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The Ubyssey Jan 13, 1977

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Array F
• • I
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housing rates to rise
Prices for both food and
residences at UBC will increase by
about 10 per cent next year.
In a preliminary budget, food
services head Robert Bailey has
proposed a nine to 12 per cent
across-the-board increase in food
prices, plus a 50 per cent increase
for coffee. Coffee will cost 30 cents
next year instead of 20.
Based on an approximate price
increase of 10 per cent, here are
some new prices which can be
expected:
• French fries — from 40 to 45
cents;
• Quarter-pound hamburger —
from 85 to 95 cents;
• Beef dip — from 75 to 85 cents;
• Submarine sandwiches —
from $1 to $1.10.
And acting housing head Michael
Davis said Wednesday residence
rents will increase by less than 10
per cent.
Davis  said  he  could  not  give
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 35      VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1977
228-2301
exact figures for the increase yet
because the joint residence
committee, made up of one student
rep from each of the five
residences and representatives
from the housing administration,
has not finished examining the
figures. They should finish Friday
or Saturday.
Davis said the housing administration is also considering a
differential rate system for the
residences.
"There will be a difference in
price between, say a single room in
Vanier and one in Totem," Davis
said. Previously, rooms were the
same price in both residences.
Davis said the rate differential
will depend on "the number of
people you share a washroom with,
how many people there are on one
floor, and how far the residence is
from the centre of campus."
Under the new system, Davis
said, Vanier will be more expensive than Totem.
Examination of the budget shows
that not all of the proposed food
price increases can be blamed on
increased prices for labor and
food.
Wage and food prices will increase six per cent next year. The
other three to six per cent will add
to the amount food services will put
toward repaying its mortgage on
the SUB cafeteria.
In 1968, food services signed a
mortgage on its SUB premises with
a promise to pay back $1.2 million
over a 10-year period. In 1974, food
services still owed $750,000.
In 1976-77 they plan to pay off
$86,000.
Next year, food services plan to
increase the payment to either
$150,000 or $250,000, depending on
the size of the price increase.
Several food service committee
members said they were not
surprised by the proposed hike in
food prices.
"I'm strongly under the impression food service prices have
been very competitive," committee member Ada Butler said.
"They have been reasonable. And,
as I have a family and run a house,
I know that costs have gone up
enormously and are about to leap
forward enormously again."
Committee chairman Stanley
Oberg said he had not yet gone
over the budget figures, but "it
doesn't surprise me."
Study urges
park for UEL
By BILL TIELEMAN
A preliminary proposal by a
government study team on the
future of the University Endowment Lands does not allocate
any UEL land to UBC, despite a
university request for at least 300
acres.
The proposal, released Wednesday, urges that the UEL remain
an undeveloped nature park.
But study team members said
Wednesday discussions are continuing with UBC about future
access to the UEL for forestry and
agricultural research.
"We've been discussing with
UBC that ways for their needs for
land for forestry and agricultural
projects might be met without a
change in the boundaries of the
park area," study team member
Gerry Rolf sen said Wednesday.
Rolfsen said UBC will likely get a
guarantee of some land for
research projects in the future.
"I think they've made a fairly
clear case that they'll need land for
forestry and agricultural research
in the future," he said.
Rolfsen said the preliminary
plan was developed two weeks ago
for cost estimating and is not a
final plan.
Team member Hayne Wai said
Wednesday the proposal will be
rewritten and redrawn as more
information is received until it is
presented to a public forum and
workshop on Jan. 26.
The proposal is basically for
standard park development, team
member Peter Horwood said
Wednesday.
The proposal includes plans for
low-rise, compact housing that
would put 2,000 new residents in the
UEL, a new elementary school,
recreation areas with picnic sites,
tennis courts, a pitch and putt golf
course and new trails and paved
bycle paths in the UEL.
Existing trails in the UEL would
be improved and parking lots
created for greater public access
to the area.
Also proposed are an outdoor
educational camp for children, a
nature interpretation centre,
playfields and campsites.
Most of the recreation facilities
would be located behind the golf
course south of University
Boulevard.
"The whole idea of developing
the park is on a minimum impact,
minimum cost basis," said Horwood.
Cost estimates and proposals for
See page 2: UEL
—doug field photo
SWALLOW HARD, young man. That $1 on the cash register is soon going to be $1.10 or thereabouts,
providing UBC's board of governors approves food service budget, which seems likely. Price hikes would
come into effect during summer holidays.
Bailey resigns top food services post
By HEATHER WALKER
Food services head Robert
Bailey has resigned.
Bailey submitted his resignation
last week to Erich Vogt, administration vice-president in
charge of student and faculty affairs.
His resignation takes effect
March 31.
Bailey would not comment about
the reasons for his resignation.
"I'd rather not get into that on
the phone," Bailey said Wednesday. "I volunteered that information in my letter to Vogt, not
to The Ubyssey."
Vogt later said he could not
comment on Bailey's reasons for
resigning because they "have
nothing to do with the university."
"I think he has done a marvellous job of organizing food
services," Vogt said. "He was
happy with us and we were happy
with him."
Vogt would not comment on
speculation that Bailey's
resignation  is  connected  with
Law students threaten impeachment
DWOR
. speaks out
Law students will decide in a
general meeting Friday whether to
take action against Mark Dwor,
law student association president,
because of remarks about cutthroat competition among law
students.
Dwor told a meeting of the
Canadian Bar Association in
December that law students steal
each other's notes and hide library
books so other students cannot use
them.
Dwor claimed Wednesday his
comments to the bar were taken
out of context and distorted in both
the text and headline of a Dec. 13
story in the Vancouver Sun.
He said he meant to explain the
intense competition among law
students, as a result of the im
pending scarcity of articling
positions for graduates.
James Conrad, law 3, one of the
students who organized the
meeting, said the issue is whether
Dwor best served law students by
making his comments to the bar.
"It's a question of ethics, or
whether or not he should go around
shooting his mouth off."
Conrad said he and other
students circulated a petition and
got enough signatures to force a
general meeting.
"We could have had 200 or 300
names on the petition," said
Conrad. "There's nobody around
here who believes he (Dwor) was
right in saying what he said."
At the meeting students will try
to learn whether Dwor said what
he   is   reported   to   have   said,
whether he meant it and whether
he believed it, Conrad said.
"Some students wanted to sue
him for slander. Others want to see
him impeached, and some want to
censure him and stop him from
making any more speeches."
Dwor's term as LSA president
expires in February.
Conrad said he is worried about
what members of the bar think
about the ethics of law students.
"They assume we authorized what
he (Dwor) said."
He said if there is cheating or
stealing among law students, it is
an internal matter to be discussed
at a meeting of the LSA.
Dwor said he was trying to show
his concern to the bar association
about the scarcity of articling
See page 8: LAW
immigration problems. Bailey is a
U.S. citizen living in Washington,
and works in Canada on a temporary work permit. He commutes
to UBC from Blaine every day.
Food services committee head
Stanley Oberg said Bailey will
announce his resignation today at a
food services committee meeting.
"I recommended to him that he
resign at that meeting," Oberg
said.
Oberg said Bailey had told him of
his resignation plan two weeks ago.
"He told me at the time not to
mention it, but since then I think it
has become quite common
knowledge," he said. "I'm sorry to
see him go. I had a lot of respect for
his abilities."
Herb Dhaliwal, a student
member of the food services
committee, said he thought
Bailey's resignation was connected
with disagreements between
Bailey and Vogt.
"Bailey and Vogt have different
philosophies," Dhaliwal said.
"They've had different opinions on
some points.
"For instance, in the thing about
the conversion of the Barn into a
pub, Bailey didn't like the idea, and
Vogt was agreeable to it."
The Barn conversion was
suggested by the Alma Mater
Society,  after last  year's  Pit
See page 2: LITTLE Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 1977
UEL proposals unveiled
From page 1
the administration of the UEL are
still being discussed by the study
team, he said.
Other proposals are for two
community parks with 50 per cent
natural forest and 50 per cent open
space.
Recreational facilities, a
clubhouse, a tea house and
restaurant, a grocery store and
park offices would be built on land
bordering the existing golf course
on University Boulevard.
The proposal allocates 12 acres
behind  existing  housing  along
'Little input'
From page 1
closure, as one way of changing
student's attitudes to drinking.
And, Dhaliwal said, Bailey liked
to operate food services in his own
way, without input from groups
such as the food services committee.
"He made several changes
without mentioning them to the
committee. He raised prices in the
pizza parlor (in the SUB cafeteria)
last week without bringing it up to
the committee.
"I really think he should have
brought that up before the committee," Dhaliwal said.
"And he made several time
changes. The place was closed
sometimes when it shouldn't have
been. And hours were changed
sometimes without any notice to
either the committee or the AMS.
"Bailey's attitude was that he
wanted to run things his own way.
He didn't like having a food services committee. "He'd rather
make decisions on his own and get
it going," Dhaliwal said.
Bailey became head of food
services in 1974, following the
death of former head Ruth Blair.
Acadia Road for low-rise compact
housing. There would be 20 housing
units per acre with an average
occupancy of 3.4 persons to each
unit.
Similar housing developments
would be located on four acres of
land southeast of University Hill
secondary school and another on
four acres north of Chancellor
Boulevard on the edge of the UEL.
A new, elementary school to be
built next to University Hill
secondary school is planned.
One  of  the  community   parks
would loop around the low-rise
housing development on Chancellor. The other would stretch
behind the proposed Acadia Road
housing development northwest of
University Hill.
Playfields and tennis courts
would be located on six acres
across from St. George's school.
Rolfsen said UBC wants access
to UEL land for research projects,
not a specific area.
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THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Candidates slam 'slush funds'
By CHRIS GAINOR
The UBC housing administration
uses secret "slush funds" which
are not properly accounted for to
the board of governors, board
candidate Bob Salkeld charged
Wednesday.
Salkeld, a former member of the
housing committee, made the
charge in an attack on the housing
administration at a student representative assembly question and
answer session with board candidates. Salkeld is president of the
science undergraduate society and
a former student senator.
At the same meeting, board
member Basil Peters, who is
running for re-election, said the
housing budget was drawn up in a
manner   different   from   other
budgets presented to the board,
which must approve them.
Peters said he had understood
that students on the housing
committee objected to the budget,
but acting housing head Michael
Davis told him the students approved of it*
After the budget was approved,
Peters said he talked to the student
members who expressed doubts
about the budget. He warned the
SRA that this year's housing
budget would be "even more
dubious" and added it would be
worse if Davis is appointed permanent housing head.
Had he not been a newcomer to
the board, the housing budget
would have been checked more
closely, Peters added.
Salkeld said his defence to the
housing committee of a student
expelled from residence led to
himself not being allocated a room
in residence this year. Salkeld
lived in residence while on the
committee.
"The housing administration is
dangerous, very dangerous, and
something has to be done," he said.
During Salkeld's speech, SRA
president Dave Theessen
cautioned him, saying "Watch it"
twice.
When asked why he had quit
midway during his senate term,
Salkeld said he had "overloaded"
himself with committee assignments, and after his resignation,
he spent more time working on the
SUS.
"I don't believe in doing a half
job," he said. "I put more commitment into the science undergraduate society."
Otherwise, the session concentrated on the issue of tenure.
When asked whether they supported tenure, candidates all said
they were against it because it hurt
teaching quality.
"I don't think the tenure system
does any good," said commerce
grad student Gary Moore. "It's an
American import."
Peters said tenure hurts
teaching quality, but warned that
older professors have "no
economic alternative" and
perhaps should be retired early.
But later, Peters said, "you have
to have tenure at UBC because
—matt king photo
PONDERING  FUTURE  of  University  Endowment Lands, provincial     Wednesday.   Following  Jan.   26   public meeting to discuss proposal,
government's UEL study team prepares preliminary proposal, released     committee  will   prepare  final   report.
Women's studies guide produced
By ANNE CORMACK
A UBC professor has helped
produce a guide aimed at the
prevention of sex role stereotyping
in high schools
Assistant education professor
Jane Gaskell organized and
researched material for the guide,
which gives information about how
to set up high school courses in
women's studies.
Gaskell said the main purpose of
the courses is to provide students
with a greater knowledge and
understanding of the role of women
in society.
"The guide is designed to make
high school students more critical
of sex role stereotypes," she said.
Gaskell said the guide contains.
courses which can be integrated
into subjects such as English and
social studies.
She said she also hopes to see
women's studies offered as a
course on its own.
The guide provides a general
outline for the courses in a variety
of areas of study. Personal interviews, community surveys,
case studies, creative writing and
critical reading are all encouraged.
One section of the guide suggests
students examine traditional
family structure and explore
alternative forms of family
organization such as role sharing,
role reversing and bringing up
children alone. The guide encourages evaluation of the effects
of influences such as television and
books on perception of family
roles.
Students are asked to critically
evaluate traditional male and
female roles. Topics for discussion
include questions such as why birth
control is commonly considered
the responsibility of the woman,
and why unmarried men are called
'bachelors' and unmarried women
called 'spinsters'.
One section describes the results
of research done in elementary
schools.
The research discovered the
elementary system is preparing
children to accept females as
second-class citizens.
This is accomplished largely by
the use of texts — particularly
math texts — where problems and
illustrations present stereotypes.
The study concludes that the
portrayal of women as wives,
mothers and nurses is both
unrealistic and harmful.
Gaskell said she hopes to see
women's studies in high schools by
next year. Whether courses in this
area will be offered now depends
on the initiative of individual
teachers, she said.
Local school boards must also
approve the courses, Gaskell said,
but so far there have been positive
responses from school districts in
Kelowna and Burnaby.
Courses currently offered in
women's studies at UBC are well
supported and highly successful.
Free copies of the resource guide
for teachers are available by
writing to' publication services,
department of education, Victoria.
A bibliography for the courses is
available at the UBC center for
continuing education.
TAs want organization
Few UBC teaching assistants favor unionization to
gain better working conditions, according to the
results of a TA's committee questionnaire.
But Dave Chapman, chairman of the grad committee on teaching assistantships, said most of the
TAs among the 700 graduate students who filled out
the questionnaire want some kind of organization to
represent them.
Chapman said the questionnaire presented the TAs
with three different kinds of organizations: a union,
an association, a grievance committee or nothing.
The TAs could also suggest forming another kind of
organization.
Most TAs indicated they want to be represented by
a grievance committee or an association, he said.
Chapman said the questionnaire, which will be
discussed at a GCTA meeting Friday at noon in the
Graduate Student Centre, shows most TAs are more
concerned about their working conditions than with
money.
"I feel we have to organize in some fashion," he
said. "We need a formal relationship with the
university where things are laid out and agreed
upon."
Chapman said that currently each department
decides itself how to handle its TAs and this causes
disparity between departments.
Chapman said graduate student TAs are not supposed to work more than 12 hours a week but some do.
Without an organization it is impossible for TAs to
negotiate a maximum work week or any other set
working conditions, he said.
Chapman said he personally believes TAs should
form a union because any other form of organization
would have no legal bargaining power.
"We should unionize, because otherwise we would
have no legal status."'
He said the questionnaire was only an informal poll
and the question of whether or not to form an
organization will be decided some time in the future.
then we couldn't attract good
people." It would be almost impossible to change the "collective
agreement" between faculty and
the administration.
Salkeld said abolishment of
tenure at UBC "couldn't come
overnight because all Canadian
universities have tenure systems. I
think this should be done on a
national level."
Commerce student Bob Goodwin
said he favors a three-year contract for professors.
Moe Sihota, Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer, said UBC
must change the tenure system to
"attempt to do something about
poor profs."
"The tenure system discourages
good teaching," said AMS finance
commissioner Herb Dhaliwal. "I'd
like to see the tenure system
abolished."
Gear sees
sweep of
senate
By MIKE BOOKING
The engineers are going to make
a clean sweep of the senator-at-
large elections because of student
apathy in other faculties, senate
candidate Gregory Schwab said
Wednesday.
He and other candidates were
speaking at an all-candidates
meeting organized by the Student
Representative Assembly in
council chambers.
Schwab predicted he and his four
engineer running mates will win all
five seats because of an anticipated 80 per cent voting turnout
from the engineering faculty. He
said he doubted the much larger
arts faculty could defeat the
engineering machine.
The elections will be held Jan. 18
and 19.
Arts representative and senate
candidate Pam Willis attacked the
quality of education at UBC. She
said classes were too large, particularly at the first and second
year levels, and that "provincial
government cutbacks in higher
educational spending were
aggravating the situation."
Willis recommended publishing
a "calendar supplement" to improve the quality of teaching. A
calendar supplement would
evaluate courses and professors
based on student questionnaires,
she said.
Incumbent senator-at-large
Maureen Peters said it is vital
student senators provide a united
front at senate meetings. She said
there is currently little
collaboration among student
senators, and recommended
strategy meetings before senate
meetings to form a common front.
Senator Bill Chow said there is
little respect for student senators
on the senate. "When a student
senator gets up to speak, faculty
senators tend to ignore them or
talk among themselves," he said.
Willis attacked the status of
women at UBC, saying there is a
deficiency of women instructors on
faculty. "For example, there are
no full-time women instructors in
the political science department."
Schwab said he regretted the low
percentage of women on the
faculty, but said he hoped the
administration would not adopt a
policy of tokenism or a quota
system to have more women hired.
"Professors should be appointed
on the basis of merit rather than
sex," he said.
Schwab said the job of student
senators is to represent the SRA.
But Young Socialist candidate
Elaine Bernard said she would not
always take the advice of the SRA
"because the SRA sometimes
makes some pretty dumb
decisions." Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 1977
Apathetic?
Just normal
Chances are, you neither know nor care that there are
student elections for senate and board of governors next
week. Apathetic? Nope. Perfectly normal.
UBC student politics are boring, for two reasons. One,
few student politicians have ever given much thought to why~
they are in student politics. Two, the elections are boring
because the candidates are eager to win and they don't want
to say anything that might offend anybody.
Let's dear with the second point first. Student
politicians seem to think the best way to win office is to
offend as few people as possible. That way, they reason,
nobody will vote against them.
Wrong, of course. It would make more sense for them to
say something absolutely honest and outrageous, if that's
what they think. So what if they make enemies — they will
also find people who agree with them and vote for them. If
they don't find enough of the latter — well, that's what
democracy is all about, comrades.
The first and more important point though, is that most
of them have nothing to say anyway. Most of them have
never really thought about what they are doing at UBC, what
role the university serves in our society, whether that society
is good or bad and-, if bad, what the university, and students,
can do about it.
Even those who have never thought about UBC in terms
of where it fits into the real world have rarely thought about
what they, as student politicians, can do to make UBC better
than it is.
To be perfectly honest, most students enter politics so,
when they're applying for jobs after they graduate, they can
say in their resumes, "student council president, 1977-78."
Furthermore, they do not envision a good student
leader as somebody who uses the position to organize
students in their fight to protect the students' interests, as
was often done in the 1960s, but instead, somebody who is
competent at managing the money students pay each year.
The Ubyssey will be running interviews with each of the
candidates competing for either board or senate positions in
Friday's paper. If this batch of aspiring young executives and
civil servants is as boring as past batches, don't feel guilty
about not voting. Eventually, the politicos will learn that low
voter turnout doesn't mean apathy, but intelligence on the
part of the voters.
Stop the press
There is a grim sort of humor in the Combines
Investigation Commission's search of the Vancouver Sun and
Province offices Tuesday. It was a Pink Pantheresque case of
the bumbling detective tripping over a corpse while searching
for clues.
You see, the investigators weren't looking into any
"possible" violations of the Combines Investigation Act by
the Sun and Province, both printed by Pacific Press. They
were busy getting evidence to aid their investigation of the
United Fishermen and Allied Workers.
One explanation for the raid, currently making the
rounds, isthat the combines people aren't really going after
the UFAWU, but bigger game, specifically Pacific Press, and
the "raid" was a simple reminder to PP that yes, the
combines people are still watching what's going on. We hope
so. We'd hate, to think that the people hired to safeguard our
interests aren't doing their job.
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 13, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Scoop," yelled Charlie Mlcallef. "Stop the presses!" Ellen Bartlett
drawled. "Hold page one," screeched Matt King. "What's all the
excitement?" asked Marcus Gee naively. "It's me," said Heather Walker, "I
was just voted toothpick queen by the staff of the McGill Dally." Ralph
Maurer grinned sheepishly, admitting that he too had come one step closer
to winning an award. Kathy Ford giggled, Sue Vohanka cheered and Steve
Howard tittered at the dual announcement. "It must have been Walker's
willowy gams," Doug Field quipped. Mike Bocking sipped Liberally from a
celebratory glass of champagne while Verne McDonald smoked a sub
sandwich. Anne Cormack and Sheila Barnes dreamed of the day when they
too could be like Maurer and commit the most horrendous blunder of the
year. Ted Davis claimed Walker's award and Chris Galnor nominated Bill
TIeleman the gas pump of the year.
f^pECiAL T&DAy/j
J@$3mw>
'Say, I wonder what's become of Bailey anyway.'
Letters
Individual rights are the issue
In its editorial comment about
Bill Vander Zalm's concern of the
function of the Vancouver Legal
Aid Society regarding divorce
(Tuesday's Ubyssey), the Ubyssey
editorial staff demonstrated both a
poor attempt at sensational
journalism     and    a    lack    of
recognition  of the  major  issue,
individual rights.
The Vancouver Legal Assistance
Society probably operates under a
charter which establishes as a
primary goal that of assisting any
eligible individual in pursuit of
those rights legally available to
him   or  her.   Mr.   Vander   Zalm
Charisma is different
I wish to draw your attention to
an error which appeared in
Thursday's Ubyssey. In the page 9
article titled So where's peace?, it
is stated that, seeing as God is
dead, "millions of Americans are
turning to transcendental meditation, yoga, astrology and the
charismatic movement."
It is a definite error to group the
charismatic movement — which is
centred in the triune God (the
Father, the Son, the Holy Spirit) of
the Bible — with movements such
as transcendental meditation,
yoga and astrology— which do not
acknowledge the living God of the
Bible.
What is referred to as the
"charismatic movement" would
not exist if God were dead. The
charismatic movement
acknowledges Jesus Christ as the
Son of God who died on the cross
and who arose from the dead and
who lives today. God is alive! God
can supply the peace which many
are seeking and failing to find in
other movements.
I trust that in
sources will
discriminating.
the future
be
your
more
Chris Holmquist
education 4
Job placement inadequate
In a university of this size, a
three-man placement service
appears to me as decidedly
inadequate. Students who have
spent time and money at the
university are entitled to a
placement service that will
facilitate the process of job-
hunting in the currently difficult
market.
Other universities I have attended keep letters or recommendations on file to send out, at
request, to potential employees or
schools. It is often not feasible for a
student to ask repeatedly for
separate letters of recommendation each time he or she
applies for a job.
Some placement services also
send out notices of job vacancies in
a student's field. I believe that the
placement   service   should   be
moved up in the university's scale
of priorities and should receive
more than token attention.
Sue Johnston
grad studies
wants to subvert that charter for
government purposes. He wants to
employ the society as an instrument of government policy.
Even though Mr. Vander Zalm is
human resources minister, concern for individual rights is only
important if it is consistent with his
ministry's goals.
Realistically, Mr. Vander Zalm
is only one of many bureaucrats
whose concern for management of
government does not coincide with
the best interests of its constituents. It is distressing that The
Ubyssey chose to dwell on his lack
of "brains."
Tom Congoran
business administration
A proposal
Since the UBC administration
pays Doug Aldridge in the neighborhood of $17,000 per year to raise
money for the indoor pool fund and
since Mr. Aldridge's last project
(the lottery) took four months to
complete and raised only $20, may
we suggest that if Mr. Aldridge
were to simply fire himself and
divert his salary directly into the
fund, his performance would
immediately show a 850-fold increase.
Ron Walls
Philip Huggett
Richard Merchant
medicine 2
Fill up the parking lots
It is becoming more and more
apparent that a lot of UBC students
really don't give a shit about how
much space they occupy! I am
referring to the unusual manner in
which large numbers of "drivers"
park their cars.
There are a lot of really inconsiderate assholes that park in
such a manner that often leaves
great wide gaps on either side of
their cars. How many times have
you seen some creep fill up enough
space for two cars?
Everyone  bitches   about   the
distances between the parking lots
and the rest of the campus; well,
try parking a 1 ittle closer to the guy
beside you. Let's fill up the bloody
lot.
The next time you find someone
hoarding two parking spaces, give
him or her this message:
Thanks for taking TWO parking
spaces! I had to park two blocks
away; you stupid inconsiderate
bastard!
Don Thomson
physical education Thursday, January 13, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Book collection growth
worries UBC librarians
By TED DAVIS
"Libraries grow — inexorably."
And at the present growth rate of
BC's libraries and book collects there won't be room for any
jore volumes within a decade.
This grim news for university
.bliophiles was disclosed Monday
y head librarian Basil Stuart-
tubbs and William Watson,
ssistant librarian in charge of
ihysical   planning   and   develop-
;nt.
The libraries must continue to
xpand and gain more volumes in
>rder to remain worthwhile and
Jevant, Stubbs said.
The university budget approved
ist September allotted $8,499,754
i the libraries. This was enough to
Aiy about 90,000 new volumes,
which Stubbs said then was an
idequate increase for the year.
But no money has been forthcoming for the planned library
sxpansion projects which Watson
said will be needed by the late 1980s
to house all the university's books.
Stubbs said one solution to the
space problem would be a central
storage area for books from all
over the province.
He has proposed this since 1965,
he said, but no action has been
taken.
Watson said a substitute for the
main library is what is really
needed.
"It's old, cramped, and has been
added to on its north, south and
east sides," he said. "It's obsolete
and does not conform to new
tougher building codes. The fire
chief on campus regards it as one
of his main worries if it were ever
to catch fire."
Plans are now complete for a
new processing centre which would
free an entire floor of the main
library for book stacks.
But Watson said the money
which was set aside to build the
new centre has been repossessed
by the university administration,
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
President Dog Kennel today
declared this tiny island kingdom
to be in a state of national
emergency following heavy slush
falls. Termed by leading scientist
MenlingKrutz "the worst and most
unseasonal storms ever", the slush
storms have resulted in the loss of
several puce blorgs, and have
caused extensive flooding in the
sludgeworks and book repository.
andhedoesn't know when it will be
constructed.
He said the administration took
back the money because of budget
restraints.
The processing centre currently
occupies the entire seventh-stack
level of the main library. When the
new centre is built, the government
publications collection will be
moved upstairs from level six,
which will then be used to house
more books.
The Asian collection, currently
in the lower south wing of the main
library, is to be transferred to the
new Asian centre when and if it is
completed.
But with no money in the centre's
construction coffers, the transfer
date is nowhere in sight.
The relocation of the Asian
collection, which consists of
volumes in Chinese, Japanese, and
Korean, and of the southeast Asian
collection of Indian-language
books, will provide more space for
limited access storage.
The one recently successful
expansion project was the com-
pletionofcompact storage areas in
the old bookbinding area of main
library and in the basement'rooms
which formerly held the Museum
of Anthropology collection.
Compact and limited access
storageareas are less accessible to
borrowers than the regular
collections and stacks Students
can request books from these areas
but they may not be located and
delivered for one or more days.
—matt king photo
MAIN LIBRARY . . . 'inexorable growth'
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS
THAT THE
Second Instalment Is Due On Or Before
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14,  1977
AiiS-
:OQ}£
BG
ds.
BEAR
GARDEN
Friday, Jan. 14, 77
4-6:30
BUCHANAN LOUNGE
Everyone Welcome
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
POSTGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
to GRADUATES in any branch of
ENGINEERING or APPLIED SCIENCE
$6,300-9 months
PLUS Planned Summer Employment
For information contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian   Mineral   Industry   Education   Foundation,
P.O. Box 45, Commerce Court West, Toronto, Ont.
CLOSING DATE MARCH 4th, 1977
NOMINATIONS ARE BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
STUDENTS COURT
AMS Student's Court is the final arbitrator of any
student's, club's or undergraduate society's disputes
with one another or with the AMS. Members of the
court meet when required. The term expires in Sept.,
1977. Any interested persons please leave your name,
student number and phone number with the Secretary
of SAC, Room 248, SUB by Friday, January 21.
John Swainson,
Secretary-SAC.
Rendale
Apple bee
Wrangler
Lee
Levi's
Big Blue
Seafarers
Brittania
Place for Pants
CURE
/ ai i    cirir   mine       x
VOLKSWAGENS TOO! \ •'      #'"••.
U.B.C. STUDENT l™~; ''
DISCOUNTS ^_^    ^3 ^)j
AVAILABLE
O) MOTORS REBUILT       (    (°J
J 12 Month Warranty \      N»_>/
12,000 miles (Bugs Only)
$235 For 36 H.P.
$265 For 40 H.P.
$295 For A V.W. 1500
$305 For A V.W. 1600
'S BUG STOP
1897 BURRARD     731-81710©
CHARGEX Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 19"
rer
on display
Vancouver didn't always look
like this.
In fact, some of old Vancouver
is still standing, tucked away
between highrises in the West End
and among newer buildings in the
rest of the city.
The beauty of these old
buildings has been recorded by
many local artists. The work of
six of these artists is featured at
the exhibition Old Vancouver.
The exhibition begins Monday
and runs until Jan. 28. It features
the work of Raymond Chow,
Nancy Boyd Gunton, Frank
Lewis, Bill McLuchie, Stuart
Oldale and Gail Sonne.
MWMMlWfllffll^^
Hot flashes
The Alma Mater Society art
gallery committee will exhibit the
work in the SUB art gallery. The
gallery is open to the public
Monday through Friday from
10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Not all the buildings recorded
are historical landmarks, so they
could be demolished at any time.
The work of these artists is one of
the few ways left of preserving
part of Vancouver's fascinating
past.
Come to the gallery, and see
what sort of house your
grandmother might have lived in.
It's well worth the time.
Grad meet
The first meeting this term of
the  grad  committee on  teaching
assistantships will be held at noon
Friday in the Graduate Student
Centre committee room. The
agenda will include an analysis of
last term's grad student
questionnaire, as well as the
discussion of strategy for TAs
during the upcoming year.
I0ERA
Tween classes
TODAY
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr.       Richardson      speaks      on
fluoridation, noon, IRC 1.
COMPUTING SOCIETY
Jim      Varan      on      problems     and
techniques of scientific computing,
noon, old civils 201.
PRE-VET
Movie     on      veterinary     medicine,
noon, Macmillan 160.
SF-SEN
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
"Perfect  pattern,"  noon,  SUB 205.
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Staff member Mike Poutney speaks,
noon, Chem. 250.
GAY PEOPLE
Dance     party    with    the    Lavender
TrouDadors, noon, SUB 211.
JAPANESE LANGUAGE CLUB
Organizational      meeting,      noon,
International House 406.
FILM SOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 247.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Dr.     Chan     Gunn     on     traditional
Chinese medicine, noon, Bu. 106.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,     noon,    SUB
212A.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General       meeting,       noon,
International House 402.
MY JONG  KUNG FU
Practice,   5  p.m.,  SUB  party  room.
UBC KARATE CLUB
General practice, 7:30 p.m., gym E,
winter sports complex.
Courses sponsored by the
International Development
Education Resource Association
begin tonight with a class about
the current struggle in South
Africa.
The first three sessions will
involve an historical overview of
colonial rule, the parliamentary
system, and national liberation
movements. Bantustans, Namibia
and Rhodesia are the topics for
sessions four and five, and session
six will deal with South Africa in
the international context.
The course will begin at 7:30
p.m. and will run weekly until
Feb: 17. For further information,
phone Malcolm Crockett at
732-1496.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
I CANDIA TAVERNA I
ig ig
IS FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY 13
|3 Call 228-9512/9513 l§
ig |3
[| 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m. - 2 a.m. j|
13 EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEIaEtalaEIaEEII] laBBBlsBIalaBBIslsIs IS
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF-HELP
WORKSHOPS TO INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1- Effective Study Habits
Four one hour sessions on developing
more efficient methods of study.
WORKSHOP 2-Improving Interpersonal Relations
A workshop to explore attitudes and
feelings towards ourselves and others.
WORKSHOP 3-Vocational Exploration
Six one hour sessions to aid you in
examining career choices.
These  free  programs are  designed  to help students develop skills.  All workshops
commence the week of January 17th. Sign up NOW since enrollment is limited.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES PONDEROSA ANNEX F
BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND SENATE
ALL CANDIDATES MEETING
All Students are invited to an
AH Candidates Meeting on
MONDAY, JANUARY 17
at 12:30 in the SUB conversation pit.
This will be your chance to speak to the individual
candidates for the upcoming Board of Governors
and Senate Elections.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
A Collier's Friday Night
by D. H. Lawrence
JANUARY 14-24
(Previews—Jan. 12 & 13)
8:00 P.M.
STUDENT TICKETS - $2.00
Box Office
Frederic Wood Theatre — Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
POLLING
CLERKS NEEDED
For Upcoming Board And
Senate Elections
Any Persons Interested Please Submit
Name And Phone No. By Friday,
Jan. 14-4 p.m.
To Lynne Martin, SUB Room 246
HOURS OF POLLING     JAN. 18, 1977-5 p.m.-7 p.m.
JAN. 19, 1977-9 a.m.-4 p.m.
PLEASE INDICATE HOURS AVAILABLE.
PAY WILL BE 5 PIT TOKENS PER HOUR.
CHRISTIE JUNG
AMS Chief Returning Officer
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
10 — For Sale — Commercial
70 — Services
COMMUNITY SPORTS
RACQUET STRINGING
Very low rates. Excellent workmanship. 24-hour service, plus exceptional prices for racquets. Call 733-
1612. 3616 West 4th Ave. Open 10
a.m.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT,   SELECTRIC    TYPING,   D
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat aecu
ate work. Reasonable rates. 263-531
THE GRIN BIN largest selection of
prints and posters in B.C. 3209 W.
Broadway (opp.  Super-Valu). 738-2311.
CAR STEREO SUPERSALE! Blaupunkt,
Pioneer, Jensen autospeakers, Mem-
orex, TDK cassettes, student prices.
294-3513, student reps wanted.
11 — For Sale — Private
MUST SELL. Stereo. Dynaco St. 400.
$470, Dynaco PAT-4 $80, KLH-5 $350.
Phone   224-9545,   ask  for Don."
1971 FORD. P.U. Standard V8. City
tested. $1300. o.b.o. 874-9832, evenings.
15 — Found
PAIR GOLD BIFOCALS with strap
found on University Blvd. end of
last term. Phone 266-6457.
20 — Housing
WANTED; Room or rooms in a coop house near UBC for Feb. 1st.
Call  228-9352   days,   non-smoker.
35 - Lost
A LADIES' Seiko Watch was lost Friday afternoon. Please call Patti at
433-4508.
MAN'S WALLET LOST in Civil 312.
Want it back, keep the money but I
need the cards. Please call Mike,
277-6493.
40 — Messages
WAYNE:   please   return   "The   Flood".
50 — Rentals
CAMPUS DROP-OFF for fast accura
typing. Reasonable rates. Call 73
1807  after   12:00.
EXCELLENT   TYPING.   Neat,    accura
anl   fast.   Reasonable   rates,   922-444
FAST TYPING, ELECTRIC machin
gramatical editing also availabl
Reasonable  rates.  Phone   224-7524.
90 - Wanted
HAVE   YOU   BECOME   INACTIVE   and
or overweight since moving to res
dence? 60 volunteers needed f(
study involving residence lifesty
and physical inactivity, Leonne 22
1756. See posted schedule Place: Va
ier  Totem  Park.
TRAVELING BUDDY to tour Gree.
and London this summer. Conta
Jane  Whelen, 224-9098, 229-9517.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER^
Rent cabin day/week.  732-0174 eves
WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM: begins Tue
January 18 in I.R.C. Room 342 co
sisting of eight one-hour session
FREE. For more details contact "
Lee B.S.N.  IV.  at 872-0459.
\r=ir=ir=ir=>r=ir=ir=ir=ir=ir=iK
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
Jr=)i=Ji=T=Jr=Jr=n=Jt=ir=ii=ir: lursday, January 13,  1977
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
'apers boycott CBC ads
The Ubyssey refused Wednesday
carry a CBC advertisement, in
:cordance with a Canadian
liversity Press decision that all
JP members boycott CBC ads.
The boycott was approved at
UP's recent conference in
ancouver at the urging of
aritime student papers, which
lid the CBC has refused to carry
iblic service announcements on
s Halifax radio station for
leetings of the Gay Alliance for
quality in Halifax.
GAE has accused the CBC public
:rvice announcements depart-
ent of discrimination by refusing
carry the announcements of
AE meeting times or its phone
ie.
In a press release, GAE
;cretary Robin Metcalfe said:
The airwaves are public property
id the CBC is a publicly owned
astern. It is supported by the taxes
The
Biggest
Bargain
in
Sight!
OPENING SPECIAL
SOFT
CONTACT $1 OQ00
LENSES IAm
Perfect Vision
Centre
Complete Optical Service
1453 W. BROADWAY
(at Granville)
738-8414
JOIN THIS
UNCOMMON HERD
that gathers in the most
congenial surroundings
on campus
THURSDAYS
8 p.m. - 12 Midnight-
FRIDAYS
8 p.m. - 1 a.m.
, HAPPY HOUR I
I    (FRIDAY ONLY)    I
V    4 p.m. - 6 p.m.   J
Memberships to YAC open to
graduating students and
U.B.C. alumni, are available
at the door.
THE YOUNG ALUMNI
CLUB is a program of t!ie
U.B.C.   Alumni   Association.
ror further information call
Program Office
CECIL GREEN PARK. 228-3313
of Canadian citizens, many of
whom are gay.
"It has a responsibility to give
community groups fair and equal
access to public service an-
nouncements without
discrimination based upon
prejudice. CBC has not fulfilled
this responsibility and must be
reminded of it."
The group has tried to place
public service announcements with
Halifax radio station CBH for two
years. In 1974, CBH refused to air
an announcement for the group's
phone line, saying it hadn't
satisfied CBC's policy guidelines
regarding eligibility as a submitting organization.
A public service announcement
is a free advertisement and
promotion for a community group
or service organization aired on
radio or television. The time is
available to non-profit groups —
and GAE says it fits those
regulations.
When the group asked to see
CBC's announcement policy, it was
told the document is confidential.
Last August, John McEwan,
director of radio for the Maritimes,
was questioned about the announcement policy. He said CBH
did not have room in its format for
one more public service announcement because of time
constraints.
He added: "We can't promote
just anything. We can't promote
that sort of group." Pressed for
details, McEwan said some
listeners might be offended by
GAE announcements.
: In Vancouver, Ottawa and
Toronto, local gay organizations
are unable to place public service
announcements, although they are
often interviewed on CBC news and
information programs.
In those cities, gay organizations
are able to get coverage from other
media in the city — but this is not
the case in Halifax.
The Dalhousie Gazette, student
paper at Dalhousie University in
Halifax, initiated the boycott
motion in an effort to reverse CBC
policy. The Gazette has boycotted
the ads since September.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
SASKATCHEWAN
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
POLICY ANALYSIS  AND
PROGRAM EVALUATION
The Budget Bureau (Treasury Board Secretariat) of the Province
of Saskatchewan is interested in interviewing university graduates
who are seeking a dynamic career in Public Administration.
THE POSITIONS:
The Program Evaluation Analyst is involved in the review of
public expenditure progran s on behalf of the Treasury Board —
the priorities and management committee of the Cabinet.
The work focuses on the evaluation of new and existing programs
which are proposed and undertaken by a wide variety of
government departments and agencies. The evaluation considers
the current policy thrusts of the Government, the social,
economic and other aspects of the programs, and the relative
merits of programming in the context of competing claims on
resources.
These positions will be of interest to those interested in questions
of public policy and the solution of problems facing government.
SALARY:
$12,000 - $21,000 - depending upon qualifications and
experience.
THE APPLICANTS:
Applications are invited from graduates (Baccalaureate -
honours, Masters or Doctoral) in Commerce, Business
Administration, Public Administration and Economics.
Successful applicants will be highly motivated individuals who
possess superior analytical skills and the ability to communicate
effectively in both the oral and written form.
Please forward applications or resumes before January 31, 1977,
to:
Mr. D. A. Bock, Assistant to the
Deputy Minister,
Department of Finance, Legislative Building,
Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0B3
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
FREgESTIMATES
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
4861 Kingsway: Burnaby
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
NOW ON CAMPUS"
EARTH
HARVEST
NATURAL
FOODS
VITAMINS, PROTEINS
HERBS, GRAINS, NUTS
BOOKS and COSMETICS
HAPPINESS IS:  BEING  HEALTHY
2132 WESTERN PARKWAY
(IN THE VILLAGE)
224-3015
The Co-operative Campus Ministry invites you..
We are open to all those involved in the struggle
for meaning and meaningful action. We are
representatives of the Anglican-United Churches
and the Student Christian Movement at U.B.C.
You can meet us at our WEEKLY WEDNESDAY
DINNER (5:30).
We invite you to:
Study Groups —
Women and Religion
Process Thought
Bible Study
Men's Liberation
Coffee House Friday nights
William Stringfellow
and other campus events.
Rev. George Hermanson is our chaplain and is
available for counselling and talking. We are
found at the Lutheran Campus Centre (University
and Wesbrook) —Come Around. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 197
Bugs, leaky ceilings
an unhappy fact of life
for rehab med students
By CHARLIE MICALLEF
Rehabilitation medicine hut B-3
has bugs, leaky ceilings, power
failures, inadequate space and
about 110 unhappy students.
Dan Belcher, rehab medicine 4
and president of the rehabilitation
council, said the school has tried
for 16 years to have the administration upgrade the facilities.
"When the school was started in
1961 the hut facilities, which include B-3 and a couple of nearby
huts, were only supposed to be
temporary," Belcher said. "They
have always recognized our
problems but never dealt with
them."
Belcher said the main hut B-3,
one of many moved from the
present site of the instructional
resource centre, has the same
working space it did in 1961 but
accommodates 10 times as many
students.
None of the staff or students are
happy about the situation.
Laura Horton, rehab 4, said she
has seen silverfish in the hut, leaks
in the ceiling and signs the
structure is not fireproof.
"It's common for fuses to blow
considering the technical equipment being used," she said. "And
there isn't even hot water in the
ladies' washroom."
But the students say the most
obvious problem is the lack of
space.
"Some days you can walk in the
front door of B-3 and see male and
female students standing in their
underwear, in the hallway,
changing their clothes," Horton
said.
Despite the fact only 30 to 40
students   use   the   huts   in   one
session, the hut is usually jammed,.
Belcher said.
Improvising
Space is in such demand students
often have to improvise. For instance, the gym area serves as a
physiotherapy room, a mock
hospital room and lecture room.
"We use the stools and beds in
the gym as our desks sometimes
and we have to move everything to
one side when we want room for
mat work," Horton said.
She said peeking students often
watch the clinical activities in the
gym from a building facing the
room.
Belcher said rehab students have
sent many letters and briefs about
the inadequate facilities to the
faculty of medicine and the rehab
school heads.
The administration have been
sympathetic but they have taken
no action, he said.
In the most recent letter, submitted to the senate building
committee, president Doug Kenny
and faculty of medicine heads, the
rehab students complained:
"The «school's inadequate
facilities are limiting opportunities
for further education. The facilities
and lack of funds make it difficult
for improving teaching proficiency
or attracting new staff."
Hazel Southard, deputy head of
physiotherapy, said she is also
concerned about the huts
vulnerability to fire.
"Fire marshalls come around
but don't really do anything," she
said.
Southard, who has been with the
school since 1967, said some work
just can't be carried on in the hut
because there is no storage space
or room for equipment.
More space in nearby hut B-2 and
some lecture space in the IRC has
been given to the rehab school but
Southard said the supply has not
kept up with the increased
enrolment of about 40 students.
Overcrowding
She added the overcrowding of
facilities and lack of money has
also meant the school's 10
professors have been overworked.
Belcher said rehab students met
last fall with William Webber,
associate dean of medicine, but the
outcome was disappointing.
"Webber told us something
might happen in the future but that
was all," he said.
EQUIPMENT STOREROOM . . . piled high
'Law competition unhealthy'
From page 1
positions. By May of 1978 as many
students will graduate in B.C. as
there will be articling jobs
available, he said. About 70
graduate students from outside
B.C. will also apply for the jobs.
"The law firms will hire whoever
they want," Dwor said. "We're not
asking them not to hire out-of-
province students."
He said the pressure to get high
marks and qualify for an articling
job forces students into unhealthy
competition.
"If students treated themselves
this way inside the school, how
would they treat each other outside
it ?" he asked. "This was what I
was telling the bar."
Dwor said none of the organizers
of Friday's meeting have approached him about it. He said he
expects to be shouted down at the
meeting.
Conrad claimed Dwor makes
LSA decisions on his own, and
ignores many student problems.
"We've gotten pissed off at him
over a period of time."
Conrad claimed Dwor ignores
problems such as the quality of
education, registration procedures
and parking. He said Dwor should
report to the LSA before he makes
any more speeches.
REHAB HUT .. . narrow hallways     ~matt ki"9 photo
Medicine dean David Bates said
Wednesday the administration is
"very aware of the inadequacies
facingtheschoolofrehab medicine
but the next move is up to the
senate building committee to
locate the funds for improving the
situation.
"There has been continuous
discussion for five years and all of
the rehab documentation has had
absolutely continuous representation, but the senate building
committee's decisions set the
priorities," Bates said.
The first priority in health
sciences is the clinical departments, then rehabilitation then the
nursing schools.
James Kennedy, director of the
UBC computing center, heads the
senate advisory committee on
building priorities.
Kennedy said Wednesday the
committee has prepared a report
advising the senate "of the most
urgent needs of 17 departments
where academic deficiencies
exist."
He said many health science
departments, including rehab
medicine, have been excluded in
the past because the senate has
expected health sciences to take
care of them.
Kennedy declined comment
about the recommendations of the
advisory report before it is taken
up by senate next week.
More than 40 huts dot the UBC
campus and physical plant personnel say the huts are used for
office and classroom facilities
because of financial restraints.
Jim Jorgenson, physical plant
civil engineer, said many of the
huts are war surplus structures
from Vancouver Island.
"It's  no   use  upgrading   them
because they are classed a:
temporary buildings."
Jorgenson said the wood framed
tar paper structures are the
cheapest space the universitj
could ever want.
"They look bad because we don'^
paint them but as far as I know
they are maintained to safetj
standards. I suppose if there evei
was a fire in one of them, people
could just jump out a window."
Jim Page, physical plant ar
chitect, said there is a minimum oj
repair work or renovation on the
30-year-old huts.
Silverfish seen
"It's a shame when money has t(
be spent on them." Page said
"they're not worth it."
But for the people who have .
work in them, such as Patrick
Denholm, a part-time secretary fo>
the department of anthropology
and sociology in hut 0-15, a little
renovation would be appreciated
"The huts are not cleaned nearh
as well as they should be," she
said, adding she has seen silverfish
in her office. "If someone lit a
match in the right place, the hut
wouldn't take long to go up."
One student said the huts are
simply "the tangible signs of a
blind and deaf administration
which can easily find money when
it decides to vote its members a
pay increase but can't afford to
make hot water for the ladies'
room in but B-3."
Laura Horton said the rehab
students have had to hold bake
sales and bottle drives to earn
enough money for a rug for B-3's
common room.
After 16 years, not much has
changed. "There's almost no use
fighting." Horton said.
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING, MINERAL or EXTRACTIVE
and PROCESS METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
$1,500-9 months
to students wishing to enter the first or subsequent
professional year of a degree course in Mining,
Mineral or Extractive and Process Metallurgical Engineering
For applications contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation,
P.O. Box 45, Commerce Court West, Toronto, Ont.
or
The Dean of Engineering
Applied Science
CLOSING. DATE MARCH 4th, 1977

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