBC chancellor Robert
Wyman, an ex-officio member of
the tributes committee and a supporter of Pattison's nomination,
said there is a review board checking that what Pattison's company,
Mainland Magazines, distributes is
satisfactory.
Wyman said it bothers him that
"a small, militant, and assertive
group" may go against the majority
senate decision and disrupt convocation through some type of protest.
"I think it's a shame if the
minority group decides that they're
going to disrupt congregation (convocation) and embarass the university."
Wyman said most women as well
as men on senate did not vote
against giving Pattison the award.
Alumni editor quits over disputed endorsement
By CORINNE BJORGE
The editor of the UBC Alumni
Chronicle has resigned. Terry
Lavender left the Chronicle after
his opposition to an Alumni endorsement of chancellor candidate
Leslie Peterson in the winter edition
was ignored.
The resignation of Lavender is
the latest controversial incident in
the traditionally austere UBC
chancellor elections.
The election began to escalate into a political battle as candidate
Stan Persky criticized UBC Alumni
Association endorsement of candidate Leslie Peterson. An article,
endorsing Peterson, written by
Alumni Association president
William McNulty, ran on page
three of the UBC Alumni Chronicle
facing a full-page advertisement for
Leslie Peterson paid for by the
Alumni Friends of Les Peterson for
Chancellor.
Lavender said he did not support
the publication of either the advertisement or the endorsement. "I
think it was wrong for the Chronicle to endorse a candidate", said
Lavender. "The Chronicle is not
associated with the election. It (the
election) is held by the Registrar's
Office" he said. "Somebody owes
Stan Persky an apology" said
Lavender.
McNulty refused to discuss the
resignation of Lavender in detail.
But despite Lavender's assertion
that the Peterson ad was one of the
reasons for his resignation, McNulty denied the endorsement controversy was why Lavender left. "I
refuse to discuss staff" he said,
"But I don't concur with his
statements."
McNulty defended the endorsement of Peterson by saying the endorsement was a news article and
that was within the Alumni
Association Board of Management's mandate to endorse a candidate. "If you want to come out
and declare what side of the fence
you're on, you're entitled to it," he
said.
But Persky called the board's actions "sheer propaganda" and
stressed that the Chronicle should
be an independent publication.
Persky also voiced dissatisfaction
with the equal advertising space for
the two election candidates in the
UBC Alumni Chronicle.
"In the past the Registrar's office, which is responsible for ad-
minstering the elections, has explicitly discouraged campaigning
and tried to guarantee equal space
for each candidate. It would have
been fairly easy to contact me (to
place an ad)" he said.
But Lavender said that Persky's
announcement of his candidacy was
two weeks past the deadline for
advertising and was what lost him
advertising space.
McNulty said he was concerned
that Persky was upset over Peterson's ad.
Control of the Chronicle will rest
with the Alumni Association until a
new editor is found.
Curtis loses third appeal and won't try again
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Bruce Curtis has chosen to exchange his right to further appeals
for the opportunity to serve the rest
of his 20 year sentence in a Canadian prison.
The 22 year old Nova Scotian
who has spent over four years in a
New Jersey prison had his third appeal denied on December 17.
Now he just wants to be closer to
home, said Curtis' American lawyer
Joanne Legano by telephone yesterday from New York.
Curtis was convicted in a highly
disputed 1982 trial of aggravated
manslaughter in the shooting death
of his friend's mother. Curtis maintains the shooting was accidental.
"The magistrate has recommended a denial of the Habeas Corpus
petition," said Legano.
Legano said the magistrate's
recommendation was 16 pages long,
and "very analytical, not just a
summary." She said Curtis will not
file an objection, or pursue any further appeals. "Bruce would like a
transfer back to Canada," said
Legano.
In order to apply for a transfer to
a Canadian prison, Curtis must
withdraw any pending appeals, and
forfeit the right to further appeals.
His petition for clemency from the
governor of New Jersey, filed last
July, would remain valid even after
transfer.
James Curtis, Bruce Curtis'
father, contacted by phone in
Halifax, said his son was not surprised by the magistrate's recommendation, "Bruce has never put
any faith in the New Jersey justice
system. He's been too close to it,"
he said.
Legano last week wrote to the
New Jersey Department of Corrections stating Curtis would like a
transfer to a Canadian prison, and
asking that the request be expedited.
A transfer would mean Curtis
would serve his 20 year sentence in a
Canadian prison, closer to his family, and be eligible for parole after
seven years instead of the man-
ditory 10 in New Jersey.
The New Jersey Department of
Corrections told Legano in late
November a transfer could take up
to 18 months because the department still has to create transfer
regulations. The bill enabling
prisoner transfers was passed just
last summer.
Curtis' aunt, Lorraine Peever,
who spoke by phone from her home
in Brantford Ontario, is skeptical.
"It's odd that a transfer to Maine
would only take two weeks," she
said, referring to an offer made by
the Department of Corrections
before Christmas. "I think the 18
months is a bluff."
She believes it is a deliberate stall,
insitiated by the Monmouth County, New Jersey prosecutor's office
which is currently lobbying the New
Jersey legislature for an amendment
to the prisoner transfer bill allowing
the prosecutor's office to veto
prisoner transfers.
Legano   said   that   Monmouth
County prosecutor, John Kay, "has
stated time and time again that he'll
do all he can to oppose the
transfer."
Curtis' father also questions the
length of time the Department of
Corrections claims the creation of
'transfer regulations will take.
"They can do things if they want
to. If not, they can drag it on."
Legano said the Canadian
government is in a position to speed
things up. "If the Canadian government calls the governor of New
Jersey and says it wants it done
quickly, it will do more than my
phone call."
Jennifer Wade, a long time
member of Amnesty International
and an active member of the Vancouver Bruce Curtis Defence Committee, said she hopes Curtis
receives his transfer to Canada
soon, but Curtis has still not received justice, and the annual January
24 vigil will occur again this year
across Canada. The Vancouver location has still not been announced. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6, 1987
Women organize against silence
TORONTO (CUP) — Women in
downtown Toronto neighbourhoods are organizing against silence
surrounding sexual violence against
women.
Following five rapes in the Annex
neighbourhood near the University
of Toronto, committed
systematically by the same man during a two-month period, women are
blaming local media and police for
not informing them about the
rapist.
"We don't want stories that
focus on the victim, what she did,
what she wore, what she looked
like, and we don't want rape reports
buried in the back of the paper,"
said Nora Currie of Women
Against Violence Against Women.
"We want information on or
near the front page."
A public meeting in early October
attracted more than 150 women,
many of whom expressed anger and
betrayal about the silence concerning the serial rapes.
A letter written by the fifth victim
of the Annex rapes, and addressed
to feminist Globe and Mail columnist June Callwood, was read aloud
during the meeting.
"Four weeks ago, as I slept in my
bed, my doors locked, a hooded
man forced his way into my apartment, my bed, and myself," the
woman wrote.
"The man who raped me has
raped four other women in a six-
block radius in the last two months.
He follows his prey like a hunter.
He attacks single women, living
alone in second or third floor apartments. He always enters through
the balcony," she wrote.
"Why wasn't I made aware
(before) that my life was in
danger?"
The woman also said she was told
by police not to speak with the
rapist's other victims, or to try to
warn women because it would
hinder police investigation.
If you feel you have
two feet left then . . .
NOW IS THE TIME TO
JOIN THE
UBC DANCE CLUB
New Bronze classes on
Wednesday nights
8:30-11:30
(Starts Jan. 14, 1987 SUB Ballroom)
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UBC STUDENTS
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ON ANY REGULAR PRICED
GREEK ENTREE
Enjoy a complimentary Greek
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VALID MON.-THURS.
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Police were invited to the
meeting, but no representatives attended. Organizers said the no-
show is indicative of their priorities.
Ann Keown, who organized a
similar meeting during the summer,
warns women of police attitudes.
"The police did show up at our
meeting. We asked them what a
woman would do if she is sexually
assaulted. Should she struggle?"
said Keown.
"The answer was, 'Do you want
to lose your life just to prevent someone from getting a couple of
minutes of pleasure.' "
Murray Cowling, an inspector of
the 52nd Division of the Metro
Toronto Police, said police did not
attend the October meeting because
they had only received the invitation that day.
"I consider that too short notice
for a topical issue like rape. I
wouldn't   want  to  send  someone
down there who didn't know what
they were talking about," said
Cowling.
Valerie Scott of the Canadian
Organization for the Rights of Prostitutes says rapes could be
prevented through the information
network shared by prostitutes, if
they were not silenced by police and
stigmatized by the public.
"It's just another example of
how society divides women to make
them powerless," said Scott, adding Bill C-49 prevents prostitutes
from communicating with each
other, the media, and police.
"We know who these guys are.
We have their license plates, we've
seen their faces," said Scott.
"Women need to network, and to
start acting for themselves."
Barbara Hall, alderwomen and
member of the Metro Action Committee Against Violence Against
Women, said women shouldn't
have to "lock themselves into their
houses" to be safe.
"Women must look at active
ways to stop violence. Organize
more meetings like this, take self
defence courses, talk to and meet
other women in your neighbourhoods, and demand better
lighting and better public transportation from your municipal polici-
tians," said Hall.
Women at the meeting signed a
petition to mayor Art Eggleton calling for funding for free self-defence
courses, and full daycare subsidies
for mothers who attend the courses.
Said Keown, "It is insulting when
police say to us, 'We didn't tell you
there was a rapist in your
neighbourhood because the women
would panic and become
hysterical.'
"Information is power, information allows us to make choices
about whether to lock our doors
and where to walk at night," said
Keown.
LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
JAN. 31st
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for full refund any time up to JANUARY 31, 1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
; BOOKSTORE
228-4741
NOTICE TO STUDENTS
STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Did you have the opportunity to prepare a submission to the Provincial
Government on Student Assistance
programs?
The British Columbia Youth Advisory
Council, established to create a direct
link between government and young
people, provides advice to government on a range of issues affecting
Youth. The government's review of
student assistance programs is an important task, one that the Youth Advisory Council knows will benefit from
the ideas and suggestions of students
across B.C.
Although the government asked for
submissions by December 31, 1986,
the Council realizes that some stu
dents may not have had the time to put
their ideas together during exams and
the Christmas break. If you are a student or Youth who did not prepare and
send a submission to the government,
and would like to do so, the Youth Advisory Council asks that you send your
submission to them. The Council has a
direct contact with government
through the Honourable Stanley Ha-
gen, Minister of Advanced Education
and Job Training, and will pass on your
suggestions to government.
Write to:
B.C. Youth Advisory Council,
c/o Ministry of Advanced Education
and Job Training,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C. V8V 1X4.
Province of
British Columbia r
Tuesday, January 6, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
By BETH RYAN and
JEFF PADDOCK
Reprinted from the Muse
Canadian University Press
Peace activists
meet apathy
Some things are better left unsaid, the saying goes, and for those
fighting increased military activity
in Labrador, some things are better
forgotten altogether.
For example, when 20 members
of the North Atlantic Peace
Organization, an ad-hoc St. John's
peace group whose name mocks the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization, recently protested low-level
military flights over Labrador, the
weather proved more of an opponent than unseen NATO forces.
A NATO study group is currently
considering building a tactical
fighting and weapons training centre in the sleepy twin towns of Happy Valley-Goose Bay in western
Labrador.
With a recording of a low-flying
jet roaring in the background, activists anchored balloons just 100
feet above the ground to show how
low NATO jets can fly. But the
balloons were caught by an unexpected gust of wind, and carried to
a tree where they burst and slowly
drifted away.
The symbolism of the event was
not lost on Newfoundland activists,
sadly aware of the seeming futility
of fighting the increased militarization of Labrador. The protest
received little media coverage, and
less support from Newfoundlanders, all of which is indicative of the poor emphasis placed on peace concerns in the debate
surrounding the proposed NATO
base.
The three main members of that
debate — the military, the native
Innu, and white residents of Happy
Valley-Goose Bay — all see
Labrador as a land with great
potential, but can not agree on exactly what the land has potential
for.
Labrador is a flier's and hunter's
dream. Its rugged terrain a mix of
tundra mountains and spruce
forest, it is admired by the military
for its wide, open space. According
to a pamphlet recently published by
the Department of National
Defence, there is "space, for expansion of the airfield and facilities,
space, to fly unimpeded over huge,
unpopulated areas."
Goose Bay has been a military
centre since 1941, when the United
States established an air force base
there. The Americans pulled out
seven years ago, crippling the local
economy, but there is still constant
military activity. The U.S. Air
Force uses the base as a refueling
stop for transport aircraft travelling
to and from Europe. The Royal Air
Force and the German Air Force
use the base for low-level training
with Vulcan, Tornado and Alpha
military aircraft, some of which is
nuclear capable.
"We have a fairly large operation
here now," says Colonel John
David of the Goose Bay base. And
things could become much busier, if
the NATO study group chooses the
site over a base in Konya, Turkey.
The decision, expected late this year
or early next year, will be based on
cost, available facilities, and how
suitable the land is for such a base.
David says an interim NATO
report indicates the Konya base will
"The Quebecois don't
have the same knee-
jerk acceptance of the
military as English
Canadians do,"
—Peter Armitage,
anthropologist
be chosen. Still, Goose Bay could
be chosen if Konya can not provide
required facilities.
Concern about the proposed base
is magnified by low-level training
flights in Labrador. The most vocal
opponents of these flights are the
native Innu — whose name means
The People — of Labrador and
Quebec, who say the flights not only disrupt their traditional way of
life, but are a facet of what leader
Penote Ben Michel calls a cultural
genocide against his people.
As well, the loudness of the
flights is damaging to their health,
the Innu say. Hunter Francois
Bellefleur recalls an encounter with
a low-level training exercise: "We
couldn't hear them coming up from
behinds us on the river. We
couldn't hear them at all. (My
children) jumped out of the canoe
when the planes took us by surprise,
because they were frightened. And
if they had jumped off in deep
water, I could have lost them."
However, the military has been
quick to dismiss such complaints.
David agrees a jet flying overhead
could frighten an unsuspecting person, but said the damage is no
greater than that caused by stereo
headphones. (This same point was
made in May by Newfoundland MP
John  Crosbie,  while  entertaining
NATO officials visiting Goose Bay.
Crosbie said those truly concerned
| about hearing loss should "look at
x the young people with the beadle phones".   Ironically,   three   Innu
"leaders were not allowed into that
° dinner or to contest Crosbie's state
ment, because they were not wearing the required ties.)
David said the noise level caused
by low-level aircraft is not as high as
the Innu claim, "given the decibel
level, you would have to overfly a
person 450 to 900 times in order to
surpass the American-set noise
level," he said.
And Henry Shouse, mayor of
Happy Valley-Goose Bay and a
strong supporter of the proposed
base, doesn't consider noise made
by the flights to be damaging to
anyone. "It's there before you
know it and gone before you know
it. It's like a clap of thunder," he
said.
But a report released in
September by the Conseil Attimek-
Montaignais indicates noise from
low-level flights can indeed cause
hearing damage. The pain
threshhold of the human ear is 110
to 130 decibels dBA, and irreversible ear damage can be caused by
hearing a noise made by planes, is
so named because it rises suddenly,
and humans don't have the ability
to prepare for such intense noise.
Using statistics gathered by the
U.S. and Royal air forces, the
report shows as an example that
noise made by the Phantom II
plane, used by the German air
force, surpasses the pain threshold
and the point of permanent
damage.
Peter Armitage, an anthropologist who has worked for
several years in Innu communities,
says effects of low-level flying on
the Innu are serious and far
reaching.
"Prolonged exposure can cause
many physiological and
psychological problems," said Armitage, adding a recent report by
the Canadian Public Health
Association makes several inap-
popriate recommendations for dealing with the intense noise.
"The report suggested that the
Innu be taught methods of coping
with the noise of the planes," said
Armitage. "How do they expect the
Innu to control an involuntary reaction?"
However, David said activists are
misinforming natives of health
hazards, and this has led to much of
the controversy over low-level flying.
"It is traumatic, if people are being told there is radiation output
from the jets, as the people are being told by some activists," said
David.
He said the military is planning to
accommodate the Innu by
relocating flights, providing they
are informed of where and when Innu will be.
See page 6: LOW Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6,1987
Fists
rJryl   J&l
In the life of a true sports fan, there are always a few special
moments, teams, and individuals.
In hockey there is always the wonder of the incredibly skilled,
disciplined and supposedly non-violent Soviet national hockey
teams.
The events occuring on the afternoon of January 4 between the
Soviet and Canadian national junior team's will be remembered for
many years to come as something the sports world would like to
forget.
Hockey is the unofficial national sport of Canada and the
U.S.S.R., and whether we like to admit it or not, it has tremendous
cultural signigicance. It is one of the fastest, most exciting sports in
the world. It is also one of the most violent sports, often marred by
fistfights and wild stick swinging incidents. Sunday's altercation
was no different, as suddenly the hideous violence of the game
was brought to focus by a group of young men overtaken by their
emotions and desire to be men.
Rather than roasting these young men we should look at the
game in general and see what it is doing to our youth. The Soviets
were once the bastion of how hockey should be played — non-
violently.
Now, suddenly the Soviets are using the same goon tactics
Canadian professionals and amateurs have been using for years.
Somehow we are shocked.
We are blind to what is going on in our own backyard. Don
Cherry and Alan Eagleson froth at the mouth trying to tell us how
those bastard Russians are at it again. Enough of the meathead
rhetoric and hockey players making political comments. Violence is
the problem, and it must be eradicated at all levels.
At home the N.H.L. must quit being so spineless and inflict
heavy penalties and fines. When the kids watch their heroes on
television, they'll eventually know that violence is stupid and
degenerate.
"Of   CDU£<Le,..Tt<€  ^*y&  SCMfcDc/Lf>
AT WrV   liOI/fZ    ilf&N  STUplMfS    SrtoljCi)
Volunteers for food and development needed
I'd like to rectify a couple of om-
missions in the article on the UBC
food bank.
First of all, Rebecca Nevraumont
provided assistance in choosing the
correct wording for the constitution
of the Food and Development Centre Board, and went over the final
document before it went to council.
Secondly, it was Sandra Jarvis
who made the initial contact with
the Lutheran Campus Centre.
All letters must be brief and typed
on a triple-spaced, 70-character
line. They must be delivered in person with identification shown by
4:30 p.m. the Friday before
publication to the Ubyssey office,
SUB 241k.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit for brevity, spelling and grammar, and libel. Sexist, racist, and
homophobic letters will not run. If
you have any questions or comments, or just want to shoot the
breeze, drop by SUB 241k, or call
us at 228-2301/05.
I'd also like to take this opportunity to let people know that
although three positions on the
board have already been filled,
several challenging volunteer opportunities still remain.
The FDC Coordinator is responsible for organizing and coordinating the activities of the board.
This position carries honorarium of
$400. Also needed are a resource
solicitor, to solicit donations or to
solicit food and merchandise from
the campus and the outside community; a volunteer recruitment
and scheduling director, to do exactly that; two fundraising coordinators, one for the campus, one
for the outside community; and a
secretary, to take care of the paperwork and ensure the smooth running of the board.
Of course, we will need many
other volunteers to help run the
centre. We are hoping to offer
childcare, nutrition counselling,
and help in coping with a low-
income lifestyle. Volunteers in these
areas, as well as for the practicalities   of  food  collection   and
distribution, will be needed.
As you can see, this is an ambitious project that will not succeed
without campus and community
support, and a lot of volunteer
manpower. Consequently, the AMS
is actively seeking your help in
terms of time and effort. None of
these positions, except for that of
the coordinator, receive an
honorarium, but they all pay off in
the sort of practical experience that
will both enhance your resume and
prove useful in any future undertakings.
Each position's term will last a
year. The first FDC coordinator's
term will run from February, 1987
to March, 1988; subsequent coordinators will be chosen in March.
The rest of the board positions will
be selected shortly afterwards. A
deadline has not been set for applications, but two weeks notice
will be given to all recipients of this
letter. The coordinator position's
application deadline will also be
published in The Ubyssey two weeks
beforehand.
Please give careful consideration
to these volunteer opportunities.
Urge anyone else who might be interested to consider them as well.
Those interested in board positions should submit a resume and
covering letter to the address below,
to the attention of Carol Pedlar. If
interested in helping out in other
ways, please just send along your
name, address, telephone number,
year and faculty. Finally, for more
information, please call me at
228-2050 or write.
Carol Pedlar
AMS external affairs coordinator
Longley wishes to lower voting age
r
THE UBYSSEY
January 6, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Doo Dee Doo Doo Doo, Ooo Dee Doo Doo
"It was another average night at the printers . . ." the man in the coal black suit said.
"Who's he?" Evelyn Jacob asked, sick unto death with either the flu or the bubonic plague.
"They would find that this night would lead them into a realm of sheer terror. Not even Michael
Groberman's repertoire of Broadway show tunes, Dan Andrew's splendiferous photography, Peter
Burn's lessons in 'coolness' or Cassandra Freeman's plans to boycott the entire Western Hemisphere
could save them now," said the suited spectre who looked suspiciously like Rick Hiebert.
Corinne Bjorge and Patti Flather ran off in terror with David Ferman to the sunny climes of North
Bay, Ontario.
Stephen Wisenthal and Malcolm Pearson called Svetozar Kontic over to have a word with the
disturbed young lad. "Uh, Rick ... as the ancient Roman philospher Suggus Bunnius once said
"Reducto ad absurdium, veni, vidi, vici, in hoc signo vinces," which loosely translated means "Quit
being a gomer and get back to work!"
Disconsolate, Hiebert wandered over to the facilities, almost bumping into another black suited
gentleman who turns to the camera and began to speak.
"Yes," Rod Serling said, "little did Rick Hiebert know that it is unwise to tempt the supernatural,
even in jest. His deepest fears would be realized as the hitherto friendly Rags would be metamorphised
by atomic radiation into a 3,000-foot monster that would see him as a chew toy."
Cut to a screaming Hiebert, being carried off into the distance by a giant cockapoo with F-16's buzzing around its head.
"But after all," Serling concluded, "Rick didn't know he was in (all together now . . .) The Twilight
Zone . . ."
Doo Dee Doo Doo, Doo Dee Doo Doo . . .
I would like permission to speak
to the AMS student's council at
their December 3rd meeting.
The issue I wish to bring up is
that British Columbia is the only
province whose voting age is 19, all
others have 18, and even federally,
we in B.C. can vote if we are 18.
Section 3 of the Constitution Act
states every Canadian citizen has
the right to vote and Section 15
states there should be no
discrimination on the basis of age.
While Section 1 allows that there
may be reasonable limits prescribed
in a free and democratic society, it
is obviously open to a court
challenge whether it can be
demonstrably justified that in the
rest of North America, except the
territories, the voting age is 18, in
B.C., however, it is 19. Furthermore, Section 24 of the Constitution Act allows individuals whose
rights have been denied to appeal to
the courts.
My point in being on the agenda
is to ask for the AMS support, including the possibility of covering
court costs, if some of my fellow
students at UBC who were 18'/2 at
the time of the recent provincial
election wish to petition the B.C.
supreme court for a declaration that
they have wrongfully had their right
to vote denied to them.
Let us inform a suitable student,
who has a driver's licence, has
worked, or even been married, but
can not vote, that their constitutional rights have been violated,
and help them pursue this matter in
the courts.
I submit that the just and appropriate remedy for this, if we win
the case, is that the result of the recent provincial election on October
22nd be invalidated and a new election called. However, I do not
maintain that I know what the court
will actually decide.
Nevertheless, I think the case is
sufficiently strong that it should be
acted upon, and I wish to present
the outlines of this argument to the
AMS and ask that they take
measures to make sure the case will
be heard, and perhaps that they will
help to cover the court costs in the
interests of all the 18 year old
students at UBC who could not exercise their right to vote in the recent provincial election.
Blair T. Longley
graduate studies
Come and find integrity
It has been largely the focus of
the AMS Integrity in Action Club
executive, with considerable help
from guest speakers outside the
university, to provide a setting for
between-faculty student communications. This has served as an
integrating force between many unique and talented people who have
discovered the value of this form of
student association.
Many of our guest speakers are
graduates from UBC, who, having
earned technical experience relevant
to business, resource management,
engineering, the arts and education,
provide leadership to members
covering a wide range of human
pursuits and experiences.
Weekly lectures, given reliably
every Thursday in Buchanan B225
at 12:30 to 1:20 p.m., have provided the means by which something
quite substantial has developed.
Our lectures will continue to be held
at the same time and place this
term.
As far as future speakers are concerned, Mr. Bill Wilkinson, Field
Director of the Whole Health Institute of Canada, a host to a television interview program, Options
for Health, and Director for the
Association for Responsible Communication, is scheduled to speak at
the university Thursday, January 8.
As coordinator of the club, I
don't aspire to impart burdensome
religious, political, social or
philisophical overtones, neither do
our speakers. We do place emphasis, however, on concise reporting of our experience, rather than
on second-hand knowledge.
We invite all those interested in
developing their abilities as leaders,
in whatever field of endeavour, to
join us. Obviously, this unique opportunity and challenge is not
restricted to those who only do well
in school.
Scott C. Mitchell
President AMS Integrity
in Action Club
third year forestry Tuesday, January 6, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Company profits selling essays
By TOBY SANGER & AURA
DE WIT of the Charlatan
Students who lack the time or
skill but with plenty of bucks to
burn are contributing to healthy
profits in a booming sector of the
economy — essay writing services.
At a cost of about $15 per page, a
Toronto based company, Custom
Essay Services, will furnish students
anywhere in the continent with
original essays tailored to individual
requirements. Prices vary slightly
depending on the client's level of
study.
According to company manager
Derrik Sim, the essays take a day or
two to write, depending on the
length and sophistication required,
and bring in A minus or B plus
grades on average.
The service, started at Ryerson
Polytechnical Institute by Ray Kennedy, is now in its 13th year and is
staffed with people Sim describes as
"intellectual bohemians who work
freelance." Sim says a number of
his employees are ex-professors,
"some of them with eight degrees."
The service also employs a
number of foreign students who
work under the table and are paid
$5 per page.
Complete confidentiality is
guaranteed and the company boasts
a 90 per cent return rate among its
customers.
A   California   based   company
modestly called Research
Assistance Inc., is advertising its
stock of over 16,000 research
papers in student newspapers across
Canada.
The company, also offering
custom research, touts an "ordering hot line" and accepts payment
by Visa or MasterCard.
When we telephoned the company in Los Angeles, Mike Kukhta,
president of McMaster Student
Union in Hamilton, was told that
students using the service receive a
list of documented research information from which they are expected to write their own papers —
rather than the completed papers
which the agency advertises.
Company officials told Kukhta
that the agency advises its
customers never to put anything into a paper which is not their own.
While essay writing companies
may only be breaking income tax
and false advertising laws, students
caught using their services face stif-
fer penalities.
Dalhousie's Calendar advises
students that the presentation by an
author of the work of another
author, in such a way as to give
one's reader reason to think that the
other author's work is one's own"
is considered plagiarism and can be
rewarded with a loss of credit and
suspension from the university.
Students assisting others in
plagiarism or other "irregular procedures" can also be liable to penalty from the university.
Professor John Yogis, chair of
the Senate Discipline Committeee
which deals with plagiarism, says
the committee has dealt with about
25 allegations of academic irregularities in the last two years, the
most common of which has been
plagiarism. All but five of these
cases have resulted in academic
penalties being imposed.
— malcolm pearson photo
BLUE-CAPPED PHLEGMCHEWER (classificationus absurdius) is
observed by members of the UBC Mistaken Birdwatchers Society. The
bird is foraging for worms that he can fly back to his family nest in Totem
Park.
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Dalhousie students seem more inclined to take advantage of the
cheaper, off-the-stacks services
available at the library. Yogis says
he hasn't come across students submitting custom produced essays
during the time he has served on the
committee.
There do not seem to be any companies in Halifax which specialized
in custom writing papers for
students, although there are a
number of companies which have
advertised in the Gazette offering
assistance in grammar and English
composition.
These services, if their assistance
is restricted to grammatical advice,
are not contributing to anything illegal. They may in fact, be filling a
role which doing a bad job at providing — training students in
writing essays.
When contacted by the Gazette, a
person at one of the services was
reluctant to be interviewed but said
they didn't know of any custom
essay writing companies in Halifax.
They estimated their business at five
to 10 people seeking grammatical
advice per month.
"I don't know if the reason is
that students haven't been using
these services or they haven't been
reported," Yogis says, "the danger
in many custom written papers is
that they are often plagiarized
themselves," making it easier to
detect.
Most cases of plagiarism are
discovered by professors who either
notice something familiar in the
material submitted or consider it to
be substantially different in style or
quality than the student's regular
work.
Yogis says his committee is seeing
more allegations and thinks that the
practice is increasing although he
admits he has little idea of how
widespread the practice is.
Sim says he's never heard of
anyone being charged of plagiarism
with one of his company's essays
and claims a manufactured term
paper is almost impossible to
detect.
"It's all original, so unless you
tell them, the profs have no other
option but to believe you. There are
a lot of lazy profs out there."
Yogis says purchasing essays
reflects a "totally defeatist" attitude on the part of students but he
defends an evaluation system which
requires submission of written work
because there is little replacement
for it.
Sim blames the university system
for the success of his business.
"They stick 400 students in a
psychology class . . . it's a large factory out there, grinding out
students . . . there's a chink in the
system."
Sim rationalizes the service in
free enterprise terms, saying "some
rich people have tutors, and if you
can afford it, it's a business
choice."
Hair Styling
4384 W. 10th Ave.
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$14.00-$16.00
For Men & Ladies
224-6434
BEST PRICES IN SIGHT
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270-7262 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6, 1987
Low level flights disintegrate Innu lifestyle
From page 3: PEACE
"We can move on a daily basis,
or even an hourly basis, if given
notice," he said.
The Innu, however, have balked
at the suggestion and argue the
military will not likely change its
operations on call. Furthermore,
Innu leader Peter Penashue said
military activity has already seriously altered native lifestyle. He said
low-level flights happen to be most
frequent during the two annual
trips the Innu make to the Labrador
bush.
Happy Valley-Goose Bay mayor
Shouse claims the 'Innu lifestyle' is
history. 'They're not living the
traditional lifestyle," he said.
"They're living the rich sportsman's idea of a vacation at someone else's expense," said
Shouse, who said "government is
bending over backwards" to subsidize native hunting trips.
Ironically, the Innu are not
leading the life of their ancestors, as
they have been attempting to do for
some years. Training exercises deter
many hunting trips, and herds of
caribou are being scared away by
low-level flights.
According to Armitage, the Innu
think the provincial government is
as much of a threat as the military.
"The government does not
recognize the rights of the Innu,
and will not allow them to hunt
without permits in their own territory," said Armitage. "But they
won't give them the necessary permits. The Quebec government does
not require the Innu of their province to have permits to hunt their
own land."
Though Shouse has "a lot of
sympathy for the Innu," he said
Happy Valley-Goose Bay residents
can't afford to lose a possible base
in the area.
If approved, the base would
spark an economic boom in the
depressed town. David estimates
between 800 and 1,000 civilian jobs
would be created in spin-offs to the
base.
"It's made a tremendous difference in Happy Valley-Goose Bay
in the people's minds. It gives us the
stability we never had when the
British were here," said Shouse.
Somewhere between the debate
of native rights and economic
recovery is the peace movement.
Gene Long, a St. John's activist,
calls the situation in Labrador one
of the most frustrating the local
peace movement has ever encountered.
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"It's difficult to be taken seriously by the supporters of the base and
the media. Peace groups have been
slandered and misrepresented,"
said Long.
"Our concerns have been lost in a
fog of emotional debate, racism
and the demand for jobs and
economic development," he said.
According to Long, work by
peace groups is being tremendously
overshadowed by job prospects, all
too hard to find in Canada's
poorest province.
"Jobs are important, but at what
cost? Isn't there another way to
develop a community's economy
besides turning to the arms race?"
asks Long. "It's a failure of the imagination of the Newfoundland
government that they can not
develop an industry in Newfoundland that does not depend on
the military."
While Newfoundlanders have remained fairly apathetic to
militarization of Labrador — and
often scornful of protestors — the
people of Quebec have been
remarkably vocal in opposition to
military expansion.
"The Quebecois don't have the
same knee-jerk acceptance of the
military as English Canadians do,"
said Armitage, who claims there are
98 groups around the world opposing militarization in Labrador.
Most are concerned about threats to
native life and the environment, Armitage said.
David Benson, a member of the
St. John's Unemployment Action
Committee, says western Labrador
is being considered because most
European NATO countries would
not stand for such a base.
"They would never, never be
allowed to do it there, but they can
get away with it here because they
can dangle the jobs in front of us,"
said Benson.
Long said a NATO base in
Labrador would not only hurt the
environment  and  native ways  of
tween dosses
TODAY
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC hosts the University of Regina, 7:30 p.m.,
Thunderbird Arena.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, 12:30 p.m.. Brock
Hall 304.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch D212.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox
Rd.
PHRATERES
Bzzr   garden,   proceeds   to   charity,   4:00-6:00
p.m., SUB partyroom.
CINEMA 16
Film presentation,  "Flavor of Green Tea Over
Rice," Japaneses film, 7:00 and 9:00 p.m., UBC
SUB auditorium.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
THURSDAY
SIHK STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, 12:30 p.m., room 119 SUB.
PRE DENTAL CLUB
Registration for ski weekend and sizing for this
year's shirts — if you miss the meeting you must
contact an executive for information. Karen,
222 0966; Brian, 224-6562, noon, Wood 6.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk given by Bill Wilkinson, "Attunement
With Life," noon-1.20 p.m., Buch B225.
PHRATERES
Skating party — free, 9:30-11:00 p.m.. Winter
Sports Centre, Main rink.
PHRATERES
Speaker, "Stress and Time Management," Mrs.
Jo Ann Maurer, noon, SUB auditorium.
FRIDAY
PHRATERES
Panel on "Consequences of Drinking and Dri
ing,"
' noon, SUB auditorium.
A.M.S. CANADA GOJU-KAI KARATE
• PHYSICAL FITNESS
• SELF CONFIDENCE
•  SELF DEFENCE
Federation of All Japan Karate-Do
Member National Karate Assoc, of Canada
MEN & WOMEN
Beginners Welcome
Plaza North Room in SUB Basement
Classes Begin Jan. 5/87
Mon. & Wed. 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Practice Available Up To
6 Times Per Week
With Affiliates
INFO: 274-0908
LSAT/GMAT/GRE
EXAM TRAINING
Taught by Professionals and Educators
Application Essay Assistance
Local Offices & Staff
Lecture Format • Practice Tests
Tape Library • Low Tuition
Weekend Courses (Fri. evening, all Sat. & Sun.)
O
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(604) 684-4411
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(403) 278-6070
(Sexton
414-1200 Burrard, Vancouver
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hair and suntanning co    ,
Y 10 SESSIONS-$39 t
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I 'Offer valid with presentation of this ad! _ , „_ ■
Exp. Jan. 15 I
I -W- 1
life, but would escalate world tensions considerably.
"The military training in
Labrador represents a new stage of
full integration of nuclear and conventional war doctrine. This is a
threat to the entire world," he said.
"It's a sad reality that people do
not realize what their relationship
with the military is doing with
military madness hitting so close to
home," he said.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1987-88
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C.
students. Successful applicants will be required to live in the
residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions
are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at the
Front Desk of each single residence area: Totem Park, Place
Vanier, W.H. Gage, and Acadia/Fairview.
Applications will be accepted from January 5 to January 16,
1987 at the Front Desks of the Single Student Residences, or
at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
Eyeglass Boutique
3305 WEST BROADWAY
(at Blenheim)
VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
Tinted Contact Lenses
Soft Contact Lenses.
Extended Wear
Contact Lenses	
149
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* 179
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EYE EXAMINATIONS ARRANGED
STORE HOURS:
Monday/Thursday 9 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m
MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED
THE CLASSIFIEDS
|RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines. 1 day $2.75; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
\dassified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day |
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
75 - WANTED
WOULD YOU LIKE A FREE SKI
VACATION at Silver Star Mountain. Ph.
542-5880 (Patricia) for more information.
SLEEP ON A MOUNTAIN TOPI Ski from ,
lodge to lift & be the first on the slopes.
Weekend ski packages start from $121. Lift,
accom. & transpo. included. Call 542-5880,
Patricia.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
JOURNAL OF PROSTHETIC DENTISTRY
From 1966 to 1984. Phone 224-1918.
COACHING positions avail, for summer swim
club (Ladner). Please reply with resume &
qualifications: P.O. Box 115, Delta, B.C
V4K 3N5.
80 - TUTORING
FRENCH OR SPANISH courses with PhD.
student. Univ. & Continuing Education
experience. Oscar 738-4102.
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. SlO/hr.
30 - JOBS
PART-TIME babysitter required immediately.
Potential for full-time, April thru summer.
References 266-7378.
PART-TIME help needed to care for new
born twin baby girls & do light hse. keeping. Require 3 to 5 afternoons/wk, 4 hrs/-
day, time & days flexible, located in Dunbar. Start Jan. 19, 1987. 224-7532.
"NEEDED DISHWASHERS, PART-TIME"
Earl's Place on 10th Ave. at Trimble is looking for energetic employees. Apply in person before Fri. Jan. 9.
85 - TYPING
40 - MESSAGES
ATTN: KOREAN STUDENTS. Improve your
Korean on Sats. at Vancouver Korean
(Language) School. Two courses (Interm. &
Advanced) designed for univ. students begin
Jan. 10, 1987. For further info, see ad in Dec.
5 issue. The Ubyssey or call Mei Lee (683-8481
(wk), 294-8045 (hm)
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227 24
hours.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
SUPPORT THE
UBYSSEY! Tuesday, January 6, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
a-^P
A ^*4&i, H
.**-**•-''
We're the publication
that covers the UBC area.
News events, sports, entertainment — we cover it all.
But we need help.
(Do we ever need help!)
The Ubyssey can only
work through student im-
put. Students who care
about UBC and want to ensure that everyone at UBC
knows what's happening.
What's important. What's
news.
Anyone can help. Doing
almost anything. You can
gain valuable experience that you can use later
in your lifetime. And if you
don't know how to do
anything, we'd love to
show you how to make a
contribution to UBC's
newspaper.
But please hurry. We are
awaiting. Drop by room
241k in SUB now and
avoid the rush.
<-.  !»V-%^
The
Price
is Right
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3621 West 4th Ave.
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See the man.
See the man read.
See the man read an example of fine American
literature.
See the man laugh . . .
Why is the gentleman laughing? Perhaps he
realizes that no publication can compare with the
august publication, The Ubyssey?
Rugby
The rugby 'Birds, with the
highest scoring offensive in Vancouver first division, were held to
three points as the Meralomas bettered the varsity team 18-3 at Connaught Park last Saturday.
The experienced 'Lomas, fielding
seven internationals, used their size
to good advantage in controlling
the ball and denying UBC the ball.
"To be successful, we have to use
our fitness and run the other team
off the feet," says 'Birds coach
Barry Legh, "and we just didn't
win enough possession to do that.
The 'Lomas dinied us the ball and
they used their opportunities well."
The loss puts the Thunderbird's
record at 11-4, well ahead of last
year's pace, and the team leads the
competition in number of tries
scored.
THE DINER
Serving U. B. C. and West Point Grey for
the last 28 years
We put our Sole into your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Price — including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
and Sundays
1:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
4556 W. 10th Ave. - 224-19121
We accept Chargex |
THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
HIE SCHOOL
FOR WIVES
BY Moliere
JANUARY 14-24
Special Previews—
Jan. 14 & 15
2 for the price of 1
regular admission
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Box Office * Frederic Wood Theatre * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
for Lunch
or Dinner!
JERRY'S COVE
Neighborhood
Pub
Order any two of our delicious Burgers and receive the least
expensive one for absolutely FREE when you present this
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Expires Jan. 31/87
OFFER VALID 11:30am-1:30pmMon.-Sat.
4:00pm-9:00pm Mon.-Sat.
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734-1205
LOOK
FOR DELICIOUS
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with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
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PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
BRAND NAMK SOFT CONTACT LENSES
Daily Wear
79.95
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3302 Cambie (at 17th) 879-9494 r
Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6,1987
PURSUI THI TOTAL IXPIRIINCI
1987
A COMPRIHINSIVI NON-CRIDIT INSTRUCTIONAL PROORAM IN LIISURI PURSUITS
CALL 228-3996 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
Courses are available to all students, faculty, staff, alumni and their spouses. REC UBC Membership is required
for all faculty, staff, alumni and their spouses. All courses are open to ALL off-campus participants.
_ REGISTRATION for all courses will take place during regular office hours:
MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
REGISTRATION STARTS: Monday, January 5 - Friday January 9, 1987
LATE REGISTRATION: Monday, January 12 - Friday January 16, 1987
WHERE TO REGISTER: Room 203, War Memorial Gymnasium, UBC
, PLEASE NOTE: ,    ,              ,
(          :     < '          — Late registration does NOT ensure a place in the course. '             I
m  J — All classes are subject to last minute changes, cancellations.
r      A   "N                  — Classes will be CANCELLED on the following holidays. ,
!       i  !                              MID-TERM BREAK - Thursday, Friday February 19,20, 1987. (   I !
REFUND POLICY:
- We cancel, you get a full refund.
- You cancel, before 3:00 p.m. JANUARY 23rd (1987), there will be a $5.00 processing charge.
- THERE WILL BE NO REFUND ISSUED AFTER JANUARY 23rd (1987), without medical documentation.
COURSE & LEVEL
101
102
103
104
105
108
701
FITNESS &^$mg$fc.
Aerobic Circuit Training
Strength Training
Strength Training for Women
Strength Training for Women
Faculty/Staff Fitness
Rhythm Fit
Fitness Instructor (Certification $80.00)
201
202
203A
203 B
203C
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
216
217
ul
*~>l
<l
CC
t/3
>
Judo I
Judo II & III
Tai Chi I
Tai Chi II
Tai Chi III
Shotokan Karate I
Shotokan Karate II
Shotokan Karate III
Kung Fu (Shorinji Kempo)
Aikido
Kendo
Tae Kwon Do I
Tae Kwon Do II
Tae Kwon Do III
Wu Shu—Adults
Wu Shu—Children
Tayson—Shadow Boxing
Internal Martial Arts
RACQUET SPORTS
OUTDOOR PURSUITS
401
404
217
501
502
503
506
507
601
603
604
609
Sea Touring Kayaking 1
Open Water Field Trip
White Water Kayaking II
Open Water Field Trip
DANCE
Internal Martial Dance
Ballet I
Jazz I
Jazz II
Campus Dance Theatre
Ballroom I
ACTIVITIES
Learn to Skate ($40.00)
Yoga ($40.00)
Golf ($40.00)
Faculty/Staff Badminton
REC UBC card required—$30
701
702
CERTIFICATION COURSES
Fitness Instructor
(Certification $80.00)
St. John's Standard ($40.00)
$40.00 PER COURSE
Monday
Wednesday
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur
Mon/Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Fri
Mon/Tues/Thur
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
6:00-7
6:00-7:
6:00-7
6:00-7:
12:30-1
12:30-1
1:30-2:
4:30-5:
3:30-4:
12:30-1
6:00-10:
:30 a.m
:30 a.m
:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:00 p.m.
:05 p.m.
:30 p.m.
:30 p.m.
:30 p.m.
:30 p.m.
:30 p.m.
):00 p.m.
.-5:00 p.m.
.-5:00 p.m.
L
L
L
1
C
I
I
D
D
D
TBA
TBA
TBA
DATES (2nd Term)
Jan. 12-Mar. 30
Jan. 14-Mar. 25
Jan. 13-Feb. 12
Feb. 17-Mar. 19
Jan. 12-Mar. 26
Jan. 12-Mar. 27
Jan. 23
Jan. 24-Feb. 28
Jan. 25-Mar. 1
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur
Tuesday
Monday
Thursday
Mon/Wed
Mon/Wed
Saturday
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed/Thur
Wednesday
Saturday
Wednesday
Saturday
Wednesday
Saturday
Saturday
Tue/Thur
Tue/Thur
Mon/Wed
8:00-9:30 p.m.
8:00-10:00 p.m.
7:30-9:00 p.m.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
7:30-9:00 p.m.
8:00-9:00 p.m.
9:00-10:00 p.m.
10:00-11:30 a.m.
6:00-7:30 p.m.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
8:00-9:30 p.m.
5:30-6:30 p.m.
5:30-7:30 p.m.
10:00-11:30 a.m.
5:30-7:30 p.m.
10:00-11:30 a.m.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
1:00-3:00 p.m.
11:30-1:00 p.m.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
5:00-6:30 p.m.
A
Jan
13-Mar. 26
A
Jan
13-Mar. 26
N
Jan.
13-Mar. 31
A
Jan.
12-Mar. 30
N
Jan
15-Mar. 26
A
Jan.
12-Mar. 25
A
Jan.
12-Mar. 25
A
Jan.
17-Mar. 28
O
Jan.
12-Mar. 25
A
Jan.
13-Mar. 26
O
Jan.
13-Mar. 26
C
Jan.
13-Mar. 26
C
Jan.
14-Mar. 25
C
Jan.
17-Mar. 28
C
Jan.
14-Mar. 25
C
Jan.
17-Mar. 28
A
Jan.
12-Mar. 25
A
Jan.
17-Mar. 28
A
Jan.
17-Mar. 28
O
Jan.
13-Mar. 26
O
Jan.
13-Mar. 26
$55.00 PER COURSE
$40.00 PER COURSE
Mon/Wed
5:00-8:00 p.m.
Thur
Mon/Wed
5:00-8:00 p.m.
Thur
Tue/Thur
5:00-6:30 p.m
Tue/Thur
6:00-7:30 p.m.
Mon/Wed
12:30-2:00 p.m
Tue/Thur
12:30-2:00 p.m
Monday
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Mon/Wed
6:30-8:00 p.m.
J&R
J&R
$40.00 PER COURSE
Tuesday
Mon/Wed
Tue/Thur
Tuesday
Friday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Thursday
4:15-5:15 p.m.
4:30-5:30 p.m.
12:00-2:30 p.m.
8:30-11:30 p.m.
7:30-10:30 p.m.
6:00-10:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m-5:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
7:30-10:30 p.m.
O
N
N
N
N
N
Q
o
A
B
B
TBA
TBA
TBA
G
PLACE CODES:
A Gym E Osborne Centre
B Gym A Osborne Centre
C Gym B West Osborne
D Gym B East Osborne
E Gym F
June 8 & 10
June 11
May 25 & 27
May 28
Jan. 13-Mar. 26
Jan. 13-Mar. 26
Jan. 12-Mar. 25
Jan. 13-Mar. 26
Jan. 19-Mar. 30
Jan. 12-Mar. 25
Jan. 13-Mar. 24
Jan. 12-Mar. 25
May 5-28
Rec Card-enforced
Rec Card-enforced
January 23
Jan. 24, Feb. 28
Jan. 25, Mar. 1
Jan. 15-Mar. 26
FGymG
G Osborne Room 203A
H Osborne Room 203B
1 War Memorial Gym
K War Memorial Gym Room 213
L War Memorial Gym New Weight Room
M Armoury
N Armoury Room 208
J War Memorial Gym Room 211       O Armoury Room 203
P Tennis Bubble
Q Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
RPool
S Psychiatric Unit Theatre
T 2845 Acadia Street
U Weekend Excursion

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