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The Ubyssey Oct 25, 1966

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 THE UBYSSEY
rss^n
Vol. XLVIII, No. 16
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25,   1966
ag* J<-' i z o 19F,f.
224-3916
STUDENT
CUS meet
splits west
into four
VICTORIA (staff) — The
Western Region of the Canadian Union of Students quartered itself Saturday.
Thirty delegates to the Western regional conference, representing the 13 universities
in the region, voted unanimously to dissolve the old region, and will ask CUS's 1967
congress to approve the formation of four provincial student assemblies to replace it.
The B.C. Assembly of Students will hold its first congress at Simon Fraser Academy Nov. 11. Similar assemblies are being planned in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
Stephen Bigsby, student
president of the host University of Victoria, said the prime
purpose of provincial associations would be to provide
more effective communication
between schools.
Bigsby noted that the B.C.
Assembly will include high
school student councillors and
representatives from vocational schools, technical colleges and nursing schools.
Said AMS president Peter
Braund: "Education problems
and realities differ widely between provinces, and effective
work in a four-province region is impossible."
The six part resolution passed by the regional conference would allow membership
in provincial assemblies by
both CUS members and non-
members.
Each proposed association
would meet several times a
year, and all four western
groups 'would convene yearly
to exchange ideas and policy
implementation   programs.
In other conference business, the University of Saskatoon at Regina moved that
CUS services be withrawn
from universities which have
pulled out of CUS.
The resolution was aimed at
the University of Alberta at
Edmonton, which quit earlier
this month.
It came after an hour of debate on the annual CUS administrative seminar, originally to be held this Christmas
at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon), and tentatively turned over to Edmonton because of financial
problems at Saskatoon.
The services withdrawal
motion goes to the CUS board
of directors' Nov. 11 meeting,
as does the seminar — nobody else in the west but Edmonton wants to sponsor it.
Said    Uvic's    Bigsby,    "Ed-
(Continued on Page 2)
See: MORE CUS
More faculty too,
suggests report
Two students should be appointed to the UBC senate,
says a president's committee report on faculty participation
in university government.
The report, released Monday, recommended that the
"students' council and the executive of the graduate students' association each appoint
to the senate annually one of
their members."
The president's committee
was established in 1965 on the
request of the faculty associa
tion.
Four members are elected by
The report of the president's committee, chaired
by Dr. Moyls, was released
to faculty and the press
Monday. It was accompanied
by a second report on university government sponsored by the faculty association — see story page 3.
—derrek webb photo
CROWNED HOMECOMING QUEEN Saturday night in the
Armory   by   president   John   Macdonald   was   Medicine's
candidate, Johanna Rees.  Runners-up were Miss Arts, Jill
Newby  and   Miss  Acadia   Camp,   Pat   McGuire.
Students left out,
says angry council
Student council Monday
pasted both the Bourne committee and the Moyls committee reports on university government.
"We are indignant that at
no point in a year and a half
of deliberation did either committee ever consult the elected student representatives,
nor indeed any students whatsoever," said AMS first vice-
president Charlie Boylan.
"Council rejects any concept
of token representation of students on policy-making bodies of the university."
"I am against this policy of
FORESTERS
PLANKED
(See Page 7)
indirect student representation
on the board of governors
through a rector," said president Peter Braund.
"Student views will only be
presented forcefully and fairly
by an elected student representative."
Braund considered two students an unfairly low representation on the university
senate.
"For any kind of effective
work, there would have to be
at least ten students on the
senate,"   Braund  said.
"Two students is a ridiculous number," Boylan stated.
"It is not even tokenism. It is
a mere gesture."
The reports were released
faculty and to the press Monday, but no copy was given to
AMS council, complained Boylan.
the president and four by
faculty.
The committee was chaired
by math professor Benjamin
Moyls.
Its broad purpose was to
study the administrative structure of the university.
The reference material for
the committee came from the
Duff-Berdahl report on university government in Canada.
The committee also wants
more faculty represented on
the senate.
"We believe that elected
members of faculty should hold
a majority in senate," the report said.
The role of the senate was
seen as enlarged by the study
group.
The senate would be the central body of the university and
would continue to have the
ultimate responsibility for university policy on purely educational issues.
It would also be able to discuss and recommend on all
matters of university interest
including financial matters.
"In particular, the senate
would participate in long-term
planning, approve educational
policy and control standards,"
the report said.
The president's committee
also asked for changes for the
board of governors.
It wants at least three members and not more than 25 per
cent of the board to be faculty.
These members would be
elected by the board and would
also sit on the senate.
There should also be a "rector" on the board, elected by
students,   says   the   committee.
The rector would be a B.C.
resident, a university graduate of at least five years standing, and not a student.
The   committee  also  recom-
BENJAMIN MOYLS
.  . . 'more faculty too'
mended that appointed heads
of departments would be more
advisable than elected chairmen.
"It seems unlikely that a weak
department will improve by
electing one of its own members as chairman," the report
said.
"While the system of elected
chairman may work satisfactorily for mature departments,
we are not convinced that a
suitable system of appointed
heads cannot work equally well
for such departments."
"We want neither tyrants
nor ineffective leaders," the report said.
"A head should be required
to consult with his colleagues
on all major departmental matters, and keep them adequately
informed.
"The head must be responsible to his department as well
as to the dean."
The report concluded with a
word for students.
"Joint faculty-student com-
mittes should be established in
departments, and in some cases,
in faculties," it said.
Women visit men
—but no privacy
KINGSTON (CUP) —
Queen's University has
reached a new standard of
enlightenment.
Women have been allowed in men's residences for
the first time.
The residence board has
permitted women to visit
the men on the condition
they observe certain restrictions such as visiting hours,
registering guests, and leaving doors open when women
are  visiting. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October  25,   1966
—derrek webb photo
GYMNASIUM JOCKS RIDE Indian float home to stadium for Homecoming Saturday, to
win prize for best float in annual parade. Thirty-five floats competed for honors; 3,500
watched  football   game.
Homecoming food-fests
yield $1,000 in profit
Homecoming made money
this year.
Treasurer Fred Yada Monday expected a possible profit
of $1,000.
However, many expenses had
not yet been counted. The
event lost money the last two
years.
Major sources of revenues
were two dances Saturday. A
combined attendance of 2,500
brought in $4,700.
Saturday's festivities started
with the homecoming parade
through downtown Vancouver,
featuring 35 floats.
Next was the Thunderbirds'
Pearson antes half
education finances
OTTAWA (UNS) — Prime Minister Lester Pearson
Monday offered to pay half the operating costs of higher
education.
The new system will cost
Ottawa an extra $90 million
next year.
In a brief, Pearson suggested
17-0 defeat of the University
of Alberta Golden Bears before 4,000 football fans at
UBC stadium.
Climax of the week was the
combined dance. Ben Stevenson, dance chairman, said: "It
was the best homecoming
dance ever."
Height of the evening was
the crowning of the Homecoming Queen — Johanna Rees,
Miss Medicine.
University RCMP said they
did not make one arrest.
Credit for decoration and
organization of the dances goes
to the foresters.
taxes will be the source of the
funds needed to support the
proposal in addition to funds
from the federal treasury.
The federal government is
also willing to take responsibility for full payment of fees
for adults' training and retraining in public institutions and
industry.
It is aiding the provinces in
providing an adequate standard of education, said Pearson.
All universities, technical
institutions, and other post-
secondary schools and colleges
are included in  the  proposal.
Existing university grants
amount to $5 per capita. Under
the new scheme Ottawa is committed to pay $14 per capita
to each province. Today's enrolment of 234,000 is expected
to reach 390,00 by 1970.
The federal formula, said
Pearson, answers requests
arising with the Bladen Report
on financing higher education.
Total payment for educational purposes in B.C. in the
1967-1968 fiscal year amounts
to $34,684,000.
LAURENCE
PUVIER
OTHELLO
TECHNICOLOR* PANAVIMO*
The Greatest Othello Ever by the Greatest A^ctor of Our Time.
8:00 p.m. Mon. thru Sat. if
3:00 & 8:00 p.m. Sunday. Starts ^//^£-'^V^Y^-♦
Thursday    f?22_K^?
HEAR-
NELSON CLARKE, FEDERAL ORGANIZER,
COMMUNIST PARTY
/Communist Response To Mitchell Sharp'
Mildred Brock, Today, Noon
COFFEE SERVED
MORE CUS, EDMONTON
(Continued from Page 1)
monton decided to get out on
principle. Let's be principled
ourselves, and if there's any
suggestion that we approve of
Edmonton's withdrawal con
tained in aid to Edmonton,
let's not aid them."
The regional conference
then decided whoever hosts
the seminar will benefit by it,
and vetoed Edmonton's application.
Defending the host applica
tion, Dave King, leader of the
Edmonton pro-CUS faction,
said: "We want to toe a part of
as many non - controversial
things in CUS as possible."
But for King, the Edmonton
observer delegation led by
council president Branny Schepanovich sipped tea at Victoria's Empress Hotel while
the services withdrawal debate raged at the university.
FULLY
Swiss Specialty Restaurant
722 Richards at Georgia
Excellent Service in 14th Century
Decor
5:30 p.m. to Midnight
Reservations: MU 3-8810
2 min. from Queen Elizabeth Theatre
SWISS CHEESE FONDUE -
MR CONDITIONED     BEEF FONDUE BOURGUIGNONNE
International
FALL FAIR
ft FLOOR SHOWS
ft FASHION SHOWS
ft BOOTHS
-sir FOOD
ft DANCE SATURDAY 9 p.m. to ?
THE MOONLIGHTERS
TRINIDAD STEEL BAND.
Fri. 7-12 p.m.   —   Sat. 2-12 p.m.
Admission $1 Adults    —    75c Students    —    50c Children
AT  IH. AND  PANHELLENIC  HOUSE
Go  west  young  man  and   lady.   See  the  far  west.
At IH  and  Panhellenic  House  Friday and  Saturday
►
GRADUATING
STUDENTS
I
DON'T DELAY
Have Your
GRAD PHOTOGRAPH
Taken Now
The Mobile Studio is at the Stadium
Now and Until October 3T
No Cost - No Appointment Needed
(This Service is Covered by Your Grad Fee)
CAMPBELL STUDIO LTD.
10th & BURRARD
736-0261 Tuesda^ October  25,   1966
■■T-4t*E;.^tfeB-Y S ■■*#-■¥-
Page 3
Politicos slam
student no-fee
education plot
B.C. educators and political
leaders disagreed Saturday
over a student plan to eliminate first year tuition fees.
The proposal was made Friday in a brief submitted by
students at three B.C. universities.
They asked the government
to set up a long-term education
blueprint, including abolition
of fees.
The suggestion won the approval of Liberal leader Ray
Perrault and NDP leader Robert Strachan. But although the
theory appealed to UBC president John Macdonald and
Simon Fraser Academy chancellor Gordon Shrum, both
labelled it impractical.
Macdonald said the staggering increase i n enrolment
makes the plan economically
impossible.
He added that the quality
of education would be lowered
in the institutions affected,
and recommended a more
workable student aid plan.
This would increase the present $4.3 million scholarship,
bursary and loan programs at
UBC.
Macdonald said the idea goes
against the Bladen Report on
the financing of higher education.
Shrum said the existing
tight money situation would
prevent more government
spending on education.
Strachan dismissed money as
a prerequisite for university
admission. He said academic
ability alone should be considered.
Perrault said progression toward free education is inevitable.
Peterson agreed first year
students need more financial
help than seniors but did not
approve abolition of fees.
Peterson will give his further
reaction to the brief at the
Ottawa conference on financing higher education this
week.
The brief was written and
presented by AMS president
Peter Braund, Uvic student
president Stephen Bigsby and
SEA president John Mynott.
Wierd things
from WUS
to hit UBC
It's here again, that weird
world of wonders from WUS—
Treasure Van.
You can pick up wife leaders,
camel saddles, steel calypso
drums, opium pipes, incense,
"moon men," boomerangs and
jewellery.
From next Monday to Saturday, 12 - 5 and 7 -10 p.m., it's
at UBC's International House.
Last year the Van made
$7,000 at UBC, which WUS
used for aid to developing universities and for international
scholarships. But don't let the
$7,000 scare you away.
Some people only spend a
nickel, and others just look.
All the same, WUS hopes
for $10,000 from UBC this
year.
—dennis gans photo
HAPPINESS IS A GIRL with a black rubber raincoat thinks
Happy Hustler as he tiptoes through wet leaves with unidentified friend.  Picture is to inform any who missed  it
that it has rained for- past six days.
Success  basic drive,
says Lutheran pastor
The success syndrome is
the religion of the affluent
American society.
Pastor Duane Emberg of the
University of Washington told
Lutheran students Monday the
desire to succeed and become
wealthy began with the Puritan founders.
"The syllogism that the
American rich man was the
American good man and the
American poor man was the
American bad man has touched
all of American life," he said.
Anti-American demonstrators
in America are losing volume
because "it is now a matter of
national honor to fight for
America," the pastor preached.
Emberg said the church
should    quit    making    moral
Arts  floaters
hit  office  shoal
The Arts ■ Undergraduate
Society finally has headquarters.
After three weeks of floating operations the AUS got
office 359 in the Brock Extension.
From here president Don
Wise will administer the vast
complex of Buchanan lockers and arts students.
Any student wishing to
work with the AUS is invited to drop into the office.
judgments. It should stop acting as a "modern Moses."
"The success syndrome will
not disappear from our society
because bureaucrats will protect bureaucrats," said Emberg.
WHOLLY ACADEMIC
Faculty urges
prof senators
UBC needs a wholly academic senate, according to the
faculty association's committee on faculty participation in
university government.
The committee, in a report
released Monday, claims the
senate should be wholly academic with the exception of
three non-faculty representatives from the board of governors.
The committee, headed by
law professor C. B. Bourne, is
a continuation of a standing
faculty committee on their participation in university government.
The report originates from
a study of last year's Duff-
Berdahl report on university
government, sponsored by the
Association of Universities and
Colleges in Canada, and the
president's committee's recommendations on faculty participation.
The committee claims the
senate is the academic legislature of the university.
"Its primary function is to
deliberate and legislate on academic matters," the report
said.
It says the senate is already
too large to perform effectively.
"Its present size is in part
due to an attempt to secure
sufficient academic representation to counterbalance the
large  lay representation."
The committee also recommended that the senate open
its doors to the university community.
"The meetings of the senate
should be open to members of
the university and a gallery
should be made for this purpose," it said.
The committee disagreed
with the president's group over
the tenure in office of the departmental chairman.
The president's committee
wants the chairman appointed
without  definite  term  coupled
C.   B.   BOURNE
.   .  .  academic  senate
with a system of review every
five years.
The faculty's committee
recommends that the chairman
be elected for a five-year term
and that a review of each department take place every five
years.
The chairman's competence
would be reviewed by a committee partly composed of his
faculty.
In most other points, the faculty committee agrees with
the president's committee.
Bourne claimed the differences between the two reports
were not large.
"There are basically two issues involved,'' he said.
"Whether outsiders should be
on the senate and what the
term of office of the chairman
should be.
"The reports will be discussed by faculty and resolutions
will then be adopted on faculty
participation in university government," said Bourne.
Profs debate arts changes
pilot plan goes next fall
Arts dean Dennis Healy's
proposed curriculum changes
have been revised in favor of
a limited pilot project next
year.
The arts faculty made the
revisions in meetings last Wednesday,  Thursday and Friday.
Healy had proposed abandonment of departmental divisions in the humanities and
social sciences for first and
second year students.
Each first year student would
choose a program consisting of
arts 1 and one other course.
Arts 1 would meet five hours
a week.
Features of the second year
program would include 12
hours of instruction per week
and no compulsory courses.
Dr. Ian Ross, of the English
department, said Monday: "The
new program will now consist
of a pilot project.
"Up to three sections of arts
1 will be offered instead of de-
_l___
DEAN  HEALY
.  .  .  charges changed
voting the  whole year to the
new arts.
"At the end of the year there
will be some sort of attempt to
evaluate   the   whole   arts  pro
gram," said Ross, who heads
the English  100 program.
According to assistant arts
dean Prof. Walter Young, political science, there was some
indecision about the adoption
of the pilot project.
A faculty vote by mail will
be made this week.
Dr. E. R. Black, political
science, said problems as to
how the project is to be applied must still be solved.
If the faculty asks for volunteers the experiment will not
be valid, Black explained, as
the volunteers would not necessarily be typical of the average
first-year  student.
At the same time, he added,
it is not fair to force students
into an experiment.
Said Healy: "The original
draft was changed after thorough discussion and constructive debate."
The complete text of the
faculty's amendments will be
available later this week. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER 25, 1966
A man who has never gone to school may
steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.
—Theodore  Roosevelt
Chafe, chafe
One might think the enlightened west coast could
get beyond the tokenism of the Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada's Duff-Berdahl report
when it studied university government.
But the way the president's committee and the
faculty association committee managed to skirt the
issue of student participation in university government
is nothing less than scandalous.
Somehow, both reports managed — after the fashion
of last year's Duff-BerdaW thing — to dismiss students
with  an   airy   paragraph   or  less.
Yet, student participation in university decision
making has been one of the major campus topics across
Canada this year.
And student outrage against the Duff-Berdahl report, which granted the possible inclusion of a token two
students on academic senates, has been heard across
Canada.
Both UBC committees bumbled on to oblivion,
suggesting perhaps two students be allowed to sit
on senate, and one even offered a student-elected rector
on the board of governors.
Just like Duff-Berdahl, both somehow did not seek
student opinion when researching their reports, although
similar omissions in scientific research would be farcical.
Both cited Duff-Berdahl as their authority for the
student dismissal. Duff and Berdahl made their token con
cession out of fear of a Berkeley situation on Canadian
campuses, not from any conviction of the essential worth
of student opinion.
Perhaps the point has not been made clearly
enough.
Students are, after all, the basic reason for the
existence of universities; and no matter how hard it
has been tried, no official study has yet managed to
disprove that thesis.
Decision making at all levels in the university
directly affects students, and the only premise of
democracy which has stood the trials of modern politics
is some involvement by the governed in the decisions
that govern them.
Two students against 75 professors on the senate
won't do.
Nor will a student-elected rector on the board
of governors.
Nor will the old, tired arguments about students
not having enough time to serve adequately — somehow, businessmen involved in the highest corporate
ranks find time, and we'd suggest students due to their
youthful vigor might more easily make time than a
candidate for the Canada Pension Plan.
What is neded is direct student representation on
the board of governors, and enough students to shake
a gavel at on the academic senate.
And open board and senate meetings, to remove' the
star chamber-like secrecy which now surrounds university decisions.
The tokens are wearing thin.
Well
Mike
Maybe we ought to loudly applaud prime minister Lester Pearson's proposed increased aid to education, since he's now advocating what we've been advocating for years.
But, like most students in Canada, we carry bitter
memories of a twice promised and twice lost federal
scholarship plan.
So, when Pearson speaks, especially on education,
we cannot avoid hackneyed thoughts of the boy who
cried wolf too often.
We'll wait and see, Lester, because you've compromised your integrity a few times too often to be
believed.
But if you come through this time, you'll have the
gratitude of all Canadian students.
If you don't, we won't be forced to revise our
opinion of you, nor will we be disappointed by the
Liberal party again.
SEUWE
I IN SESSXQtt
It seems a few troublemakers among  us still favor
keeping students at university . . .
I'M HIGH
BY  GABOR MATE
Friedburg blows cool
That's a funny thing about
Friedburg . .  .
He rushed into the party
Friday night, with a wild
expression on his face, hair
tousled, shirt unbuttoned,
and screaming.
"Whee! The colors! The
lights! The sounds Whee,
I'm high!"
He came over to me. I was
dancing with the broom, as I
had become bored sitting in
the corner all by myself,
reading record covers.
"Hey," he said, "I really
dig you. I
really dig
your   face.
II t' s honest.
Stupid but
honest."
"What's
he    on    this
time?" I ask-
'ed.
"Oh, someone replied, "he
ate a sugarcube and he thinks
it's LSD."
"You mean ..." asked
Friedburg.
"Not again," said Friedburg.
"It's true," they said.
"But I thought ..."
"You were wrong," they
said.
Next day I noticed a large
crowd in the middle of
Broadway, blocking traffic.
They were all watching
Friedburg who was dancing
ballet  in   his   underpants.   I
think he was doing the Death
of the Swan from Swan
Lake.
"Whee!" he sang as he
danced. "The colors, the
lights, the sounds! 'Th hiiiigh
 Hi," he said, noticing me.
"You know," he said,
"there is something really
digable about your face. I
mean I really dig it. It's a
stupid face, you know, stupid,  but honest.
"Yeah," the crowd roared.
"What a stupid face."
"But honest," others said.
"Stupid,   but   honest."
"What are you on,?" I asked Friedburg.
"Grass," he replied. "Pot.
The best stuff I've ever had.
Here, I've got some left." He
handed me a reefer.
"Friedburg," I said, "this
is  a  filter  Players."
"Oh no!" he cried.
"Yes," I replied, "you've
done it again."
"You mean ..."
"Yes," I said.
Meanwhile the crowd was
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing          Richard Blair
News    _     .     - Carol Wilson
City                    Danny Stoffman
Photo  .__      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    -     -_ Claudia Gwinn
Focus     - Rosemary Hyman
CUP Bert Hill
Ass't News        Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Ass't Photo    -    Dennis Gans
getting restless, "Hey," they
murmured "Let him dance."
"Yeah," said others, "get
your stupid but honest face
out of here and let him
dance."
Someone handed Friedburg
a Seven-Up bottle.
"Whee!" he yelled, taking
a drink. "The colors, the
lights, the sounds! I'm high:
This is the best liquor I've
ever had!"
I shook my head sadly, hid
my stupid but honest face in
my hands and walked away.
Friedburg was last seen doing the Dance of the Dnieper
Cossacks on the back of a
Jersey Farms delivery truck.
RW
Flagrantly flashing through In
his briefs was lineman Tom Morris. Watching were K a t h r y n
Keate, Angela Ottho, Sue Grans-
by, Mary ussner, Murray McMillan, Ron Simmer, Norman Gidney,
Pat Lidka, Kathy Harkness, Mute
Poynte, and John Appleby.
Kurt Hilger and Derrek Webb
camrad   the   rainy  day  bureau.
Sportsman says Arden writ
brief, George typed brief, Jim
stayed brief.  Lots  of brief cases. Tuesday, October 25,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Yay  Huberman
Hurray for the open letter
(Nobody's a Hangman at
Home, Oct. 20) to president
Macdonald by John Huberman. I agree wholeheartedly
that one should have the right
to welcome draft dodgers
without his ethics being questioned, however, I also think
a good point was raised in
the editorial of the same day.
What would happen if all the
dissenters came to Canada?
It could mean that a large
part of America's conscience
would become lodged in Canada, leaving president Johnson relatively unobstructed
in his attempt to convince the
American people of the righteousness of the cause.
I would also like to comment on Gabor Mate's article
Dead Friends Tell No Lies,
also October 20. This has to
be the worst attempt at humor I have ever had the misfortune of reading.
I wonder why a paper with
the standards of The Ubyssey
would even print crud like
that. The article is ridiculous.
AL   WIGGAN.
arts 3.
'Less  titillating
Editor, The Ubyssey:
My sympathies to the Rev.
Herbert   Fox    who    "exper
iences intense arousal when
looking through Playboy
magazine."
As much of your readership
knows, the aforementioned is
revered as a journal of high
repute in the professional
world of today.
It contains thought-provoking and exceptionally good
interviews with the history-
makers of the present in addition to numerous valuable
articles of contemporary
interest.
In the world of ethics it is
said to have ushered a breath
of fresh air into our ludicrous
double standard morality, although one must concede it
could be getting dangerously
near the fan.
For cure of the curate, may
I recommend that he enroll
in a speed-reading course.
Perhaps if he read more "dynamically" he wouldn't "feel"
so "dynamically." Soon, he
would be able to digest the
reading matter very swiftly
indeed.
His appetite for knowledge
of the realistic world would
then be satiated, and he could
avoid corruption by skipping
the colourful pictures. Reading Playboy would then prove
to be a much less titillating
experience but then again,
perhaps a little anti-climatic,
eh wot?
SHEL
'Horny  old men
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It seems to me that someone ought to look into the
Lutheran ministry. From what
I can gather it seems to be
comprised of horny old men
who get intense arousal
every time they open a Playboy.
If Rev. Herbert Fox didn't
fold the center section so that
it was the cover maybe he
wouldn't find PLAYBOY all
that glossy.
The philosophy is that sex
is clean and that sex is fun.
The complete antithesis being
Rev. Fox deriving his jollies
from pornographic literature.
I have always been of the
opinion that clergymen, who
are trained to curb their emotions, must at one time have
their strongest drive, sex,
break through. If the Reverend stems the flood this
way, fine. He is far better off
than pacing East Pender.
A  Fellow Knight of
the Round Bed
LOWEST
PRICES
ALWAYS
BUDGET
House of Beauty
Phone and enquire or our low rates
4384 W. 10th       Ph. 224-6434
An engineering career with
CROWN ZELLERBACH CANADA LIMITED
Graduates of mechanical engineering and chemical engineering have career opportunities at Crown Zellerbach
Canada Limited, one of the leading fully integrated forest
products organizations in the country.
Engineers can apply their talents and skills in many different  ways   because  of  the  wide  variety  of   products
manufactured by the company: pulp, paper,  packaging,.
plywood and lumber.
Contact the Student Placement Officers to arrange a
meeting with company representatives who will be visiting
the campus.
Interviews NOVEMBER 1, 2 and 3
University of British Columbia
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON f DRUGS
Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Vancouver       M^ww«Mf--MW«aWB   "*w Westmtatfar
677 Granville     ||Y|\TT|TiV|\TTjT|      675 Columbia
Opp. THE BAY   llllAiikH.Ail-JCPP. Army m Navy
681-6174 ■■________■_____-__-_-■-----. ia 1-0751
CAREERS IN MANPOWER
• INTERESTING
• CHALLENGING
• REWARDING
University graduates! Do you enjoy working with
and helping others? The new Department of Manpower and Immigration offers career opportunities
for personnel desirous of contributing to Canada's
social  and economic  development.
For further information contact your  University Placement Officer
Make Appointments Now for Interviews November 1 to 10
DEPARTMENT OF MANPOWER AND IMMIGRATION Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October  25,   1966
—kurt hilger photo
SMILING AGGIE QUEEN Laura Townsley and 17 opponents for the Homecoming Queen
crown made a convertible tour of the campus Friday at noon. Miss Medicine, Johanna
Rees,   was   picked   to   reign   at   the   Homecoming   dance   Saturday   night.
Cash spurs searchers
for Open House symbol
A contest, open to all students, for the design of a project and symbol to represent
UBC's Open House '67 has
been announced.
The design must symbolize
the function of the university
in developing all aspects of
Canadian life—cultural and intellectual.
The project must be a struc
ture that can be erected on
campus.
Open House, held every
three years at UBC, will be
held March 3 - 4, 1967.
This campus-wide event, involving students and staff, will
feature faculty displays, short
lectures, special events, and
campus tours.
Open House   is  designed  to
Pay brainy persons
to marry, says prof
KINGSTON (CUP)—A University of Ottawa professor
has suggested marriages between intelligent persons be
subsidized in order to increase the proportion of intelligent
persons in society.
acquaint the public with UBC.
This year Special Events
will enliven the proceedings,
portraying the non-academic
side of campus life.
Among events planned are a
happening, a paint-in, clubs
display, model parliament, and
demonstrations and debates on
current topics of importance
to university students.
Open House was last held in
1964, when more than 120,000
people toured the campus.
Anticipated attendance for
Open House '67 is 135,000.
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in  Technique
and Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at  2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
Studies have shown highly
intelligent parents tend to produce highly intelligent children, Dr. E. O. Dodson told
students at a biology society
meeting here.
But in many cases members
of this intellectual elite must
delay marriage because education costs make marriage
economically unfeasible, he
said.
Dodson suggested subsidizing young marrieds during
their unproductive college
years. Under his plan, a student in the top three per cent
intelligence range would be
subsidized provided his mate
was also in the top three per
cent.
Participation in the plan
would be on a purely voluntary basis. In-order to qualify,
couples would have to prove
their emotional and psychological maturity to a screening
board of clerygmen, psychologists and other officials.
AMS Charter Flight
VANCOUVER TO LONDON AND RETURN
$395
Leave May 11th - Return August 25th
Application Forms and In'ormation at the A.M.S. Office
WANTED
students for the
BLACK MASK
BALL
COSTUME  DANCE
October 29th - 8:30 p.m.
Dance Club Lounge — Brock Extension
Admission at the Door
mmmtm
-«NPVlMiJRm-        BY Nil 19r
:v :_v. .■ • "^
Presents
classical singer
ttjffik __#w__M_>__u'*niiwMftn#
,   WEDNESDAY NOON 35c
BrOCK haul
"■■»"<■
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to toe held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.M.S. Office).
V
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offers careers in
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS ON
November 7, 8 and 9
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
ENGINEERING — (Chemical, Mechanical, Civil)
—Permanent employment in engineering.
HONOURS GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING — <Options 1, 2, 3)
—Permanent  and  summer  employment  in   geology
and/cr geophysics.
GEOPHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
PHYSICS AND GEOLOGY
—Permanent  and  summer  employment  in  geology
and/or geophysics.
MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
HONOURS PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
Arrangements For Personal Interview
May Be Made Through The
University's Placement Office Nose
in
ass
141   beers  at  least
TUF DF B MET
Mmm Mm   mL fill mi
~~' VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25,   J966
Worth
two "m
books
No.   138
ndercut comes again
w/^-*^^Arrf
Lose inhibitions
ease frustrations
There comes a time in the affairs of a UBC student
when all things of a university nature must he put aside.
The UBC Foresters feel that
•&&&&
Sjr...
a&
s
dies aid
ider tells
needed EUS
Magistrate
ermate (not a pun) inter-
Alfred  E.   Newell, cork Newman or . . . well
ayhow . . . some E.U.S.
ot, down at the Rotten
or  is it  the Broken
f    to     determine
or not the engineers
dead.
Boor or Master-mate, or
er   the   bloody   jerk's
; was, claimed the E.U.S,
at said that they were
perhaps not completely dear!
Mastermate, in pursuing his
intercourse with Erie Newman,
inquired as to how the engin
eers could regain their former
status as the red mob.
Mr. Newman is quoted as
saying that "we are now going
to the Ladies Aid and Woman's
disastrous  defeat at  the  chariot race."
Having completed his intercourse with the disheartened
president of the E U.S., Master-
mate decided to proceed to the
campus to interview the victorious Foresters.
As   is   often   the    cane   with
Institute for moral support in [ people who smoke too much.
an    attempt    to   rebuild    our j Mastermate   lost   his   way   in
spiritual beings. 'the weeds out on campus and
'"Perhaps we can survive our j happened, by some foul chance,
: | : to wander into the building of
westers carry logs,
mg peaceniks this week
This week is Forestry "Week on campus in which the
ents of the Faculty of Forestry traditionally take charge
important affairs.
Tomorrow noon there will be a Piece March which will
the major tborouglrfairs of the campus protesting pro-
marches. The march will consumnate. on the Ebrary
-. at which place mastermate will be formally executed.
hanging will symbolize the death of all weirdy-
peaceniks, eomnrunisrtE, student councillors, and
?ers who take part in organizing the artsy masses in
gatherings.
The PRESIDENT  of  the Forest Club  challenges all
abers of the Students Council to a log birling contest
ay noon at or in the Buchanan pool.
The Forest Club challenges the faculties of agriculture,
eering, and science to a lo^-carrying contest to be held
ay at noon on the Main Mall.
Friday night the Forest Cjlub sponsors the Undercut
sin the_aiowmart Building. Come one, come al. to the
; fcash of the year.
the red mob.
Whereupon ho was har-
rangued by some sever.il dozens of the red types and forced
to flee with his hair by jumping from the building into the
bushes.
Several brave and strong
green-clad foresters perceiving his plight grabbed the
foggy-brained   Mastermate.
Perceiving- also that a stench
was indeed arising from him
and that he appeared dirty,
forthwith proceeded to throw
him into the lily pond and
thus the great Mastermate, I per's music
founder of the movement to j hours,
appease the Chinese by bending on his knees, perpetrator
of the "bomb the cong" slogan,
met his greasy fate flattened
against the bottom of the lily
pond.
No charges were laid following the incident.
this time has now arrived. We
invite you to relieve your
frustrations, lose your inhibitions, and thoroughly enjoy
yourself in the comfortable,
unsophisticated a t m o s- phe
unsophisticated a t m o s -
phere generated by the Undercut. Here is a simple recipe to
follow.
Take in hand one male (or
female) university student.
Add one (or two) bottles of
gin, rye, scotch, vodka, beer,
screech or a Chilcotin handy-
pack. Tell Hank the Hobo (and
the Hillbillies) to turn the
beat on full blast.
Add   1200   more   drinking
(and drunk) students. Turn the
lights down low <on off.) Stick
the  whole shebang into a big
j dance hall  and mix liberally.
After five hours of teking,
open the door and see what
you have in the oven — the
most successful dance of the
year,  the Forestry  Undercut.
You guys won't have to wait
while your date dresses up,
nor will you have to put on a
monkey suit .lust drag her
out of the house as she is:
io;k, s-tnek, and barrel. So fellas,, here's, a chance to see her
a; she really looks under all
that make-up and those fancy
rl'-thes.
By tradition. Undercut is a
unique bash! Art us you feel
and say what you bloody well
wan! to. Everyone will be doing the same so you won't fee!
uncomfortable.
As a matter of fact, you
probably won't feel any thing
— or you won't remember
feeling it. Everyone enjoys
themselves lo their utmost
capacity and even a little
more.
The scene of the action is
tht- P.N.E Showmart building.
The bash will start at 8:00
p.m. and the orgy will con-
nummatc at 1:00 a.m.
You are liable to see all
1/vpps of people at the Undercut engaged   in various  kinds
neers mix water to prevent
their eyeballs from getting
sucked back into their empty
cavernous noggins.
Helease of frustration is facilitated by absence of apparel
(except blue bowlers).
A prize will be given to the
couple with the best topless
hard times costume. If your
sense of propriety demands
modesty then grab a ganny
sack or other grubby clothes
and come on down to the
Showmart Building.
This entire recipe will cost
you but $3.50 per couple. At
ieast one member of each
couple must be an AMS student! Tickets are on sale at
the AMS office or can be obtained from any friendly Forester.
ot    relaxation.    Some    people ] the goa
like to stand and babble: some      Bodie
like   to   sit    and    get   quietly
stoned,   while   others   like   to
dance.
For the latter types there
will be music by Hank the Hobo and the Hillbillites. This
top-rate band has guaranteed
to supply the best in loud,
fast-beating, senior teeny-bop-
for    five    fiery
There will be mixer for sale
for those weak bloods who
need it. For those Foresters
who don't know what mixer
is. its the tiddly "sxhwepper-
vrscense" liquid used to dilute
grain alcohol. Artsy types
drink    mixer    straight.    Engi-
Engineers
break .ears
lose race
Latest, word from the field
confirms the rumors that the
Engineers suffered a humiliating defeat in front of 10,000
UBC students on October- „,
1968.
Thirty-five d a u n 1 less warriors clad in Forestry green
pulled out ahead in the final
stages of the rhariot race to
defeat the cowshite bedecked
red mob.
The race -began at midtime
in the Teacup football came.
Then the starting gun fired.
the burly green tram fired-off
leaving the red mob in a cloud
of dust
It was not until the race was
Hearing its completion that
the red mob. heni over with
the frenzy of their effort, eyelids shut tight in '.he climax
oE their exertion, froth fleck
ing from the corners of their
mouths, ran smack bang into
posts,
flew in a'i directions,
the chariot splintered into a
thousand pieces. And the proud
Foresters ran handily around
the disarray of broken gears to
finish first.
Stories from other parts of
the campus confirm that many
engineers have since commit
ted suicide by jumping out of
windows. Reliable sources
from the Registrar's office report that there is a mass ex-
odtrs of students from engineering to other faculties.
The engineers' spirits have
been broken completely by
your friendly foresters. Engineers are dead.
*ir
'   -I
V s «f
Foge 2
T H I     PLANK
TwftMfcrjrV 00©fa**< %$,   fl
TIIF   01 IIIV
i n Ij  f ii n n ii
Pot-iishtid onnuaHy fay the Forest Club of UBC with tho help of thre«
ca»e_ of ke*r, lets of goodwill and a little sweat.
Editor:    It. W. Crosiley.
Contributors: Ran D_vi», Dick Armas, Mike Sywulych, Bob Willing-
ton, Harry Morgan, Chris rtaxlewood, Derek Webb anii Bill Henderson.
TypirtK    Joyce Churchill!, Rene* FHjet arwt louij. Crossley
The assistance anti helpful advice of Pat Hrushowy- af the Ubyssey
staff it gratefully acknowledged.
OCTOBER 25, 1966
'Wood is Good?"
-THE UNCERTAIN FORESTER
1966
Wood forever
The universally accepted, unique and definitely
proven fundamental law upon which the practice of
Forestry is based is that "WOOD IS GOOD."
All of the Forestry Research which is carried out
by the members of the Faculty of Forestry is based on
this law. This fact, then, must be kept constantly in mind
whenever one is surveying the results of research done
in Forestry.
One of the most amazing discoveries made in the
last few years was that trees can be grown in a computer. Until the final results of this discovery by Dr.
J. H. G. Smith are investigated, however, it is considered
necessary to continue growing trees in the great outdoors. When Dr. Smith's method of growing trees is
adopted it will ne longer be necessary to grow trees
outside and all of the now-forested land will be turned
over to the conservation people.
Dr. P. G. Haddock after years of tedious counting
discovered that there are more trees in the interior than
on the coast- When the results of his tree count were
compared with comparable surveys in the European
countries he discovered that the interior of B.C. has more
trees than all of the European countries put together.
Late last spring at the height of the mating season
for Douglas fir, Dr. O. Szildai invented and successfully
bred a tree with u square cross seetijiial shape.
Subsequent to this important invention Dr. W. Well-
wuod discovered that due to the fact that square trees
can be grown there will probably be less waste in slabs
and edgings from trees in the near future.
Dr. J. W. Wiisen is studying the annual growth
rings of Dr. Sziklai's invention found that the annual
rings are square in shape. Dr. Wilson theorizes that
this discovery may account for the fact that the tree is
square.
After many, many years of laborious research. Dr.
B. G. Griffith made a tree that grows horizontally along
the ground. This type of tree will he easier to fell and
make eone-pkking much easier. Mr. J. R. Mills is working out a new set of logging cost data for Dr. Griffith's
horizontally-grown trees. If the trees can be made to
grow along the ground towards the landing, yarding
costs will be greatly reduced.
Mr. L. Valg discovered that there are several different types of pulp mills on the B.C. Coast and that this
probably accounts for the different types of air pollution
in evidence on the caast.
Mr. L. Adamo vieh discovered that not only is wood
good,, but that it is better than steel and always will be
the best construction material forever and ever.
Dr A. Kozak and Mr. D. D. Munro are trying to
fit the square and horizontally grown trees into Dr.
Smith's computer.
Dr. J. E. Bier and Dr. K, Graham are working out
ways and means of keeping bugs and diseases out o£
the computer so that only GRADE A trees will be grown.
And last but by no means least. Mr. J. Walters
found out just recently that there are still a few trees
left up on the Research Forest north of Haney.
Appointment
Of interest to members of the University of British
Columbia and the forest industry is the recent appointment of Mr. Jack Walters to the post of acting director
of the University of British Columbia Research Forest
at Haney, B.C.
Mr. Walters was born in England in 1921. After
serving with the British Army from 1939f to 1941 and
the Royal Air Force from 1041 to 1946, he attended the
University of British Columbia and was granted a
B.Sc.F, in 1951 aad an M.F. in 1955. From: 1951 to 1956
he employed by the Forest Biology Division at Vernon,
B.C. Since 1956 he -has. been- Research Forester at the
University of-British Columbia Research Forest.
Mr, Walters has always had a special interest in
the development and education of undergraduate and
graduate forestry-students and much of his work'has
been by way of' demonstrations for their' benef't In
return ht- ha.- * „m_.l the tespeel and mendsJim _>t all
thoie who know him.
f$a.i" 5*c©-f   U «q, *Jkid aUe>*rf 4k« fire,   m
DEAN'S MESSAGE
Foresters' future good
<m4
t<r«ur
t?
In the summer of 1963 a
survey was made of the employment of the 748 graduates
in forestry from this University up to that time. Just over
91 per cent were employed in
Canada and all but 76 of those
were in British Columbia.
By next April more thai-
ISO additional students will
have graduated or, in the last
four years, more than one-
fifth of the total in the previous 40 years.
The demand this year for
our graduates will exceed the
supply just as it has during
the last several years.
Looking    ahead,    there    is
every    indication    t hat    the
strong   demand   for   forestry
graduates   will   continue   and |
will increase. !
The current extensive ex
pansion of the pulp and paper
industry will necessitate greatly intensified and improved
forest management in our
province, which has approximately one-third of the pulp-
wood  inventory  in  Canada.     '
Furthermore, projection of
demand for wood for fibre,
lumber and plywood indicate
still greater expansions in the
future.
At a national conference on
forestry in Canada last spring,
the assembly of experts estimated that the demand for
wood for all purposes would
grow from 34 million cunits
in 1965 to 51 million in 1975.
and to 140 million in 2000 —
an increase of 50 per cent to
1075    -  an  increase  of  over
four  times  by   2000   A.D.
The prospective demands in
19? 5 could be met from oui
resources by careful planning
a n d intensive management
starting now but 'here will
• ioi in- enough wood l.o meet
cstin.-it"d   demands   by   2000
A.D. unless planning, forest
management and research are
greatly intensified very soon.
In brief, if we go on as we
are this country will ftece a
wood shortage before twenty
years have elapsed'
The demands on our forests
for recreation and non-extractive   uses   are   also   growing
GARDNER
. . . opportunity
very rapidly and these cannot be denied. Until recently
the main concern of forest administrators has been with
the assessment of the resource
and the most economical harvest.
Now new attitudes and policies are plainly necessary and
!he professional forester today
may be involved in a number
'■f activities associated with
the "multiple-u-'e" concept
Mich as recreation, watershed,
I*11 and wildlife, and grazing
management.
The possibilities for con-
fiietj of interest in policy and
operations are considerable
and   many  graduate  foresters
skilled in forest resource :
agement will be required
assist in their resolution
management.
Already   forestry   graduati
play   an   important   role
parks management and ma
more will be required for
activity in the next decade
our   park   system   grows
meet the demand.
Among the great variety
other employment possibilt
for forestry graduates, peril
the most acute shortage
suitable graduates is in tb
field of wood science and te
nology.
The   wood-using   indu
offef   good  career   oppc
ties in research, develop.)
production,   distribution,
and,   after   experience,  senti
administration  to  those
uates  with   an   underst
of the physics, mechanics
chemistry of wood.
Unfortunately,    very    f e j
have   chosen  to   specialize
this field.
Many     forestry     grad.
with    post-graduate    train
are needed now for re
and teaching. In the next
years the Canada Depart
of   Forestry   hopes  to
several  hundred for  res
in   various  fields   of
and forest products aeross
nation.
Also,  virtually every fa
try jfaculty in North Ame
is searching for staff but **
is   a   great   shortage  of
quatjely educated teachers, f
Forestry  and  wood
offers education  and  trail
in   the  application  of  sc
to the wise management
use of our most impot'jctj
newable resource leaditu
great   variety   of   cha! en
employment opportuj
ties within our own nor
_>v .
. <
J>1 fcdoy,  October   25,   1966
THE      PLANK
Poqe 3
:ho!ar
>aves
iculty
ne of the original staff
ers of the Faculty of
Stry is Dr. B. G. Griffith
ougb planning retire-
ue_t in the 1967-68 ses-
he has .been active in the
Jty since he arrived thirty
ago.
uro FORKS
Bring   attained   his   high
ol education in the Grand
ks area,  Dr. Griffith came
T.B.C.   in search  of  a  set-
dpgree.  He graduated in
with a Bachelor of Sci-
degree   in   Botany   and
On   graduation,   he
offered   employment   by
'federal  government,  who
i him to do a grass study
North-West Territories
by the Provincial Forest
ce who needed an assis-
; botanist. Not caring much
fUte North-West Territories,
began   working   tor   the
Service.    Dr.    Griffith
employed for  five years
Alexa Lake Experimen-
tCStatkm  and  one   year   at
Cowichan   Lake   Experi-
al Station. At this time,
esigned to obtain a raast-
> degree at U.B.C. He pro-
ed to  Harvard  where  he
awarded   his   Master   of
degree.   He   attained
Joctonate at the University
fashington.   In   1837,    Dr.
0th became a member of
If UBC  faculty  of  forestry,
IVE
Griffith   has   led. an
life,    in    1929   he    be-
a   member   of the   Ca-
Institute   of   Forestry,
^has  served  this  organiza-
wcll, having held most of
|, responsible    positions   in
Vancouver   Section   and
served    on    the    National
oittee.   He   has   been   nasi president of the Junior
est  Wardens   and   in   1.940
director of the Canadian
Stry Association.
ISHED
1936,   "A   Pocket   Guide
i,T_e Trees  and  Shrubs  In
was   written   and   pub-
by   Dr.   Griffith.   Since
time,   he   has   published
research papers such as
bulletin  on  "Soil  Moisture
University Forest". At
jB-presem   time,   he  is   pre-
a bulletin on  a pheno-
study on which he has
: working for the past ten
itgh active in academic
t, Dr  Griffith goes bowl-
eicly  He has been ehair-
i*pr«sident  and  secretary
Jtwulty bowling league,
en m the league for
en yea1".
^e retire., Dr. Griffth
, staj   physically   ac-
j^eontinutng    his.    re-
es. He will be mis-
f he has taught and
.whom he  has   been
fy.th over 1-i.-, term
_vil
I THINK THAT I shall never see, a poem as ioveiy as Gino Hawreiak. Gina is the Forester.'
choice for Queen of the year and is our candidate in the Homecoming Queen contest.
She's quite a wonderful girl m all aspects. Gino hails from Edmonton, Albertc which is
on the other side of the Rockies in o land called Alsaskataba She's 5'5" tall, 96 pounds
light,   brunette   and   has   the   most   fascinating brown eye;.
Resources management
mmw
must consider recreation
|i "Resources should be man-
Paged on a multi-use basis and
i: outdoor recreation must at ail
j times receive consideration,'"
! This is a statement of gov-
| ernment policy made recently
: by the Honourable Ray O.
j Williston of, tht; Provincial De
j partment of Lands, Forests
I and Water Resources. The de-
j cision made by the minister
I in, the Stctlako River contro-
| versy does not reflect the afore
: mentioned doctrine and indeed
j smacks of hypocrisy.
The Stellako is a seven-mile
stretch  of  river joining Fran
cois   and   Fraser   lakes of the
t
I Upper   Fraser   system.    From
1:1.914   to   1948   the   transports -
I tion   of  logs   down   the  river
jjwas common  place,   The  fish
|!resource was relatively  unim-
ijportant due to the obstruction
created toy the Heir Gate slide
of 1913. After construction of
jj trie     fish     ladders,    genuine
|:efforts were made to improve
lithe salmon runs, and from 1948
j' to   19-64 no  log. were  driven
': down   the   river  and   the   fish
I resource   became   of   substantial value. The  Steliako  sock-
eye   run   is   worth   $1,200,000
I per year and the sport-fishing
1 value is also appreciable.
The Federal Deoartmeni of
Fisheries, permitted log d-iv-
ing in lOfis as no alcrnativc
meant; of I05: transoort wa;-
then feasible Tm- federal department, along with tht, In.er-
natioin.' Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission and fbe }>?<->■
vincia) Department or Tyorrca
tion an-' Conservation nr,*i
took, an extensive sl.n-ly o! the
sffer*:-: o! lop ririvin" re the
salmond and rainbow trout resource.
Their findings indicted thai
the log- drives posed a definite
threat  to the fish resource
Mumcroui; in;.; jam? cause;.'
extensive gouging an dcrosion
of the grave) beds essential for
successful spa wm ing.
Resultant, accelerated stream
bank erosion car, cause channel changes and further gravel
loss. Streams tributary to the
Steliako contribute little gravel ^ind restoration. <s£ the grat-'-M
beds- is thus an extremely ?tow
process.
Accuim.'
10:1;
bark and other wood debris in
the gravel beds cor; deplete
oxygen    supplies    and    rrdurt
th*1 production, rif inori organisms.
Trout  and  salmon   eggs  are
destroyed bv the combined
effects of erosion, ponging and
suifor.au on.
The final report: recommended .'ha! this seven-mile stretch
of water he protected from log
driving. An a It.-mate mod" oi
transporlatior: in the form a a
roar! parallel to the rvcr ;.-;
now  .--,  cx,'stc_.c-;.-.
Truck transportation cost:.
are higher but 0 seven-mi iu
haul is, no; unreasonable in a
po-tion 01 the province where
forty to sixty miles hauls sre
not   uncommon.
In addition a concern for
immediate fmancin1 gains
without regard for the long
term benefits of a particular-source is not >n the public
interest.
Mr Williston's enigmatic decision to defy a federal order
and to permit the t<»66 log
drive appears to have political
connotations. I: could be '.he
intial shrnv of pwr r in n sub
sequent sen*'"- te g^in provincial jurisdiction over the
Fraser   ifiver.
iJcop!i- in posljions to manage the natural resources of
Crown lands art- expeted to
act  in   {he   public   interest.
Air force
strikes
tactically
Another tactically air raid
on heavily defended oxen pads
was carried out today by units
of the United State:-; Air
Strike force.
The force is operating from
a base in an undisclosed arrs
of   die   Riviera or   mavbo
the Gold Coast.
EAID
The raid came after Anneri
can intelligence had closely
studied a e i r a I photographs
taken by high-flying reconnaissance planes at the height
of the monsoon season.
These photographs clearly
indicated that the oxen pads
were being used by oxen,
some of which were known
to have Viet Cong sympathies.
DEFENDED
The photographs also indicated that the area was heavily defended by bamboo installations t h a t had obviously
been planted to prevent South
Korean landing-
Some of th.- ba if. h o. !..
thicket:-: were son: lo :b<- over
a century old and were doubt-
ies_: swajrd by i<»e wmili *,'.
political   change.
After pin-pointing _hr- tar
gel and estimate thai Use explosions must have severe'y
damaged Viet Cong morale in
the ares
ADVANTAGE
Immediately after the air
attack helicopters flew in a
battalion of South Korean
marines to follow up the ad
vantage of air supremacy
Unwove !.rv Vii-f Cone
cad disappeared undo*-t_n>unri
leaving behind an-as of liiriglt-'
infestrd b> w<-M todociunalpri
animals and snake; thai. >m
mediate!v set vv _. fnj.ntrr-
offensive.
Helicopters r- t u r n e n to
within   Kit)  miies  of  in*   aror<
pmg   poir;:.    le
nicK   up   ,-
POUHED
Me? "iv rule
a    battaiio
l;_S    M'.i'-jne.s
in      _>_ip^f!f;
rourio.e.i i= vriagf- on trio o^t-
strrrt. and prrur; o m i(i nrl-
lion rounds of srr;_;i! arms fin-
brforc assauit wrrvo:- mopped
up.
Seven marines are reported
missing and an undisclosed
number were flown honie suffering  war neurosis
WAR  IS  HELL.
One battle weary loather-
neck    told    Plank's,   corrosposi
dent:
"This   war    t>    h'l!      I»    we
hadn't  known th-jr  vt*is,rre w;-i;-
descrtci   _„.*   ■;';;-"
have   been   tern;
rifle   nr   ours   i?
off   tike   flier-
"tt'_  ;;   -o.itte-r
-^Hir--.    -Vf;i-i-;
le   Thar,   new
AnnfK'.se:   us
-'   ab,.> ■:     --rvn-
buddie  before  he.  shoots T H E '    ? I A N K
■■■Tii»v_ay,.'October '2-5, 1966
FOOLS  CORNER
Read and retch
I had eighteen bottles of
whiskey in my cellar and 1
was told by my wife to empty
the contents of each and every
bottle down the sink ... or
else.
So I said I  would and p-O-
cork of the next and drank
one sink out of it, then drew
I he  rest  down the glass.
I pulled the sink out of the
next glass and poured the cork
down the bottle, then I corked
the sink with  the glass bottle
ceeded with the unpleasant j and drink and drank the pour.
task. I withdrew the cork j When I had everything emp-
from the first bottle and pour- j Ued> t steadied the house with
ed the contents down the sink,! oae haLndr counted the glasses,
with the exception of on* I TOrkS) bottles, and sink with
glass,   which  I drank. j the otner> wriich were 79 and
I extracted  the  cork  from! as the house came by I count-
the    second    buttle    and    did j ed them again and finally had
likewise with it, with the ex- j all  the   houses  in   one  bottle
eeption of one glass,  which 1 ) which 1 drank.
drank.   I   then   withdrew   the'     I  am  not   under  the  infli.-
cork from the third and poured the contents down the sink,
which I drank.
I. pulled the cork from the
fourth bottle down the sink
and poured the bottle down
the glass whieh I drank.
enee of ineohol way the toy
though thinkle peep  I  am.
I am not half as thunk as
you might drink.
I fool so feelish, I don't
know which is-me and the
drunker    I    stand    here   the
I pulled the bottle from the j longer I get.
I hate men because they take
me into alleys, dance halls,
towers and bedrooms. They
press me and feel me all over
with their fingers. After they
get me hot, they hold me to
their lips, and drag the life out
of me. When they get what
they want, they throw me aside
and 1 am good only for tramps.
Why should they take advantage of my white body.
After all 1 am only a cigarette.
Two rather plain girls who
had been good friends all
through school and the many
years following had made a
vow that the first one to get
married would phone up the
Other after the first night to
tell her what it was like. Finally one of them gets married
and. the next morning she
-phoned "her  friend.
"Oh Mable. it was awful. 1
don't    think     I    could    stand
another night of it. Up and
down, in and out, up and
down the whole night long. I'm
telling you Mable. it you ever
get married, don't get a room
next to an elevator."
The drunk sitting at the bar
seemed quite puzzled. Finally,
after much contemplation, he
turned to the gentleman sitting
next to him and asked, "Para
me shir, you schpill a bo'le
beer in my lap?"
The man beeame quite offended and told the drunk
that he most certainly hadn't.
The drunk thought this over
for a while and then turned to
the lady sitting on the other
side of him.
"Parn me lady, you schpill
a bo'le beer in my lap""
"Certainly   not!"   bace  back
the reply,
"Jush as I been schinking,"
said the drunk, "it waseh an
inside job!!"
An attendant took: the in- j When the music stopped he
.mates of an asylum to a foot-j hollered, "Sit Nuts" and they
ball  match.   When  they  play-1 all sat.
■ed the national anthem at the : What really messed every-
starl of the same he hollered, ! thing up was when a man
"Stand Nuts."" | came  around  hollering.  "Pea-
They   all   stood   obediently,    i Nuts."
■",-■■' !
To -my darling girl friend:
During the past year, 1 have attempted to- seduce you 36-5
times, i have succeeded 12 times? This averages once every thirty
days.
The following is a list of the reasons for which I did not
succeed:
we will wake the
children
it's too hot
too tired
it's too cold
it's too hoi
it's too early
pretending to sleep
window's open, neighbors will hear
backache
toothache
headache
giggles
I'm  too  iv.ll
not m the inood
baby crying
watched ;ate show
grease on face
reading The Ubyssey    2
company in the next
room 24
you're too drunk 26
?
7
15
3t
5
16
80
9
16
9
10
4
4
58
19
7
5
■?tii|Stts#ifc
\H
Do you think you could improve on this record during
coming year
Your ever-lovin
inS bm fr
 I I ———-win I	
iend.
«-',»-, ioiii
Some of us remember the
Ohio State University student-faculty free-speech protests.
Most of us remember forced integration at Mississipi U.
All of us remember the
Berkeley Free Speech Movement.
And then there was UBC.
Crisis. Grievances articulated. Action. Solidarity. That
was the housing action program, fall, 1966.
Actually there was a vague
similarity between the series
of events that happened at
Berkeley in 1964 and at UBC
this fall. Except that events
during the FSM occurred
over several months while at
UBC the HAP lasted a few
weeks. Come to think of it,
there are a few other exceptions.
An early FSM incident was
Jack Weinberg's one-man 32-
hour sit-in a police car stranded in the middle of the University of California campus.
An early HAP incident was
Jim Green's demonstration of
endurance as exposed by a
front page Ubyssey picture
of Green in his sleeping bag
under a tree, surrounded with
cooking utensils and other
junk necessary for out-of-
doors survival.
FIRST LSD TRIP
But Weinberg had an audience of up to 6,000 sympathetic students while Green's
picture was rigged. Weinberg,
touched off a key series of
spontaneous speeches and discussions among those surrounding the police car and
standing on top of it. It began FSM.
Green was in bis damp
sleeping bag long enough to
have the picture taken,
caught pneumonia and in the
wake of student unconcern
proceeded to take his first
LSD trip.
Then there was the famous FSM sit-in at the Berkeley administration building.
Eight hundred students were
upset enough to risk arrest
and were arrested. Concerned faculty and parents pitched in to raise bail.
At the parallel point in
HAP this Utopia for non-
thinkers was jarred by its
student council's tent-in. At
the peak 80 determined folksinging students participated.
The highest risk was catching a cold, but we all knew
there was a housing crisis
and something had to be
done. Concerned faculty and
students snuck toy to peer at
the collection of oddities called tent city.
WORRIED MOTHERS
The writer put up his tent,
proceeded to not sleep in it
and finally had it stolen.
Posters pushing candidates
for the second vice-president
Tuesday,  October  25,   1966
|NKf*R:::
*tt*£__3
student election were used as
wind-breakers. The administration received phone calls
from worried mothers who
wanted to know if everything
would be all right. An abated
attempt to cook hot-dogs failed when  a  tent  caught  fire.
The last dramatic incident
at Berkeley was a giant rally
after which FSM leader
Mario Savio was dragged offstage by administration cops.
This sparked and was integrated with a student strike
which affected up to (there
are various estimates) 80 per
cent of the 27,000 student
campus.
HAP also closed with two
related incidents: a noon
rally in the middle of the
campus where 800 passersby
sat down in convenient chairs
to be entertained by housing
czar Malcolm MacGregor,
and a march to city hall
which turned into a small
orderly   delegation.
The FSM strike resulted in
overwhelming support for
the students by Berkeley faculty. The faculty voted to
have suspensions of FSM leaders lifted and made concessions to students.
DON'T GIVE A DAMN
HAP originally was to
pressure UBC's administration into building residences
to accommodate all UBC students who want to live in
residence.
Somehow it ended downtown at Vancouver city hall
fighting over zoning bylaws
with a handful of politicians
who really don't give a damn
about  UBC students.
FSM was a valuable exercise in power politics for
Berkeley students. HAP was
a valuable lesson in mis-politics  for  UBC  students.
At one early stage in HAP
a probable candidate for second-vice president was made
an  unofficial HAP  represen
tative so that he could speak
in residences, thus exposing
his name.
TWO MASTER PLANS
He later decided not to
run.
At another stage in HAP
campus leftists met and planned a tent-city which had
little resemblance to the official students council plan.
Neither  plan  worked.
One envisioned rabid discussions of the increasingly
bureaucratized and inhuman
university system. These discussions, to be accompanied
by articulate speeches on
specific grievances such as
why so many students talk
of getting an education in
spite of their required academic work, would, naturally, spark direct confrontation with the administration.
The  leftists.
The other originally envisioned folk singing and a
parade of. cars to city hall
and even a letter of support
from UBC president John
Macdonald. Needless to say
the letter of support never
came. Student Council.
Student council, as politically aware as most civil servants, never really knew
what was going on. Council
executives thought they
knew what was happening
except there were as many
versions of the story as there
are executives.
The administration, usually about as reactionary as
middle-of-the-line John Birchers, never had a chance to
react. MacGregor, who usually makes the rest of the administration look pink, made
the rest of the administration
look pink.
The leftists tried to look
pink and failed. But then
they didn't have MacGregor
on their side.
Anyone for a good crisis?
Undergraduates, Graduates and Post Graduates in
engineering and honours science are required by
COMINCO LTD. for summer and permanent employment.
INTERVIEWS WITH REPRESENTATIVES
November 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1966
Your University Placement Office has details and
literature about Cominco and will arrange an interview.
Cominco
Green   blorgs
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
The Queen of May of this island city was raped Sunday by
a horde of great green hairy
blorgs. She said she was displeased.
GERMANY
Lufthansa   / £SS'5
Wenn Sie
18 Jahre
Oder alter
sind und
einigermassen
mit Ihrem
Deutsch
zurecht
kommen,
dann senden
Sie diesen
Gutschein
ein.
Erkonnte
Ihnen
Vergnugen
und
vielleicht
sogar Nutzen
bringen!
Lufthansa German Airlines, Dept. UX122
410 Park Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10022
Bitle senden Sie mir ein Antragsformular
und Informationsmaterial uber Arbeits-
moglichkeiten fur Studenten wahrend der
Sommerferien 1967 in Deutschland.
UNIVERSITAT:
Lufthansa
THE     UBYSSEY
L 1
Page 11 Page 12
U    D    I     O   O   L     I
i u^aviv- j
WblWWCI
,NTERNAL MEMORANDUM
TO ".       University Recruiting Teams
FROM :       The President
Gentlemen, as you prepare for your annual visit to Canada's major
universities, I'd like you to keep in mind the following facts:
(1) We are investing $5 million in new buildings
and equipment each year.
(2) We are launching five new grocery products
each year.
(3) In five years we plan to double our present
size.
To accomplish the above, we will need competent young people,
willing to be challenged and eager to accept expanded responsibility
as our company grows.
Today, we need close to one hundred topnotch graduates to staff
our expanding organization — people with talents in marketing
finance and engineering and the sciences.
But I'd like to make special mention of the requirements of our sales
organization.   It provides us with the sales and marketing management people of the future.   Be sure to pay particular attention to
candidates interested in starting with our sales force because this
interest denotes an understanding of the roots of our organization
and a realism which can take them further and faster up the GF
ladder.
This work you do for General Foods is very important to our future.
I know you will do it well.
JWA/i
mr
A General Foods Recruiting Team
will visit University of British Columbia
on Nov. 2,3 and 4. See your Placement Office.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
AVAILABLE   NEXT   WEEK
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE AND  BOOKSTORE - ONLY 75 CENTS
Be sure of your copy — buy early — limited quantity Tuesday, October 25,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page   .3
REFERENDUM SET
—al harvey photo
TEENAGE VANDALS IN THE GUISE of mature university
students cause grievous bodily harm to innocent goal
post following Homecoming game Saturday. Vandals
could be celebrating Thunderbird's 17-0 win over U. of
Alberta.
Boylan proposes
new-way council
There'll be some   changes  made  in  the  Alma Mater
Society constitution
AMS council moved Monday
night to strike a constitutional
revisions committee and approved a policy outline proposed by committee chairman
Charlie Boylan.
Purpose of the revisions, said
Boylan, should be to redefine
the purposes of the AMS, to
represent the students more
eqiutably than at present, to
redistribute the work of the
executive, and to streamline
council's service functions.
The committee will discuss
proposed revisions with the
undergrad societies and report
to council before Christmas.
Boylan's policies were supported by science undergrad
society president Frank Flynn.
"The council should not be
composed of undergrad society
presidents," said Flynn.
"Being a president is a full-
time job and sitting on council
as well is too much work."
• *    •
In other business, council
moved to defer a survey of
residence conditions until student housing experts have met
with architects of proposed
new residences.
• •   •
Council also approved an
agreement with Local 145,
Musician's Union, the first such
since March, 1958.
By the terms of the new con
tract, stand-by bands must be
provided and paid for by
groups who hire a band from
outside Local 145's geographical area.
"This area, roughly, is the
lower mainland," said Braund.
Exceptions to the stand-by
clause are homecoming, frosh
reception, open house, and certain others to be defined later.
• •    •
Council will call Thursday
for non-councillors to sit on administration advisory committees. So far nominations have
been presented for only two
committees.
• •    •
A motion to have "continued
and full discussion" of the war
in Viet Nam was passed.
The move was a response to
a request from Viet Nam Day
Committee secretary Sharon
Hager that the AMS endorse a
week of speeches, films and
discussions on the war.
AMS first vice-president
Charlie Boylan moved the
AMS give its support to the request without actually sponsoring the week of protest, but
this was amended by treasurer
Lome Hudson in an attempt
to stop the heated debate on
the war which followed the
original motion.
McGill firm over CUS
MONTREAL <CUP) — McGill University's students' society is going ahead with its
plans for a mid-January referendum on McGill's membership in the Canadian Union
of Students.
The students' society will
hold an open meeting Nov. 2
or 3 to discuss the proposed
referendum which will decide
whether McGill remain in
CUS, join l'Union Generale
des Etudiants du Quebec, or
become independent of both
organizations.
McGill's    council    decided
Oct. 13 to hold the referendum
after    external    vice-president
Arnie Aberman recommended
withdrawal from CUS.
"I will take the results of
this referendum, to be binding on me, even if it means
getting back into UGEQ,"
Aberman said.
"If we do stay in CUS however, it will be, as before, on
an   apolitical   stand.   In   the
WHY BE GRAY ?
HAIRCOLORING TREATMENTS
-  HAIRSTYUNG -
UPPER TENTH BARBERS
4574 W. 10th Ave. __ by the Gates
111111
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACES
"War on the Agrodome Floor"
FOREIGN STOCKS
A  cross  between   stock  car
racing and a  demolition
derby.
AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Children   under  12   FREE  with  Adults
U1/W
meantime, we are witholding
McGill's fees from CUS pending the results of the referendum."
Aberman said he sees nothing illogical in staying in CUS
and refusing to take political
stands, as CUS is moving in a
political direction without an
activist constitution.
"I   hope   in   the   next   few
congresses CUS will return to
its senses and be content to
fulfil its role as a service organization,"  he said.
Aberman said while he
agrees with the universal accessibility principle, he does
not think free education and
student salaries advocated by
CUS will help achieve this
goal.
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
Paul Krassner
SAMPLE QUOTES
"Hey, what you got there, mister?"
"Nothing much, kid, just these little plastic models of the American Dream/
"How much do they cost mister?"
"That depends, kid, how much you got?"
"Communism is the Brotherhood of Man Without the Fatherhood of God/
Thursday, October 27
Auditorium      -       12:30      -      35c
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
founded in 1959, now boasts over 250,000 graduates reading at an average
of 1500 words per minute with goo J comprehension. Reading Dynamics is
an 8-week effective reading program, designed to teach you to vary your
reading rate and technique according to material being read. The course is
approved   by the  Minister of   Labour  as  an   educational   tax   deduction.
LIMITED ENROLMENT
Although the majority of our Winter Classes are filled to capacity, we still have a few ooenings on the following starting dates:
THURSDAY OCTOBER 27th
to be held at University Hill Secondary School
MONDAY OCTOBER 31st
Downtown Institute
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL:
EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS J&Su.
OFBCLTD- Page  14
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October  25,   1966
Birds swat
'best team
in West'
The University of Alberta Golden Bears are not the
best college football team in western Canada.
The UBC Thunderbirds are.
These would seem reasonable conclusions from UBC's
17-0 win over the Bears Saturday at Varsity Stadium.
A homecoming crowd of 4,000 watched through a
Scotch mist as the Birds humbled the team sportswriters and
fans had labelled "best in the west".
■    Bears tough against run
^m ■•■ ■■■■        ""-■___ c -.•",3_ik________r ■.*,
! -■»_*■*■. .   • Ml -jr.
—derrek webb photo
UBC THUNDERBIRD defensive tackle Hal Stedham (84) overpowers University of Alberta
Golden Bears blocker and deflects punt by Bear Garry Corbett (1 2) in UBC's 17-0 homecoming  victory  over Alberta  Saturday at Varsity Stadium.
ENGINEERS:
let's
interview
each other
Maybe you'll be one of the graduate engineers we interview in the near
future. If you are, we invite you to interview us, too. After all, an interview is a two-way street. We want to know about you, and you will want
to know about us. Only in that way can we establish the basis for a
sound working relationship. So give it some thought. Decide exactly what
you'd like to know about Columbia Cellulose, and about living in the
west. Ask about our policy of training for engineers that assures practical
experience on specific, planned programmes. Right now, we're in the
midst of a vital phase of development: A 750-ton per day bleached
kraft pulp mill is being completed at Prince Rupert. Our need for engineers in construction, design, process and research and development
was never greater. Let's get together and talk about the future. Why not
arrange an interview time now through your university employment
office? We'll be on campus November 21  to 25.
6.
OLUMBIA
<_£
ELLULOSE
HEAD OFFICE: 1111 WEST HASTINGS STREET, VANCOUVER 1, BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISIONS: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT • PRINCE RUPERT PULP DIVISION • TWINRIVER TIMBER LIMITED
CELGAR PULP DIVISION . CELGAR LUMBER DIVISION . CELGAR WOODS DIVISION . CALUM LUMBER LIMITED
Alberta, beaten 4-2 the week
before by Manitoba, was far
from easy going for Frank
Gnup's Birds.
The Bears arrived with a
tough interior defensive line
that thwarted UBC attempts
to establish a running threat
up the middle, and in the early
minutes Bird pass receivers
had trouble catching the slippery, unfamiliar leather ball.
(U.S. rules permit use of a rubber football.)
But Bird pass protection for
quarterback Dick Gibbons was
excellent most of the afternoon. George Brajcich, Mike
Rohan, Bob Fitzpatrick, Jim
Fornelli, Bob Gillingham and
Jim Blair gave Gibbons time
to complete 13 passes.
UBC's outstanding defensive
team stood out there on Alberta's first series of downs
and watched sophomore quar
terback Terry Lampert fire a
pass to speedy halfback John
Violini, who gathered in the
ball and romped 51 yards to
the Bird 24.
Crossbar gets into act
The Birds survived that
bomb, though, and the first
quarter and most of the second went by in the run-pass-
punt sequences so dear to fans
of Canadian-rules football. Until the late minutes of the half,
that is.
Appropriately, it was a
third-down punt by Alberta
that catalyzed a game threatening to degenerate into defence-oriented trench warfare.
The punt hit the crossbar of
UBC's goal posts, arced back
the way it had come, and settled into the arms of a Golden
Bear lineman at the UBC 15.
The lineman was obviously
surprised at this turn of fortune, but manfully carried the
ball to the UBC two yard line
before punt return men Sonny
Brandt and Chip Barrett stopped him.
But an angry Bird defence
hurled back Alberta's first attempt, a dive play, and the
Golden Bears decided to run
to the wide left side of the
field.
Lampert's pitchout to Gil
Mather was off target, and
Bird defensive halfback Kent
Yaniw scooted in to recover
the fumble.
Barrett snares long bomb
Then ensued UBC's most impressive drive  this  season.
Gibbons led the Birds from
their own six-yard line to a
touchdown in five plays.
With 2:09 remaining in the
first half, Gibbons threw to
end Lance Fletcher for 31
yards, then hit Brian Sedgewick for 18 more.
From midfield, Gibbons missed Fletcher on first down.
But on the next play he
threw a 40-yard strike to Barrett, who lined up as a flanker.
Barrett took the ball away
from two defenders at the Alberta 15, and stumbled past a
hard tackle at the ten to fall
on the six.
Halfback Bob Sweet took it
from there, diving over his
own right tackle and veering
to the outside for the touchdown. Sonny Brandt converted, and the Birds led 7-0.
They maintained their momentum into the third quarter,
but had drives snuffed out by
a fumble and two interceptions.
Birds get pair of breaks
Barrett and Mo Hayden
intercepted passes by Lampert,
too, and the Golden Bear
offence, despite a shotgun formation which sent out as many
as six eligible receivers, looked docile.
Just into the fourth quarter,
UBC got the breaks it needed.
Barrett's punt went through
the hands of a Bear deep man,
and Sam Kravinchuck recovered the fumble at the Alberta
six.
UBC managed just one yard
in two tries, so Brandt booted
a 12-yard field goal to make
the score 10-0.
Tackle Jack Christopher re
covered an Alberta fumble on
the very next scrimmage play,
and UBC bolted in to score
from the 36 in three plays.
Sweet churned for 15 on the
same dive play that scored the
first touchdown.
Two plays later, Ron Kincade swung out , of the tailback position in UBC's I formation and went 14 yards for
the major off his own right
tackle.
Brandt's conversion attempt
was no good the first time, but
a roughing penalty on Alberta
gave him another shot, and
the Birds had their margin
with 11 minutes to play. Tuesday,  October  25,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
\ ^v.Aa.^&S&CV ■* ^    *£vsftS %s.
Page  15
NOW who's tops out this way?
jan»_i«.
—derrick webb photos
UNWELCOME VISITOR in UBC backfield
Saturday was Alberta defensive tackle
Ed Molstad (64) whose 6-6, 212-pound
frame popped up in front of UBC quarterback Dick Gibbons (16) all too often.
Molstad, fast for his size, bears down
on Gibbons (above), then forces him to
run with the ball despite open receiver
Rod Smith (86), calling for pass.
A misty, cold Saturday was
the day the UBC Thunderbirds
laid claim to the title of best
college football team in western Canada. They did it by
throttling the holders of that
title, the University of Alberta
Golden Bears, 17-0 at Varsity
Stadium.
UBC's defensive players
were their usual tough selves,
with solid line play and an
effective pass rush.
A dozen Alberta players
left the field at various times,
victims of either soft training
in Edmonton or good technique on UBC practice fields.
Chip Barrett, the extra back
who was supposed to stay out
of the way in the Birds' first
Canadian rules game this season, merely punted, returned punts, caught a 49-yard
pass to set up a touchdown
and dived to intercept a Bear
aerial.
Dick Gibbons, protected
well by his offensive linemen,
nevertheless had to scramble
on occasion, and passed for 13
completions with soggy
leather football.
—norm betts photo
TIMELY DEFENCE by UBC Thunderbird linebacker Roger Gregory (21) thwarts University
of Alberta quarterback Terry Lampert's pass
to end Darwin Semotiuk (75) in second quarter of UBC's 17-0 victory Saturday.
—powell hargrave photo
INTENSE  BALL CARRIER above   is  Chip  Barrett,  who  played   both   his   normal
defensive  halfback   position   and   an   offensive  flanker   post  with   poise.   Here
Barrett, off balance on one  leg, strains  in  the grip of an Alberta  tackier to
make extra yardage on a  punt return.
HSH\**.„^*-'^,«MMB   .--S^aKM!,';
<■ J-v
■ $m
Stickers blitz
North Shore 8-1
The UBC field hockey
Thunderbirds ran away from
North Shore "A" in a B.C.
Field Hockey Association contest on Spencer Field Saturday.
Led by centre forward Warren Bell's four goals, the Birds
Intramurals
Tennis
goes a
head
Intramurals director Gordie
Cameron reports that a new
tennis singles schedule has
been drawn up to replace a
missing one.
The revised schedule opens
Wednesday with the following matches:
Chan (law) vs. Rocky (science); Stewart (engineering)
vs. Johnson (ATC); Lobb (forestry) vs. Insley (Phi Delts).
MAA meets
The Men's Athletic Association will hold its first general meeting Wednesday at
12:30 in Memorial Gym 213.
All managers are asked to attend.
zoomed to a 7-1 half-time
bulge, and coasted the rest of
the way.
Besides Bell, UBC scorers
were Paul McMillen, Dave
Johanssen, Doug Harrison,
and Jamie Wright, with a goal
apiece.
The victory put UBC in a
first-place tie with Jokers "A".
JAYVEES LOSE
AT MOSCOW
The UBC Jayvees had a
taste of major college competition Friday when they met
Idaho Frosh in Moscow,
Ihaho.
The result was a 36-0 defeat for UBC.
The Frosh, sporting a high
school Ail-American quarterback, ran mostly sweeps and
off tackle plays against
UBC and had little difficulty penetrating the Jayvee
defence.
The Jayvees played a
spirited game but were unable to cope with Idaho's
power running and pinpoint  passing. Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   October  25,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Red gives sharp reply
COMMUNIST CLUB
Nelson Clarke, federal communist organizer, speaks today
at noon in Mildred Brock.
Topic is Communist response
to Mitchel Sharpe.
ECONOMICS SOC.
General meeting noon today
in Ang. 213. Elections and discussion of mid-terms. All interested economics students are
urged to attend.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
College Life Thursday at 9
p.m. in Lower Mall common
block lounge. Robert Andrews,
western regional director, will
be the speaker. Everyone invited.
PRE-LIBRARY CLUB
Mr. Ley, director of the
Fraser Valley Regional Library, will speak Wednesday
noon in Bu. 225. Dr. Rothstein will also be preesnt. All
welcome.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Gloria Doubleday, classical
singer, will perform works of
Bach, Mozart, Wolf, and Warlock Wednesday noon in Brock.
. Admission is 35 cents.
HAMSOC
General meeting noon Thursday in Bu. 212. All members
and prospective members
please attend.
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Public lecture by Aaron
Levine on Effective Citizen
Participation in Planning.
Wednesday noon in Lass. 102.
MUSSOC
Auditions for principal parts
in How to Succeed in auditorium, Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
Be prepared to sing and read
. . . everyone welcome.
PRE DENTAL SOC.
Meeting Wednesday noon in
Bu. 204.
AUS COMMITTEE
Evaluation committee meets
today at noon in BE. 359. New
members welcome.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Ladies division meeting tonight. Check notice board for
time and place.
PRE LAW SOCS
Joint general meeting today
noon Bu. 223 for election of
officers.    Inter-society    debate
JOBS    ABROAD    GUARANTEED
ENGLAND
BRUSSELS : The Int'l Student
Information Service, non-profit, today announced that 1.000 GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD are
available to young people 17-'/2
to 40. Year-Round and Summer.
The new 34 page JOBS ABROAD
magazine is packed with on-the-
spot-photos, stories and information about your JOB ABROAD
Applications are enclosed.
TRAVEL - FUN - PAY - CULTURE
LANGUAGE.
For your copy, send $ 1.00,
AIRMAIL, to: ISIS, 133, Rue
H6tel des Monnaies. Brussels, 6,
Belgium.
Wednesday noon in Bu. 217.
Everyone welcome.
STUDENT   VOLUNTEERS
All volunteers who have not
had an interview please phone
Mrs. Buzan at RE 1-7781.
DESERT CLUB
Informal get acquainted
luncheon meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 216.
MATH CLUB
Dr. Clark speaks on convex
sets today at noon in Ma. 229.
Student-prof night Wednesday
at 7:30 in Bu. penthouse. All
welcome.
HISPANIC STUDIES
Prof.    Giuseppe    Mozzariol,
director of the Scientific Foundation, Quevini Stamplia Library Gallery, Venice, speaks
Tuesday noon in Bu. 403 on
Le Corbusier's Hospital in
Venice.
SEAFORTHS UBC
All interested in joining see
Lt. Chris Dodd, UBC Armory
at 7:30 p.m.
MARKETING CLUB
Dr. Hardwick will speak on
location with regard to downtown     retailing.     Wednesday
noon in Ang. 407.
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack talks on Finding
the Time to Live in Bu. 223
Wednesday at noon.
Western Canada's Largest
Formal  Wear  Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts   &.  Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623    HOWE    (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608  Granville   (at 10th)  4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 80 - October 21, 1966
The Addict in the.Street.  Lamer & Tefferteller (Penguin)       .95
African   Outline.   Bohannan   (Penguin)               --     .95
The  Ancient Greeks.   Finley   (Pelican)  1.35
The Bird Watcher's Quiz Book. Collins (Dover)     .     — 1.10
The Bolshevik Revolution 1917-23. Vol. 1, 2 and 3 Carr. (Pelican) 2.25 ea.
Breaking Smith's Quarter Horse.    St. Pierre    (Ryerson hardcover) 3.95
The  Brutal  Friendship:  Mussolini,  Hitler and  the  Fall  of  Italian       z
Fascism. Deakin.  (Pelican)  -_  2.95
The   Chemistry   of   Life.   Rose   (Pelican)    _ ...              1.65
Classics  of Cardiology.  Willius 8.  Keys  (Dover)  (Vol.   1   8.  2) 2.15 ea.
Cooperation  in  Change.  Goodenough   (Science  Editions)    3.20
18th  Century  Europe  1713-1789.  Anderson  (Oxford)      1.50
The  English  Reformation to  1558.  Parker  (Oxford)     1-50
Epilepsy and Other Chronic Convulsive Diseases. Gowers (Dover)  _. 2.00
From   Magic   to   Science.   Singer   (Dover)   2.15
The Genesis of Twentieth Century Philosophy. Prosch (Anchor) 1.95
Genetics  and   Man.   Darlington.   (Pelican)  _.   _     1.65
Girls of 2 Summers. Taaffe. (McClelland & Stewart) _    2.50
Glossary  of Linguistic Terminology.  Pei.  (Anchor)    2.25
The Good Samaritan and the Law.  Ratcliffe. (Anchor)         1.65
Hegel:  A  Reinterpretation.  Kaufman.  (Anchor) 1.95
Hegel:  Texts  and  Commentary.   Kaufman.  (Anchor)   1.10
The   Hemingway   Reader.   Poore   (Scribner   Library) 3.70
Heredity   and   Your   Life.   Winchester   (Dover)      .._              1.60
A  Hero of Our Time. Lermontov  (Penguin)    -          .95
The  History   of  Surgical  Anesthesia.  Keys  (Dover)        2.15
In   A   Few   Hands.   Kefauver   (Pelican) --          1.65
In Praise of Older Women. Vizinczey  (Ballantine)      .95
A Jest of God. Laurence (McClelland & Stewart)              2.50
Just Add Water and Stir. Berton.  (McClelland & Stewart)       -     ..—    .95
The  King  of the Cats.  Dupee  (Noonday)     -  - 2.10
LSD. Alpert & Cohen (New American Library)  —  —  2.50
The  Last  Days of  Mussolini.  Deakin  (Pelican) -_._.   1.85
The  Living World of Shakespeare. Wain  (Pelican)              1.25
Longer Contemporary Poems. Byron et al. (Penguin) —  1.35
Louis Pasteur.  Holmes (Dover) _          1.35
The Making of the President 1964. White (Signet) __ .--  .._._-_   ._-    .95
O   Canada.   Wilson   (Noonday)        _             —      _.  _ 2.65
Patterns   in   Criminal  Homocide.   Wolfgang.   (Science   Editions)      ... 2.65
The   Pelican   History   of  Greece.   Burn.   (Pelican)        _.      1.65
Peoples^ & Policies of South Africa. Marguard (Oxford)        1.75
The Philosophy of Art. Ducasse (Dover) .  ...     .   . .    ... .__ 2.15
Psychoanalysis and  Social   Research.  Hendin &  Carr  (Anchor)     .  ...  1.10
A Reader's Guide to Geoffrey Chaucer. Bowden (Noonday)  — 2.10
A Reader's Guide to Herman Melville. Miller (Noonday) 2.10
A Reader's Guide to the Contemporary English Novel. Karl (Noonday) 2.10
A Reader's Guide to the Nineteenth Century British Novel.  Karl
(Noonday)           _   .     .   ..    .     2.45
Reflections  on  Art.   Longer  (Galaxy) _     .      . _ 2.15
Report on the John Birch Society 1966. Epstein & Forester (Vintage)      1.90
The   Road   Past   Altamont.   Roy   (McClelland   &   Stewart)   _ ...         2.50
Roots   of   Revolution.   Venturi   (Universal   Library) _    __      4.25
A Short History of Anatomy & Physiology From the Greeks
to  Harvey.  Singer  (Dover __   ..         ...     _. 1.95
Socialist  Humanism.  Fromm (Anchor)             1.95
South Africa: The Struggle for A Birthright. Benson (Pelican) _ 1.85
The Specificity  of Serological  Reactions.  Dandsteiner  (Dover)     .  _       2.15
Strategy  and  Structure.  Chandler (Anchor)        2.95
Terror in the Name of God. Holt (McClelland & Stewart) ...__.. .95
Troilus   &   Criseyde.   Chaucer   (Anchor) -      _       2.25
The Underdeveloped Country. Galbraith (Canadian Broadcasting)
Corp.)    _ .      _     ..           1.25
UBC BOOKSTORE
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST — GOLD BRAIDED RING.
Size 4 in Freddie Wood or Buchanan.  224-9872.  Andrea Rose.
$5.00 REWARD FOR RETURN OF
my wallet. No questions asked.
Call Lome Salutin,  224-9662.
LOST: BROWN BRIEFCASE WITH
rodeo sticker Friday noon behind
Brock. Please return to Brock
Ext.  359.	
FOUND — ONE SOGGY SLEEPING
bag after tent-in.  Brock Ext.  359.
LOST—ONE MAN'S BLACK RAIN-
coat with girl's purse in pocket
at Amouries' Homecoming Dance
Sat.  nite.  Please call 733-1020.
STOLEN: ONE BLACK DUFFLE
coat, outside physics lab. Hebb.
110. Please return to lab or call
327-3492, ask for Dennis.
LADY'S     WRISTWATCH      LOST
Thursday.  Please  phone  278-1594.
LOST: MAN'S WATCH OUTSIDE
library Thurs. evening. Reward
for return. Phone Bruce 224-9064.
LOST: RED KNIRPS UMBRELLA,
Thurs. in Math. Bldg. or Library.
Finder please phone Rose-Marie
733-5881. Reward. .
FOUND: BEIGE PURSE WITH
contact lenses in it. Phone Sharon
228-2181.
Coming Dances
12A
PUSSY GALORE AT THE BLACK
Cat Ball, October 29th in The
Armory. Dance to the novel sound
of the Brave New World from
8:30 to 12:30. Admission $1.25 per
person. Costume optional.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted Elliott,  224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students  Faculty  and  Staff  Wel-
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,    736-9422.
THIS IS A GROWING BUSINESS,
you grow it and we'll cut lt!
Campus Barber Shop. 153 Brock.
(WP) TREASURE VAN SUCCESS-
fully rebuffed Saracen attacks en-
route from Gobi to I.H. Stocks of
camel saddles and opium pipes
safe.
POETRY CONTEST: UBC's LITER-
ary Guild announces a contest open
to all UBC students. Entry fee:
25c per poem, limit 25 lines maximum. Payment: one contributor's
copy, and prize of $5 for best poem
published'. All rights reserved. Address entries to 'Literary Guild
Contest', c/o BE 259, Brock Hall.
DEADLINE: Dec.  1, 1966.
PHANT   BEWARE!    SPUD   IS   ON
your campus.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED. THREE GIRLS.
Kingsway from Slocan, Welwyn,
Knight. Wendy, 434-5911; Louise,
879-2392;   Helen  876-9817.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's MWF
from Lenkurt Electric. Phone CY
1-1059.
Wanted
15
SENIOR MALE STUDENT TO
share large, comfortable, and
fully furnished suite in 12-storey
Kitsilano apartment bloc. Luxurious living at residence cost.
Phone Norm at 736-0579 after six.
Travel Opportunities
16
GO WEST YOUNG MAN. SEE THE
far west at I.H. and Pan Hellenic
H. Fri. & Sat.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE: 1964 TRIUMPH, RADIO,
rebuilt engine, 1 year guarantee.
Only $1,050.  224-6857.
HONDA DRIVERS
COLD?
WET?
RIDE WARM AND DRY ALL
WINTER!
I will trade my 1954 Olds Rocket for
any   50cc   late    model    motorcycle
complete with accessories.  This  is
a one owner car in excellent running   condition.    Only    65,000    well
cared  for miles  since   new.   Some
of    the    features    include:    power
brakes,   automatic   trans.,   custom
radio,   backup   lights,    seat   belts,
undercoat,   tinted glass.  Tires and
battery   almost   new.
Will trade, or sell for $225.00. Phone
733-1078   or   drive   by   and   see   at
rear of 2171 W.  1st Ave after 5:00
p.m.
AUTOMOBILES (Cont'd)
1958 HILLMAN, GOOD CONDI-
tion, new brakes. Must sell immediately. $450. Call Sandy, 731-
4344.
FOR SALE '57 FORD, EXCELLENT
cond., w.w., radio, etc., $450 or
best offer.  988-9354.
Motorcycles
27
FOR SALE 50cc HONDA SPORT,
$125, or 150cc Honda Benly, $225.
Phone  943-3705.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
HAND CARVED
Teakwood chairs and lamps from
the orient.
Unpainted single pedestal desks
$14.95 and up. Unpainted double
pedestal desks $24.50 and up. Unpainted chests of drawers $11.95
and up. We now have over 5,000
sq. feet of floor space to serve you
better.
KLASSEN'S  FURNITURE MART
3207  W.   Broadway   -   RE   6-0712
Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store.
Typing
43
TYPING   SERVICE
Mrs. Gail Symons
3885  W.  12th  Ave. CA  4-6435
ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED
70th & Granville
263-4530
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
GOOD HOT DINNER IN Exchange for hour's light duties on-
campus.   Nate, RE 3-2105 after 6:00.
COMMERCE GRADS '67: ATTEND
briefing sessions and job interviews being held on campus —
Government of Canada.
Briefing: Oct. 26, 12:30 to 1:30,
Rm. 214 Angus Bldg. (Refreshments will be served.)
Interviews: Oct. 27 & 28, Student
Placement Offices, West Mall.
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
WANTED: MATH 120 TUTOR.
Willing to pay reasonable rate.
Phone 922-5156. Prefer older experienced tutor.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available next week.
Limited Number. Order now, only
75 cents from Phrateres or pub-
lications office, Brock Hall.	
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.
MUST SELL BASS GUITAR AND
30 watt bass amp. Like new. Ask-
ing $355.00. Phone 738-6730 after 6.
NATIONAL BASS AND NEW
Kalamazoo amp, hardly used,
both   $325.   AM   6-5701,   Michael.
SONY 102 TAPE RECORDER AND
5000 ft. tape, new condition. Phone
224-9029.  Dick,  room 9.	
GOT A LOCKER IN BUCHANAN
or EMA? Paid for it? Lower Buch-
anan  11:00-1:00 this week.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GOOD ROOM NEAR GATES. MUST
be non-drinker, non-smoker. Ph.
224-3096.
BEDROOM AVAILABLE FOR Women student in apartment near
University. Telephone after 6 p.m.
224-4674.
DOUBLE SLEEPING ROOM. Private bath, entrance, Seven min.
walking dist. from Brock. Mrs.
Boyce,   224-5700.
Room ft Board
■2
ROOM   AND   BOARD,    CLOSE   TO
UBC gates. Share. Phone 228-8380.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Five minutes from classes. Male.
Phone Al,  224-9660.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED — SR. FEMALE STU-
dent, quiet non-smoker, to share
suite with two of same. Granville
and Matthews. 731-8832 after 10
p.m..   Car-pool.
3-RM. BSMT. STE., B.C. WITH
priv. entrance, bathroom, fridge.
RE 8-0574. Nov. 1st, senior students $80.

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