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The Ubyssey Feb 25, 1986

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 39
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 25,1986
Lost, jobless youth need help now
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Canada must help hundreds of
thousands of lost, unemployed
young people or face even greater
social problems in the future, the
chair of the senate special committee on youth said Monday.
"It's intolerable — we have to
take action now," said Jacques
Hebert, in Vancouver to defend the
threatened Katimavik program and
promote the committee's report,
Youth: A Plan of Action.
"If we are one of the richest
countries on earth there is no reason
why such a large number of young
people should be left to drift," he
said.
The report released Feb. 19,
recommends better funding for
universities, colleges, job training
and employment programs, and
calls for youth representatives in
decision making, volunteer opportunities in Canada and overseas,
and a campaign against illiteracy. It
also suggests action to help disabled
and native people.
Statisics show 700,000 young
Canadians are unemployed, increasing crime and suicide rates,
strained social agencies, and large
numbers of homeless youth, according to the 139 page report
prepared by 12 Canadian senators
who gathered testimony from
across Canada between April and
December 1985.
Hebert said he can't believe how
complacent Canada's youth are in
the face of these problems: "One of
the reasons why our leaders are not
open about dealing with youth is
because our young people are so
damned patient," he said.
But Canada should do something
soon because "this patience will
have a limit," he said, referring to
V
youth riots in Liverpool and other
British cities.
He added action should be taken
not out of fear, but because of a
human feeling for the plight of
young people. "If we don't take a
very drastic decision many of these
ydung people will never work as
long as they live."
Hebert said the government
should take the problem of youth
joblessness into account before
making any cuts in expenditures.
"The public hearings were very
disturbing for our members," said
Hebert. "We knew there were problems and that's why we launched
this study in the first place. But
even we were not prepared for the
testimony showing the terrible
depth of these problems."
Hebert helped found the
Katimavik youth volunteer program nine years ago and wants to
preserve the program, the Mulroney
government decided to terminate
last month.
It's a coincidence that preserving
the program is one of the 26 recommendations of the committee, he
said. "We need more Katimaviks."
He said the program, which sends
groups of twelve young people to
do volunteer work in three different
parts of Canada over nine months,
is a chance for young people to
work with others and discover
themselves. "It gives them new
motivation to get out and fight."
He said there is a large group supporting Katimavik and interested
people should write their members
of parliament if they want the program preserved. "They (the government) didn't suspect that we had
such a large community that supported Katimavik."
The report covers a number of
social issues other than youth
unemployment and poverty.
It calls for greater opportunity
for all young people to attend well
funded universities and colleges.
"We stand in favour of more support for post-secondary financing
across the country and better access
for Canadians from all communities."
The senators also advocate co-op
education programs. "We believe
that this combination of work and
See page 5: Job
Jobs lie in challenge
^^BA^^b^    ,
#   'dl .
-neil lucente photo
"I ALWAYS WONDERED why my ears flopped about in this thing," wrestler left muttered at wrestler right. "
Also explains the nasty rash I get on my lobes," he continued before springing for a further lesson on the proper
use of protective gear.
Federal Youth ministry faces axe
OTTAWA (CUP) — All signs show
the Conservative government will
eliminate the ministry of youth in
its budget, Feb. 26.
At least three of Youth Minister
Andree Champagne's top assistants
have quietly left her office in the
past few weeks. Kevin Darroch, her
legislative assistant, and Patricia
Thompson, her special assistant,
have moved to other jobs in the
bureaucracy. Lisa Van Deusen,
Champagne's press attache, has
gone to Europe.
Champagne told Jean Lapierre,
Liberal youth critic, in a local
television interveiw Feb. 14 for the
Hull TV station CBOT (to be aired
this week) that she does not know
what her budget will be.
Most revealing is an updated
memorandum labelled "secret"
from Champagne's chief of staff,
Serge St-Pierre, which describes
how to write a cabinet document
that would "demonstrate that a
politically relevant constituency exists outside the context of IYY (International Year of Youth)."
The memo paints a picture of a
ministry that will try anything in a
fight to survive. One handwritten
section titled "IOU's and/or Irons
in the fire" lists "ministers and
'heavy' MPs who 'owe' Andree
Champagne" and "Ministers and
heavy MP's with grant requests
under 'active' consideration, i.e.
not yet turned down" as targets for
lobbying to ensure cabinet votes to
retain the ministry.
The notes refer several times to
the importance of the ministry in
"delivering the youth vote. The
stategy for ensuring the survival of
the ministry includes "chairmen to
be given a 'personal' backgrounder
on the youth strategy so that he/she
might . . . advise his/her caucus
members on initiatives they
might/should take to ensure the
survival of the Minister of State
(Youth)."
Initiatives for caucus members
include "notes/letters to the PM;
collar the regional minister, express
views/concerns to other ministers
from the region; make a pitch to
Cabinet Committee on Social
Development/planning and
priorities ministers they know personally. . ."
See page 5: Youth
By EVELYN JACOB
Students and Youths working on
EXPO site jobs will have part of
their job training subsidized by the
provincial government if their
employers take part in the new
Challenge 86 employment program.
Lyle Birbeck, director of federal
provincial relations for labour said
Monday the new program will
create up to 18,000 jobs in B.C.
Challenge '86 will follow last
year's Challenge program which
provided summer jobs for youth
and students aged IS to 24 and was
jointly funded by the government
and private sector.
The federal-provincial cost
shared program is divided into four
categories:
• To provide wage subsidies up to a
maximum of $2.50 per hour to
tourist information centres,
businesses, and farms where the
employer will match the government subsidy increasing the hourly
wage to $5.00 per hour.
• To reimburse non-profit
organizations,* museums, colleges,
universities and municipalities for
the provincial adult minimum wage
of $3.65 an hour.
• To reimburse employers for 50
per cent of an employee's wage for
Simon Fraser provides choice on daycare
By VIRGINIA McKENNA
Worker's for Simon Fraser
University student society now can
choose how their children will be
cared for while they work.
Subsidizing daycare is not a new
thing at SFU. "It has been going on
for about eight or nine years, even
before we were unionized," said
Rhonda Spence, S.F.U. Student
Society employee and Shop Steward
of the Canadian Union of Public
Employees Local 23%.
The S.F.U. Student Society 75
percent subsidy will be extended to
cover employees who choose at
home childcare. This percentage
covers a maximum of $355 a month
for infant care, said Spence.
"It's a boon to employees
because, as you can imagine, $475 a
month for daycare would be a big
chunk   out   of  our  wages,"   said
Spence.
The latest contract has made this
subsidy available to employees who
choose to keep their children at
home with their other parent or
with a private babysitter, said
Spence.
The change to the contract, initiated by the trade union in their
summer bargaining talks with the
student society, represents a
recognition of the value of the person who is in the home looking
after the child she said.
Student union subsidization of
daycare costs is a rare practice at
Canadian universities she said, adding "As far as I know, S.F.U. is
the only Student Society to provide
subsidized daycare to their staff."
"S.F.U.'s daycare system is
great, but I don't know if such a
need exists at UBC", said Alma
Mater Society president Simon
Seshadri.
U.B.C.'s Alma Mater society
funds no daycare services for its
employees, said Charles Redden,
the AMS business manager.
"Only a very small number of
staff have children here - not more
than 6 or 7," said Redden.
A referendum was held three
years ago which asked students if
they would be interested in supporting daycare for students at UBC
and they voted "yes" overwhelmingly, said Redden.
The AMS will be providing
daycare facilities for students, but
so far there are no plans for staff
daycare services, said Redden.
"We have negotiations for contracts every two years and the subject of subsidized daycare has never
been an issue."
training prior to Expo up to $2.50
an hour, for a training period of up
to 80 hour* in an '^Expo 86 on Site
Training Incentive Program".
• To offer students and youths
interest-free loans up to $2,000 per
person, or $3,000 per partnership
for persons to plan and operate
businesses in the student venture
loan program.
NDP employment critic Colin
Gabelmann said Monday, "The 86
program will not reduce youth
unemployment in a province with
the poorest youth group job creation in the program of all the provinces last year."
"There are presently 62,000
young people unemployed in B.C.,
and there will be thousands more
when students from colleges and
high schools infiltrate the job
market this summer," he said.
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students Pacific region chair
said the "Be your own Boss" loan
program had a low success rate last
year with a defautlt rate of 20 per
cent.
"The program is a risk, not a student employment program," said
Hunt. Student venture programs in
the past have been criticized in the
past as inviting students to lose
money, rather than save for tuition
fees.
The federal government has
allocated 16.6 million to B.C. from
part of a total of $125.6 million to
fund Challenge programs nationwide.
The B.C. provincial government
has not revealed what their
Challenge 86 contribution will be,
but expect to announce it in the
next provincial budget expected to
take place in the latter part of
March.
Hunt said the provincial government spent 8.3 million out of a total
10.5 million allocated for the program last year.
Pat Brand, UBC Canada
Employment Centre manager said
the centre has not been made aware
of the details of the program but
said last year the centre handled
about 15,000 applications handled
by his office for jobs funded by the
provincial government on campus. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 25, 1986
Cockburn helps Haidas
By TODD WONG
Bruce Cockburn presented a
$35,311 cheque to Robert Davidson
of the urban Haida nation tribal
council,.after two benefit concerts,
Saturday night at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre.
"I'm overwhelmed by the
response," said Cockburn. "I hope
we've raised people's consciousness
about the amount that Canada's
aboriginal peoples have at stake."
"There's been a lot of energy by
Canadians put into Central
America, I just think it'd be great if
some of that energy could be redirected or expanded at home."
Cockburn has written songs concerning native Indians before. Red
Brother, Red Sister appeared on the
album Mummy Dust.
Svend Robinson, Burnaby MP
and NDP justice critic, had approached Cockburn with the idea of
a benefit concert for the Haida nation to help preserve Lyell Island.
"Bruce was sympathetic to the
lands claim issue and the Haida
cause," said Robinson. "He felt it
was something worthwhile for him
to do." Robinson blocked logging
roads with the Haida on Lyell
Island when Haida elders were arrested late last year.
Robinson said the money would
probably be spent on court and
travel costs for the Haida who were
charged with trespassing and defying a court order.
"When the Haida sought an injunction to prevent logging on Lyeil
Island until land claims were settled, the provincial court judge told
them they had no rights, because
they had been sleeping on them,"
said Squamish Chief Joe
Mathieson, at a public forum on
native land claims in North Vancouver.
Cockburn rarely does benefit
concerts but said he was glad his
current tour allowed him the benefit
opportunity after the concert. His
latest albums explored the social-
political    systems    in    Central
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America, as a direct result of his
travels. He has not made a trip to
the Queen Charlotte archipelago
but feels it isn't necessary to visit
the islands to understand the problems facing the Haidas and other
Indian nations.
After a standing ovation called
Cockburn back for an encore,
Robert Davidson presented him
with a Haida painting in recognition of Cockburn's efforts on
behalf of the Haida cause. The
painting depicted two blue salmon
emerging from two red spawning
salmon. Davidson explained the
painting as the universal cycle of
death begetting life, and went on to
use the salmon analogy to describe
the plight of the native Indians.
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and have a clean credit record, you can get
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That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
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Why is American Express
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So call 1-800-387-9666 and
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Don't leave school without it"'.' Tuesday, February 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CAUT calls for more top women
By CAMILE DIONNE
Although the ratio of women to
men faculty members is higher at
UBC than the national average, few
women currently hold administrative positions, said a representative
of the Canadian Association of
University Teachers Wednesday.
Carolyn Attridge told about 35
people in the Buchanan penthouse
the invisibility of women in top
university positions is due to the
"scanty" pool of qualified women
to choose from.
"We have to address the question
of the pool of qualified people to
enter the university and that means
looking at attracting women into
graduate progams," Attridge said.
Women currently make up 19 per
cent of UBC faculty, three per cent
higher than the national average.
And the national average has not
improved dramatically over the past
ten years, added Attridge.
Said Attridge: "Over the last 15
or 20 years the number of women
students have greatly increased so
that the proportion of women and
men in the undergraduate student
body are almost equal."
Different career patterns between
women and men she said, is another
reason for the uneven faculty ra-
lio.
"Traditionally many women
have chose to opt out for periods of
time in pursuing their academic
careers in order to fulfill family
responsibilities."
She said women who choose to
take the time off are often incorrectly viewed by their colleagues as
being "less serious" about their
careers.
CAUT, a national organization,
is currently developing a "positive
action" policy for administrative
appointment procedures and is also
developing model policies for
tenure and promotion, which consider the career patterns of women
and sexual harrasment policies.
Attridge closed the talk on the
current status of academic Canadian women by complimenting the
progress academic women have
made in their workplaces. "There
are many positive signs," she said.
"I just am concerned that the initiatives keep growing."
Culpspels changs
steve wou
THRONG GATHERS EXPECTANTLY as vague granite apparition seemed to form in front o'1 Main Library.
Some claimed image, thought to represent the Virgin herself, could only be seen with high-powered arc lamps.
Hollywood North types including B-rate actors from old sit-coms were seen to mutter their disbelief and shake
their heads.
TORONTO (CUP) — "Our spel-
ing desperately needs tu be
simpliefied, reformed, and ra-
sionalized. It iz inevitabel that this
reformasion wil ocur. The suner,
the better."
Some of the above words might
look funny, but the Simplified
Spelling Society of Canada, which
penned them, insists the more-
phonetic spelling is simpler, more
rational and will eventually be
easier to understand.
The three-year-old group calls
current English spelling "a
disgusting mess' that has caused
among other problems, an illiteracy
rate of 20 per cent in Canada.
"English is by far the Western
world's worst language," says the
SSSC's president Ted Culp. We use
"ph" when we mean "f", "gve"
when "g" would suffice and add
letters that don't do anything, like
the "b" in dumb".
The   group   wants    people   to
Doubled tuition deigns demanded demonstration
HALIFAX (CUP) — It was the
city's biggest demonstration in five
years. About 2500 university
students marched through
downtown Halifax Feb. 13 to protest a provincial royal commission
report which recommends doubling
their tuition fees.
The students, from Dalhousie,
Mount St. Vincent and St. Mary's
Universities, King's College and the
Nova Scotia College marched from
Dalhousie to Province House, the
provincial legislature.
The art college students pounded
on conga drums and sang, carrying
their paintings with slogans added
such as "My dog could write a better report" and "1 wanna learn to
spel. (sic)". Others sang in unison
to Twisted Sister's "We're not gonna take it!" blasting from speakers
on a truck that led the procession.
Mount St. Vincent students carried a placard advertising their
university for sale: "Four scenic
acres overlooking Bedford Basin . .
lots of old books, vintage lab
equipment . . . owner must sell immediately." Chinese students carried a 15-metre red dragon painted
with "100 per cent? You've got to
be kidding."
The Student Union of Nova
Scotia organized the demonstration, plastering all five campuses
with posters, reading "something's
going wrong, Tom Mclinnis,
Minister of Education" and "Don't
let them double your tuition." Barb
Donaldson, chair of the Canadian
Federation of Students, joined the
students in knocking on every door
of the 30-storey Fenwick student
residence, urging students to join
the protest.
"I can't believe that in Nova
Scotia, where they pay the highest
fees in the country, that they would
double tuition there," Donaldson
said.
Along with doubling tuition fees
the report recommends the
ministry:
* eliminate bursaries for all
students;
* require international students to
pay 100 per cent of the cost of
educating them. This would double
their current $3000 tuition fees;
* demand payment, either from
Ottawa or from students from other
provinces, to compensate for out-of
province students who exceed the
number of Nova Scotians studying
in other parts of Canada;
* establish a core curriculum for all
students, which "should stress the
relationship between the subjects
studied and should develop in the
student the intellectual powers and
abilities associated with educated
people."
Two days before the march, Conservative Nova Scotia premier John
Buchanan announced in a press
release the government would not
increase tuition fees 50 per cent,
because tuition fees aie up lo the individual school.
Donaldson laughed off the
release. "The fact that the provincial government sets the operating
budget means they effectively set
the fees universities must charge,"
she said.
BC post-secondary edi
■»
Kll   t
By DEBBIE LO
The "parking lot theory" suggests each of the B.C. post-
secondary institutions cater to
distinct socio-economic classes, said
a Canadian Federation of Students
representative Saturday.
Donna Morgan told a crowd of
about 100 students, faculty
members, and administrators, at a
community conference on post-
secondary education that students
attending each institution reflect the
accessibility of each.
"UBC is not representative of the
general car population," she said.
"BMW's are qualitatively different
from SFU's rabbits."
"And the downtown VCC (Vancouver Community College) has no
parking lot," she added.
Morgan said education in B.C. is
"ghettoized".
Lower income students attend
community colleges for job
oriented education, and richer
students can afford to take liberal
arts at UBC, said Morgan who added a small minority of highly
motivated students, less than ten
per cent of the students who take
transfer programs, actually transfer
to universities.
Post  secondary institutions  are
also dominated and run by white
middle class males, she told the audience.
Stephen Leary, of the Downtown
Eastside Residents Association and
former member of CFS, said the
provincial government believes it is
"good business" to use post secondary education for training.
"Critical thinking is being
discouraged,and the Socreds don't
take kindly to criticism," he said
John Waters, president of the
College    Institute    Educators'
"(But) I was pleased to see the
provincial government was so
afraid of us as to have to release this
communique," Donaldson said.
"They were trying to take the wind
out of our sails. It actually increased our media attention."
On the day of the march, the provincial cabinet was meeting in
Shelburne, N.S., about 150 km
from Halifax, in preparation for a
throne speech at the end of
February. Students hope the march
will influence statements about
education in the speech from the
throne.
ghettoizes
Association, said funding for post
secondary education has been
driven by "buzz" concepts.
"Restraint, cost-effectiveness, efficiency ... all make you feel good
inside," he said. "They are all trigger words developed in the minds of
advertising executives."
The conference, organized by the
Simon Fraser student society, included Gordon Shrimpton, University of Victoria faculty association
president, and William Saywell,
SFU president.
simplify their spelling and has
drawn up 13 rule changes as phase
one of the project.
Despite the enormity of the task,
Culp says it is inevitable that we will
revise our spelling.
"The present system is so irrational, it will collapse like a house
of cards."
Already, he notes, there have
been some changes, primarily in
American usage. The "our" ending
is changing to "or", "re" as in centre to "er" and simplified words
like "nite" and "thru" are popping
up.
Culp admits there are difficulties
in trying to overhaul a spelling
system and says some have been
overcome while others are unresolved.
People will still be able to read
books written in the old way, he
says, because the new system will be
phased in. Eventually, the old
books will wear out and ones with
revised spelling will be published.
As for learning a new system,
Culp says it will be simple, especially for young people who aren't as
tied to the old style.
"The more you use it the more
comfortable you become with it,"
says the Toronto high school
teacher. "It's become very difficult
for me to spell in the normal way."
However, there are snags. Culp
says about 16 new letters will be
needed and admits there will be problems because different countries
pronounce words different ways.
Culp won't say how many
members the society has, only that
they're "thinly spread" across
Canada. The group has plans for a
dictionary and a newspaper to
spread the gospel of simplified
spelling.
In the past, there have been attempts in other countries to reform
spelling, some more successful than
others. Portuguese, Dutch, Turkish
and Chinese have all undergone
reforms.
A Simplified Spelling Society
cropped up in Britain at the end of
the last century, enlisting the support of notables like George Bernard Shaw and Lord Baden-Powell.
However, the society's calls went
unheeded.
Students frustrated with spelling
can writelo Gulp at 240 Russell Hill
Rd. in Toronto, M4V 2T2.
Council votes to decertify student journalism society
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton
student council stood firm on its
decision Feb. 20 to decertify the student journalism society for inviting
the South African ambassador to
participate in a campus debate.
After an emotional and often
confusing three-hour debate before
a crowd of 150 students, council
voted 18 in favour — five opposed
to a motion to decertify the club.
Decertification means the journalism society won't get free access
to campus services or the campus
security that will be necessary for
the ambassador, Glen Babb, to
speak.
The   student   councii   executive
had suspended the society status as
a university club a week earlier, saying the club's invitation violated
council policy to sever all links with
the apartheid regime and its
backers.
The society's vice-president, Rob
Mackenzie, said that the council ruling does not mean they will
withdraw the invitation to Babb.
"We were shot down tonight, but
we'll be back tomorrow."
Carleton's anti-apartheid group
(CAAG), which opposed Babb's
appearance on campus, did not initiate the move to decertify the journalism society. But the originator of
the motion to sever links with apar
theid said he was pleased at the outcome. "It's not exactly a victory for
CAAG, but this meeting could have
produced a severe set-back for us,"
said Paul Gross.
The council also voted to have a
committee review the original anti-
apartheid policy.
The journalism society has tentatively confirmed Canadian journalist Peter Kent to oppose Babb in
the debate. Kent has covered Africa
for both the NBC and CBC.
Mackenzie says he might get
around the decertification by asking
Carleton professors -to invite the
ambassador. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 25, 1986
Douggerel
&jjfizk-/#
Last week the irrepresible forces of reac-
tionism, heterosexism and "journalism" on the
North Shore came together in that cataclismic
whimpering that is Doug Collins.
M;. Collins reads The Ubyssey. Yup. We know
because he hated our recent Gay and Lesbian
Special issue ar;a wrote all about it in the North
Shore News.
Doug says nomosexuals are "strange,"
"queers," and "pervert-person." He scoffs at
their desire tor equai rights.
Conversely, Doug appears to adore heterosexuality. We do believe he indulges. (Rumor has it
he fathered kids.) You see, Doug is still mourning
the end of the Godiva ride, an event he
characterizes as the work of "healthy engineering
students."
Doug is incensed that some power on campus
allowed the Gay and Lesbian issue while denying
the engineers their ride. And he suggests that the
fact The Ubyssey could publish such an issue is
evidence that "our universities are still overfund-
ed and that Bill Bennett should cut out some of
the new dough he's promised them."
First, Doug, there is no specific power that has
chosen to allow one and deny the other unless
that power is popular opinion — a fact which
might suggest that your sense of morality is reactionary, narrow, and insensitive.
Secondly, Doug, you certainly must recognize
a difference between a group of slobbering
engineers paying a prostitute to strip for them in a
university building, and the journalistic attempt of
a minority to educate the public in its quest for
equal rights.
But perhaps the most basic issue here, Doug, is
your obvious interest in the sex lives of others.
You suggest there are right reasons and wrong
reasons for a man's penis to become erect, and
you also portray a disdain for women who simply
aren't interested in penises. It seems fair to
assume that you believe tnat your own penis
becomes erect for correct reasons — and you are
obviously rather proud of that. But can you not
appreciate the subjectivity of that experience?
Oh, and that remark about the provincial
government cutting university funding to kill The
Ubyssey: Doug, sweetheart, The Ubyssey is not
funded by the provincial government. Journalist's
rule number one: check your facts. You always
look so dumb when you're wrong.
Prejudice and unquestioned fear subvert facts
Recent letters to the Ubyssey
have shown that once again people
refuse to accept facts and information as they are presented to them,
and instead choose to subvert the
facts to unquestioned fears and prejudices.
I am referring to the letters in
response to the Gay/Lesbian issue,
and in particular to the furor touched off by the graphics of the "Censored" article. Judging by the
strong reaction to the excerpt of
porn, it seems obvious that some
people never actually read the article or thought about the issue involved.
Although the graphics are, incidentally, the responsibility of the
Ubyssey and not of the author, they
did serve a purpose. Euphemism
and gentility were shed in favor of a
direct presentation of what is
undeniably a sexual reality in our
society. If it offended, it offended
those who will not take even the
most basic steps towards frank sexual discussion. By remaining silent
and willfully uninformed, they help
to perpetrate the sexual ignorance
that hampers every aspect of our
culture.
The excerpt of admittedly bad
gay porn published alongside the
"Censored" article was never
meant to serve for the arousal of
horny gay men, despite how some
readers might have interpreted it.
The Ubyssey is not now nor has it
ever been a forum for pornography.
Nor, might I add, would all gas
men find such porn appealing
anyway, as some would find it impersonal  and  dehumanizing.   (Not
even to mention that such sexual
practices are no longer considered
"safe" in light of the probable
spread of the AIDS virus.)
Furthermore, to parallel the
display of this story with the struggle against the Godiva Ride is to
misunderstand both causes. The
people of the CASC never opposed
all forms of sexual expression; they
opposed those which exemplified
the domination and the exploitation
of women by men.
Porn has to be approached with
an understanding of the social circumstances surrounding and
creating it. And although the porn
published in the paper is explicit, it
is not violent and the two men are
mutually consenting.
But the meaning o:' the article
itself should not be lo-t in the tur
moil over the graphics. In the interest of protecting us from
ourselves, state apparatus halts the
distribution of texts and of
magazines which are deemed offensive to vague codes of sexual,
political, and religious acceptability-
The unavailability of Torso or of
a guide to vibrators is not of great
personal significance to me, but the
issue of a state right to unaccountable censorship is. 1 agree with the
efforts of many to stop the production and distribution of works
which exploit b r u i a I i t \ and
violence.
However, state censorship of al!
forms of sexual expression, particularly minority ones, is not a
solution. It simply furthers the oppression of minorities by the majority and doesn't help end the process of sexual violence.
Perhaps the inclusion of the sample of porn alongside the censorship
article was not the wisest of political
moves, as it can alienate those who
prefer to approach sexual liberation
in a cautious and quiet way.
Neither, however, is it anything
to be ashamed of. Sex, gay sex included, is par; of the rea! world.
Deal win. ;..
Iain Blair
arts 5
Scientists cry SOS
CASC urges "we"
unite and conque:
I have a suggestion to make to
Wayne R. Sankey and the other
students who are apparently concerned about Ladies' Nigh; in the
Pit and other such sexist events.
There's a group called the Coalition
Against Sexism on Campus that
was formed specifically to fight
things like that, and I suggest you
join it to promote your views.
Many thanks
The International House
28-Hour Dance-A-Thon (held Feb.
14 to Feb. 15) raised over $1200, as
well as 150 food items, for the Vancouver Food Bank.
On behalf of the Dance-A-Thon
Organizing Committee, thanks go
out to the following people:
Dr. Strangway, President of
UBC, for opening the event; all International House staff, leaders,
and volunteers for shovelling snow;
the Language Institute for its
assistance; St. John's Ambulance
Volunteers for their patience; Kate
from CKWX 1130, and The Vancouver Sun for making appearance;
the RCMP and Campus Security
for their support; all raffle sponsors; our guest D.J.'s; the bands for
donating their time.
Finally, lotsa thanks to all those
who danced on Friday and Saturday, particularly Judy and Alexis
for raising over $350 through sponsorship by dancing ten and seven
hours respectively.
Without all your help and support, the Dance-A-Thon would not
have been the success that it was.
Actions speak louder than words.
Kevin Shelly
graduate studies
You may not have heard of
CASC, so I'll fill you in on tne
details. Earlier this year CASC tried
to negotiate with an undergrad
society from a faculty which is 88
per cent male. Every year this
undergrad society holds an obnoxious public dominance ritual involving a naked woman. The society
refused to negotiate with CASC —
and you can confirm that with its
president — so CASC rallied support for action to be taken to stop
the ritual.
The society in question modified
their ritual this year and said they'd
never hold another one, cross their
heart and hope to die. CASC is still
working on that issue, with the
hope that they never do. In this, it is
not acting as a small group of
"morality police", but as representatives for the two thousand people
who signed the petition to the President.
So far, that iias oeeri the major
issue for CASC. In fact, it's what
brought us •together, so were certain to have consensus on :i. But
I'm sure that if we had more people
in the group that were concerned
about the Ladies' Nights (like you,
Mr. Sankey!), we could work on
that as well.
And I do say "we"; I am a male
member of CASC, and proud of it.
Rarely have I ever met a group of
people so committed to what they
believe, and so willing to spend so
much time fighting for it. Can those
who belittle CASC's work with petty ridicule say as much for
themselves? Are they motivated instead by worn-out symbols of their
own pride? Are they simply unable
to argue their side as maturely as
others have done? I fear we already
know the answers.
Jamie Andrews
grad studies
This year has seen a resurgence ot
the Science Undergraduate Society.
Many long hours ha\e been spen;
preparing events for the
undergraduate students.
Unfortunately there has been a
substantia! problem: lack of funds.
The S.L'.S. operates on an
undergraduate fee levy set in 1979.
As the buying power of a dollar has
dropped sharply, we (the S.U.S.)
are having trouble helping our constituents.
To ease this problem, we are posing a referendum, "that the S.U.S.
Undergraduate fee be raised to ten
dollars."
Before you gasp, that fee will still
be the second lowest on campus (second only to Arts). Other
undergraduate society fees range
from $12.00 to more than $20.00
(eg. the E.U.S.). So, realistically we
would still be running an austere
budget.
Wlia' do you get from the
S.L'.S 7 Beer gardens, lockers,
dances, newsletters, club grants. -Lf.e
Chariot race, and. best of all.
Science Week. As the S.L'.S. is also
planning a speaker series, a first year
science orientation handbook, and
improvement and expansion of
"the Underground" undergraduate
student lounge in CPAX 6.
All of these services come from
the S.U.S. fee levy and are directed
back to the constituency.
To make all of this work, we need
a better budget. Help us help you
and vote YES for the new S.U.S.
undergraduate   fee   of  $10.00  on
Feb. 27 and 28 in Hebb Theatre and
Chemistry 250.
Kirk Hancock
S.U.S. fee referendum
Holier than thou view outrages
THE UBYSSEY
February 25. 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
This is the story of a lovely lady (Debbie Lo). who was bringing up three very lovely girts (Virginia
McKenna, Evil Lynne Jacob, Brenda Chint. All of them had hair of gold like their mother, the youngest
one in curls. It's a story of a man named Brady (Michael Grobermanl, who was busy with three boys of
his own (Stephen Wisenthal, Svetozar Kontic, David Ferman). They were four men living all together,
but they were all alone. Alice - Camile Dionne. Sam the Butcher - Neil Lucente Davy Jones - Todd
Wong. And the production staff: Gaffer -Steve Chan. Best Boy - Richard Brower Hairstyles -Brenda
Chin. Ms. Lo's wardrobe furnished by Romy Kozak International. Cinematnqrapher - Steve Wou, Continuity - Kristi Blocker. Theme song sung bv lan Robertson. Produced on location.
I was outraged by the content of
the letter entitled "God against
gays" in the Feb. 19 issue of the
Ubyssey.
The attitudes exemplified in this
letter are not unassociated with the
inquisition, the witch burnings and
the holocaust. Mr. Szeto voiced a
pharasaic "holier than thou" attitude which simply does not equate
with the teachings of Christ.
Christ's message was expressive
of love and forgiveness, not the
legalistic condemnation expressed
by Mr. Szeto. Christ stated that no
individual should judge another for
fear that she/he be judged by God
in the same manner. Indeed, Christ
demanded that the individual examine one's own conscience before
evaluating someone else. (Matt.
7:1-3)
During His ministry, Christ lived
with those people who society shunned. Should He have chosen this
generation to reveal himself, he
would have undoubtedly ministered
to gay people. Christ himself suffered persecution much the same as
Lesbians and Gay men do today. It
is with them that His understanding
and compassion lie.
I would strongly recommend to
Christians as deeply troubled by
this issue as Mr. Szeto that they
read But Lord They're Gay by Rev.
S. Pennington or any other similar
book which deals with this question
in a positive manner.
I. would also strongly caution
these Christians to heed the words
of Christ when he said, "He that is
without sin among you, let him be
the first to cast a stone ..." (John
8:7). Tanis Sugden
education 4 Tuesday, February 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Phone lists open to abuse
WINNIPEG (CUP)— Printing
the full names, addresses and phone
numbers of University of Winnipeg
students in the campus telephone
directory endangers women, said a
U of W student.
"It is an open invitation to har-
rassment and possible sexual assault
of women," said first year student
Susan Smiel. "At two universities
in the U.S. there was a direct in
crease in assaults after the directory
was put out."
A U of W student said she received a series of harrassing phone calls
in 1984 because her full name was
printed in the directory.
"Only my initial is in the city
phone book," the student said.
"Unless it was random chance, he
must have gotten my name from the
university directory."
Directory   coordinator   Burton
Youth forum delayed
From page 1
St-Pierre argues in the memo that
cabinet has to be convinced that
youth have other concerns besides
employment, that a ministry of
youth is necessary as a spokesperson "both for the government
within an important constituency of
voters and for youth within a
decision-making body that affects
them profoundly.
"We want to be seen as lean and
uncontroversial — a low-key but
necessary player within government," St-Pierre writes.
Meanwhile no new date has been
set for a national youth forum.
Champagne said in an interview last
October the forum would be held in
Ottawa in January.
Stewart Braddick, special assistant to the minister, now says the
national forum has been postponed
again. "It (the forum) is under active consideration in view of the
current situation. A number of
dates have been proposed and are
under review," he said last week.
He did not directly deny that the
ministry would be cut. "I see no
signals saying there isn't going to be
a ministry of youth," he said.
He said the government was planning new youth initiatives and that
they would be "bigger, better,
stronger, faster.
"There will be a strategy come
the new fiscal year and there will be
a minister," Braddick said.
Howard McCurdy, NDP youth
critic, said the government had
planned to shut down the ministry
but  now  probably  won't  do  so,
Job training needed
From page 1
learning is the model of the future
and should be expanded and encouraged in Canadian universities
wherever it is feasible."
They call for the creation of a
new Canadian Youth Channel and
the banning of all TV advertising of
alcoholic beverages.
Young people should have
volunteer opportunities at home
and abroad, including a domestic
"Young Canadians Community
Service Program," says the report.
It also suggests funds now being
spent on unemployment insurance
and social assistance be switched to
public works and job training projects for young people.
because of the national furor over
the axing of Katimavik, and two
reports released last week, from a
Senate committee and an NDP task
force, which call for urgent attention to youth problems.
Robsor, said forms included ir
registration kits gave students the
option of having their names
deleted from the directory.
U of W wome'i' centre. \oiuntoer
Katherine De ine said most
registration kits did not contain the
form.
"They were not available to
students registering in person."
Devine said.
Robson said last years' directory
contained the tames and phone
numbers of students who did not
wish to be listed He said he didn't
know if any students received harrassing phone calls last year.
The cost of publishing the directories is $3-4,000, said Michael
Sunley, student council Internal
Coordinator.
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1986 SPRING LECTURES
VICTORIA FROMKIN
Highly regarded as a leading phonetician, Dr. Victoria Fromkin is Professor of Linguistics and
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THE NATURE OF THE MENTAL DICTIONARY
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APPLICATIONS FOR
AMS-SUB
HOUSE STAFF
Now Being Accepted
The AMS House Staff's primary area of responsibility is
physical set up, breakdown and servicing for groups using
SUB meeting facilities. Positions are part-time, throughout
the summer, with hours based on building use.
Training will be provided. Previous hotel, banquet/house
staff experience will be considered an asset. Availability for
evening and early morning work required plus some on call
work. Residence on campus or nearby would be an important
asset.
Open to all UBC Students. Application forms are now
available in the AMS Administrtive Assistance office SUB
Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BK RETURNED TO ROOM 238
By 4:30 p.m., Friday, March 7, 1986 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 25, 1986
Vi/A
('ltf&?i
TODAY
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, Buch 223.
CUSO
Development education series, "Why work
overseas?" — representatives from CUSO, slides
of Central America, how to get involved, 7:30
p.m.. International House.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on emergency medicine with guest
speaker Dr. Wood, noon. Wood 1.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZAT.ON
Weekly meeting, bible readings, testimonies of
healing, all are welcome, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for cultural dance workshops: introduction to ballet, March 8, introduction to belly dance, March 15, Registration 8:30 a rn -4:30
p.m , International House office
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, noon. Brock 302
Some day we'll get Marx this
good in all our classes. But in these
days of Groucho Marxism and John
Lennonism (with apologizes to
Firesign Theatre), we need to get
some class into our labor analysis.
Leading leftie academic Gugliemo
Carchedi, author of countless
tomes on class and the labor process, will be bringing our socialist
savvy up to date with his talk on
"Current Issues in Marxist Theory
of Classes," noon on Wed. Feb. 26
in ANSO 207/209. Later the same
day, Carchedi will give a seminar on
similar topics, 3:30-5:00 p.m. in
ANSO 205. So don't be left behind
— be classy and let your Marx hang
out.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., gallery lounge.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, featuring Nathaniel Hurvitz, 8:30-11
p.m., Graduate student centre, qarden room Inunnp
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General  meeting,  vote on amendments to constitution, noon, Chem 150.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
General meeting for all club members to elect
new executives for 1986-87 and to plan classes
for 1986 fall term, noon, SUB 206.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture: "Attunement with Jife" guest speaker
Bill Wilkinson, noon, Buch B221.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration  for cultural dance workshops:  introduction to ballet, March 8, introduction to Del
ly dance, March 15   Registration 8:30 am-4:30
p.m.. International house office.
DEPARTMENTS OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND
SOCIOLOGY, AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Public lecture: Gugliemo Carchedi, author of
numerous works on class and the labour process
speaks on "Current issues in Marxist theory of
classes", noon. Anthropology and Sociology
207-209. Seminar, 3:30 5 p.m.. Anthropology
and Sociology 205.
LATIN AMERICA SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 237.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 237.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Ancient editot Stephen Wisenthal talks on who
to contact about what for news, noon SUB 241K.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Important meeting, noon, SUB 205,
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Meeting, noon, International House lounge.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter classes, noon, SUB 208.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Wayne Westergord, UBC history dept., speaks
on Anarchism in the Spanish civil war, video as
well, noon, Buch A204.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese pamtmy class, 4:30-6 p.m., Asian centre
604.
UBC PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Psychology of dentistry with  Dr.  Christiansen,
noon, IRC 5.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Guest   speaker    7   p.m.,   UBC   daycare  gym,   2845
Acadia Rd,
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Presentation    on    the    Catholic    charismatic
renewal, come out and find out what it is about,
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noon,     St.     Mark's    college    music    room
(basement).
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediates'    Mandarin    conversation    class,
noon, Buch B317.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Executive elections, noon, SUB 125.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration  for cultural  dance workshops:   Introduction to ballet, March 8, introduction to belly dance, March 15. Registration 8:30 a m.-4:30
p.m.. International house office
MARKETING CLUB
Peter   Brown  speaks on   Expo 86,   noon,   SUB
auditorium.
FRIDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden. 4:30 p.m , SUB 205
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lecture   Stephen Lewis, UN ambassador, 10:30
a.m   noon.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Speaker: Prof. Petro on human rights in eastern
Europe, noon, SUB 212
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Guest speaker, 7 p.m., UBC daycare gym, 2845
Acadia Rd.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE/BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration  for  cultural  dance workshops:   introduction to ballet dance, March 15   Registia
tion 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.. International house of
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
NOTICE OF
ELECTION
EXECUTIVE POSITIONS:
* PRESIDENT *
* VICE-PRESIDENT
NOMINATIONS:
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24,
ELECTION:
W.A.A. ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1986        12:30 P.M.
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valuable sailing experience. $135. Contact
John, 263-9678/228-4231.
THE   BEST  WAY  TO   LEARN   FRENCH?
In a small town, not far from Paris near the
coast, in one of the most picturesque
regions of France. Living with a French
family or in a historical mansion (10
bathrooms!!. REAL IMMERSION with intensive and semi-intensive teaching for
English speaking people only. The French
American Study Center has 10 years of experience and does a great job. University
credits — special rates for Canadians.
Winter Program on the Riviera. Trip paid for
Counsellors.
MEET the Program representative on Saturday, the 1st of March between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m.
AT: Apt. 4, 1366 West 13th, Van. or phone
731-2639 evening Feb. 28th.
INEXPENSIVE room and board, located on
campus. $350/month (double occ.l.
$400/month (single). Includs TV, VCR,
washing facilities, IBM computer and a
sauna. Call 222-4470. Ask for lan.
SICK OF RESIDENCE?? Roommate needed
Mar. & April. Fu!!y furnished 2 bedrm. apt.,
2 blocks from Kits. Beach. Washer/dryer,
dishwasher, $290. 731-5033.
25 - INSTRUCTION
"GREAT EXERCISE", great fun! English
riding lessons at "new facility with indoor
riding ring. Located in Delta 2 min. thru tun
nel. Phone stable a.m. 946-2590 or evgs.
856-8735.
80 - TUTORING
ARE YOU A TUTOR?
Want to Earn Extra Income?
For Contacts Unlimited
Send Resume to:
G. & C. Associates
#110, 1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C. V6H 1EE
Ph. 736 3399
85 - TYPING
PHRATERES PRESENTS "Vintage Fashion
show" 2-4 p.m., March 2 at Isabel Mclnnes
Lounge, Gage Towers. Admission is by
donation to food bank. Everyone welcome!
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE
FEE
REFERENDUM
FEB. 27 &28
1 Undergrad lounge bldg. fund
1 Improve Science Week
1 Speaker Series
1 Improve Newsletter
■ Black & Blue Review
■ More & Better Student Events
VOTE IN HEBB THEATRE
&CHEM. 250
11:25-4:25 p.m.
LEARN TO SAIL. UBC Sailing Club will
be offering lessons beginning Mar. 8.
24 hrs. instruction, Sign up SUB 58.
30 - JOBS
RESEARCH    ASSISTANTSHI PS   for
graduate students with extensive ex
perience in RF & electronics in UCLA
Auroral research facility, Fairbanks, Alaska
Call (213) 825-9531.
CARETAKER NEEDED for remote island
lodge up coast A chance to write or
meditate. Couples preferred. Stipend!
bonus. Call Woldy 926-1237 bet. 7-10 p.m
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we   type   theses,    resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs,, wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731 9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879 2027.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing 6- word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W 10th Ave (at Alma!
222-2661
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student fates Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346
BABYSITTER NEEDED immed 3-5:30 p.m.
M-F. Involves some driving Et- meal preparation. Must have own car. Karen, 228-0583
after 6 p.m.
35 - LOST	
MEN'S WHITE GOLD ribbed ring in SUB
or close by on Feb. 20. Reward. 228-2747 or
224-1228. Barb or Dave.
40 - MESSAGES
11 - FOR SALE - Private
HANG-GLIDING enthusiasts:  1978 Rogallo
wing glider. Call Todd at 224-9515, after 6.
"SHAME THE DEVIL" by Lyn Morrow is a
career woman's novel: inside government,
press gallery, politics, publicity, using well
known characters. ISBN 0-9692-0-2820-1,
$15.95 postpaid. Lynmor Publishing,
Osoyoos, B.C. V0H 1V0.
PREGNANT? 731 1122
Free tests —confidential help.
PREGNANT  &  DISTRESSED?  We are a
childless couple desiring to adopt. Perhaps
we can assist each other. Please respond in
confidence with your name £t address to
Pauline, P.O. Box ,48552, Bentall Centre,
Vane, B.C. V7X 1A3.
WORD    WEAVERS Word    Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st   Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING, TYPING. Special
rates for students. Terra Business Service.
731-9273 or 732-6653.
ANY TIME TYPING. Term papers, etc. $1.25
per page. Phone Chrystal, 261-3157, 5940
Crown Street.
'69 DATSUN  510,  station wagon.  New
starter, battery, rad. $350. 222-2117.
20% OFF USED BOOKS (floor models)
from now until 4th April. When the "Prop"
will close for 5 months while the manager
buys in Europe. Proprioception Books, 1956
W. Broadway. 734-4112. Open 2-6,
Mon.-Sat. Park in rear betw. Maple &
Cypress.
10 SPEED, Raleigh Record, blue.
$95. 734-1678.
'74 NOVA, red, V8, auto., PS., P.B.,
97,000 mi., radio/cass., $1350 obo.
734-1678.
20 - HOUSING	
TEMPORARY HOUSE SWAP starting Fall
'86. We have large 3-bdrm deluxe waterfront home with dock on Quadra Island,
B.C. To exchange in Vancouver area.
285-3239.
ALL ARTS UNDERGRADS
Submit Your
Short Stories, Poetry, Scripts,
Drawing or Photography
for
Publication in the
1986 ARTS REVIEW
Magazine
Until Feb. 28, 1986
Buch A107
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U 8- Del. on
campus. Stud, rates. Mastercard/Visa.
985-4250.
YEARAROUND EXPERT essay, theses
typing from legible wk. Spelling/grammar
corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. King
Ed bus rte.
WORDSWORTH wordprocessmg. Hardware: IBM. Software: WordPerfect. Call
Kerry Rigby, 876-2895. 12th 8- Commercial.
TYPIST: will type essays, theses, etc.
min. notice req'd $1.25/page. Call
222-0150 after 5:00.
SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resumes,
mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wkends.
731-1252.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Electronic typing
25 yrs. exp. Theses, mscpts., reports,
resumes, statistical. 271-6755 Richmond.
70 - SERVICES
SPEAKEASY has pamphlets and posters
on bus routes, health, movies, campus
events . . . drop by SUB Concourse.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333       (hrs. 9-4:30 p.m.)
Eves., Sun. Thurs.   939-2703 Tuesday, February 25, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds so close yet so far away
By KRISTI BLOCKER
After winning the first two games
against Saskatchewan this weekend
the UBC men's volleyball team suddenly lost the next three.
The Birds, buoyed by aiei fans
raced to wins in the firsi two games,
15-6 and 16-14. However, the
Huskies stiffened and fought back
to win the last three games and
match, 15-4, 15-9 and 15-5.
The Birds seemed tentative in try
ing to win a crucial third game
which the Huskies looked confident
of winning as the match wore on.
"I don't think our team expected to
be leading 2-0 and had trouble
focusing on how to win a third
game and the match," said. T'Bird
coach Dale Ohman.
''In the first game ihe Birds
played steady and took full advantage of a poor start for ihe Huskies.
After leading 14-2 the Birds recased
Poolers get limelight
The UBC diving team often gets
overshadowed by its poolmate, the
swim team but it plays an important
role.
In dual meet as well as in CIAU
competition the diving team and
swimming scores are combined to
produce an overall men's and
women's score. The strength of the
diving team can often mean the difference between winning and losing.
Don Lieberman has been coach
of the diving team for eight years,
two of them as competitor/coach.
His expertise has enabled UBC to
consistently produce top ranked
divers, including last years CIAU
champion, Nancy Bonham.
Toronto native Mindy
Kalchman, arts 1, is the women's
top prospect this year. She joins
three year veteran Melody Smeaton
in representing UBC at the CIAU
championships   in   Quebec   City
(HUMES OF
THE HEART
A Pulitzer Prize Winning
Comedy
by Beth Henley
Directed by Julie Akers
FEB. 25-MARCH 1
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Sat. Mat. March 1 at 4 p.m.
Student Tickets $4
• Box Office - Room 207 *
• Frederic Wood Theatre   *
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
The University of
British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
presents
AS YOU
LIKE IT
By William Shakespeare
Directed by
John Brockington
MARCH 5-15
* Special Previews      *
* MARCH 5 & 6       *
* 2 for 1/reg. admission   *
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Thurs. Mat. Mar. 13, 12:30
Studenl Tickets: $4.50
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Box Office        Room 207
Support Your
Campus Theatre
March 7-9. Smeaton placed fourth
on the one metre board and sixth on
three metre last year. Jane Little
also competed for the Birds this
year but will not be travelling to
Quebec.
The men's team is headed by
Steve Church, science 4. Church
lead the men's team with sixth place
on one metre and eighth on three
metre last year. Calvin Church, will
be competing in his final meet at the
CIAU championships after five
years at UBC. Michel Hameury
dove for the Birds all season but
narrowly missed qualifying for
CIAUs.
and finally won 15-6. "This was the
first turning point of the match
when we allowed the Huskies some
success at the end of the fi si
game,    said Ohman.
!r. game two the Bird- -Uii'.jd
siewiy, dowr 5-3 at the :■: .1 a:iC
13-9 near the end. "Tins v.a.1 Hie
key pan of the natch for \\>-. iom~
in£ bad. from 9-13 to win !6-4. I
was sure we'd cime out strong ir
the game three,'   said Ohman.
However, the Birds did not respond and lost the third game easily
15-5. "Game four proved to be the
key for the Huskies as the teams
fought evenly tc 8-8. The Huskies
then took over and pushed to a 15-9
win," said Ohman.
In the pivotal fifth game the
Birds were no match for the inspired Huskies and they blew out
the Birds 15-5. Offensively the
T'Birds were led by rookie Greg
Williscroft's 21 kills, captain Chris
Frehlick's 18 kills and veteran
Walter Janzin's 16 kills. Defensively Norm Hanson and Williscroft
came up with seven digs.
Saskatchewan was led by All-
Canadian Candidate Darcy Busse
with 22 kills and nine stuff blocks.
ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
ONLY
SUNTANNING
WOLF SYSTEMS
10 Sessions
20 Sessions
with presentation of this ad
Offer Good Until Mar. 15/86
5784 University Blvd.
(\n UBC Village) Vi Blk. Away
Ph. 224-1922
224-9116
NEW YORK SELTZER        *
¥
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¥
¥
¥
¥
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¥
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¥
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presents
PUNCHLINES!!
FREE COMEDY
TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY
FEBRUARY 26 - 12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM -  FREE
¥ WIN $ $ $ $ $
¥
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STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT. I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
736-7516
'••••*••• TON IG HT!!! '••••••••
WARREN MILLER'S
SKI FILM
STEEP AND DEEP
Tues., Feb. 25-12:30 p.m., 7 & 9 p.m.
UBC SUB AUDITORIUM
UBC SKI CLUB MEMBERS: $3
NON-MEMBERS: $4
Produced by AMS SPECIAL EVENTS
GRAND OPENING
SPECIAL
WE'VE MOVED!
3617 W. Broadway
738-9520
$2.00 OFF GREEK ENTREES
10% OFF PIZZA, PASTA & BURGERS
Wednesday Night is Student Night J
20% off (food only) j
Dining In Only ■
j Please present coupon                           Expires Mar. 15/86 J
m:
=Jfl APPLICATIONS are
s^J  now being accepted for:   i^
5 positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
and 1 position for
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
Applications and further information can be
obtained in the Administrative Assistant's
office, SUB Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
NO LATER THAN 4:00 p.m. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 1986 to SUB ROOM 238.
University of Alberta
Scholarships for
Graduate Studies
University of Alberta is a large lj^;■ *h-c-'" ,.■ m d •>: search center of'er-
ing a full range of academic: programs to ovi 28 000 students
Approximately 3,500 students are pursuing graduate studies through
the 75 departments which belong to the Facu'ty of Graduate1 Studies
and Research
University of Alberta offers a large array of scholarships to supenor
graduate students, mclud-ng the following
1 Graduate Faculty Fellowship - an addit.onal S2.000 per annum :o
all graduate students who hold major awards from MRC.
NSERC. and SSHRC
2 Approximately 60 Province of Alberta Graduate Scholarships and
Fellowships valued at $8,100 - $9 300
3 Approximately 20 Dissertation Fellowships of Si t 500 for completing Ph D  students
4 20 Andrew Stewart Prizes of S2.500 to senior Ph D   students in
recognition of excellent research.
5 Over 140 Alberta Heritage Medical Research Foundation Studentships of S12.000 (plus S2.500 research grant) to graduate
students in the medical sciences
6 Approximately 20 Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Scholarships of
$11.500 avaitable to Canadian and international graduate students.
7 Many   more   major  and   minor  awards   listed  in  the  Graduate
Calendar
In  addition,   we  have  a   fully  competitive  program   of  afaduate
assistantships for teaching and research, and a program o' research
travel support available to students
Foi further information write to
Graduate Registrar
Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research
University of Alberta
Edmonton. Alberta  T6G 2J9 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 25, 1986
UBC ends season in style
By BRENDA CHINN
The Thunderbird Women's
Volleyball Team closed out their
season in high style with two wins at
home on the weekend.
The victories give UBC an 8-7
record and third place in the
Canada West Conference. Unfortunately, only the top two teams,
Victoria and Saskatchewan, playoff
for a chance at the national championship.
On Friday night, the Thunderbirds had a large crowd of supporters to witness their win over the
playoff bound University of Saskatchewan by a score of 3-2 (15-7,
4-15, 13-15, 15-10, 16-14). Sheila
Jones led the T-Birds with 27 kills
and Tara Senft added to her lead in
Canada West spiking with 25 kills.
Trina Hewlett was a major force in
the win, stopping the Huskiettes
with six stuff blocks.
In the final game, the Thunderbirds were able to ward off the
Saskatchewan threat with strong
setting by Amy Ku to coordinate
the UBC attack.
The final match of five-year
veteran Tara Senft's UBC career
was highlighted by a 3-0 (15-3, 15-3,
15-8) victory over the University of
Alberta Pandas on Saturday night.
Senft had 13 kills in the match and
was crowned the number one spiker
in Canada West with 271 kills for
the season.
The win over the Pandas was a
true team effort with a total of 10
service aces and all players contributing  to  the  attack  statistics.
Notably, Lisa Hague and Christine
Martin came off the bench to supply seven and five kills respectively.
Blocking was also a dominant
factor with Maureen McBride and
Liza Snoeck leading the T-Birds
with five stuff blocks. Heather
Olafsson and Louise Paniers also
came off the bench to provide excellent service reception, allowing
the Pandas to score only two service
aces.
Strong performances should also
be credited to starters, Karen Pa-
quette and Kelli Wright, for their
steady defense throughout the
match.
The Thunderbirds are now looking forward to a successful season
next year with 11 returning players.
-neil lucente photo
UBC'S TARA SENFT capping a brilliant five year career pounds in another point. Despite a successful season the
'Birds failed to make the playoffs.
Thunderbirds protest for playoffs
By RICHARD BROWER
The UBC Thunderbirds filed a
protest on Friday with the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union.
They claim that the Saskatchewan Huskies used a player no
longer eligilble for university competition in two hockey games between the teams in early January.
If the C.I.A.U. decides this week
that Brent Hamilton was an ineligible player for the January 10th and
11th games, then the Huskies will
forfeit the games to UBC and the
Thunderbirds will eliminate them
from the playoffs. It would be the
first post season appearance for the
T'Birds since 1977.
UBC coach, Fred Masuch, claims
that Brent Hamilton was no longer
eligible after he graduated in
December and took on a full time
job here in Vancouver. Under
C.I.A.U. guidelines, a player's
main occupation must be that of a
student.
"We're on our return flight back
to Vancouver and he's on the plane
with us. It seemed a little strange
that a full time student from
Saskatchewan would be sojourning
out to Vancouver," said Masuch.
Hamilton was in Vancouver to
begin a training program with a
Vancouver investment firm. "As it
turns out he's here on a training
program with Pemberton,
Houston, Willoughby and it's our
understanding he's a full time
employee. He evens plays hockey
with them at Thunderbird arena
before our Friday practices," said
Masuch.
The complaint first went to the
Canada West league officials. They
couldn't rule Hamilton ineligible
because he was still registered in the
necessary amount of courses at
Saskatchewan, and wasn't breaking
league rules.
UBC has had to appeal to the
C.I.A.U. Under their guideline an
athlete must be a full time student.
Saskatchewan says Hamilton is no
longer eligible. He hasn't played
hockey for them since coming to
Vancouver, but they say he was still
eligible on January 11th.
In this weekend's play, the
Thunderbirds hosted Lethbridge
Saturday and Sunday, winning 9-3
and 4-3. Dean Thompson led the
scoring spree on Saturday with a
hat trick.
UBC's new offensive threat, Fred
Ledlin, also scored three over the
weekend. Both wins were a must to
keep playoff hopes alive, as Saskatchewan won their final two games
with Regina.
If the Hamilton protest goes
through, then UBC and Saskatchewan will finish the season tied
for fourth, the last playoff spot,
with 14 wins and 14 losses.
The T'Birds will break the tie
with a superior record in games between the teams, taking three of four
with Saskatchewan forfeiting the
two disputed games.
-#   1%   $Jk   f£
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(One block from campus in the Village)
fan^»
Mon.-Fri. 11:00 a.m.-10 p.m.
Sat., Sun. & Holidays 4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
224-1313
44AH5. £>E5k3fJ
for Men & Women
SHAMPOO, CUT, BLOWDRY
9.95
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
(reg. 12.95)
3621 W. 4th A ve. 733-3831
£IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|IIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU£
i &mtm to fbrgetting $mr troubles. |
heads are better than two' I
Introducing
Your DRAFTED
NITE!
1010 Beach Ave.
683-1993
| Starting Tuesday, Feb. 11 in Tommy's Pub, |
1 and every Tuesday following, f
| get drafted for 50c |
| Tommy Africa's IS your |
| Neighbourhood Club §
?IIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|||||||||lrf

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