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The Ubyssey Jan 30, 1973

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Array Students boycott talks
Student representatives on
the arts faculty committee
convened to discuss student
parity, walked out of the
meeting Monday, charging the
talks were meaningless.
Students issued a statement
saying "our function is
presently being limited by your
narrow interpretation of the
amended resolution" passed at
the Dec. 13 faculty meeting
establishing the faculty
committee on student
representation.
The representatives asked
faculty members on the
committee to vote on the status
of student members of that
committee,     to      approve
publication of material
discussed at these meetings, to
open them to all interested
students and to issue the
recommendation that:
"All representation of
students in the faculty
meetings and committees of
that body be parity minus one,
thus following the guidelines of
—mark hamilton photo
ENGINEERS DISPLAYED the biggest gas bag at UBC to kick off engineering week, Monday noon on the
war memorial gym soccer field. The hot air balloon was substituted at the last minute when both
engineering, undergraduate president Harold Cunliffe and classics head Malcolm McGregor failed to show.
The balloon, like the week inaugurated, never got off the ground.
the senate report requiring
faculty to be in an appropriate
majority where there is
student representation."
The statement said the
faculty was not prepared to
work with a "qualitatively
different attitude" with
students which makes student
representation     meaningless.
Dawn Hasset, a member of
the student committee said
faculty        and student
committees cannot be
reconciled because there are
two different approaches to the
problem.
"The faculty is traditionally
for minimum student
representation through formal
procedure. The student
approach is to have
participation of all concerned
parties through open meetings
and public hearings."
The student representatives
said they felt the final
recommendations to the
faculty with the student
committee playing an integral
part in those recommendations
would not be qualitatively
different than if they didn't
attend the meetings. "This is
because they refused to
recognize us as a negotiating
body.
"At that point we felt it was
more beneficial to the
students' position to
discontinue meeting the
faculty," they said.
The arts undergraduate
society will now encourage
departments and institutes to
organize implementation of
student representation
because of the senate report
allowing representation at all
levels of the faculty.
Committee formed
to investigate report
By JOSIE BANNERMAN
Administration president Walter Gage has formed a special
committee to investigate the findings of the recent report on the
status of women at UBC.
The report, released Jan. 23 by the women's action group,
shows women at UBC are discriminated against in terms of
•appointments, salaries, promotions and educational
opportunities.
Shelagh Day, former arts 1 instructor and author of the
report said of the committee: "It's exactly the response we
expected."
"Ours is a minority report, not a university report," Day
said. "A university report will have to be prepared before any
action can be taken. Hopefully the committee will work
quickly."
The president's committee, chaired by academic planner
Robert Clark, will:
• "Consider the validity of the assumptions made in the
report, the statistical methods employed and the conclusions
reached,
• "Examine the extent to which discrimination against
women, if any, is a result of university policies rather than
general policies in society."
Day said Monday she is encouraged by campus response to
the report. "Obviously people are taking the findings of our
report seriously," she said.
"The fact that a committee was set up so quickly is an
indication of this."
The committee consists of ten UBC faculty members.
Besides Clark, the members are: Alice Baumgart, school of
nursing; Lois Bewley, school of librarianship; James Kennedy,
computing centre; Julia Levy, microbiology; Peter Suedfeld,
psychology; Peter Lusztig, commerce; Jessie McCarthy,
health care and epidemiology; Ruth White, French and James
Zidek, math.
Clark said Monday: "All those named to the committee have
agreed to serve on it, but nothing further has been decided at
this stage."
William Armstrong, deputy administration president, said
the committee is broad based and representative of a wide
range of interests at UBC.
"The president has instructed the committee to study the
report very carefully and make recommendations to the
administration," he said.
"I personally question some of the statistical methods used
in the report," Armstrong said. "However, the president's
committee will examine and report on their validity."
Day said the report on the status of women at UBC is an
important beginning.
"We now have a document on which we can base our work,"
she said. "Our job has just begun;
AMS elections attract two slates
Two slates have already been proposed for the
upcoming Alma Mater Society elections.
On one hand is the Democratic Students Caucus,
led by arts undergraduate president Brian Loomes
for president. Running with him are Dawn Hasset,
arts 2, for vice-president; grad studies senator Stan
Persky for secretary; Diane Latta, arts 2, for
internal affairs; science senator Svend Robinson for
external affairs; Dave Fiddler, arts 4, for treasurer
and Charlene Moriarty, science 2, for ombudsperson.
Opposing the DSC will be the reigning Students
Coalition headed by current AMS co-ordinator Bob
Angus for president. Supporting him will be Pemmie
Mur, of nursing, secretary; John Wilson, commerce
3, treasurer; Debbie Rota, arts 3, internal affairs;
Bonnie Long, education 4, external affairs; and John
Keating, commerce 3, co-ordinator.
There is a possibility of a partial third slate by the
Young Socialists if their challenge of the
constitutional bylaw prohibiting political parties
from running for election is successful.
Elections for the first slate — president, secretary,
co-ordinator and internal affairs officer — will be
held Feb 7 and other positions will be filled in an
election Feb. 21.
Slates appeared to agree on several of their
campaign policies. AH say they agree to the principal
of student representation on faculty committees, but
disagree on the extent of representation.
The Young Socialist candidates said they want
parity on all levels and a general democratization of
the university.
But DSC and SC candidates said they intend to
study the matter further before deciding to follow the
issue. SC presidential candidate Angus said his slate
definitely wouldn't push for parity on tenure and
hiring committees.
"We want student in-put but not parity to the
committee," he said.
Detailed candidates' statements will appear in
next Tuesday's Ubyssey. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30, 1973
Hell-raising needed at union hall
By HELEN POTREBENKO
J. he Office and Technical Employees Union, local
15 meeting was held in the IWA hall Monday, Jan. 22
and although some members didn't receive their
notices until the day after the meeting, about 200
members were present. The president and
secretary-treasurer Opal Skillings sat on a stage in
front of and above us and had the only two
microphones in the place. Members who spoke from
the floor had to shout at the president who then told
the audience what had been said. Naturally, only
loyal members in the first two rows chose to speak.
The purpose of the meeting was to vote on a
motion to increase union dues. They are now $6 and
will be increased to $7, then $7.50. Several people in
the front rows spoke in favor of the increase but
thought it should be higher. After this, the president
seemed a bit embarassed that there was no
opposition. He asked for the cons to speak but we
couldn't because we had to shout. So then he asked
someone to tell us how OTEU dues compared with
other unions.
High, high, came a shout from the back.
He looked surprised and said other unions had
equal or higher dues.
They get paid a lot more, too, the voices from the
back shouted but then the opposition collapsed into
giggles.
J. don't know what salaries of other OTEU
members are like. I make $2.40 an hour and cannot
afford $7.50 a month plus the $15 initiation fee. In the
office where I work there is no job security, no coffee
breaks, and all sorts of other problems including
gross sexism. It may not be typical of OTEU
contracts, however, and in the non-unionized parts of
the job, people get even less money, work more than
8 hours a day with no overtime pay and suffer all
manner of illegal exploitation. The president said the
base rate of contracts was increasing with the rising
cost of living and that increases for people above the
base rate was even higher because they often
negotiated percentage increases in wages.
The reason the dues increase is necessary is that
it costs the local $10,000 a month just to break even.
They represent approximately 1,200 members.
According to the report of expenses for November
1972, the office's biggest single expense is salaries,
which came to $3,012.82. There are two men on salary
and at least two typists. The president explained that
in order to save money, the union had put the two
typists on part-time so that they wouldn't have to pay
their share of the pension plan. It was not suggested
that the two men take a salary cut, although they
understood that by increasing the dues, they are, in
effect, asking members to take a salary cut. But then
I suppose it is only the business of women to make
sacrifices.
Xhe second largest expense item was the per
capita disbursement to the international, which
came to $1,720.14. Organizing and negotiating
expenses came to a mere $153.58 in November. Costs
of parking and the car allowance for the president
was $112.
There was a whole lot of other business including
correspondence, and a report from the Vancouver
and District Labor Council. A trustee was elected by
acclamation and she took the oath of office which
included a promise to turn over the books to the
international upon lawful demand. The local
constitution also states that wherever the
constitution conflicts with the international union
constitution (Office and Professional Employees
International Union), it (the local constitution) shall
be inoperative and of no effect.
The president announced that the union should be
involved in community affairs because it
represented white-collar workers. Daycare was not
listed as one of these, nor was mention made at any
time of equal pay with men doing similar work. He
also said the union didn't have enough social affairs
and so there would be a wine and cheese party
following the next meeting. This was greeted with
enthusiasm and people even shouted he should forget
the meeting and just have wine and cheese. I was in
sympathy with these people as it is difficult to see the
purpose of such meetings if they aren't even going to
pretend there is membership involvement.
yT.ll this serves to illustrate the deficiencies of the
traditional trade unions which independent unions
and the Working Women's Association have been
describing for some time. Highly paid bureaucrats
are not aware of the problems of the workers they
are supposed to represent. International unions are
dominated from the States, and are not only not
international, but are undemocratic and leave little
provision for members to make their views known.
Both SORWUC (Service, Office and Retail Workers
of Canada) and AUCE (Association of University
and College Employees) by contrast, do not provide
for any permanent salaried positions so that no
bureaucracy can be created. (If anyone thinks this is
inefficient remember I get paid $2.40 an hour, get no
breaks, and work shifts.) All issues such as dues
increases would be decided by referendum so that
there was no possibility of stacked meetings.
Part of the reason that a union can become as top-
heavy and unresponsive as OTEU appears to be is
the apathy of its membership. But the women's
struggle has just begun and besides the alternatives
seing worked out outside the union, perhaps there
will soon be a women's caucus working to reform it
from the inside.
AUCE (Association of University and College
Employees) will hold an information meeting for
staff in the garden room of the graduate student
centre from 12 to 2 p.m. Wednesday. Jess
Succamore, national secretary-treasurer of the
Canadian Association of Industrial, Mechanical and
Allied Workers will speak at 12:15 and 1:15 on the
strength of independent Canadian unions compared
to the American unions. Free coffee will be served.
WARNER, ELEKTRA, ATLANTIC
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9903—Emerson, Lake and
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PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, January 30, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Women ignored, says sociologist
Women's voices are not
usually heard, but UBC
sociologist Helga Jacobson
said she hopes to rectify this
problem  through  the  now- framework    for    a    better ' and what they have to say,"
accredited   women's   studies understanding       and       an says Jacobson. "Women have
program. increased knowledge of who been left out of the picture of
"We   are   aiming    at    a women are, where they are the world too long."
MORE WORK for physical plant employees was created over the
weekend by a marauding band of engineers who spray-painted
windows in new Sedgewick Library. Workers managed to scrub off
—mark hamilton photo
mess by Monday afternoon. In case you don't know, it's engineering
week. Hopefully, physical plant won't have too much extra work
during the week.
Argentine army stifles freedom
By LEN JOHNSON
The press is not presenting an
accurate picture of the political scene in
Argentina, according to Daniel
Zadunaisky, spokesman for the
Argentina movement to defend political
prisoners.
Speaking in the SUB clubs' lounge
noon Monday Zadunaisky said there are
more important things than concern
about Juan Peron and Martin Bormann
in Argentina.
He said the main issue is the
internment of political prisoners and the
lack of freedom of expression.
The government, a military
dictatorship since 1966, has the right to
detain prisoners indefinitely without
trial upon declaration of a "state of
siege" which voids all rights contained
in the constitution and dissolves the
congress.
A "state of siege" may be declared in
times of internal commotion and the
only person with power is the president.
"Internal commotion" is not defined.
Zadunaisky said people may be
arrested for possession of subversive
literature or merely upon the accusation
of another person. Prisoners have been
arrested from all levels of society and all
walks of life, he said.
Prisoners are often kept in cells so
small that it is impossible to stand up.
Plumbing in the cells is limited and the
floor is often used in the absence of a
toilet. Medical attention is almost nonexistent and exercise is limited to 15
minutes per day. Books and
communication between prisoners are
not allowed.
People arrested on suspicion of
subversive activities are beaten and
tortured in attempts to elicit
information, said Zadunaisky. People
frequently disappear and later are
discovered dead or badly beaten.
Zadunaisky said although elections
are scheduled for March, the
government has placed such heavy
restrictions on them as to make them
almost meaningless. The military has
said in press releases that they plan to
exercise strong control over the future
government of Argentina.
"Argentinians need all the help and
international solidarity possible," he
said. Demonstrations in other countries
have proved effective in aiding the
release of political prisoners in the past,
he said.
Jacobson and three
colleagues, English prof
Annette Kolodny, anthropology
prof Dorothy Smith and
psychology prof Meredith
Kimball are responsible for the
organization of the women's
studies courses to begin next
fall.
Three-unit and six-unit
courses are offered involving
the study of English,
psychology, anthropology and
sociology. The classes will be
small, ranging from 25 to 50
students.
The second year courses are
open to all students. "We are
not opposed to having men,"
Jacobson added.
However, as yet neither a
degree nor a major will be
offered in women's studies.
"It is still an experimental
program. The expansion
depends on the kind of feedback we get from students,"
she said.
The evening women's studies
course will continue. "The two
programs are very different,
but they both complement each
other," said Jacobson.
"The course is intended to
fill in information gaps and to
tell people that we are here and
we are speaking," she added.
OTEU
signs
contract
The Office and Technical
Employees Union Local 15, and
the UBC administration
Thursday signed their first
agreement covering about 50
physical plant workers.
Local 15 president Bill
Swanson said in a press release
workers received a 16 1/2-percent increase in the one-year
contract, achieved with the
intervention of provincial
mediation officer Peter
Dowding.
Wage increases are
retroactive to June 1, 1972
when the contract begins.
Swanson said the union and
the administration agreed to
conduct a review of all job
classifications within 60 days.
He said the two parties
agreed any possible
upgradings would also be
retroactive to June 1, 1972.
Muck
The following is the second of a three-part series
written by a graduate student member of the
bookstore committee.
By ETHAN SCARL
When a careful accounting of the bookstore
losses was done two years ago, one large source of
revenue loss was a high stock shrinkage.
Shrinkage means any unexplained loss of
stock, including such things as shoplifting. By
coincidence the shrinkage just about equalled the
store's net operating loss so we got some ill-
advised headlines claiming shoplifting of $150,000
worth of merchandise caused the operating loss.
In fact there are other sources of loss, as was
pointed out in the last instalment, and shrinkage
is by no means entirely due to shoplifting. Failure
to bill, mistakes in billing and cash register
mistakes all contribute to shrinkage.
Nevertheless, shoplifting does exist, perhaps in
a greater proportion than at comparable
bookstores. One of the reasons for this is UBC
students feel they are being taken for a ride by the
bookstore, so take to shoplifting to return the
, ripoff.
What students should know is arrests are being
made at an average of about six per month, and
without exception those caught are handed over to
the RCMP, and in a majority of cases convictions
are obtained in the provincial court.
Penalties range: from mild to medium,
depending on the disposition of the judge, but of
course what hurts more than the sentence is the
criminal record.
At the moment the bookstore sees arrests and
criminal records as the only effective deterrent
regardless of its distastefulness.
There are two kinds of deterrents: One which
keeps an offender from repeating, and one which
is an example for others. In the first case no one
has ever been arrested for shoplifting twice at the
bookstore. On the other hand it is doubtful whether
arrests are deterrents to others, partly for lack of
publicity.
As to the overall effectiveness of the policy it
cannot yet be shown that prosecuting is reducing
total shoplifting. Shrinkage is being reduced but it
will be some time before this can be established to
be the result of a drop in the amount of stock
stolen.
When I talked to members of the Alma Mater
Society executive about the matter of students
going before courts, I sensed they had a basic
sympathy with the students. Some even expressed
delight with cases of students who had managed to
get off.
But overall, the executive said they supported
sending thieves up for trial without exception,
citing their own frustration in dealing with
vandalism in SUB.
Everyone seems to feel it would be nice if some
other method of handling shoplifting could be
found. Certainly, if prosecution is the answer no
student or administration operated court could
have the effectiveness of the provincial body and
the police.
Some suggestion has been made that a system
be worked out whereby violators be parolled in the
care of the bookstore and after completion of a
satisfactory amount of work at the store, be
released without a criminal record. Besides
providing some return to the store for the losses
suffered due to thievery this would certainly be a
less damaging way of going about punishment.
So far the bookstore has not indicated it will
change the policy of prosecution of all offenders,
but all suggestions will be considered. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30, 1973
Snit
There was supposed to have been a discussion
Monday noon on sexism at UBC and ways to combat it.
Engineering reps were supposed to have been there. So
were members of the women's action group. So were
interested onlookers.
The discussion didn't happen. The engineering reps
were there. So were the interested onlookers, presumably
eager and willing to discuss sexism at UBC and ways to
combat it.
But the members of the women's action group
weren't. It seems the group pulled a purple snit because
they weren't issued an invitation to attend the discussion.
And it seems they wanted an invitation because a group of
engineers tried to break up their last meeting.
We won't attempt to go into the intricacies of this
type of logic.
What matters to us is that there was an opportunity
to discuss the problem of sexism. And the women's action
group failed to make use of it.
The group also displayed a lack of common decency
by not appearing at a meeting where they were expected
to speak. As a result a lot of people who bothered to
attend a meeting on sexism probably won't bother again.
It's a great way to educate people about the women's
movement.
This sort of behaviour is expected from a small group
of engineers. It is not expected from a group of people
who claim to be seriously interested in changing our
society.
Finger
Well, it's Lady Godiva time again.
A group of engineers get their annual chance to assert
their "masculinity." They do this by paying a nude woman
to parade around campus on a horse.
The spectacle is hardly worth commenting on. Just
remember that if by some misfortune you should happen
to meet this sad procession, let people know what you
think about it. An upturned middle finger would be quite
suitable.
John Hancock
We have been getting a distressing number of
unsigned letters.
Our rule regarding unsigned letters is simple — you
don't sign them, we don't print them. Like all rules this
one is occasionally broken but generally we try to make it
stick.
The rule is unfortunate because occasionally we
receive a work of minor genius without a signature
attached. If you really want to remain anonymous, or are
humble, let us know and we'll make sure your name isn't
made public.
But we'd really like to know who you are because of
libel laws and other considerations which are too
frequently brought to our attention.
Besides, a lot of you have really funny names.
THI UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
This masthead editorial is abo>Jt John Andersen and Jan O'Brien and
why don't they do something about it. I mean you'd think with people like
Kent Spencer in high places (ho, ho) and authoritarian muskmellons like
Sasges running the show there'd be some light at the end of the tunnel for
these glaring inadequacies. Goodness gracious intoned Len Johnson, what
has become of us. People Like Gary Coull, Roger Mac Neil I and David
Schmidt sat around mumbling in muted tones about it but as Josie
Bannerman accurately realized, no good will come of it. Sue Manley and
Lesley Krueger reflected a moment. Pocket fluff said Palmer. Remember
those words. You'll be hearing a lot about them in the days to come.
©
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Letters
Rassle
After reading Ruth Hodgins'
letter to the editor, January 26, I
feel prompted to express my own
embarrassment towards the quality and content of the letter. In
my view, a criticism of a so-called
biased and misrepresentative article cannot have much validity if
the criticism is itself written in
terms both biased and unclear.
The article entided SFU lightweights rule supreme, by Forrest
Nelson, according to Ruth Hod-
gins, is based upon much misinformation regarding the SFU
team. Hodgins further entreats
Nelson to stop displaying his
ignorance. I would be interested
in knowing precisely what misinformation Hodgins is referring
to — the comments in the article
concerning wrestling ability?
According to Nelson's article,
"Anthony was cautioned before
the pin ... Anthony got away
with more than he was caught
for." This statement does not
slander Kim Anthony, whom I
personally feel is a gentleman off
the mat. On the contrary, Anthony was simply displaying the
wrestling experience that has helped him become a champion.
Again, referring to the article,
"Goldert seemed to be lured into
losing some points when SFU's
Coatta feigned slowness on some
of Goldert's double takedown's."
This does not do injustice to
Coatta, for in wrestling it is an
admirable quality to be able to
make your opponent underestimate your ability. Finally,
"Martin seemed to fake a pained
shoulder in order to gain his
breath - the ref fell for it. After
his rest, he vigorously attacked
Grist again, and quickly got a
pin." This technique illustrates
what helped Steve Martin to become a national champion, his
brain. When tired, he uses the
rules to his best advantage and
calls a rest. In this case, that rest
probably enabled him to win the
match. The whole point is, Nelson
was merely articulating some
wrestling techniques, not defaming the SFU wrestlers as Hodgins
seems to indicate.
As for Nelson mentioning that
the UBC team was not as well
conditioned as SFU's, I do not see
this as being particularly biased in
favour of UBC. If anything, the
comment is a tribute to the SFU
wrestlers' willingness to train
hard.
Finally, as a note of personal
reassurance to Ruth, when Nelson
stated that "Denc'an appeared to
be the more intelligent wrestler in
his bout against Bob Hodgins," he
did not mean that your brother is
not intelligent. He means that in
an attempt to compensate for the
obvious difference in strength,
Dencan had to rely more upon his
mental ability. The fact that Den-
can's strategy nearly worked is
inconsequential.
I therefore do not agree that Tuesday, January 30, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
SUB FILMSOC PRESENTS:
Nelson's article was biased and '
misrepresentative. I do however
suggest that Ruth Hodgins familiarize herself with a few simple
facts about the sport of wrestling
before she attempts to criticize
any further articles. Any questions will be gladly answered if
they are addressed to me, care of
the UBC wrestling team. Thank
you,
Mike Richey,
P.E.  1
Red
I was embarrassed to find the
picture in the Jan. 26 edition with
the phrase Gears and silly
grins ... take Lady Godiva for
ride. There I was on cloud nine
with the illusion that being part of
the "great and notorious UBC
engineers' gang" was something of
honor and great esteem to be
proud to be part of. What a laugh.
Who was I kidding anyways? If
you think racial groups are discriminated against then take a
second look at women and the
engineering undergraduate society's Lady Godiva ride. Are
women treated as human beings
or objects to be played with?
Tradition does not justify the
Lady Godiva ride (and neither
does payment for "services"). It
discriminates, degrades and utterly disregards respect for women as
human beings.
I suggest the Archie Bunkers of
the EUS (and anyone else) read a
book called Lottery, then take a
deep look into yourselves and
your values (if you cannot read,
the film is available from the
National Film Board of Canada).
B.P.
science 2
Blood
I am writing this letter in disgust at the attitude of the so-
called "educated" people. Here
they sit at the great and wonderful UBC theorizing about all the
problems of the world — Vietnam,
women's lib, etc. Yet when it
comes right down to doing something — where are they? We have a
great opportunity to help our
fellow man by giving one half
hour of our time to donating one
pint of our blood. The turnout is
so poor I really wonder how
people   can   honestly   complain
about  "situations" without  ever
trying to change or help them.
Don't get me wrong, I have a
great respect for UBC and all we
stand for. And I do realize that
apathy is worldwide. But here at a
place where people have a chance
to be really objective and
"human" — it makes me sick to
realize how many of them care in
words only (just so long as they
needn't take any action themselves), especially with such a
blood shortage.
If these people are so "people-
oriented" in their values why
aren't they out doing something
instead of sitting around complaining.
So get off your fat asses and
donate.
Wim Jellema
applied science 1
Women
It seems unusual that Ms. Neu-
man and the women's lib sorority
are complaining about another
woman making fifty or a hundred
dollars for an hour's work when
they are demanding higher wages
for other women. It may be that
because these ladies don't have
the physical assets needed for the
job but it seems unreasonable to
try to prevent someone else from
taking the opportunity. In future
we may expect to see a revitali-
zation of the anti-saloon league
and the union of the Wreck Beach
observer and complainer society
and women's lib all trying to
dictate public morals and attitudes.
Lawrence Milne
commerce 1
Crows
I would just like to mention
the disgust I feel when I see
several brave boys leaning out the
windows of the civil engineering
building displaying their puerility
by harassing with obscene noises
and comments every girl that
walks by. It's too bad these crows
have nothing better to do with
their time than make life miserable for other people. Incidents
such as this go a long way in
contributing to the sick image
projected by the engineering
undergraduate society. All the
urban cars and blood drives in the
world cannot unmake this image
GENERAL GRAD CLASS MEETING
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1st
12:30 HEBB THEATRE
Discussions on
• SOCIAL PROGRAM
• GIFTS & GRANTS
COME AND EXPRESS YOUR VIEWS
rr w rr
ExportA
CANADA'S FINEST CIGARETTE
WARNING: The Department ot National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health
increases with amount smoked.
while such uncivilized behaviour
continues. It makes me ashamed
to wear my read when I have to
wear that image.
M. J. Kelly,
applied science 3
Biggs
Congratulations to your new
(or at least heretofore unseen)
Page Friday record columnist
Mike Biggs on a real fine
review (Rocking Rivers, Jan.
12).
It has been regrettably rare
in your record spots to see a
write-up displaying such good
taste as to choice of material
and such obviously informed
critical insight.
More power to Mr. Biggs! I
look forward to hearing more
from him on future Fridays.
Next he'll probably look at
someone like Jesse James
Winchester. No . . . that might
be a little loo much to expect.
Doug Moore
education 5
feHtoiAfti
Specialized Service
FRANK ZAPPA'S
I
•
FEB. 1-4
■£■        WOULD
Thurs. 7:00
M           YOU
Fri. 7:00 & 9:30
H9   TAKE YOUR
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Wifm       MOTHER
Sun. 7:00
WT             TO THIS
«vl
m*           MOVIE?
Only 50c
RESTRICTED
SUB AUD.
STARRING
THE MOTHERS OF INVENTION •
RINGO STARR
THEODORE BIKEL
UBC's Musical Theatre Society Mussoc
presents
PROMISES,
PROMISES
FEBRUARY 1 — 10
CURTAIN: 8:30 p.m.
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM
STUDENT PERFORMANCES FEB. 5, 6/8:30
FEB, 8/12:30 p.m.
TICKETS 1.00/1.50 - THUNDERBIRD SHOP (SUB)
You are invited to attend
OUR ANNUAL ANNIVERSARY
BOOK SALE
Thursday - Friday - Saturday
February 1st - 2nd - 3rd
DAILY TILL 9 P.M.
50% OFF
ALL BOOKS
Every book in the store will be on sale
Choice of thousands of hardcover books
DISCOUNT BOOK CENTRE
(Corner 17th Avenue)
3297 Dunbar Street VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phoenix '73 presents . .
WIED.
JAN. 31
PONDEROSA NIGHT
BOOTHS - GAMES - ENTERTAINMENT
at Ponderosa Cafeteria - 8 P.M. - 1 A.M.
Only 50c — Tickets in advance SUB Main Floor
THURS.
Feb. 1
SKI FILMS — SUB AUD. Noon 254
FRIDAY
Feb. 2
DERRIL WARREN — SUB 207/209 Noon
Leader Conservative Party of B.C. — FREE Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30, 1973
Hot flashes
Morrison on
women, low
Provincial court judge Nancy
Morrison will speak on women
and the law, 7:30 p.m., today, in
the SUB ballroom.
Admission to her lecture, this
week's feature, in the women's
studies program, is 25 cents.
Open house        Bedlam songs
Volunteers are now being
recruited to act as tour guides,
booth operators, and general
helpers for UBC open house 73,
March 3, 4, 5.
Drop by and sign up 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Monday to
Friday, in SUB 100A.
"A song from bedlam", is the
title of a poetry reading by
Raymond Clarke and Rig Hughes,
noon, Wednesday, in Buch. 102.
The reading will be from
"Jubilate Agno", an 18th century
poem written by Christopher
Smart while in St.Luke's hospital
for the insane.
'Tween classes
TODAY
CANOE and KAYAK CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
ECKANKAR
Eck and herbs, 7:30 p.m., SUB 211.
EXPERIMENTAL. COLLEGE
Future  of the college, noon, SUB
111.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Judge  Nancy   Morrison  on  Women
and    the    law,    7:30    p.m.,    SUB
ballroom.
GO
Meeting, noon, SUB 216.
SAILING CLUB
Film:   Australia   18-footers,   noon,
SUB 205.
DIVINE LIGHT MISSION
Guru Maharaj Ji will show you light,
7:30 p.m., IH room 402/404.
CUE
Writing   term   papers,  essays,  etc.,
noon,  Mildred  Brock room, Brock
Hall.
NEWMAN CLUB
Communication    workshop,   noon,
SUB 105B.
WEDNESDAY
FREESEE
Last film  in the Civilisation series,
.noon     and     1:35     p.m.,     SUB
auditorium.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Rev. Powell on capital punishment,
noon, SUB 213.
ONTOLOGY
Conrad   French   on   beyond   man's
intellect, noon, Buch. 216.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
KUNG-FU
Practice, 4:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
THURSDAY
MEDICAL UNDERGRADS
Lecture on population control and
family planning, noon, I.R.L. 2.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Two films on Taiwan, noon, Buch.
104.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film:    Un ipays    sans    bons   sens,
noon, Buch. 102.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square-dancing,    noon-2:30    p.m..
Clubs lounge.
GRAD CLASS
General     meeting,     noon,
Theatre.
CCF
Meeting,   group   fellowship,
SUB 211.
WARGAMERS
Fun, noon, SUB 119.
AQUASOC
Meeting,    underwater   film,
SUB 205.
Hebb
VALUABLE COUPON
2 DINNERS FOR THE PRICE OF 1
AT THE
ADMIRAL   HOTEL
HARBOUR LOUNGE 4125 E. HASTINGS
Clam Chowder
Salad-Dressing
LOBSTER TAILS
Risotto Rice
Sherbert, Beverage
$8.35
5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
(By Reservation) 298-7232
POOP   DECK   CABARET
FRI & SAT NIGHTS WITH
5th Ave. Muscle
Clam Chowder
Side Salad-Dressing
SIRLOIN STEAK
Baked Potato, Sour Cream
Onion Rings
Sherbert, Beverage
$7.35
+BLEED +
RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE
ALL WEEK IN SUB
DELIGHTFUL FOOD
RESTAURANT
Genuine Hong  Kong Bar-be-cue &
Salt Baking Chicken
Chinese crisp roasted duck & Won
Ton Mein
HIGH QUALITY — LOW PRICE
277 E. Pender
684-1916
SHALAL
presents
AN INTRODUCTION TO
SENSITIVITY GROUPS
Come Meet And
Experience With Us
Weekly Starting Jan. 31
8:00 P.M. - YMCA
955 BURRARD
$2/Evening
EXHIBITION OF GERMAN BOOKS
3,500 LATEST TITLES
JAN. 30-FEB. 11
ADMISSION-FREE
VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY     '
750 BURRARD STREET
MON.
-FRI.
9:30 A.M.
-9:30 P.M
SAT.
9:30 A.M.
-6:00 P.M
SUN.
1:00 P.M.
-5:00 P.M
A series of German films with English sub-titles
will be shown Feb. 1, 6 and 9 at 8:00 P.M. in the
Library Auditorium. Open to the public.
Do Something For Someone —
LAST WEEK OF UBC
BLOOD DRIVE
SUB 8.30 - 4.30 Continuous
Do Your Part To Help — TODAY
Afraid of Virginia Wootf?
see MIKE NICHOLS'film
Who's Afraid of
Virginia Woolf?
THURSDAY, FEB. 1 — 12:30
Old Auditorium Admission 50c
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional tines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 Unas, 1 dsy $1.50; additional tines
35c; additional day* $1.25 & 30c
Classified ads tare oat accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 atH.tke day before publication. f
Ptmxttont&ffke, Room241S.U.B., UBC, Vat. 8.B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
LOST: EMERALD ENGAGEMENT
ring. Sentimental value. Reward.
Phone  278-6681.	
Rides & Car Pools 14
Special Notices
15
CATAIN VANCOUVER CLUB —
Two for the price of one books
distributed by Assoc. Room 100B,
SUB.	
LARRY: MET TOU ON THE TRAIN
to Jasper in Aug. 72. Please contact—Celeste—6210 Curtis St., Bur-
naby  2, B.C.	
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-PM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 732-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.
SKI TODD
Mid-Term   Break:   Transportation,
Motel,   Three   days  skiing  —   $53.
Phone   Deedee,   987-4807.	
BREAK THE CIGARETTE HABIT
comfortably — No weight gain or
nervousness. Smoke Watchers, 688-
5821.
Special Events
15A
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS  TODAYI
Bookstore and SUB
THE POPPY FAMILY WITH PAPA
Bear is coming on Friday, Feb. 9,
8:30 p.m., War Memorial Gym.
Tickets only $2.00. Poppy Family,
Poppy Family, Poppy Family, Pop-
py Family, Poppy Family.	
Travel Opportunities 16
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
I960 VW, GAS HT., BEETLE, RE-
built engine, transmission, very dependable, mechanically excellent.
Asking $150.00, offers, Pete 224-7686
Motorcycles
25
FOR SALE, TWO HELMETS, $6.00
each, and windshield for small
motorcycle,   $8.00.   Phone   732-0928.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
tfje Hmti anb'.&fyutter
Camera*
IT'S SNOWING!
SOMEWHERE
SKI    TIME
CAN    BE   PICTURE
TIME   —   WITH   A   MINIATURE
AUTOMATIC   35mm    CAMERA
Konica   C 35 from      $74.50
Olympus 35 ECR ~~    99.50
Ricon Hi-color 35, with
motor   drive        69.50
Fujioa Compacts     75.95
All above  include case.
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates. Mrs.  Ellis, 321-3838.
ESSAYS TYPED. NEAT ACCURATE
work. 35c per typed page. 325-9976.
If I'm out leave your phone num-
ber.	
TYPING; ESSAYS, THESES. CALL
Donna, 266-4929, Kerrisdale area.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends  and   evenings   263-4023.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
Essays,  term papers, etc.  224-7918.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
COUPLE FOR PART-TIME MAN-
aging, 13 unit West End apartment block. % rent credit for 2
BR. manager's suite. Children welcome. Telephone 327-1554 after 6:00.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR MAN ONLY. BSMT.
Warm, quiet, private entr., near
gate—ready  now—224-7623.	
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, $50.
Kitchen, etc., $90/couple. Phone
Frank, 224-9549. Visit 5745 Agronomy Road.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity
House, 5765 Agronomy Road. Reasonable rates. Color TV. Laundry
facilities. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:00
for  details.
Furnished Apts.
83
MATURE, INDEPENDENT FE-
male wants roommate, same. February-April, West End apartment.
Partial transportation provided,
684-3770.
Unf. Apts.
84
Communal Housing
85
GIRL NEEDED To SHARE HOUSE
immediately. Rent $62.50, own rm.
Area:   29th   and  Dunbar.   224-3166.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL — BUY
INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, January 30, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
—mark hamilton
THUNDERBIRD CENTRE John Mills (25) fights Mike Frisby and
Steve Panteluk (54) of the University of Alberta for the ball during
Sunday's basketball game. Birds lost, 67-54.
Rally tough
competition
More than 1,000 miles of B.C.'s roads will be encountered by
more than 45 drivers in the 16th annual Thunderbird rally,
organized by the UBC sports car club.
One of Canada's five national championship events, the
rally attracts competitors from as far east as Quebec and as far
south as California. Last year's top place finishers, Taisto
Heinonen of Vancouver in a Renault Gordini, and Cliff Hall of
Seattle in a Swedish Saab, can expect tough competition from
Eastern Canadian driver teams.
Thought to be the toughest winter rally in Canada, this
year's Thunderbird will begin at the SUB loop at 3:30 p.m.
Friday. From Vancouver the rally proceeds to the Princeton
area, where it takes to B.C.'s back roads.
Encountering various conditions ranging from gravel and
mud to ice and deep powder snow, the rallyists will arrive in
Kamloops early Saturday morning. After a brief rest, the
surviving rallyists continue their journey over more of B.C.'s
roughest roads.
Finishing in Kamloops, Sunday morning, the drivers will
have a chance to recuperate before the rally breakfast, and
presentation of $900 prize money.
Score card
WEEKEND GAMES
Basketball
UBC 54, Alberta 67
UBC 51, Alberta 72
Victoria 62, Lethbridge 78
Victoria 55, Lethbridge 79
Calgary 65, Saskatchewan 63
Calgary 74, Saskatchewan 69
CWIAA Standings
W    L   GTP
Alberta 11     3     6
Lethbridge 10     4     6
UBC 7     5     8
Calgary 5     9     6
Victoria 3     9     8
Saskatchewan 2     8   10
Ice Hockey
UBC 6, Calgary 5 (O.T.)
Victoria 3, Calgary 14
Victoria 1, Calgary 5
Saskatchewan 1, Alberta 8
Saskatchewan 2, Alberta 9
CWIAA Standings
W   L GTP
Alberta 13     3     8
Calgary 12     6     6
UBC 10     7     7
Saskatchewan 6    8  10
Victoria 0   17     7
Soccer
UBC 4, Paul Taylors 1
PCL Standings
Victoria Gorge
Victoria West
New West Blues
North Shore United
W L T P
6 3 1 13
6 2 0 12
5 3 0 10
4     3     0     8
UBC 3     2     17
Inter Italia 2     8     0     4
Paul Taylors 15     0     2
Intramurals
The unit managers meeting has been
moved to Tuesday, Jan. 6.
Women favored
The UBC Thunderettes will
have a six point lead over the
University of Victoria Vikettes
going into the Canada West
University Women's Volleyball
Championship next month in
Lethbridge.
The Thunderettes, defending
champions, picked up 16 points
for placing first in the first half
of the tournament played in
Victoria Saturday night. They
edged Victoria 15-9, 19-17 in the
final game, giving them a 5-0
won-lost record to Victoria's 4-
1.
Overall winner of the two-part
series goes to the Canadian
inter-collegiate championships
in Arcadia, N.S. in March.
Birds beat
Canucks for
excitment
By RICHARD
KRANABETTER
Some fans say the hockey
Thunderbirds are more
entertaining than the
Vancouver Canucks. The
exciting Friday night game
with the Calgary Dinosaurs
gave credibility to this view.
Alex Dick, standing in front
of the net, scored the winning
goal easily when set up by a
Brian DeBiasio pass from the
corner. DeBiasio was the star
of the game, scoring two goals
as well as setting up the
winner.
The Birds came out hitting
and dominated the first period
deserving their 2-0 lead.
Calgary had only three good
scoring chances in the first
period.  '
In the second period, the
Birds stopped hitting. Calgary,
a fine skating team, came up
with three goals after Craig
Thomas had scored the Birds'
third marker. He beat the right
defenceman and scored from a
difficult angle.
The Birds dominated the
third period going ahead 5-3.
Calgary, although outplayed,,
managed to get two goals on
deflections. This set the stage
for the overtime period.
BINGO
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Camosun
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE?
Ph. Mrs. Joan Bentley-224-0255
RUTHERFORD-McRAE
733-8181
CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
WITH THE
GOVERNMENT OF SASKATCHEWAN
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
The Budget Bureau has openings for university graduates
(doctorates, masters and baccalaureates) with high potential
who are looking for a challenging and interesting career
opportunity. The work is analytical in nature and involves the
evaluation of government programs, the review and control of
budgets, and assistance to the Treasury Board, Cabinet and
departments in developing solutions to a wide range of
problems.
There is also a limited number of positions in other branches
of the Department of Finance which will appeal to graduates
with an interest in management improvement, taxation and fiscal
policy, investment and debt management, and personnel policy.
While the positions may be of particular interest to those
in Economics and Commerce, graduating students in ALL
FACULTIES are invited to apply.
Starting Salary $8,000 and up
depending upon qualifications and experience.
Representatives of the Department of Finance will visit
the campus on FEBRUARY 14, 1973. For an appointment
and further information, contact your Student Placement
Office.
HIKERS, CAMPERS
CLIMBERS, SKIERS
WAREHOUSE SALE
Vs to 7z OFF HIKING and CAMPING EQUIPMENT
50% OFF LEFT-OVER SKIING EQUIPMENT
Vs OFF CLIMBING ROPES, CRAMPONS
HIKING BOOTS and ACCESSORIES
UP TO 50% OFF CLOTHING,
INCLUDING HIKING and SKI JACKETS,
PONCHOS, SOX, SKI PANTS ETC.
USED CAMPING RENTAL EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE
ALSO CANOES - PADDLES, ETC.
TEPEE RECREATIONAL CENTRE
1605 W. 5th Ave., Vancouver, B.C. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 30, T973
Eating grapes of discontent
By LINDA HOSSIE
I wouldn't call the reactions to
inflationary food prices grapes of
wrath, exactly, but I might call them
grapes of discontent, and now that few
people can afford to buy grapes of any
description the time is ripe for a
revised look at the present methods of
food pricing and marketing that neatly
harvest and package the consumer as
well as the groceries.
Just such a glance was .taken by
Gary Rush, Simon Fraser University
sociology professor, and students of a
public opinion course, who published a
study called Supermarket Storybook
last June. The study analyzes the agrobusiness corporations that control, over
50 per cent of all production,
processing,   packaging,   wholesaling,
control the market, unrestrained
competition and price-cutting are
irrational and destructive. If increased
profits are not to be gained from a
larger share of an existing market, the
only way to ensure the goal of greater
profit is through increased prices.
Thus, under monopoly conditions, the
only way that prices can go is up. In a
classical capitalist economy, prices
are determined by what the consumer
will pay. In a monopoly capitalist
economy, prices are determined by
what the traffic will bear."
"What the traffic will bear" turns out
to be astonishing variations in price
from region to region. Safeway stores
charge higher prices for food in the
lower income Grandview area because
there is less competition (there is little
Cheap food
Buy-Low,
3151 Arbutus,
Vancouver
Sunshine Market,            Euguen Farmer,                Vincent Foods,
3135 Oak,                       2754 West Fourth,            1036 Robson,
Vancouver                        Vancouver                          Vancouver
Davies Bakery,
6635 Main,
Vancouver,
327-2340
Sing Lee Fish Market,                      Paramount Salvage,
433 Gore,                                         339 Railway,
Vancouver                                          Foot of Main - 682-6741
682-1535
shipping, warehousing and retailing
facilities in Canada.
According to the study, the three
largest food marketing corporations in
Vancouver are Safeway, George
Weston Ltd. (which operates Super
Valu, Shop Easy, Mini Mart and other
companies) and the Independent
Grocers Alliance or IGA.
"In a situation where a few giants
money to go around, so there are fewer
stores) and because people in low
income areas don't have the time or
means to travel to other parts of the
city to shop and compare prices.
The difference in price for a year's
supply of meat from the independent
meat market in Surrey as compared to
the cost of a year's supply of meat from
Safeway in the  Grandview  area  is
-M nrxi
linnnn
CO-OPS ... best group alternatives
$164.32 — the cost of a side of beef.
Similar discrepancies exist in the
prices of produce and canned goods.
Safeway is not the only culprit. All
major food chains have different prices
Prices are higher on weekends, when
most people shop. Even numbered lots
are priced at odd numbered prices (two
for 45 cents) so people wanting only one
item have to pay the extra half cent.
Items are often sold in varying
measures (by the pound at one store,
"each" at another) to make it difficult
to compare prices.
Regardless of this seemingly selfless
system of shareholding, the basic goals
of corporations are the same as those of
the "robber barons" — to maximize
profit.
"One of the common arguments in
favor of corporate capitalism is that,
because of rational, automated and
volume production, the unit cost of
products can be decreased. This saving
can then be passed on to the consumer
through lower prices."
In order to keep profits within the
corporation, food corporations are
gradually taking over or investing in
all aspects of production, distribution
and sales. They are also expanding into
unrelated but prof itable areas "such as
drug        manufacturing, paint
manufacturing and even finance.
Company executives and board
members are executives in, or sit on
the boards of other corporations, which
is a subtle but efficient way of
and   controlling    the
influencing
economy."
This   kind
influence  is
MUSIC ... faster as time flys
of mass control and
called "agro-business".
The parent U.S. owned Safeway owns
Canada Safeway Ltd., which in turn
owns Canada Safeway  International
Finance Corporation, MacDonalds
Consolidated Ltd., Jasper Dairy Co.
Ltd., Wingate Equipment Lessors Ltd.,
and indirectly, through MacDonalds,
Clearbrooks Frozen Foods Ltd.
George Weston/Kelly Douglas
(Super Valu) owns Westfair Foods
Ltd., Mini Marts Ltd., Western
Groceries Ltd., W. H. Malkin Ltd.,
Shop Easy Stores (B.C.) Ltd.,
Marven's Ltd., Imperial Cone Co. Ltd.,
Weston Bakeries Ltd., and E. B. Eddy
Co. Ltd.
Weston interests also include food
and housekeeping catering at
industrial sites, packaging, display
materials, toys, games, automobile
parts, dairy and farm industries, retail
drugs, fish and meat packing and on
and on.
Dominion Stores operate the same
way and the directors and officers of
the Dominion chain are widely
represented in financial  institutions.
The study presents one practical and
emotional solution to this particular
domination: co-operative food buying.
"This kind of collective effort has a
great potential for alleviating the sense
of powerlessness and alienation that
people face in modern society. Success
in one co-operative venture can lead to
other meaningful alternative life styles
— daycare centres, car pools,
communal housing etc. The present
economic system is geared to put
people into acquisitive competition
against each other.
But don't hold your breath. There are
low price outlets in Vancouver now.
Rush's study lists several, and more
are developing all the time. Don't settle
for grapes of discontent when the wine
of revolution is at hand.
SENTENCE!
Abortion kills
Babies but U.S.
Supreme Court
Rules Killing Okay?
WHY DON'T YOU JOIN
RIGHT TO LIFE
ACTION GROUP?
Wed. Noon — Jan. 3
SUB Room 105B
Stan Kazun 266-8676
Bernice Gerard 266-9275  8
aoooooooooooooooooooodl
A
PROBATION
OFFICER
has a tough challenging but rewarding career. He works with
the courts, with the offender, and with the community to help
solve one of society's major social problems - crime.
If you think you could measure up for training with the
B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for more details
INTERNATIONAL EXTRAVAGANZA
FRI. FEB. 2
8:30 p.m. .
SUB BALLROOM
Come    to    a    multi-cultural
evening and Dress Parade.
-Featuring  SINGERS,   DANCERS  and   FOLK  TALES  from
Africa, Japan, Yugoslavia, India, etc.
—Many colourful and unique natiohal costumes as well as a steel
band.
—Admission only $1.25.

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