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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1982

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Array Urgency to nuclear arms race fight
By DOUG SCHMIDT and
PAT MacLEOD
"Be realistic — demand the impossible." This slogan of the 1960s
peace movement has resurfaced in
the 1980s with the nuclear disarmament movement.
And it best describes the theme of
Saturday's symposium: Ending
the Arms Race: a Canadian
Perspective, organized by the UBC
students for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament.
Organizers and participants of
the day-long event were surprised
by the large turnout. The 500 tickets
were quickly sold out and
organizers estimate at least 650 attended the speeches, films, displays
and literature tables.
"I'm amazed at the incredibly
broadbased   disarmament   move-
Cream contest leads
to event guidelines
A whipped-cream wrestling contest Feb. 17 has led student council
to form a committee to investigate
the appropriateness and morals of
SUB events.
Council voted unanimously
Wednesday to form an unlimited
membership committee to investigate and draft policy on events
of "questionable principles."
The motion to form the committee came forward after administration director Terry Cox told council
of the engineering undergraduate
society sponsored event.
Cox said the student administrative commission, a commission of council dealing with SUB,
passed a motion Feb. 22 prohibiting
any such events in SUB. "A significant portion of women would find
it offensive," he told council.
The committee's purpose is to
provide SAC with a set of
guidelines to administer, arts
representative Jon Gates said.
Arts representative Charles Menzies, who moved the original motion, said Monday SAC can and
will deal with non-SUB events.
"The AMS should guarantee that
events which are considered
deplorable are not allowed to happen. Anyone with an ounce of
moral responsibility will take it further," Menzies said Monday.
Engineering undergraduate society president-elect Rich Day said
Monday he agrees with the committee's look at SUB activities, but
disagrees with Menzie's philosophy
on committee scope.
"I don't see how you can dictate
morals to the general public. You
can't have a (Moral Majority
leader) Jerry Falwell attitude and be
critical of everything under the
sun."
ment of today. Although there is
still a sense of urgency, there is no
longer an air of gloom and despair,
but a newly found sense of optimism," said Jessie Chiang of Seattle Pacific University.
Chiang spoke convincingly to an
enthusiastic audience, and received
a standing ovation from the 450
people who listened for an hour.
"Our fear of the Russians is
manufactured by the manufacturers
of weapons," he said. "The only
way to decrease our mistrust is by
seeing the truth. We are all basically
peace-loving people, but many of us
are not very well informed."
Chiang said that while we fear the
Russians, they fear us to a far
greater extent.
"If we can't trust the Russians
and they can't trust us, how can you
expect both sides to come to an
agreement? This has led us to the
current dangerous situation," he
said.
Other speakers covered different
aspects of the arms race. The morning was devoted to general
background and what could be
done to affect change.
Michael Wallace, a political
science professor at UBC, spoke
about Canada's role in the arms
race.
"Canadians shouldn't act so self-
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 53
Vancouver. B.C. Tuesday, March 2,1982
righteous when they talk about
disarmament. We are as much to
blame as any other nation," he
said. Wallace denounced Canada's
sale of Candu nuclear reactors to
countries with unstable governments. "What do we do if some
government violates our 'strict'
safeguards? Send in the
Mounties?" he asked.
Anthony Arrott of the Simon
Fraser University department of
physics explained the recent concern over the arms race: "During
the '70s, we had the military doctrine of MAD (Mutual Assured
Destruction). But now we are talking about fighting a nuclear war. In
1972, with SALT, everything looked promising — a real start. But
then events refocused our direction
See page 2: REALITY
Red Rag slammed
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Two off-campus groups
disgusted by this year's Red Rag
will ask the Association of Professional Engineers of B.C. to take action against the engineering
undergraduate society members involved.
"I think that anyone with an
outlook that could put out a
publication like that, couldn't have
any professional ethics which are
comparable with the ethics of the
association," said David Chiu of
the International Committee
Against Racism.
Susan Hoeppner of the Vancouver Status of Women said this
year's Red Rag is the worst she has
ever seen and she will approach the
association with Chiu.
Chiu, a professional engineer,
said he hopes the association will
publicly condemn the Red Rag and
seriously consider whether they
should admit the engineering
students involved with the publication as members.
Caroline Small, the only woman
on the association's executive council said Hoeppner and Chiu will be
unable to make their presentation at
the   upcoming   March   3   meeting
because they did not notify the
council in time.
But the Red Rag will be discussed, said Small. "It's weird, I've
never seen anything come out of a
university like this," she said of the
publication.
Small added that activities like
the Red Rag discourage women
from considering engineering as a
career. "I don't know what the
numbers are like at UBC but you
can bet there aren't too many
women floating around in red
jackets."
But while Small says she is
disgusted by the publication, she
added there is little the council can
do. "They object to the Red Rag
but they feel the university has to
clean up its own act. They have no
mechanism to force anyone at UBC
to do anything."
Small said the council can only
make a presentation through UBC's
administration president and applied sciences dean. "(The council)
isn't going to sit on a white charger
about this thing."
The possibility of cutting off
grants to the EUS has been explored
"but I don't want to penalize the
good things the EUS does for this
radical fringe," she said.
Bennett WACked off
— kathy ford photo
RADIATE NOW, avoid the post-war rush, nuclear protestor advises unsuspecting student in SUB Thursday. Radiation suit-clad skeletal being
was drumming up business for anti-nuke symposium in Woodward
Biomedical building Saturday. See story, above.
Canadian University Press
When provincial premier Bill
Bennett stepped before a Simon
Fraser University library packed to
the stacks with students Friday, he
planned to talk about his late
father, long time Social Credit
premier W.A.C. Bennett.
He didn't get the chance.
A crowd of 350 students  and
WANY determined to end oppression
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The threat of nuclear war, a product of spaceage technology and the
build-up of arms looms over the earth like a dark, menacing cloud.
This technology, which is primarily responsible for the tense situation
between the superpowers, is a reflection of our male-dominated,
patriarchal society, according to a local anti-nuke group.
Women Against Nuclear Technology believe "it's the boys playing
with their toys." Nuclear technology perpetrates the male-power situation because men make the decisions; men continue to expand the
nuclear arsenal; men control the buttons to blow up the world.
WANT says women, like the earth, are raped and abused. Nuclear
waste pollutes the earth's rivers, lakes and streams, while uranium mining destroys the environment. Women are the victims because they are
placed in a powerless position and again men have the upper hand.
WANT is a Vancouver-based feminist organization determined to
eradicate the patriarchal mentality. Annette Clough, spokesperson for
WANT, expresses this determination.
"We consider the issue of nuclear technology and nuclear arms to be
a feminist issue because we see a connection between the same kind of
mentality which goes into developing arms and that which creates
abuses to women," says Clough.
"It's the ultimate extension of the mentality that justifies power over
other people, physical and economic violence to women, non-white people and the poor.
"It goes back to ancient times when men could control women
through brute force," says Clough. "Now, powerful men are controlling women and the environment, people of other races, and the working
class."
The threat of nuclear war is the greatest danger facing the human
race, she says. "It's the first time in history we face the possible end of
life on a universal scale."
If our society was matriarchal, women would not have developed this
technology in the first place, she claims. "Women have a better grasp of
the "connectedness' of life. Modem Western man sees the world in a
fragmented, compartmentalized way."
Referring to A Day After Trinity, the documentary on Robert Oppenheimer, inventor of the first atomic bomb, she says that men were so
enthralled by the technology that they did not see the implications of
what they were doing.
Clough's east end apartment walls display feminist and anti-nuke
posters, speaking out against the abuse of women. She can hardly contain the anger she feels toward men. Her steely brown eyes convey that
she will no longer tolerate the oppression of women. "Until every
woman can walk down the street without fear of male violence, we are
not liberated.
"Women have a history of involvement in peace movements across
the world. Statistically in the United States, more women are
See page 7: WANT
university staff wanted to talk
about funding cutbacks to the
library he was renaming in his
father's memory.
"Give us some money for
books" shouted one protester.
Said another: "And give us some
salaries for staff so we can service
the library."
Even university president George
Pedersen was greeted with boos,
hisses, and a chorus of "bullshit"
when he took the podium to recite a
prepared text on the highway
building legacy of Bennett's dad.
"Some people came here with
manners," he told the group standing behind a fews rows of seated
"dignitaries" roped off from the
crowd. "And some came with
money," one student responded.
Bennett, standing before walls
taped with posters saying "WACK
off Bill, we want our education"
and "Cut out the Socred cancer,"
told the crowd increased university
funding must wait.
"A strong economic tide will lift
up university funding and funding
of all social services," he told
hecklers. And he applauded "those
who do not always say 'gimme' but
ask how much they can do."
Bennett, universities minister Pat
McGeer and a handful of students
from athletics, other departments
and the student society later huddled in a private meeting upstairs in
the SFU library- Page 2
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2,1982
No nukes are good nukes
From page 1
and we returned to where we were
at during the cold war."
Many suggestions and proposals
were made on how individuals
could help remedy the situation.
Said Wallace: "I'd rather rock the
boat than have it blown out of the
water. 'Be realistic — demand the
impossible.' Don't accept what
politicians tell you. Don't let them
Weekend co-op
rock Y rolls RCMP
Cooperation was one thing the
Rockers Co-op dance did not have
Friday night.
SUB proctor Vic Venn called the
campus RCMP after a fight broke
out at the dance in SUB. It was all
over by the time the RCMP arrived,
but when the police did come they
found many of the people at the
dance were under the legal drinking
age. The dance was allowed to continue, but the bar was shut down.
"The people who were running it
couldn't handle the security, so we
shut it down," said an RCMP
spokesperson. Once the alcohol ran
out the party died pretty quickly,
said Venn.
Cliff Stewart, Alma Mater Society vice-president, said he will suggest to council that it look into
Rockers Co-op's status as an AMS
club. "I am going to suggest that it
should be reviewed," said Stewart.
"Every time they have a function
there are problems."
Stewart blamed Friday's trouble
on the large number of underage
people who were in attendance.
"There is no way any more than 10
per cent of the people at the dance
were university students," he said.
tell us what to do or how to think.
Do something that is deemed impossible by the current political
agenda."
"Without a doubt, the most
pressing issue that we face today is
the arms race," UBC biologist
David Suzuki said in the afternoon.
He described a recent visit to
business groups in the U.S. where
he was "terrified" by the attitude
that we must rush the arms race
because the Russians have an edge.
Suzuki said he believes that
humans are no longer in complete
control of the awesome technology
that has been created. "You have to
be insane to believe that 30 minutes
(the time it would take for a Soviet
missile to reach the U.S.), is enough
time for any human being to respond rationally."
"Over half of all the world's
scientists carry out work for the
military and the bulk of all research
is devoted to destructive power and
profit," said Suzuki. Science
students should be required to take
courses that put scientific advances
in a social and political context, he
said.
The afternoon focused on events
closer to home and ended with a
panel discussion made up of
representatives of local peace
groups.
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For further information write to:
Graduate Advisor/Co-op Coordinator, Department of
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B.C..V8W 2Y2
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
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UBC SPORTS STORE
March SALE 2-13
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Track Suits •  Shorts $6.00
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■r~1*» W * il»ll ^H     Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon. through Fri.; Sat. 12 a.m. to 2 p.m
BA THING SUITS
25% OFF Tuesday, March 2,1982
THE    U BYSSEY
Page 3
Women key to humanizing science
By WENDY CUMMINGS
"The task that seems of primary
importance, both for men and for
women, is to convert science from
what it is today, a social institution
with a conservative function and a
defensive stand, into a liberating
and healthy activity."
Women are crucial to this new
development of a more humanistic
approach to science, Margaret Benston, a Simon Fraser University
chemistry professor said Thursday.
But because they form a minority
in the science department, women's
contribution to research is inevitably limited, said Benston. At SFU,
for example, only three women
hold tenured positions in the
'chemistry department.
Benston says, "Clearly there is
discrimination against women in
the sciences." Many firms simply
do not hire women, and those who
have achieved successful apprenticeships feel subtly out of place as
"token scientists."
She said like all minority groups,
women in science are perceived as
"different;" separated from the
"norms of science" as defined by
the practices of the dominant male
group.
Thus simply because women are
not "one of the boys" they suffer
disadvantages, she said. There is a
subtle connection between social
contacts and promotions according
to Benston; the implicit dependence
on collegiality, for example, establishes contacts and networks ensuring grants.
Added to this obstacle, women's
overall participation in science de-
Science students
head back to polls
for another round
It's back to the polls for science
students.
The battle between Brad Waugh
and Horacio de la Cueva for science
undergraduate society representative on student council will be
fought again March 16.
Losing candidate de la Cueva
contested the Feb. 17 results
because the election had not been
properly advertised. At its Feb. 24
meeting student council voted to
send the issue to student court, but
before it got there the new SUS executive agreed to hold a new election.
"Much to my embarrassment,
and (the new executive), we checked
through old science newsletters and
there was no announcement of the
time that polls would be open,"
said Dave Frank, Alma Mater
Society president and former SUS
president.
SUS executives had earlier called
criticisms of the election ludicrous
and said de la Cueva was a "sore
loser." They also said they did not
have time to run another election.
De la Cueva said the election
should be advertised properly this
time "not as a favor to the candidates, but as a duty to SUS
members."
The SUS executive election will
not take place again because the
seats were uncontested.
Meanwhile, the engineering
undergraduate society is also
heading to the polls. The elections
for first vice president, second vice
president, social co-ordinator and
professional relations officer take
place Wednesday. The only contest
is between Virginia Peacock and
Tom Sloggett, who are seeking the
social coordinator seat.
Last week engineers elected
Richard Day as their new president.
He received 359 votes to Jeff Day's
290 votes (the two are not related).
Richard Day's campaign included
pornographic cartoons on his
poster.
creases statistically with educational
advancement; the higher the degree,
the fewer the women, she s;ud. For
example, there are fewer female researchers than lab assistants. Even
in biology, a field that more and
more women are entering, men hold
most of the prestigious positions.
"The tradition of science is controlled by men," said Benston. In a
recent survey of North American
women in universities, only 100 had
[tenured positions in graduate
chemistry departments.
But why are there so few women
in science? Benston said the current
assumption of the scientific community that it is a completely objective discipline, is one explanation. The scientist's mentality coincides with the assumed division of
traits between men and women and
men are encouraged to believe that
they are totally objective and dominant, she said.
Women, however, are assumed
to be more irrational and illogical
by nature, according to Benston.
This presumed dichotomy between
the sexes has negative results for
women and thus many lack the intellectual confidence to approach
the scientific community, she said.
But the intrinsic joy of science, of
searching for a truth still attracts
women. Unfortunately, those women who pursue science must accept lower pay and lower status, she
said, adding that "women should
insist they want to be part of science." By defining themselves as
outside the norm, they can aid in
the development of a new critique
of science.
—arle •ggartson photo
SYMBOLIC SCENE of technology's encroachment on humanity took society that forces him into subservient position. Crane is evil, worker
place on site of $3 million parkade being constructed beside Asian Centre, good, and sky stands for omnipotent deity. Trees symbolize natural urges.
Construction worker raises hand to indicate frustration with mechanized   Next symbolism test in Thursday's paper.
Pit patrons express displeasure ai 'kiddieland'
By KEITH BALDREY
The verdict is not in yet, but so
far the message is clear: students
dislike a lot of things about the Pit.
More than 450 people have replied to the Alma Mater Society's
questionnaire about the Pit to date,
and AMS vice president Cliff Stewart said Monday there are two main
criticisms about the pub: it is too
loud, and "the decor is sadly lacking."
But he said the questionnaires
have not yet been compiled, and Pit
patrons have until Saturday to drop
their suggestions into the boxes provided.
Some random samplings of students' complaints:
• "I feel like I'm in kiddieland."
• "It stinks like stale beer."
• "I'd like to see the video games
explode."
• "It   is   a   horrible   mixture  of
'disco goes preppy.' "
• "Beer for breakfast please."
"I'm not surprised by what's being
said," added Stewart. "Basically
we were testing the waters. We
wanted to make sure we were in
touch before we started changing
things (in the Pit)."
Stewart said any changes will be
carried out in the summer, to inconvenience as few students as possible.
Marketplace magic now fading
The economic policies of
American president Ronald Reagan
and British prime minister Margaret
Thatcher are to blame for the current recession, a prominent
economist said Saturday.
"The policies of president
Reagan and Mrs. Thatcher ivill prove even less successful, especially if
they are implemented in the doctrinaire way of the last two or three
years," professor Lawrence Klein
of the University of Pennsylvania
told 500 people in IRC 2.
The current conservative policies
challenge Keynesian economics,
which became mainstream in the
'50s and '60s, Klein said. The
Keynesian approach of demand
management and welfare measures
served the world well in that period,
he said.
Klein said there have been three
challenges to Keynes recently —
supply-side theory, monetarism,
and the rational expe:tations
theory.
"These three challenges dovetail
in their rejection of activist government. They are bound together by
the belief in 'the magic of the
market,' " he said.
There are two great economic experiments now being conducted in
the Western world, Klein said. One
is the conservative approach of
Reagan and Thatcher which is also
followed by Germany and Japan.
The other, Klein said, are the approaches of Francois Mitterand of
France and Georges Papandreas of
Greece.
The viability of either approach is
still in doubt because these experiments have not yet run their
course, Klein said.
"It won't cost too much to fix the
decor. There have been suggestions
to change the lighting, put in some
plants and put The Ubyssey murals
back up. They don't cost too much
but they make a massive change.
"Basically, people want to see it
turn back into a neighborhood pub.
They don't like the downtown
style," he said.
Student council must approve
any change or expenditure for the
Pit, he added.
Less than two years ago the AMS
spent more than $30,000 on Pit
renovations, but Stewart did not
consider that money wasted.
"The majority costs were moving
food services. It's not money down
the drain," he said.
Stewart said the questionnaires
will be compiled next week. "Anybody who is interested can help?'
he said.
Teamsters, Pace Services, battle at BCIT
Canadian University Press
A dispute brewing between the
Teamsters union and Pace Services
Ltd. has spilled over onto the B.C.
Institute of Technology campus.
Pace Services supplies and
operates the vending machines in
the student activity centre, and local
351 of the Teamsters union is the
bargaining unit for the Pace
employees.
The union is striking because they
claim Pace has not paid them health
and welfare premiums, RRSP
payments or union dues since October, 1981.
They have submitted their
grievance to the B.C. Labour Relations Board and are asking people
at BCIT not to service or take
money out of the machines until
their dispute has been settled.
Penny Goronuk, the business
representative for local 351 said she
had a meeting with Pace president
George Phillips, and he has since
agreed to give his employees the
health and welfare benefits and the
RRSP payments, if the union
agreed to go out and empty the
machines of money. But he is still
withholding their guaranteed
salaries.
"Since we have been dealing with
the company, we haven't gotten
very far. They're saying we'll pay
this and this, but we won't pay
wages," said Goronuk. "He
(Phillips) doesn't want to guarantee
wages."
Robin Williams, student association president, said the SA has
nothing to do with the vending
machines, and will not enter the
dispute.
Pace Services could not be reached for comment. Page 4
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2,1982
A problem of sexism, not genetics
Women in the faculty of applied
sciences and in every science faculty at UBC are few and far between.
But this fact has nothing to do
with genetics. It has nothing to do
with women's ability to do math, to
think logically or put up with the
long and difficult years involved in
attaining a high level of knowledge
and skill in the sciences.
It has a lot to do with sexism. It
has a lot to do with the mentality of
the administration at this university
and their inaction when it comes to
events like the Red Rag and the
Lady Godiva ride.
Last week was Women's Week
at UBC and the theme of women in
the sciences revealed many of these
problems to local audiences. SFU's
Margaret Benston charged that
there are fewer than 100 women in
chemistry   departments   in   all   of
North America. She also charged
that men in the scientific establishment still view women as too emotional, too weak, too empty headed
to understand the complexities of
science.
Add to this the fact that there are
very few women professors in the
sciences at UBC. They were only
three per cent of all science faculty
members last year. Even if a woman
is willing to put up with the discour
aging attitudes from their male professors and male student leaders,
there are no role models for them.
And then there are the attitudes
that students themselves reflect.
When Richard Day, recently elected engineering undergraduate society president, uses a pornographic
picture on his election poster, he
probably sums up the fight of the
women at this university in many
ways.
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He is saying that he is only concerned about the approval of male
members of the EUS. He is saying
that women are merely sexual playthings, that he is not concerned
about representing their interests.
Day is appealing to the old boys
system which is cemented together
by this common exploitation, and
instead of being embarrassed or
ashamed by it, he makes it part of
his election platform.
But Day's perpetuation of the
problem is typical at UBC. University administrators have also failed
to address the problem by neglecting to encourage women at the
graduate and faculty levels through
affirmative action or other programs.
The problems and its manifestations are subtle. It is often difficult
to point fingers at the discrimination, but it exists. And the evidence
is clear; there are very few women
in the sciences at UBC.
II     ' II I   HIM 1        «•*—WW^************************»
JLG vArf*3.PS
First step simple one in gay movie
Shaffin Shariff's review of the
movie Making Love was extremely
unfair. He finds fault with the
movie because it was too cautious. I
ask you Shaffin, for a movie meant
to appeal to the mass public on the
subject of homosexuality, what the
hell did you expect?
Of course the movie was
cautious. Are you aware of the
large study carried out in 1974
which revealed that 75 per cent of
the American population strongly
believed the four following myths:
• homosexual women are
masculine and homosexual men are
feminine;
• homosexuals are obsessed with
sex;
• homosexuals recruit other
people;
• homosexuals are child
molesters.
All four myths have been soundly
disproven. For example, 95 per cent
of child sexual abuse is carried out
by heterosexual men against young
girls. And if you think such
ridiculous negative attitudes about
homosexuals don't exist today, I
draw your attention to a poll conducted by the Canadian Human
Rights Commission in November,
1981. Only 32 per cent of Canadians felt that gays should be protected from discrimination in the
Canadian Bill of Rights. The same
poll revealed that 53 per cent of
these people felt that persons with
past criminal records should have
such protection and 54 per cent felt
that persons with histories of
alcoholism and drug abuse should
have protection. The results speak
loudly for themselves.
Most people can hardly say the
word 'gay' without sneering and
most can hardly grasp the simple
idea that two people of the same sex
can be in love with each other. The
Suzuki coverage not
worthy of good doctor
As a former staffer I must protest
strongly the dismal coverage given
Dr. David Suzuki's talk to 150 people last Tuesday evening. I had a
mid-term Wednesday so could not
attend the speech. Instead I awaited
Thursday's Ubyssey to inform me
of what the good doctor had said.
Foolish me! What I found was a
measley two inch piece surrounded
by a much longer story about what
a SFU professor had to say to (wait
for it) 17 people. It is irrelevant that
Kimball was speaking on the topic
that's keeping everyone on campus
awake at night, when a noted professor like Suzuki speaks to the
number of people he did, the story
deserves more attention than someone from off campus who speaks to
only 17 people.
If I get together with a few of my
friends to discuss the brilliance of
Wayne Gretzky is this front page
news? Come on get with it — be responsible and responsive!
Ross Burnett
zoology 4
audience in Making Love wiggled
and giggled with embarrasment
when the two men so much as embraced. So, of course, since this is
the public's first glimpse into gay
life, it was necessary to make that
first step a simple one. The complexities can come later.
The media has always
perpetuated negative myths and
stereotypes about gays (who, incidentally, make up 10 per cent of
the population). The effects of such
messages on the public are clearly
demonstrated in the studies I've
mentioned. Gays suffer from the effects of these attitudes on a daily
basis. I commend the movie for
presenting a more realistic portrayal
of gay life.
With all that said, and without
going into a long explanation, I
disagree with Shaffin's opinion that
the movie was shallow and emo-
For some silly reason The
Ubyssey publishes letters from
members of the university community and occasionally from drug-
crazed hippies reliving their student
radical days. We make an effort to
print everything, but racist and sexist slurs or mindless rambles will be
subject to severe editing or will not
be printed.
Letters should be typed triple-
spaced on a 70 character line or they
will sit around for several months.
Similarly, unsigned letters or letters
which do not identify the writer
properly (faculty and year, staff
position or address if not a student)
will be ignored. The staff will consider witholding a person's name.
tionally empty. Nor, for that matter, was the movie overly cautious.
Despite some faults, I found it interesting and very moving. I enjoyed it and plan to see it again.
Donna Parker
social work 5
Writer fake, or
not registered?
Will the real Stephen Harkness
stand up? In the Feb. 23 edition of
The Ubyssey there appeared a letter
from a Stephen Harkness, arts 3,
attacking Dave Frank and Rich
Day. Now the problem is this: according to the registrar's office,
there is no one by the name of
Stephen Harkness registered in arts
at UBC, or in anything else for that
matter. I am forced to conclude
that either Mr. Harkness was too
busy writing vitriolic and ill-
informed letters to bother registering, or else there is no Stephen
Harkness, in which cause someone
on this campus wants to air their
views, but hasn't got the guts or the
convictions to append their own
name to those views.
It is a shame that such a valid
arena of public expression should
be abused not once, but twice in
two weeks by some inconsiderate
asshole(s). If you haven't got the
strength of conviction to back up
your own views, then keep your
mouth shut.
Cliff Stewart
engineering 2
Poster ignores beauty,
emphasizes power
Science holds the power to arrange a basically incomprehensible,
nondeterministic world into a more
predictable, controllable pattern.
This is oversimplifying, perhaps,
but the products of science can be
extraordinarily beautiful: when you
can understand what makes your
heart beat, how a bee's wing keeps
it in the air, how an almost invisible
seed can become a soaring tree,
what makes the sun and stars shine!
You people with your self-
congratulatory Science Week, have
you thought at all what you mean
when you hang a monstrous poster
on the north face of SUB, with a
picture of a nuclear explosion and
the inscription "Science has the
Power!"? Kerry Regier
THE UBYSSEY
March 2, 1962
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising. 228-3977.
"I declare this month's theme to be beautification," Eric said. Keith Baldrey, who was
backing the swing to the right (or was that left) by the gang of three, insisted that the objects
of the month include a comprehensive campaign against spitting. "No spitting," he said.
"And promote correct political thought," exclaimed Muriel (where there's drugs) Draaisma.
Meanwhile in College Province, Arnold Hedstrom and Brian Jones crossed the North Vancouver border and requested political asylum from the Dave Balderstone/Stew Murray Immigration Department. "Sure, no problem," said Dave. "There's lots of room in my asylum,"
Wendy Cummings and Pat McLeod. Scott McDonald, in a fit of pique, began transferring his
black market sandals from the cheese factory to the back of Julie Wheelwright's shoe factory. "But Julie," said Deb Wilson, "your factory only makes left foot, size seven shoes."
"Quit complaining, Deb," said Doug Schmidt, "if the shoe has fits, beware it." Tuesday, March 2,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Well personally, I feel the argument for
solipsism is nothing more than mere conjecture mixed with an over-inflated ego,
possibly including a basic misunderstanding of the values and morals so
necessary in today's technological world.
That's right. What can a semiintic or
linguistic argument, even if satirical, contribute to an understanding of the human
condition?
So it goes like this eh.. -
By CHARLOTTE OLSEN
Instructors in the English department continually state that they
spend most of a first year English
course attempting to teach their students "economy of language."
That is, they prefer that students
not use big words, or three where
one will do. But today's students
possesses a very economical language^	
The problem is that one generation has never really understood another, especially when it comes to
communication. To assist the professors in understanding their 'stu
dents, below is a list of some of the
most current expressions of modern
English and their definitions.
not too
shabby
go
Letters
Swimmer victimized in sauna
break it
down
to get behind
something
panic stations
panic city
I have recently been victimized by
some intrepid soul at the UBC
aquatic centre. Feb. 18, 1982, 12:30
p.m. Whilst relaxing in the luxury
of the men's steam room for ten
minutes, I had placed my bathing
suit (with key attached) on the
hooks provided and immodestly sat
to sweat.
When I came out of the steam
room, I noticed the key attached to
my suit had been removed. El Zip-
po, boys and girls! Gone! I went up
Loonies ruling?
A most disturbing thing has come
to my attention in recent weeks.
Specifically, the amazing propensity your fine rag has for allowing
correspondence of dubious or fictitious origin to be published in the
pages of your usually fine example
of student journalism.
What's going on here? Are your
letter pages being filled by staff
lackeys sitting at typewriters late at
night in an office reminiscent of a
sauna?
Dave "Call me Larry" Balderstone
lunar 6
to my locker to check for any loss to
find my pants in a heap minus $50,
a watch of very high sentimental
value, a gift from my grandfather,
and two weeks of swimming passes.
(As "staff" I have to pay.)
I would like to wrap this up and
say that 1 hope the culprit spends
the money on something he reeds,
and 1 hope that if you tire of the
watch you might have the courtesy
to drop it into the book bin or some
other suitable anonymous container; it would be very much appreciated. Oh, and thanks for
showing me that I had better con-
FREE
HAIR CUT
MODELS NEEDED FOR
HAIR DRESSING
CONVENTION. FOR MORE
INFORMATION CONTACT
THERESA AT
731-4901
ALL FIRST YEAR GEARS (SB's)
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
OPEN HOUSE
THURSDAY MARCH 4
12:30 FORW. 317
BOOGIE
with BYRNES
at THE PIT
The Jim Byrnes Band
Thursday, Mar. 11th at 8 p.m.
Saturday, Mar. 13th at 5 & 8 p.m.
Door Charge: $1.00 from 4 p.m. Sat.
$2.00 from 7 p.m. Thurs
& Sat.
trol over my anger than expected at
the price of a warier self-consciousness about trusting my fellow
unknown co-swimmers.
If nothing else, I shall for personal safety take a more modest appearance of my apparel upon my
next visit to the sauna.
Stephen B. Archibald
Canada Employment centre
rm. 214, Brock hall
gross!
rap
attractive and
modern, desirable.
"That jacket is not
too shabby."
Translation: "I like
it."
say, said, state. "So
I go, what do you
mean? And she
goes, what do you
mean what do I
mean?"
explain, set out specifics. "Let me
break it down: what
happened was. . ."
translation: "I'll explain it to you."
to understand, aka:
to dig, to assimilate,
to see where you are
coming from. "I
can get behind your
feelings."
an intense reaction
to stressful situations. "The minute
that the exam
schedule is posted,
it's panic city on
campus!"
expression of disapproval
speak to someone
with intensity,
usually without
meaning or valuable
content
yno
you know?
eh?
DB
KFC
aces!
to ace
something
jam tart
hoser
hustle
hassle
comma, period or
other punctuation
mark used in
spoken English
understand?
pardon? speak up,
sonny, or do you
agree?
abbreviation for
dead body or bodies
abbreviation for
take-home chicken
Super!, Far out!
Well done. An
expression of extreme approval,
to succeed at something "I aced that
exam."
expression meaning
"silly person" but
with affectionate
overtones
jerk, undesirable
person, silly person
but without the affectionate overtone
previously meant to
move quickly, or an
ancient dance. Current meaning: to attempt to charm
someone to start a
social relationship;
to try to pick up
an irritating problem. Being hustled
by a hoser is a hassle.
<**i ijvinib
STILL MOUNTAIN SOCIETY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA PRESENTS
a NINE DAY COURSE in
NATURAL
HEALING
In Vancouver
Workshops • Lectures
Classes* Dinners
March 6-14 — Evenings and Weekends
SHIATSU AND
ORIENTAL DIAGNOSIS
HEALING WITH FOOD
. . . MACROBIOTICS
NATURAL FOODS COOKING
Classes and Dinners
To sign up for more information
please call 263-3045.
Women's Athletic Directorate
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
Positions Available are:
President
Vice-President
Member-At-Large
Secretary
Nominations open from February 23, 1982 till March 8, 1982.
Nomination forms and Information are available in Room 208, War
Memorial Gym.
Elections will be held at the Annual General Meeting to be held on
March 9, 1982 at 12:30 p.m., in Room 32, War Memorial Gym.
Management positions with the following teams are open for the
1982-83 athletic season:
Volleyball
Basketball
Curling
Squash
Skiing
Swimming
Diving
Field Hockey
Track and Field
Gymnastics
Badminton
Ice Hockey
Rowing
Soccer
Cross Country
Information on all these teams is available in Room 208,
Memorial Gym.
War
McGill
Faculty of Management
The McGill MBA
A Clear Path to Managerial Advancement
Regardless of your undergraduate field of study or work experience,
graduate study in management makes good sense. And the McGill MBA
merits serious consideration.
• two year intensive program designed to provide specialized knowledge and essential skills
• distinctive international program offering a balance between
learning-by-doing (case method) and theory
• in first year you cover the "need to know" areas of management
• in second year you specialize in your choice of our fifteen
areas of business (finance, marketing, etc.) and you become an
expert in your field.
You're invited to contact Mrs. Susanne Major, MBA Admissions
Director, by phone (514) 392-4336, by mail or in person at
1001 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, PQ, H3A 1G5 for further information. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2,1982
[
Tween Classes
r
]
TODAY
PC CLUB
Annual general meeting, executive elections,
noon, SUB 212.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Spanish film, Calabuch, 7:30 p.m., National Film
Board theatre, 1161 W. Georgia.
FINE ARTS FACULTY LECTURE SERIES
From the halls of Montezuma, power and magic
in the art of Motecuhzoma II. Speaker is Dr. Marvin Cohodaa, noon, Lasserre 102.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12-1 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Paty lectures on Neurology, 12 noon, IRC 1.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
Information table, revisionist literature, still selling Socred Socialist calendars, all week, SUB
foyer.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Meeting, noon. Bio. 2449.
QAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning, meeting, everybody welcome, noon,
SUB 215.
UBC DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
Displays set up for nutrition month in regards to
food and your health, all day, SUB.
STUDENTS FOR AN ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Students needed with lots of energy to get the
word out about the march on Friday, March 12,
1:30 p.m., SUB council chambers.
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule: 12:30, Mini Concert, the
Skids; 5 p.m., Thunderbird Reports; after 6 p.m.
news. In Sight, a look at the Pit Questionnaire; B
p.m.. Mini Concert, Bud Luxford; 11 p.m.. Final
Vinyl, Colin Newman; cable 100 fm.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Marxist literature and discussion, noon, SUB
foyer.
CCCM
Liturgical calisthenics with Rev. George, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre gymnasium.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, 12:30-2:30 p.m., SUB 111.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer.
WEDNESDAY
PC CLUB
Aid.  Nathan Divinsky speaks on topics other
than indefinite integrals, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Discussion on responsibility, noon, SUB 111.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12-1 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
FRIENDS OF FINDHORN
Concert, $5, 7:30 p.m., chapel, Vancouver
School of Theology, 6050 Chancellor Blvd.
CVC
CVC square dance $5 non-members, $4 members. Tickets at SUB 216a or at the door.Dinner
at 6 p.m., dance at 8 p.m., SUB ballroom.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
This month's newsletter with election details are
now available. Deadline: March 16. Office hours:
Wednesday, Thursday noon 'till March 16, (RC
G30.
DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC
AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Spanish film, Asignatura pendiente, 7:30 p.m.,
National Film Board theatre, 1161 W. Georgia.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Lunch in Israel, featuring falafel, hamantaschen,
noon, SUB party room. White and blue clothes
should be worn to keep in the Israeli spirit.
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule: 12:X, Mini Concert, 999;
after 6 p.m. news, CITR's weekly editorial with
the stunning and macho Joe March; 8 p.m., Mini
Concert, The Heptones; 11 p.m., Final Vinyl,
XTC, English Settlement; cable 100 fm.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie Cup game vs. Vance ver Rugby
Union Reps, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Talk on responsibility, noon, SUB 111.
CCCM
Community dinner and program, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for outdoor adventure sailing
experience — Jericho, by 3:30 p.m. today. War
Memorial gym 203.
THURSDAY
COOP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12-1 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WUSC
North China Factory, noon, Buchanan 205.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. Gould speaks on periodontics, noon, IRC 1.
EIG
General meeting — elections. Comedy hour with
films on Site C and the Columbia River Treaty,
courtesy of B.C. Hydro, noon, Angus 224.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting: Bring your own teddy bears,
noon, history lounge, Buchanan tower.
QAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker from the local group of parents and
friends of gays, noon, SUB 125.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
The Egypt-Israel peace treaty, noon. International House upper lounge.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., Angus 321. Bzzr
garden on Friday at 4 p.m. in SUB 212.
INTRAMURALS
Organizational meeting for novice sailing experience, noon, SUB 211.
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule: 12:30, Mini Concert, Iggy
Pop; 3 p.m.. Cross Currents, a look at environmental and consumer issues; 5 p.m., Thunderbird Report; after 6 p.m. news. Insight; 8 p.m..
Mini Concert, Elvis Costello; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl,
cable 100 fm.
CIAU SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Preliminaries at 11 a.m., finals at 7 p.m., goes
through Saturday, all day. Aquatic centre.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Discussion, noon, St. Mark's College.
UBC DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
Displays set up for nutrition month in regards to
food and your health, today tiil Friday, SUB
foyer.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Navroz Jaman, Badha achijal, 6:30 p.m., SUB
117.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, noon. International House.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
General meeting, evaluations, noon, SUB 119.
BSU
Rev. John Myers speaks on Jesus Christ: A Radical?, noon, Angus 215.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer.
INTRAMURALS
Corec volleyball — drop in, 7:30 p.m., War
Memorial gym.
FRIDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 212a.
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Lecture: Mr. Lee Fairchild, University of Washington, speaks on General dynamics and generation of mudflows produced by the May 8,
1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens, 3:30 p.m., Geol.
330a.
VOC EIG
Dance to The Panic at the VOC-EIG fun raiser
bzzr bar - $2.50, 8 p.m.-1 a.m., SUB party
room.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Folk night for human rights, featuring professional and amateur musicians, coffee, baked
goods and bar, 7:30 p.m., International House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Rami Raz, director of the Israel Aliyah centre and
a panel of students will discuss opportunities to
travel and study in Israel, noon, Hillel House.
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule: 12:30, Mini Concert, Bonzo
dogdoodah band; 3 p.m., Dateline International,
a look at world affairs; after 6 p.m. news. Campus Capsule, 8 p.m.. Mini Concert, Lene Louich;
11 p.m., Final Vinyl, the neglected album Siouxe
and the Banshees; cable 100 fm.
VOC-EIG
Fund raiser dance, 7:30 p.m., SUB party room.
Featuring The Panic.
CIAU SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union championships.  Aquatic centre.  Preliminaries at  11
a.m., men's diving final at 4 p.m., finals 7 p.m.
Meet goes to Saturday.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Lecture: Do or the Day of Activity in Japanese
Thought and demonstration of Kado (flower arrangement), 3:30-5:30 p.m., Asian centre 604.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour and meeting, noon, International House main lounge.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for McNulty team relays (men's
and women's), tug-of-war (also both sexes),
War Memorial gym 203.
SATURDAY
ZEN BUDDHISTS
Introductory and Advanced Retreats, led by a
monk from Shasta Abbey, Ca., a Zen monastery. Re Sunday retreat, phone Elaine, 294-4372
or Howard, 922-7477. Introductory and advanced retreats, 9:X a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Sun., 7 a.m.-4
p.m., Britannia Community Centre library, 1661
Napier.
| Hot Flashes |
Clear solutions
cheesy problem
You've got no money. You're living off cheese sandwiches and
Freshie because your student loan
doesn't cover all those budgetary
items. So what are you going to do
when your tuition fees go up 33 per
cent next year?
You can go to the Students for
an Accessible Education meeting
today at 1:30 p.m. in the student
council chambers and discuss plans
for the upcoming march and rally
on March 12. Join with other students in the fight against Freshie.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Variety show and danca, 11.50 for all, tickets at
AMS ticket office, not at the door, 7:X
p.m.-12:30 a.m., Internetional Houae.
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule 4:30 p.m., stage and screen,
film and theetre reviews: 6-9:30 p.m., The Import Show; 8 p.m. Mini Concert, Simple Mind;
11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, the classic album feature;
cable 100 fm.
CIAU SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union meet.
Aquatic centre. 11 a.m. for preliminaries. Finals
at 7 p.m.
COALITION FOR WORLD DISARMAMENT
President of B.C. Federation of Labor and other
speakers and music, 1:30 p.m., assemble Burrard and Georgia and march to Robson Square.
SUNDAY
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule: 8 a.m.. Music of our Time;
12-2:30 p.m.. The Folk Show; 2:30-6 p.m.. Rabble Without a Pause, a lunatic view of the world;
3 p.m., Laughing Matters, a look at history and
content of recorded comedy; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, CITR's II album — Material, Memory
Serves; cable 100 fm.
MONDAY
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Multimedia display featuring a slide and tape
show, posters, literature, music etc., depicting
Jerusalem, the City of Peace, 12:30-2:30 p.m.,
as part of Israel week, middle of hallway of SUB.
CITR UBC RADIO
Program schedule: 12:30 Mini concert; 3 p.m.
The Melting Pot, A look at research at UBC; 4:30
p.m., Everything Stops for Tea, cultural programming; 7 p.m. Off Beet, cheap entertainment
for cheap people; 8 p.m.. Mini concert; 9:30
p.m.. The Jazz Show with Shelly Freedman; 11
p.m.. Final Vinyl, a jazz album TBA.
NOTICE!
Galiipoli has been
cancelled.
In its place:
SUBFILMS presents
Thurs 8- Sun 7:00
Fri Er Sat 7:00 Er 9:30
$1.00       SUB AUD
EUS CAMPUS WIDE
MARDIGRAS
DANCE
Saturday, March 6th
in the
ARMOURIES
Featuring CRISIS
and a
DIXIELAND BAND
PRIZES FOR BEST COSTUME, BEST MASK
Tickets $5.00 at AMS Box Office
Doors open at 8:00 No Minors
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Presents SHAKESPEARE'S
KING LEAR
'one of the most powerful plays ever conceived for the stage'
Directed by Donald Soule
MARCH 5-13
(Previews March 3 & 4) 8:00 p.m.
Thurs. Matinee—March 11 at 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4.00
BOX OFFICE - FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE - Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
NOMINATIONS
ARE NOW OPEN
For Student Appointments
To The Following
Presidential Advisory Committees:
Child Care Services
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services Advisory
International House Board of Directors
Land Use
Men's Athletic
Safety, Security and Fire Prevention
Student Services
Traffic and Parking
United Way Campaign
Walter Gage Memorial
War Memorial Gymnasium Fund
Women's Athletic
Youth Employment Program
AMS Representation On These Committees
Is Of Vital Concern In Ensuring That
Students Are Well Represented In All Facets
Of The University's Operations.
NOMINA TION FORMS ARE A VAILABLE FROM THE ALMA
MATER   SOCIETY   EXECUTIVE   SECRETARY'S    OFFICE
ROOM 238,   STUDENT  UNION  BUILDING
6138   S.U.B. BOULEVARD VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T2A5
NOMINATIONS CLOSE ON WEDNESDAY
MARCH 10,1982
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 linos, 1 day $2.00; additional lines, 16c.
Commercial — 3 lines, t day $3.63; additional lines
56c. Additional days $3.30 and SOc.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. DbqMw is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 247, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. WT2A6
5 — Coming Events
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very attractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
REBOUND EXERCISERS. Exellent quality
(2 year warranty) at student prices,
873-0619 days or 734-0448 eves.
11 — For Sale — Private	
1979 MONZA SPYDER. Black with light blue
interior, sunroof, 4-speed, 305—V8, radials,
power steering, 8-track stereo, buckets,
mags, immaculate, well maintained, $6,500
or best offer. 736-0806.
66 — Scandals
70 — Services
86 — Typing
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers
factums, letters manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.)
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 73&4042.
FUSSY FINGERS TYPING SERVICE. $1.25
per page. Call Mary, after 6 p.m., 274-6448.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING-$10.00/hr.
Equation   typing   available.   Pickup' and
delivery. Phone Jeeva, 826-5169 (Mission).
WORD PROCESSING. We prepare research
and term papers, resumes and reports in
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99 — Miscellaneous Tuesday, March 2,1982
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 7
Nuclear technology and war inseparable
From page 1
anti-nuclear than men," she says.
Similar organizations like WANT
are found in Europe, the U.S. and
in the rest of Canada.
WANT conducted an informal
discussion at UBC last Wednesday
as part of women's week. Kristin
Penn, another WANT member,
says "It's not possible to put an end
to the arms race until we put an
end to the kind of mentality that
promotes sexism, racism, capitalism
and imperialism."
She says WANT began with a
group of women who found the
anti-nuke movement lacked
analysis and was isolated from
other issues. "People separate the
two issues, nuclear technology and
war, but there is a real connection
between   the   two.    Nuclear
'Illegal' AGM plagues council
By CRAIG BROOKS
The Feb. 14 Alma Mater Society
annual general meeting had even
more irregularities than first
thought, finance director James
Hollis told council Wednesday.
Hollis said in addition to starting
the meeting 20 minutes too early,
outgoing AMS president Marlea
Haugen forgot to have the financial
statements as of Dec. 31 approved.
Council Briefs
Also, administration director
Terry Cox said the meeting had not
actually voted on any matter,
despite the word "carried" placed
under the motions in the minutes.
This may lead to problems with
the B.C. registrar of societies in accepting the minutes, Hollis said.
The provincial registrar of voters
received "word from upon high"
not to let the Alma Mater Society
conduct voter registration booths
on campus, vice president Cliff
Stewart told council Wednesday.
The registrar had earlier given
permission for the AMS to set up
the booths and canvass in
residences, but the booths were
later rejected, Stewart said.
"It appears they didn't want
students to get the chance to
register," he told council. Tie rationale given by the registrar was
"we have to treat all universities the
same," he said.
* * »
Paperwork.
That's what council spent 45
minutes discussing Wednesday.
The question on the table —
should   every   student   council
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
Yukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
member have a complete copy of
the Alma Mater Society code of
procedure, a 250 page document.
Lined up on one side — the executive. Said finance director James
Hollis: "it costs $15 a shot, that's a
lot of money."
On the other side — everyone
else. "The cost can't be measured in
dollars. It'll save time. (Hollis's)
cost benefit analysis fails," said arts
representative Peter Goddard.
After almost an hour of discussion, debating the handing down of
code copies from one constituency
representative to another, the cost,
and other issues, councilors voted
unanimously in favour of each
council member getting a copy of
the code.
THE DINER1
technology is technology run
amoke, abused?' Penn says.
Paulette Roscoe, a welfare rights
activist involved with WANT who
spoke with Penn, says "Industry
reaps the profits from science and
technology. That's the issue we're
challenging. Most science is done
for profit."
Penn, who spoke with Roscoe in
the women's centre, says research,
especially nuclear research, cannot
be trusted. "Industry is profiting
and we can't trust industry," says
Penn.
Science is not neutral and is not
taught within, a social or political
context, Roscoe adds. "Scientists
work in isolation, reinforcing
piecemeal rather than holistic thinking.
"There are two problems with
nuclear technology," Roscoe says
to 15 people in the centre. "The
first is the problem of waste.
Science has left the problem up to
future generations to deal with the
holding tanks. We bear the cost of
having radioactive tombstones."
The second problem is security.
"Other people besides governments
want to make bombs and the tight
security surrounding nuclear plants
is a high cost to pay," Roscoe says.
"They need to be constantly guarded and surveilled.'r
Roscoe says a nuclear plant is expensive to build and is capital rather
than labor intensive. "Other forms
of technology cost less money and
create more jobs," she says. "In
nuclear technology there is a type of
corporate capitalism."
She is concerned that nuclear
technology is being exported to
third world nations. "This questionable technology is promoted to
make profit," she says.
"Canada is the sixth largest
nuclear weapon producer in the
world. I was shocked when I found
this out."
I
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'This Week at Hillel"
Tuesday, March 2nd
Shefa Dairy Lunch - 11:30-2:00
Wednesday, March 3rd
Free Lunch
Provided by Hillel mothers
12:00-2:00
Thursday, March 4th
Shefa Dairy Lunch — 11:30-2:00
Zionist Seminar — 12:30 p.m.
PURIM MUSIC
FESTIVAL
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Featuring
Chassidic Songs
and
Cantorial Pieces
Avreml Friedman
and
Zalman Baumgarten
vocalists
accompanied by a live band
followed by
REFRESHMENTS
Sunday, March 7, 1982
7:30 p.m. in the
Lubavitch Centre Auditorium
5750 Oak Street, corner 41st Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
COST: $7.50 — adults,
$6.00 — Seniors & Students Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1982
Calgary takes volleyball
By SCOTT McDONALD
Calgary, Victoria and then UBC.
This was the way the first Canada
West men's and women's volleyball
tournament ended in November
and it was also the way the fifth and
final tournament ended Saturday in
War Memorial gym.
The Calgary teams will now be
the representatives of the Canada
West in the national tournament to
be held March 11-13 at Dalhousie
University.
The UBC women had their best
tournament and went 4-1 in their
matches. UBC defeated Victoria,
Saskatchewan, Alberta and
Lethbridge while losing to Calgary.
The win over Victoria was the
first in league play for UBC this
season. The match went the
distance with UBC taking the fifth
game 16-14. The other wins were all
3-0.
UBC coach Sandy Silver has
maintained all season that her team
would beat Calgary but that will
have to wait till next year as Calgary
did UBC in 15-6, 15-9 and 15-5.
Calgary finished the season with a
24-1 record while UBC was 14-11.
Despite the Calgary match Silver
said she was pleased with the play
of her team. "This is the way we
should have been playing at
Christmas time."
Silver said because of injuries two
players had to switch positions. Kelly Meechan, who had a sore
shoulder, was switched from the
power position (the person who
smashes and blocks from the right
side) to setter, while setter Collen
Cole moved into Meechan's spot.
Silver said this major change stalled
the progress of her team for a while.
Silver said UBC's standout again
was Tara Senft. Karen Blair also
gave another consistent performance, and Cole was brilliant
defensively, she added.
Silver was also pleased with the
play of Moira Shaunessy and Alana
Kurz who have not gotten much
playing time this year. Kurz came
into replace Carol Pollock who injured her knee.
Pollock injured her knee Saturday morning against Alberta. She
did not tell Silver and played
against Calgary in the afternoon.
It is not known how serious the
injury is. Pollock may have chosen
to continue playing because she is
graduating and this was her last
tournament.
'Birds improving
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
With Saturday night's loss, the
UBC men's hockey team blew its
chance of ending the season on a
winning note, earning their season's
first two-game weekend sweep and
winning three in a row. Such is the
life of a Thunderbird.
But at least the UBC Thunderbirds didn't finish the season the
way they started it.
The 'Birds opened the season
with losses of 13-2 and 10-5 against
the Alberta Golden Bears in Edmonton. The 'Birds closed their
season on the weekend at the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Arena
with a 2-1 win and 6-3 loss against
the same club.
In a close-checking but sluggish
affair Friday evening in front of
about 275 fans, Kevin Argue and
Tom Ouchie scored unanswered
goals to lead the 'Birds to a 2-1 victory — the third in four games. The
game-winner by Ouchie in the second period was on a break-away in
which he unleashed a devestating
blast from the top of the right face-
off circle, beating Bear netminder
Denis Potvin cleanly.
Both goaltenders were called
upon to make a number of fine
saves. With less than one minute remaining, UBC's Ron Paterson foiled Alberta's leading scorer, Jim
Lomas, on a breakaway.
In the season finale on Saturday
night, the 'Birds blew a 2-1 lead
after one period. The 6-3 defeat was
witnessed by a sparse crowd of
about 140.
"I'm saddened and disappointed
with Saturday night's game," said
Mike Mines, the Arena's public address announcer. "It was their last
game of the season and hardly
anyone showed up. Besides that,
the 'Birds' power play was dismal,
they blew a lead, the Arthur W.
Delmonte Concert Band wasn't
there, and the hot dog buns were
stale."
Although two of the 'Birds' three
goals were on the power play, they
failed to score 11 other times when
they had the player advantage.
Alberta had 34 minutes in penalties
compared to only 12 minutes by
UBC — far cry from the night
before when only three minor
penalties were issued in the entire
game.
Kevin Argue, Terry McDonald
and Bill Holowaty were the goal
scorers tor the 'Birds on Saturday.
The 'Birds finished the season in
last place with six wins and 18 losses
for 12 points, two better than last
year. Bill Holowaty was UBC's
leading scorer with 17 goals and 17
assists for 34 points.
Looking to next year, the prospects for Jack Moores' second
campaign as coach of the 'Birds appears to be getting brighter if the
team can keep on improving during
the off-season the way it did this
past season.
Senft was named to the first team
Canada West all-star team and Cole
to the second.
The UBC men finished all five
tournaments 3-2 for a 15-10 record.
Despite the lack of improvement in
results UBC coach Dale Ohman
said the last tournament was UBC's
best. "This was the first tournament in which we played strongly in
all of our matches."
UBC defeated Alberta, Saskatchewan, Lethbridge and lost to
Calgary and UVic.
Friday   UBC   defeated   Saskat
chewan and then lost to Calgary in
a two hour five game match.
Calgary went through the tournament undefeated and finished the
season with a 22-3 record. Two of
these losses were to UBC who ended
the year 15-10.
On Saturday after an easy 3-0 win
over Lethbridge UBC lost a
monstrous thre« hour match to Victoria. UVic jumped out to a quick
two game lead before UBC got unpacked and won the next two
games. The last game was all Victoria and it ended 15-8.
After a half hour rest UBC then
had to play Alberta and this match
also went five games with UBC taking the last three.
UBC's Brad Willock was named
to the Canada West first team and
teammates Chris Frehlick and Paul
Thiessen were named to the second
team.
Ohman added that no one in the
east will come close to Calgary in
the nationals. In 1983 the Canadian
Championships will be held at UBC
and the men and women will
automatically receive an invitation.
— michMl black photo
WHEN NOT FIGHTING in parking lots in the Prairies men's volleyball likes to play a bit of sport. UBC coach Dale
Ohman said a good fight in cold parking lot helps build team unity. This translated into strong team effort in
season-ending volleyball tournament at War Memorial Saturday. In case you are wondering why these is no articles in this caption it is because of The Ubyssey's archaic style.
'Bird droppings
Wrestling
Martin Gleave's bid to repeat as
the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union wrestling champion
(61 kg class) fell a little short on the
weekend.
Gleave, a second year medicine
student, lost in the championship
Ski team in U.S. nationals
The UBC ski team won the men's
alpine title and the women placed
second at the Northwest Collegiate
conference ski championships last
weekend. Both the men and women
now qualify for the national championships to be held in McCall,
Idaho, March 4-6.
UBC captured top spot in both
the men's slalom and giant slalom.
John Hilland continued his first
place monopoly of the giant slalom
but was outshone by teammate Dale
Steven who took first place in the
slalom.
Hilland finished third in the
slalom in front of UBC's Bob
Leitch and Rick Crowdon who
placed fifth and seventh respective
ly. The alpine title combined with a
second place cross-country finish by
Ole Anker-Rasch left UBC ranked
third out of 12 teams in overall
standings behind the College of
Idaho and Pacific Lutheran University.
The women's team strong showing left them tied in second place
with Pacific Lutheran in overall
standings behind Idaho. Two falls
in the slalom led to their weaker
than usual individual placings.
UBC's best performances came
from Mia Davis' fifth place crosscountry finish and Beth Copsulich's
eighth place finish in the giant
slalom.
The men and the women now
travel to Idaho next weekend to
form the only Canadian entry
among 20 of the best college teams
in the U.S. because the Northwest
conference has traditionally been
the strongest division in the U.S.
UBC coach Rick Crowson said the
men's team has a very good chance
of winning the alpine championship. UBC has dominated the alpine
events as previous conference meets
this year.
The women may not place as well
as was expected earlier because two
members will be unable to attend,
Crowson added. Last year, UBC
missed qualifying for the national
finals by four points.
final to Lawrence Holmes of McMa
ster University 6-4. Gleave was the
only UBC wrestler competing at the
CIAU's after having won the
Canada West Championship last
weekend.
Rugby
Contrary to a report which said
UBC was playing weak com-
petitiion on its tour of California,
UBC coach Don Spence said
California teams have a high
level of skill. UBC won all of its
games, 18-13 over Stanford, 24-4
over California State, 44-19 over
Santa Barbara and 31-13 over
UCLA.
Soccer
The varsity men's team has complained about a lack of media
coverage and we agree it should get
more attention. Saturday the soccer
squad become the first varsity team
on campus to lose to a junior college when Capilano College beat it
3-2.
Danny Sudyeko and Gavin
Chamlers were the goal scorers for
UBC. The 'Birds had a chance for a
tie late in the game but Conrad
Titlar screamed a shot over the bar
from 12 yards out.
Hoop
The men's team ended its season
with a rare victory Saturday when it
defeated the University of Alberta
78-76 at Edmonton. On Friday
UBC lost 87-61.
Jamie Boyle lead UBC Saturday
with 28 points while teammate Bob
Forsyth added 20.
The games mark the end of Forsyth's career at UBC. He bows out
as the leading scorer in UBC's
history.
Gymnastics
The men's and women's teams
travel to Winnipeg this weekend to
compete in the national championships. At least five gymnasts from
the women's team will compete.
UBC's Patti Sakaki, the defending
Canadian champion, is a doubtful
starter due to a back injury.
Swimming
The national swimming and diving championships start Thursday
at UBC. The meet will last for three
days and features the top college
swimmers and divers from across
the country. The UBC women are
currently ranked number one in the
country while the men are fifth.

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