UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1984

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127421.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127421.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127421-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127421-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127421-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127421-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127421-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127421-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127421-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127421.ris

Full Text

Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII. No. 17
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday. November6,1984
®<s*5sjg™fc' 48 228-2301
Layoffs, program cuts real
• i
ions
The termination of faculty and
the discontinuation of educational
programs are "reasoned responses"
to the anticipated budget deficit for
1985-86, said UBC president
George Pedersen in a memo released Monday to the university community.
Pedersen said in the memo he
cannot wait any longer in developing detailed financial plans for the
next fiscal year despite no firm indication of the size of the provincial
grant.
UBC faces a 1985-86 shortfall of
at least $6.6 million, Pedersen said,
adding this estimate may be too
low.   He  said  in  the  memo  this
the provincial operating grant, a
"reasonable" tuition hike and a
"modest" salary increase.
"At the present time ... to get a
zero per cent increase would be
good," Pedersen said in a Monday
interview. UBC's operating grant
was cut five per cent for 1984-85.
The administration has been told
to expect anywhere from a zero to
five per cent cut from last year's
amount, said Bruce Gellatly, administration vice-president finance
and administration. Despite last
year's five per cent cut the administration is still expecting a zero
per cent cut, he added.
"If we have another five per cent
Gellatly, "The situation would be
disastrous."
Pedersen has appointed Gellatly
and vice-president academic Robert
Smith to develop a plan to deal with
the short-fall. The plan must be
completed by Dec. 21.
In the memo, Pedersen said cuts
to UBC's budget must come from
salaries, which make up 86 per cent
of general operating expenditures.
And Pedersen said since attrition
can no longer be used to make up
the shortfall, two options are faculty and staff layoffs, and the cutting
of programs.
"I don't know how many staff
we intend to lay off because I don't
know what the average salary is,"
said Pedersen Monday.
Faculty association president
Elmer Ogryzlo said the association
is currently negotiating with the administration over what constitutes a
financial exigency, which would
allow termination of faculty under
1983 provincial government legislation.
"If there is a financial exigency,
faculty positions are not secure,"
Ogryzlo said when asked if tenure is
nullified.
"I would hope that one of
Pedersen's steps is a hiring freeze. It
would be unfortunate if hiring took
place during a financial exigency,"
Ogryzlo said.
Tennis courts lost $25,000
estimate is based on no change in   cut, we're in deep trouble," said UBC lost between $25 000 and
RNs' power dims
By PATTI FLATHER
Nurses are concerned with the
provincial government decision to
introduce legislation transferring
approval of nursing schools from
nurses to the education ministry.
Health minister Jim Neilsen
wrote the Registered Nurses
Association of B.C. in September.
He indicated he will change the
B.C. Registered Nurses Act to take
approval of the curriculum of all
B.C. nursing schools away from the
RNABC.
Nielsen's letter "took the association by surprise. There was no warning of any kind. There was no consultation," said RNABC board
member Ethel Warbinek.
Warbinek, also a UBC assistant
nursing professor, said, "1 think it
(the proposed change) bothers the
whole nursing profession. The
facutly at the university are very
upset."
Warbinek said no one knows why
the government plans to take on the
approval task, nor what they will do
with the nursing schools once the
act is changed. She said she is worried the government may not
recognize that because of financial
costs the Canadian Nursing
Association goal that all nurses
will have a baccalaureate by the
year 2000.
And the province may standardize different nursing programs offered at UBC. Community colleges
and Vancouver General Hospital
because they think they can save
money this way, she said.
Warbinek said when the RNABC
received notification the government changes seemed set. "It's
almost a fait accompli. It's going to
happen anyway." She said she does
not know if influencing the government to change their plans is possible.
But she said RNABC will try to
build controls into government
power by retaining control over
registration of nurses into the profession.
Jack White, RNABC public affairs consultant, said RNABC has
responded to Neilsen's letter and
has discussed the issue with the
government.
"Our position is that we would
prefer to see (approval) independent of government," said White.
He added RNABC is willing to bring other relevant organizations
such as employers into the approval
process.
Associate nursing professor
Sheila Stanton said the most important thing is for nurses to retain a
very powerful say in the approval
process. She said the current stage
of talks between the government
and RNABC is crucial for nurses to
maintain input, adding she did not
want to say too much because of
this.
Terry Moran, health ministry information officer, said the
registered nurses act is being reviewed by the government and RNABC,
but he said he knew nothing about
the transfer of approval to government.
$30,000 installing its new grass
tennis courts, the vice president
finance and administration said
Monday.
Bruce Gellatly said the physical
plant absorbed this sum when it
helped install the new tennis courts.
These costs included transferring
the lawn from the Vancouver Lawn
Tennis and Badminton Club to
UBC.
"Presumably the only ones that
will know the exact costs involved
are the groundskeeping staff,"
Gellatly said Physical plant supervisors were not available for comment Monday.
Absorbing   the   $25,000-$30,000
would further reduce physical
plant's budget that was cut by
$645,000 for 1984-85.
Assistant physical plant director
Chuck Rooney earlier told The
Ubyssey even garbage collection at
UBC is reduced this year due to
those cuts.
Gellatly said the entire installation of the courts cost approximately $90,000 but "approximately
$60,000 of that will have to be paid
back in the future."
He said that $60,000 was money
UBC withdrew from its short term
investment funds to hire a contractor. The contractor did much of the
work required to install the courts,
Gellatly said.
This included laying down a sand
base for the courts, placing a fence
around the four courts and planting
cedar saplings outside the fence.
Gellatly said user fees will pay
back the $60,000 and interest on the
money UBC would have earned if it
had invested these funds earmarked
for short term investments.
No member of the university administration has yet claimed
responsibility for making the decision to install the four grass tennis
courts at UBC.
UBC president George Pedersen
was in Germany in late June when
the courts were transferred.
IN A CLEAR EXAMPLE of adaptive evolution, an unidentifiable (read
on) UBC student opts to become a vegetable rather than face eight more
months of rain from a human perspective. Is the process reversible?
"We'll have to wait and see," said P. H. Dee, a biology professor.
Awareness week illustrates fine arts cuts
Fine performing arts students at
Simon Fraser University organized
a week to raise support against cuts
in their faculty.
Their student's union organized
Awareness Week from Nov. 5 to
Nov. 9 to "illustrate the variety and
quality of work done at the (fine
performing arts) centre" and "attention to the proposed cuts."
And performing arts faculty
and students are lobbying SFU administrators to have the cuts reduced. SFU plans to cut the fine performing art's budget by 33 percent.
Centre for the Arts director   Grant   Strate   and   faculty
members met SFU president
William Sayweil Monday "to get
him (Sayweil) to understand what
we do, which he doesn't," Strate
said.
Strate said the centre's contemporary nature is unique, and the
fact it offers programs in many
disciplines, such as dance, music,
theatre, and the visual arts is unique.
Sayweil agreed with the CFA
faculty regarding the excellence of
the centre's program Strate said,
but Sayweil claimed it was too expensive and had to be cut.
"Our  position  is the cuts  are
necessary," said Strate, "but one
third is too much." The cut is the
largest planned for any faculty at
SFU.
The president's advisory committee on university planning
report, which recommended the
CFA cuts, was "narrow, parochial,
prejudicial, and badly researched,"
Strate said. "It is a statement to the
world that you don't value the program."
Maggie Guzzi, a Fine Peforming
Arts Student Union member, said
she agrees with Strate's assessment.
"It's a question of concept," Guzzi
said. "They do not see it as integral
to the university."
The FPASU has scheduled dance
and improvisational theatre presentations, and clips of films and
videos done by students at the centre during the week.
Recently elected university senate
member Joan McKinley, dance 4,
will speak to the senate on the cuts
Monday night.
A rally is being held Friday at the
SFU Mall where NDP MP Svend
Robinson and CBC director/producer John Juliani will
speak and the FPASU is holding a
dance Saturday to cover costs incurred by the week. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6, 1984
U of S relaxes liquor ban
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
University of Saskatchewan administration has partially lifted a ban
on campus liquor permits, but has
enforced stiffer controls on liquor
functions following an alcohol related death on campus.
And student council president Al
Shpyth said the administration is
questioning students about their
plans for functions more than ever.
The ban, imposed Oct. 3, after
18-year-old Shawn Reineke died in
a U of S residence, and lifted Nov. 1
remains in effect for the building
where the death took place and
some nearby. Reineke died Sept. 30
after falling seven storeys down a
garbage chute. He was attending a
private party.
The administration also reduced
liquor function time limits from six
to four hours and will require
groups sponsoring campus events to
have liability insurance in most
cases.
Shpyth said he thinks mere is a
"new mentality" surrounding campus functions. "We (students) are
not the best judges of what is right
for the function being put on," he
said.
Shpyth said he thinks the continuance of the ban at some residences
violates students' rights as adults.
"I am yet to be aware of a direct tie
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Daily Blah reporters in this tiny island
community erupted in pleasure
Monday when Daily editor Chatti
Blather announced the return of
grey eminence and grand poobah
Beef Caldrey to this tiny rag.
Blather announced with some pride
that she had masterminded the successful return of this hack to the
beloved newsroom SUB 241k for an
editorial roast. Saturday at 1:30
p.m. is feast time.
between the tragic death of Shawn
Reineke and a special occasion
function. It's not fair."
Police have not released any new
information surrounding the death,
and administrators say the partial
ban will remain until the police inquiry is complete.
The new liquor permit regulations were set after the administration reviewed campus liquor functions. The review noted that "on
the whole it is well-managed and
controlled" and that "students
have shown themselves to be responsible," said university president Leo Kristjanson.
Shpyth said no students participated in the review.
Meanwhile at UBC, some students have won a temporary victory
in their fight against restrictions in
parties and drinking in residence.
After mounting a successful petition campaign against rules set by
the UBC housing office, Gage
Towers residence students will have
a "trial" beer night Nov. 14.
UBC's housing office put restrictions on alcohol consumption in
residence in September, including a
ban on all organized parties Sunday
to Thursday. The new regulations
also banned drinking games at organized social functions and require
professional bartenders for residence-wide parties.
Eighty per cent of Gage residents
signed the petition, which demanded changes in the new regulations.
Corky says:
"If money talks . . .
turn up the volume."
HAIR
CORKY'S
^YLIH<>
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD presents ....
THEATRE
TWELFTH NIGHT
By Wm. Shakespeare
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
NOVEMBER 9-17
(Previews - November 7 & 8)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Matinees/ 13th & 15th at 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets - $4.50
Previews/ 2 for the price of 1 Regular admission
BOX OFFICE    *    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    •    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
WARNING:
<#    %
^^m%
STUDENT
DIRECTORY
Available Now
at AMS Ticket Centre,
Science Undergrad Office,
residences.
$1.25
Tl
Jfe     Time is running ^&
-        out to get the best  ^gk
summer job ever!      ^w^
*
i --a^a:::-
J|j§ Money: v
Jill Job Satisfaction:
n
i
f
%
Management Experience:
Personal Growth
rj
Aapan \Jverdea5 C^uuurat^rddoclati
ddociation
JAPANESE LANGUAGE CLASS:  The lessons will be conducted
Tn either individua1 or small group classes.
INTRODUCTION OF ENGLISH TEACHERS TO JAPAN:  We assist
in the teaching contract with prospective institutes
in Japan.
Sffi, kf£m&,m   B * £ « & & ( 7 r » * •> S y»c±»JB*SO^
2-2580 Burrard St. Van. V6J 3J7    TE*L. 733-1746
For further information "P,
on other briefing sessions ▼*
in your area, call collect:     ^
w
(604) 879-4105
*■!■#
■■■■■■■
College
I Pro
i Painters
The most rewarding summer job of your life! Tuesday, November 6, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ontario teachers still on strike
TORONTO (CUP) — After
three weeks on the picket lines,
teachers from Ontario's 22 colleges
see no end to their strike, and one
union official says the government
is not taking the union's position
seriously.
Caught in the middle are the
120,000 full-time and 160,000 part-
time students who continue to be
shut out of classes and risk losing
their academic year.
Some programs with rigid certification standards, such as nursing
and Canada Employment training,
are most severely affected.
Despite these problems, teachers
are gathering much support from
students and morale is high among
the 7,600 faculty involved in the dispute.
"We don't have any control over
the Tory government, but what we
would prefer is for the Council of
Regents to take this situation seriously," said Katie FitzRandolph,
Ontario Public Service Employees
Union, representing the teachers.
The union is standing firm in its
demands for a 45-hour work week
for teachers, but the council, representing the government, refuses to
discuss the matter further.
The council examined the union
workload proposal but considered
it unworkable in the college situa-
CAPITAL PUNISHMENT ADVOCATE looks on with dismay when she discovers proffered tune is not funeral
march. Later effigy hanging of Beethoven consoled disconsolated Dead Kennedy's fan.
Student daycare centres in peril
VANCOUVER (CUP) — Some
parents and childcare workers in
B.C. say single mothers face incredible barriers to post-secondary education because the B.C. government
does not provide enough money for
campus daycare centres.
Lee McKay, a member of Vancouver's lesbian and feminist mothers' action group, said government
cutbacks in daycare subsidies mean
single mothers must often choose
between going to school and ensuring their children are well looked
after.
"If universities want to be accessible to women as well as men they
have to arrange some first-rate
childcare, otherwise the situation is
just not equal," McKay said.
Universities and colleges, she
said, are designed for students without dependents and many in B.C.
have substandard facilities for
children.
Although the Canadian Federation of Students-Pacific launched a
campaign three years ago urging the
government to upgrade daycare on
campuses, CFS-Pacific chair Tami
Roberts said subsidies have been
frozen since 1981.
The cutbacks have severely affected daycare facilities on two
B.C. campuses so far. At Kwantlen
College in Surrey, the on-campus
daycare centre closed its doors in
September, while the Simon Fraser
University daycare centre is selling
raffle tickets to pay for its maintenance and utilities.
Julia Sweet, former Kwantlen
College daycare worker, said the
centre workers staged bake sales to
keep the facility afloat, but it was
forced to close down this year when
the college administration refused
to guarantee salaries for workers
and keep the money from the children's fees for later supplies.
Sweet said the closure is symptomatic of the low priority given to
children and people who care for
them.
"Why do cashiers, for example,
make more money than us? We are
responsible for children. We are
helping to better society."
SFU daycare workers, however,
are more optimistic about their situation. Although they are faced with
a $66,000 cut in funding for maintenance and utilities over a three
year period, they hope they will
raise $10,000 this fall to upgrade the
centre's 10 large playgrounds and
provide bursaries to subsidize parents' childcare fees.
"The playgrounds have to be
safe,"   aid   centre   director   Joyce
Branscombe.
At the University of Victoria, the
daycare centre got a boost from students who voted last spring to kick
in a dollar per student per year to
fund the centre. Most of the money
will go to a five per cent salary increase for the workers at the student-run centre.
Although daycare centres collect
fees from parents that range anywhere from $100 to $500 a month,
most daycare workers earn the minimum wage. Crystal Saunders of
the Capilano College women's centre, a single mother herself, said the
wages are a reflection of the poor
government planning of daycare.
"It's not set up with any kind of
intelligent rationale at all. I think
we single parents are discriminated
against all the way down the line."
UBC's Alma Mater Society recently voted to put $350,000 into a
daycare program an AMS committee organized.
PUNCHLINES
FREE COMEDY
Tomorrow — Wednesday
12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM
WIN $ $ $ STUDENT JOKE-OFF
lion, said Bob Burnhardt, ministry
of colleges and universities staff relations officer.
Seneca College union spokesperson Ted Montgomery told a recent rally it is a now or never situation for Ontario colleges. "If we
don't stand up now, the quality of
education will slip-slide away until
their (students') certificates aren't
worth the paper they're printed
on."
Many teachers have taken to
wearing  buttons  with   the  slogan
"I'd rather be teaching."
The council has infuriated teachers by taking out province-wide
newspaper ads calling the strike
"unnecessary" and demanding union leaders call it off "before more
damage is done to the community
colleges and to the careers of the
students."
Union negotiator Ron Martin
says the council is wasting money
"in one of the most senseless ways
imaginable."
Students dislike
drop-add rule
Students biggest beef with UBC is
failing grades which are assigned to
students who drop a course after
the two week registration period
ends, recent questionnaire's results
say.
The Students for a Democratic
LIniversity's questionnaire says this
concern far outweighed any other.
They received 616 responses in the
survey conducted in the last two
months.
SDU spokesperson Alicia Bar-
sello said the survey was a success
because it outlined students' concerns.
But she added SDU did not conduct the survey scientifically and it
could only be used as a rough approximation of students' UBC dislikes.
The survey said the next most important student concerns are the
"high students-per-instructor ratio,
inadequate counselling and inade
quate registration procedures."
A majority of students surveyed
said a problem requiring change is
the high student-per-instructor ratios.
The questionnaire, entitled
About Quality of Education, asked
students about specific aspects of
UBC, including assignments, exams
and text sales. Barsallo said SDU
set up weekly tables in Sedgewick
library, Woodward library and
SUB to elicit student response.
Barsallo said the survey's results
provided SDU with a base on which
to organize student presentations to
UBC's administration and also established a rapport with interviewed
students.
"The next step is for more
powerful bodies like the Alma
Mater Society to conduct scientific
surveys on student concerns," Barsallo said.
University Women's
Club fights porn
The University Women's Club is
fighting pornography.
The UWC and other women's
groups met with corrections officials Thursday to demand pornographic material be removed from
corrections facilities.
But Correctional Services deputy
commissioner for B.C. James Murphy said he is not prepared to make
"moral judgments" regarding
prisoners' reading tastes.
UWC spokesperson Kit Stevenson said prisoners who committed
violent crimes such as rape and
child abuse have access to pornography depicting these acts.
"They are simply feeding their
appetite  for violence,"  she said.
"Pornography will reinforce their
violent nature. They will go out and
recommit their violence."
Stevenson said researchers in the
U.S. proved a direct relationship
between contact with pornography
and real violence.
Stevenson said laws dealing with
pornography must be improved,
education should be increased, and
current laws must be enforced.
In response to Murphy's remark
Stevenson said "Who will take responsibility if he doesn't?"
The UWC, along with other women's groups, are lobbying Progressive Conservative MP (Capilano) for action on the matter. Collins was "shocked" to learn of the
extent of pornography available in
prisons.
«fr
<$0
THE
MOLSON
INTERNATIONAL
SPORTS SEMINAR SERIES
AND
THE THUNDERBIRD BOOSTER CLUB
present
VIC BRADEN
A tennis lecture for UBC students,
staff & faculty
Thursday, November 8th
12:30 p.m. Woodward I.R.C. #6
One of the world's best known tennis coaches, Mr. Braden will present, what he terms "a million dollars of tennis research and a million
laughs," during a one hour show.
Tickets: $1.00 and are on sale beginning at 12 noon. Doors open at
12:30 p.m. and no one admitted after 12:40 p.m.
For more information call the UBC Tennis Centre at 228-4396 Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6,1984
' THE UBYSSEY '
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"The tap's broken," proclaimed Rory. "No, I fixed it," taunted Charlie. "We researched it," chorused Chris and Gordon. "One person at a time," declared Robert. "Uh huh," affirmed Monte. "What
about me?" asked Hui. "Don't mention it," replied Denise. "Stick to the topic," Patti reminded them.
"You too," retorted Mark. "I took the pictures," interjected Ingo. "Who gets the credit?" queried
Yaku. "Staff," answered Sarah. "Is that women staff?" chuckled Dave. "I'll rewrite it anyway,"
threatened Erin.
1984 again
It could be from a page out of 1984.
The Social Credit government which emphasizes private initiative and independence is gradually but insidiously acquiring more control over post-
secondary education.
The health minister's recent decision to take from nurses the right to
oversee their curriculum in colleges and to transfer this right to the education ministry is an example of this trend.
How can the education ministry know better than registered nurses how
to run the nursing programs? The health minister's proposal to change the
B.C. Registered Nurses Act shows a blatant disregard for the special
knowledge nurses have in their own field.
While one hopes that negotiations between RNs and the government
will lead to an intelligent compromise, the health minister's letter to the
RN's association announcing he will change the act without approval is not
a promising sign.
The nurses have not even been offered a reason for the proposed
changes.
This new move to change the act can only be seen as part of Social
Credit's move to centralize decision-making regarding post-secondary curriculum. The move fits in with two Social Credit acts passed in 1983 — the
Institute of Technology Amendment Act and the College and Institute
Amendment Act. These acts reorganized the governing boards of colleges
and technical institutes to increase provincial government influence and
decrease community involvement.
Nurses and other professional groups must defend nurses' rights to a
say in their own profession. The government should not determine the requirements for a complex, technical course.
The decision is frightening because its motives are unknown and judging
from the government's past performance it may think costs can be cut in
nurses' training. This may be true but the government should not take
lightly the policy of the Canadian Nurses' Association to make all nurses
baccleureate degree possessors by 2000.
A simple budget slashing may destroy this goal. More than that the
technical quality of B.C. nurses may be harmed by the changes.
And the quality of B.C.'s society will drop another notch.
Letters
Cyanide option a hazardous step backward
The UBC peace club's "cyanide
option" cannot be considered as
"one step better than doing nothing
about war" for in reality it proposes we make one step backward.
Though posed as a gimmick to draw
our attention to the threat of nuclear war, it is hazardous to the real
peace movement.
This club recommends suicide.
Today, many people, especially the
youth, really do despair for their future in the face of an alarming rising
social phenomena of our time, directly related to the anxiety generated out of the present severe economic crisis. This is nothing to joke
about.
The "cyanide policy" creates the
impression that war, nuclear and
conventional, is inevitable. It encourages us to give up and die. This
is fine for the superpowers.
While chattering incessantly that
they really want peace, the superpowers continue to arm themselves
to the teeth and are committing
murderous aggression all around
the world. The UBC peace group
readily complies to the call of the
superpowers and, in turn, teaches
us to put our fate completely into
their hands and hope that they will
eventually quit their war-making.
In this respect, they also try to have
talk substituted for action, and then
limit their talk to the question of
nuclear versus conventional weapons.
Students urge unity
As concerned students of Indian
origin at UBC, we have been very
discouraged by the recent train of
events since June 1984, both in India and in Canada.
The army attack on the Golden
Temple in India as deplorable as
would be any on the Vatican, Mecca, or the highest synagogue in
Jerusalem. The consequences of
such were far reaching both here
and in India, culminating in the
equally deplorable assassination of
Indira Gandhi.
Although the past cannot be
changed, we, as today's youth and
tomorrow's   elders,   implore   our
community leaders and members to
make such unified and constructive
decisions as will be beneficial to the
youth and Indian community at
large both here and in India.
Amandeep Sanghera
Natinderjit Dhaliwal
Charanjit Manhas
arts 4
Harjinder Sangra
Jaskaran Dhillon
arts 3
Ravinder Chadha
Sarbjit Dhillon
science 2
Hardev Sangha
social work
People should have no illusions
about the real intentions of the
superpowers and they should not
Club wants awareness'
Both Stephen Richards ("Student disgusted with cyanide pill proposal," Letters Oct. 26) and Allen Soroka ("Ubyssey suicide not
answer to arms race, "Letters Oct, 30) have misconstrued the position of UBC Students for Peace and Mutual Disarmament on the
stocking of cyanide pills at UBC for students to take in the event of
nuclear war.
The petition that SPMD is circulating calls for a student referendum on this proposal. We believe that it would be a valuable exercise
in awareness for all UBC students to be confronted with this question, down in black and white, when they go to vote. Underlying the
question is, after all, a problem which all of us have to live with from
day to day. Rejection of the cyanide pill alternative may lead people,
perhaps initially less aware than Mr. Richards and Mr. Soroka, to
the only sensible and positive option: giving up some of their time
and energy to working to lessen the risk of nuclear war.
SPMD does not support a yes vote on the referendum, should it be
called; neither does it oppose a yes vote. Rather we believe that this is
a choice which must be left to the UBC students themselves: despair
and apathy, or hope and action. Mark Fettes
graduate studies
gamble away their lives on any form
of conciliation with them. We must
refuse to participate in all plans for
war between the superpowers and
put forward our own uncompromising demands.
I suggest the following practical
ways in which UBC students avert
the danger of war. We must demand that Canada get out of
NATO and NORAD, and that there
be no more foreign troop training
nor weapons testing in our country.
We must turn away foreign military
craft from our land, air and waters.
UBC students and others should
protest the military activities in the
Juan de Fuca Straight and at Comox and Nanoose Bay, as well as
the harboring of warships in Vancouver and Nanaimo.
We have to rely on our own
strength to organize such actions.
Sign the anti-cyanide option petition I am circulating.
Barbara Waldern
unclassified
Graffiti lacks 'tact, imagination'
East and West both act in bad faith
The opinions expressed by Jane Sharp (Oct. 23, "Soviets sincere about
arms") are typical of precisely what is plaguing the "peace movement."
Far too much time has been spent by people such as Sharp trying to identify
a "bad guy." Invariably it is the U.S. that is said to be the actor that is
bargaining in bad faith.
But let's face it, adherence to any of the few arms agreements by either
side has been sorely lacking. Neither the Soviets nor the Americans, it is
plainly evident, have ever been "sincere" in their negotiations. The only
reason it appears to critics like Sharp that it is the U.S. that sets off the
chain of violations, is that there is relatively more known about the U.S.'s
operations.
In this respect, Sharp's rhetoric does the peace movement much more
harm than good.
David Silverman
arts 3
Recently the UBC campus was
visited by person or persons unknown who were unsatisfied with
the current architectural features
and took it upon themselves to "improve" the scenery. One morning,
the slogans "U of C, "Calgary"
and "Engg," among others, were
to be seen on many campus buildings, colorfully painted in brilliant
pink. These decorations were centred around but not confined to the
engineering area of UBC.
While I am not in a position to
judge the artistic endeavors of others, these actions clearly display a
certain lack of tact, maturity, and
imagination. The trend of the slogans suggests that engineering students from U of C are responsible,
but students who defame their own
faculty in the eyes of others must
lack tact as well as presence of
mind.
And although it is sometimes said
that the actions of some engineering
students are not consistent with the
level of maturity demanded by their
course load, I find it difficult to believe that any student would willingly divert funds from an already financially strapped educational system. The costs involved in sand
blasting and repainting will probably amount to tuition costs for five
or six students, a few TAs, or maybe some new lab equipment.
Finally, the imagination of these
students also leaves much to be desired. If the most complicated stunt
they are capable of is a quick romp
with a 50 cent spray bomb, then
they are perhaps wise to consider a
change of careers — I suggest sanitary or domestic engineering. The
faculty, and in future, the profession, would no doubt be better offf.
Ron Byres
civil engineering 4
CFS
"no" committee wants support
The "no" committee of students
against the Canadian Federation of
Students has been formed and is
looking for your help. If you believe that there are a lot better uses
for more than $200,000 of your
money than wasting it on useless
talk from some professional
students then you cannot afford not
to get involved.
If you are interested in getting involved in either a major or minor
way, or in just hearing what we
have to say then come out to our
meeting this Thursday at noon in
SUB 260, or contact us at 224-6683
or 228-9448.
Donna Chow
Steven Harris
no committee co-chairs Tuesday, November 6,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Honey, don't
forget bread,
milk and the
Kinko's Copies.
Copies
O
Binding Service
Fine Papers and
Envelopes
Passport Photos
kinko's copies
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1KB
HAIRCUT $9.00
STYLE $12.00
SENIORS $5.00
Kids $6.00
NO W OPEN FRIDA YS
TIL 8:00p.m.
YES WE ARE OPEN MONDAYS
Come in and meet LIZ
for your
FREE SHAMPOO WITH
EVERY HAIRCUT
Get your style for only $9.00
Offer expires Nov. 30/84
2105 W 16th Ave.
Appt's 734-2343
Masters of swing unrelenting
By CHRIS WONG
Four earnest looking elderly men
all clad in sharp black shoes, meticulously pressed grey pants, and precisely tailored blazers topped off
with crests descended upon the
Plazazz last week.
The Modern Jazz Quartet
Playing at the Plazazz Showroom
Until Nov. 10
A roving gang of over-age private
school boys? Walking and talking
advertisements for the Sears fall
line? Not quite. They're the Modern Jazz Quartet: to some, masters
of swing; to others, the opiate of
the jazz masses.
A growing number of jazz critics
inventive counter melodies and a
keen sense of swing. In essence, the
quartet is a jazz dichotomy — a
group focusing on musical subtleties in a genre generally thought to
be characterized by intense, ferociously active playing.
Maybe the critics should consider
more carefully the nature of the
music before they start their mud-
slinging. Jazz includes everything
from Ornette Coleman's honking
on the saxophone to Benny Goodman's lyrical clarinet playing. And
yes, the MJQ's brand of jazz incorporating European classical elements deserves a place in the jazz
pantheon. Because underneath the
group's intricacies that fall outside
the norm, they are solid, depend-
They say it's music only for
those in the geriatrics ward
— the Ex-lax crowd.
are dismissing the MJQ's music as
lacking in inspiration or "boring."
They say it's music only for those in
the geriatrics ward — the Ex-lax
crowd. Not only are the assertions
lacking in substance, they constitute
a misinformed insult to jazz traditionalists.
"If the word subtle were to be
given a human definition, it would
probably be in the person of the
four gracious and ageless gentlemen
who comprise the Modern Jazz
Quartet," reads the flak sheet on
the group.
What that piece of perfunctory
prose is referring to, is the MJQ's
mastery of the little things that
count in jazz — subtle chordal
shadings, steady rhythmic backing,
able players.
They may rarely play loud and
fast, but they always apply extraordinary skills when it comes to
maintaining a consistent beat and
original harmonic structures.
The MJQ's musical director and
pianist, John Lewis, has often been
the butt of criticism because of his
seemingly simple and superficial
playing. Okay, his only resemblance
to pianist Keith Jarret is his tendency to moan along solos. But the
fact is, Lewis is not interested in
playing sixteenth notes in record
time and in the oddest chord patterns. He achieves complexity by
other means — that is creating original and moving backup and soloing using a minimalist approach.
c/e
inis
Nightly Specials for $6.95
5pm 9pm
monday    QUICHE or chili
tues. and wed.
EGG PLANT MOUSSAKA or chili
thurs.   TUNA VEGETABLE CASSEROLE or chili
friday    HEARTY WINTER RAGOUT or chili
with choice of soup or salad, slice of cheesecake,
coffee, tea or cappucino.
SPEAKEASY
IS A PEER
COUNSELLING
CENTER
STAFFED BY EMPATHETIC
PEOPLE WHO ARE WILLING
TO LISTEN AND
OFFER SUPPORT
Mon - Fri: 9:30 AM to 7:30 PM
Sub Concourse
DROP IN OR PHONE: 228-3700
On the other end of the stage providing an alternative to Lewis' laid-
back clunking on the ivories, is Milt
Jackson, the jazz king of the vibra-
harp. His work on this rarely used
instrument flows smoothly and
without redundancies. Lewis and
drummer Connie Kay and bassist
Percy Heath provide unrelenting
support for Jackson's improvisations.
Together, these four gentlemen
who maintain serious dispositions
throughout their performances and
bow politely at the end, are purveyors of an individualistic jazz
style that emphasizes music that
calls for reading between the notes.
There's a lot more there than surface impressions indicate.
< w
B  S
3  S
O  *>
£3
PE
BRASS
CO
H
o
z
PS
o
TEL STOOL'SIN
FRENCH DOOR
TAPS * CHANDE
50 YEARS
w
-<
CO
c
z
D
c
m
?r«^
T^
Ss •"»
r^
33
?XO •
H
m
Or/>m r-
M
CO
O)
EADE
MOLI
* WA
LDER
Pi
o
3J
o
MO
M*^
^
™°o
C
>
r?Zr"
^*
H
en
CO
O      w
z     en
O
09
o
z
m
C/5
O)
en
o
W
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
"Over Coffee" — News from Israel in Hebrew. Snack bar
open — 12:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7
Our Weekly Hot Lunch, featuring Hot Homemade Borscht
with Sour Cream, Bagels with creamcheese and Salad.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
Network Seminar — Last of the 3-Part series with Professor
Shmuel Sandler — "Religion and State in Israel" — 12:30p.m.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Movie  Night  —  Triple bill.   Details to follow  in  Friday's
Ubyssey.
For further info, call us at 224-4748
n \ Dami I Di tillery Named a National Historic Place by Ihe United States Govei
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, you
can caste for yourself why our whiskey is so
uncommonly smooth.
As soon as you sip the water we
use, you can tell it's
something special.
That's because it flows,
pure and iron-free,
from a limestone
spring located deep
under the ground.
At Jack Daniel
Distillery, we've used this iron-free
water since our founder setded here
in 1866. Once you try our whiskey,
we believe, you'll know why we
always will.
J^-^—^^ks
Iron frvti  from an underground spring
Star of Excellence    V
Brussels
1954
It you d lue .1 booklet about )ack Daniel's Whiskey write us a letter here m Lynchburg  Tennessee 3735? USA Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6, 1984
we*
>W&0?i
TODAY
Aquatic
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Tutorial session, 7 p.m.. Brock Hall 3518.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,  everyone welcome,  7 p.r
centre.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
WORLD UNIVERSITY OF CANADA
Visitor from WUSC Ottawa, noon, Buch A202.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
"Over Coffee" — news from Israel in Hebrew,
snack bar open, noon, Hillel House.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Recovery  program   for  compulsive  overeating,
newcomers welcome,  noon,  conference room,
Lutheran campus centre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
PRE MED SOCIETY
Lecture:    medical    school    admissions,    noon,
Wood 2.
fatffaMS
Learn about Vancouver's civic
election and its key issue before you
vote. Civic Independent candidate
Reva Dexter, former city hall equal
opportunities coordinator, will be in
SUB 119 Wednesday noon. Mayor
Mike Harcourt's campaign manager
will be there too. A question period
will follow. The meeting is sponsored by UBC's NDP club.
UBC political science professor
Michael Wallace guarantees a cynical analysis of the U.S. election and
what Ronnie or Fritz mean for the
superpower arms race. Be there at
noon Friday in SUB 205 for the
bearded wonder.
DINO HAUTE
COIFFURES
4532 W 10th
224-7440
is offering a
Super Style Cut
at a
Super Low Price
Clip this and save 25% on
any perm or body wave
Late appointments Thursday
and Friday Evenings.
Offer expires Nov. 301"84
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Orders  and   payments  for   psych   club   shirts,
noon, Kenny 2007,
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration for new dance work,  noon,  SUB
216E.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., Osborne centre.
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION FOR
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES' STUDENTS
Information meeting, 1:30 p.m., MacMillan 160.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
General meeting with speakers from the Mike
Harcourt and civic campaigns, noon, SUB 119.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hot lunch  —  Borscht and Bagels,  noon,  Hillel
House.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 212A
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
UBC VANCOUVER ADVENTURE
AND TRAVEL CLUB
Slide presentation on Nepal, noon, SUB 205.
UBC CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Meeting, noon, SUB 212.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Major General Johnson speaks on: Why Canada
should not test the cruise, noon, SUB 207/209.
THURSDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Orders   and   payments   for   psych   club   shirts,
noon, Kenny 2007.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Aga Khan lecture, noon, Woodward 1.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal for new work, 5 p.m.  to 6:30 p.m.,
SUB partyroom.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Talk  on:   God's  promise,  grace and love,  part
two, noon, Scarfe 206.
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION
FOR ENGINEERING
Information meeting, noon,  Computer Science
building 200.
SOCIALIST EDUCATION SOCIETY
Literature table,  11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB
concourse.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Film,  Acid  Rain  Requiem or Recovery,   noon,
Geography 212.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Religion and State in Israel, Prof. Sandler, noon,
Hitlel House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation  meeting  plus jeux surprise,   1:30
p.m.. International House.
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Form — questionnaire results, noon, Buch B216.
AMS CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Hennings 302.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Film night: Gallipoli, Dr. B. Greenwood will lead
a discussion afterward, 7:30 p.m., Buch A204.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Buchanan Classic game versus SFU Clansmen, 8
p.m., SFU West gym.
THE PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Men of Ideas: Logical Positivism and Its Legacy,
noon, Buch B214.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN
THOUGHT IN SCRIPTURE
Lecture, Dr. Loren Wilkinsen of Regent College:
Christianity   in   Academic   Environment,   noon,
Buch A204.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Lecture   on   Pornography,   noon,   women   students' lounge,  Brock Hall.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Orders and payments for psyc club shirts, noon,
Kenny 2007.
FRIDAY
THEATRE ASSOCIATION
Auditions for two one-act plays, 4-8 p.m., 3102
Main St., basement of Heritage hall.
FRIDAY FOLK NIGHT
Continental Drift concert traditional Irish and
North American music, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.. International House.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting and jeux surprise,  noon,
International House
Ice Skating, 8 p.m., Kitsilano ice rink.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
UBC political science professor Michael Wallace
analyzes the U.S. election and its effects on the
arms race, noon, SUB 205.
ARC MAGAZINE
Bzzr garden, 4:20 p.m., Buch lounge.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD-
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112
ANOTHER INTRAMURAL EVENT...
UBC SKI FAIR
NOVEMBER 7,8,9 - 10 a.m.-3 p.m., SUB Concourse
DAILY ACTIVITIES IN
THE SUB CONCOURSE
- Hot Waxing & Filing - $3.00
(While U wait) j
* Ski Packages at Special Student Rates, I
Available to individuals and groups
* Exhibits: Including Grouse Mtn., Whister,
Blackcomb, 108 Hills, Big White, Benno's
X-Country Shop & "Universki". //   .    j
Wednesday: '*, #
* Fitness Show (12:30, Concourse)
* Bzzr Garden (4:30-7:00, SUB Room 207)
* Ski Films (7:00 SUB Auditorium-Prizes) La X
Thursday:
* Fashion Show (12:30, Concourse)
Friday:
* Auction (1:00, Concourse)
— Ski Clothing, Equipment, Ski Packages
and Ski Passes ...
Developed in Co-operation with the Intramural Sports Ski
Services Department and the UBC Ski Team
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS-,
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and   65c.
Classified ads are payabl > in advance   Deadlines  10 30.i.m   the
day before publication
Publications Room 268, S.U.B.. UBC,  Van., B C   V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
ENGINEERING
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION
Information Meeting
Thursday, November 8, 1964
Computer Sciences Room 200,
12:30 p.m. -2:00 p.m.
For students in Science I or Applied
Science I interested in gaining study-
related work experience.
Sponsored by the Office of Co-operative
Education,     Room    213,     Brock    Hall
228-3022
AGRICULTURAL
SCIENCES CO-OPERATIVE
EDUCATION
Information Meeting
Wednesday, November 7, 1964 —
Room 160 MacMillan Building,
1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
For students in Agricultural Sciences I,
Agricultural Sciences II (transfer students)
or Science I interested in gaining study
related work experience.
Sponsored by the Office of Co-operative Education, Room 213, Brock Hall, 2283022.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1.2 MEGABYTE COMPUTER. 2 floppy
8-inch drives. Intelligent terminal. Sacrifice
$2700. John 438-3342.
"SOLID GOLD" entertainment booklets are
now on sale through the UBC Swimming and
Diving Team. Call 228-2033/4521 for further
information. Price is $35.00 per booklet.
GREMLIN 74. 6 cylinders. Reliable. Runs well.
Real bargain. $500. Phone 684-6778.
15 - FOUND
A SUM OF MONEY in cash form was found
outside Bank of Commerce front door. Please
phone if yours. Identify when lost and the
amount. 261-4484.
20 - HOUSING
ON CAMPUS HOUSING, avail, reasonably
priced, rent incl. Great meals prepared by our
full-time cook. Contact David Kelly, 224-9930
or drop by Deke House, 5736 Agronomy Rd.
ROOMS FOR RENT: on campus, shared
rooms, $150 per month. Contact Brian or Cam
at 224-9119.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
PREPARATION for the ENGLISH
COMPOSITION TEST. Develop strategies for
writing summaries and essays. (We have
essay clinics, too). 731-1252.
LSAT/LGMAT preparation courses, coming
to Vancouver. For info call 112-800-387-3742.
30 - JOBS
STUDENTS needed for p/t canvassing work
with well established insulation company.   16
hrs./wk. $8 hr, car and some sales experience an asset. Call Jim Hogan, Insul Pdts.,
324-2444 or home 731-6761.
40 - MESSAGES
IF THERE ARE any witnesses to the car
accident on Sept. 25 {at the Registration
Buildingl who like to see justice done, please
call Mike at 435-8660.
70 - SERVICES
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
BOOKEEPING & TAX SERVICE. Expert &
personal attention — individual, sole proprietor
and corp. Reasonable. We service your account at your location or at our office.
434-9186.
ILLUSTRATOR: Scientific, graphic &
general illustrations. No job too small. Quality
work, low prices. 734-5039.
86 - TYPING
WORD PROCESSING $1 50/PG IDS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST     U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays &■ resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 26&6641.
TYPING-ESSAYS, term papers, resumes.
$1.25/pg double-spaced. Professional
results. Call Gerry, 271-7142.
TYPING. Professional. 25 years experience.
Electronic typewriter. Reasonable rates.
271-6755.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
theses, reports, letters, resumes. Days,
evgs/wknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731-1252.
WORD PROCESSING. Reports, essays,
resumes, etc. For professional results at
very competitive rates call 266-2536.
WORD PROCESSING. Reorts, term
papers, mspt., theses. $1.25/pg IDS).
Resumes $10. Fast professional results. Call
eves., wkends. 734-0687.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced typist.
Reasonable rates. Call Mary Lou at
421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2895;
872-3703.
ABOVE   AVERAGE   TYPIST.   For  accurate
professional results call Audrey. 228-0378.
TYPING SPECIAL
EXTENDED TO NOV. 30
Double Spacing
Reg. $1/pg., NOW 90c/pg.
Reg. $1.80/pg. NOW$1.60/pg.
Fast, Accurate Typing
CALL Glenna 734-8661 eves or
weekends
WORDPOWER
3737 W. 10th (at Alma)
PROFESSIONAL
•Editing
"Proofreading
AND
-Word Processing
ALL
At a Word Processing
hourty rate!
15% Student Discount
All types of written material accepted.
SUPPORT SERVICES INCLUDE:
'Xerox photocopying
'Binding (Umbtnd,
'Printing
'Translation & Tutoring
222-2BB1 Tuesday, November 6, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Moncton expels activists
TORONTO (CUP) — Universite
de Moncton administrators will
likely face harsh criticism in December when Canada's nation-wide
teachers' association releases its final report investigating the university's alleged abuses of freedom of
expression.
A preliminary report leaked to
the Globe and Mail two weeks ago
said administrators expel more students in proportion to its population than any other university in
Canada and that many of these are
students politically active on campus.
The inquiry, prepared by the Canadian Association of University
Teachers for U de M's association
of librarians and professors, follows the expulsion of 15 students in
the spring of 1982. They occupied
the administration building in protest of a massive tuition fee increase.
According to the Globe and Mail,
the report says the conditions under
which eight of the 15 students were
allowed to return violated Canada's
Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
The report also investigated the
activities of one dean who created
an uncomfortable academic environment and difficulties for professors wanting tenure.
Brenda Cote, one of the students
expelled for her leadership role in
the occupation, said she is not surprised by the report's conclusions.
"We were always aware of faculty and students' rights being denied at the U de M," she said. "It's
been a major problem since the
(university's) creation."
Cote, who was also chair of the
Canadian Federation of Students
the year following her expulsion,
We want your letters. They must
be typed, triple-spaced on a
70-space line. We edit for grammar
and brevity, and do not accept sexist or racist letters. And don't forget
that "Dear Sir" went out at The
Ubyssey years ago, but the letters
editor becomes overjoyed when she
sees a letter addressed to the "Dearest editorial collective."
LSAT
Preparation
Training
18 Hour
Weekend Course
Sexton
Educational Centers ?
414-1200 Burrard St
Vancouver, B.C.
V6Z 2C7
(604) 684-441 1
|
said more pressure must be placed
on the administration to make the
university democratic.
Faculty association president
Donald Poirier said he hopes the
administrators do not seek another
term in office.
CAUT executive secretary Donald Savage said he will not comment
on the inquiry's findings until the
final report is made public in December.   Investigations   are   still
under way.
Savage says the CAUT's academic freedom and tenure committee, under whose auspices the inquiry was conducted, sent a preliminary report to the concerned parties at the U de M for an official
response.
Any other actions, such as the
imposition of censure, would be
undertaken at the CAUT's general
meeting in May 1985, he said.
§ r
TRAVEL CUTS
Christmas Charters
si*
§J!f
VANCOUVER
Toronto
$369       Winnipeg
$219
Edmonton
$139       Ottawa
$399
Saskatoon
$159       Montreal
$419
s
Ss
«SN
The travel company of CFS UBC, Student Union Building
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER 604 224-2344
N* >SK *S5 SN> KSJs *SJ JNS >SN *K> SS>> *N *SJ SS
WHERE CORPORATIONS BUY SOFTWARE
• ■^^ Mail-Ordcsr
Software
438-2142
AMEX
VISA
MC
niversity PO's.
THE
THUNDERBIRD I
SHOP
U.B.C.
TOQUES &
SCARVES
Only
2.
98
EA.
OUR FAMOUS
SELECTION
OF
CHRISTMAS
CARDS
ARE
HERE
FIRST THERE WERE
WINESKINS . . .
NOW
BEER
SKINS
Great for skiing
partying or
whatever
5.
96
EUROPE'S
LATEST FASHION
FLUORESCENT
NECK TIES
7.
98
Lower Level
Student Union
Building, U.B.C.
Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-19111
Visa & Mastercharge
Accepted
II
Special Koerner Lecture
Sexual Discrimination
And The Law'
.a
DR. CATHERINE MacKINNON
— Faculty of Law, University of Minnesota, author of
Sexual Harassment and Working Women—
12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 8
Law Faculty Auditorium
Room 101/102
Co-Sponsored by the Faculty of Law and
The Office of Women Students
with the support of
The Leon & Thea Koerner Foundation
ADMISSION FREE
PERM SPECIAL
unc! cut. Xdunavy
or perm conditioning;
Women     Ojt UvJ
Men 25.00
(Until Nov. :-5(> N4-BOOK NOW!)
3621 W. 4th Ave, Van.   733-3831
One Dfflz=§pecidT
Tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov 7th at
iS BOOKSTORE
i Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6, 1984
'Birds beat Redmen in semi finals
By MONTE STEWART
Life is full of unexpected pleasures.
That's Joe Johnson's philosophy. The UBC men's soccer coach
was especially bemused with his
team's good fortune last Sunday in
Montreal where they shaded the
previously undefeated McGill Red-
men 1-0 in a Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union semi-final contest.
The 'Birds will play Carleton
University Gee Gees Saturday in
Ottawa for the national championship.
El Ladha scored the only goal
UBC needed to post the victory.
The veteran defender scored on a
breakaway in the 62nd minute. "He
beat the goalie by a whisker,"
Johnson said.
Johnson was slightly worried going  into  the  game.   The T-Birds
played without leading scorer Rob
Shelley, who broke his ankle recently.
And several players came down
with the flu before Sunday's game.
McGill had been ranked in the
top five teams, while UBC never
managed a high ranking — despite
losing only two games all year.
Goalie Brian Kennedy recorded
another shutout. He played all win-
SPORTS
— rory a. photo
GLEN STEELE ROMPED for two majors as the Thunderbirds defeated Montana Tech 27-22 Saturday.
Gridsters in Quinter's eyes
By MONTE STEWART
The Thunderbird football team
closed the 1984 season Saturday
and for some players the exhibition
victory may determine who will get
a chance for a professional career.
The 'Birds defeated the Montana
Tech Orediggers 27-22 in a non-
conference game at Thunderbird
stadium.
Playing American rules (four
downs and a shorter, narrower
field), the UBC passing game reached unexpected highs. Freshman
quarterback Jordan Gagner paced
the 'Birds to their fourth victory of
the season.
Gagner still has several years to
go before he can even consider a pro
career but those players who are
eligible to join the Canadian Football League were in full view of Bill
Quinter, B.C. Lions' player personnel director.
Quinter had a camera crew at the
game filming several 'Birds who
have a strong chance of making the
pros. Quinter said he was sending
several invitations to the Lions' upcoming rookie tryout camp on Dec.
1.
"Glenn Steele will certainly be invited," said Quinter of the UBC all-
time leading rusher. Steele ran for
two touchdowns Saturday.
Quinter added defensive back
Bruce Barnett will almost certainly
be selected as a first round draft
choice for the Leos' territorial protection. Last year, B.C. selected
UBC defensive back Laurent Deslauriers (who was subsequently
traded to Edmonton) as the territorial pick. "We're always looking
for defensive backs," Quinter said.
The offensive line played very
well Saturday, allowing Steele to
romp for 214 yards on a record 35
carries. John Melvin, in his first
season on the offensive line, provided several holes for Steele.
Quinter said Melvin deserves a
look-see despite his relative inexperience on the offensive line.
Melvin, a Nanaimo native, stands
6'5" and weighs 275 pounds. "We
have to take a look at John because
of his size," Quinter said.
Andrew Murray scored the other
UBC touchdown — his third ever
— hauling in in a 60-yard pass from
Gagner in the third quarter.
Other UBC points came on a two-
point conversion, and a 15-yard
field goal by Rob Ros. The fourth
year receiver, who has also been invited to the Lions' camp, was forced into the role of place kicker when
Tom Dixon was kicked off the
team.
'Birds out for another Buchanan Cup
The UBC basketball season tips
off this weekend as the Thunderbird men's team goes against Simon
Fraser University Clansmen in the
annual Buchanan Cup series.
Last year the Thunderbirds took
the trophy.
Things will be different this time
round.
Mike McNeil, who coached
SFU for the past five seasons, will
be on the UBC bench assisting
'Birds' second year mentor Bill Edwards. Stan Stewardson is the SFU
coach, resuming a position he gave
up in favor of McNeil.
Ken Klassen, the 'Birds' leading
scorer last season, will not play this
weekend or for the rest of this season because he is recuperating from
knee surgery.
The first game of the three-game
series is Thursday at SFU while the
second game will be held at War
Memorial gym Friday at 8 p.m.
* *    *
The Thunderbird women's basketball club hits the road this weekend. The 'Birds will compete in the
Huskiette tournament at the University of Saskatchewan.
Starters Delia Douglas, Natalie
Johnson, Colette Piloud and Na-
dine Fedorak have returned to the
team that finished 13-16 last year.
* *     *
Varsity volleyball begins this
weekend for both the men's and
women's  teams.   Both  clubs  will
host the  University of Victoria.
The men's club, which wound up
second in Canada last year after
winning the national crown the year
before, has lost veterans Paul
Thiessen, Chris Frehlick and Brad
Willock to graduation.
The women have returnees Er-
minia Russo, Anita Holenstein and
Alana Kurz, as well as several other
veterans.
The women's team begins play at
6 p.m. this Saturday, followed by
the men at 8 p.m.
*     *     *
The UBC wrestling squad travels
to Victoria this Saturday for an exhibition tournament against Royal
Roads Military College.
ning games this year, allowing only
four goals.
Last year Laurentian University
captured the national crown. This
Saturday's game is the first time
UBC has played in a national soccer
final.
This season the women's team
also won the Canada West title.
However, there is no national final
for women's soccer because only
two conference competed in the
sport.
Coach Johnson has been getting
some of the top recruits in B.C. for
several seasons now.
But   the   'Birds'   coach   always
stressed the capabilities of Canada
West opponents. Under the unique
playoff structure of the Canadian
Interuniversity Collegiate Athletic
Union, only the first place teams
from the nation's three conferences
qualify for post season play.
Johnson said his team played well
in UBC's first ever soccer semifinal.
The 'Birds finished the regular
campaign with a 7-2-1 record, tied
with the University of Victoria Vikings. UBC earned the post season
rights because of a better goals for
and against record.
Field hockey "Birds
catch final third
Inclement weather on Nov. 1
forced the Canadian Interuniversity
Athletic Union women's field
hockey championships indoors to
B.C. Place.
Originally, the six-team tournament was to be held at UBC on the
outdoor Warren and McGregor
fields. However, playing conditions
were made impossible due to the
unexpected snow and the continuous downpour of rain.
The University of Victoria Vikettes, rated number one going into
the championship tournament,
played according to form and defeated the York University Yeo-
women 1-0, to win the national title. Eiko Tabata, scoring the lone
goal of the game midway through
the second half, clinched the victory
and the first-ever CIAU championship for the Vikettes.
UBC Thunderbirds, last year's
national champions, lost to the Vikettes 3-1 in semi-final action Saturday morning but rallied back to defeat St. Mary's 2-1 to place third in
the tournament. The Universities of
New Brunswick and Waterloo placed fifth and sixth respectively.
Two UBC players, Heather Benson and Melanie Slade, received
CIAU tournament all-star awards.
Gail Wilson, CIAU coach of the
year, and the Thunderbirds now
continue their season playing in the
Vancouver Women's League. Upcoming events include the UBC Invitational Tournament in the Armories Feb. 8 to 10.
Rowers sink, swim
By MARK TEARE
Plagued by hidden logs and incessant rain, Saturday's Head of the Gorge
regatta in Victoria is one which most participating coxwains and oarspeo-
ple, will want to forget.
The course itself has tricky turns and unpredictable tidal currents, but
submerged logs claimed two victims in the men's eights event.
The UBC heavyweight and lightweight crews finished the 4.5 km course
first (15:41) and third (17:41) respectively without much more than a
scratch, but University of Victoria and Vancouver Rowing Club rowers hit
logs. UVic came second and the favored VRC came last.
The women's eights had a relatively uneventful ride. UVic varsity won in
17:11, UBC varsity came second in 17:36, and UBC junior varsity finished
third in 19:07. The excitement for the soaked UBC JV crew was generated
by an oarswoman who stepped overboard in supposedly shallow water, and
porarily disappeared from sight as she touched down on the murky floor of
Victoria's inner harbor. She eventually reappeared and was rescued by her
fellow crew members.
The Beaver Lake-Elk Lake head regatta went off without a hitch Sunday. In the women's events the UBC varsity crew took first spot over the
3.5 km course in 11:40, UVic finished second in 11:56, UBC JV finished
third in 12:49. The UBC novice crews finished second (14:05) and sixth
(15:23) in their battery, which was won by UVic (13:49).
This is the second regatta within a month in which UBC has beaten UVic
over the shorter distances (3.5 km), but has been beaten by UVic over the
longer (5 km) distances.
In the men's open event, the VRC crew redeemed themselves from Saturday's disaster by posting a sound seven second victory (9:34) over second
place finishers UBC (9:41). UBC managed to squeak by third place UVic by
one second.
VCR lightweights handily defeated the UVic lightweights, and the UVic
JV men finished first (10:16) over second and third place UBC lightweights
(10:44) and UBC JV (10:56). The UBC novice men were second to UVic.
Next week, our crews meet for two traditionally exciting regattas at
Green Lake and at Lake Washington in Seattle for the last of the series of
three fall regatta weekends.
Swimmers prove strength in U.S.
The prediction that this year's
UBC swim team possessed more
depth than any previous season was
proved correct at the University of
Washington pool Friday for the annual Husky Relays Meet.
UBC placed second out of five in
both men's and women's
categories, with the Huskies taking
first place.
The only UBC victory was in the
men's 1,500 yard freestyle where
Geoff Donnelly, Dave Young and
Chris Bowie swam 500 yards each.
Almost all the women performed
well, with Anne Martin, Fiona
Waddell, Barb McBain and Ronda
Thomasson being singled out by
coach Jack Kelso as having a good
meet. The women were a solid second in the final standings with 96
points to U of W's 136.
The men's final team scores were
closer. The U of W had 106 points
and UBC 86.
The next meet for the 'Birds will
be when they travel to Washington
again to meet Central Washington
University and Pacific Lutheran
University in separate dual meets.
■J

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127421/manifest

Comment

Related Items