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The Ubyssey Jan 12, 1973

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 26 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1973
48 ,228-2301 ,
ByKENTSPENCER
Recreational, intramural, and intercollegiate athletics at
UBC should be consolidated under one autonomous board, says
the final president's sub-committee report on athletics.
The sub-committee recommended each division of athletics
— men's extramural, women's extramural, men's intramural,
women's intramural, and recreation — seat one director on the
committee with the chairman to be appointed by administration
president Walter Gage. -
At present, men's extramural sports is run by the men's
athletic committee, and women's athletics fun by WAC.
Recreation and intramurals are administered through the
physical education department.
The sub-committee chaired by administrative assistant
Byron Hender feels the proposed changes will best provide for
the co-ordination necessary for an improved program.
The report conveniently makes no mention of any of the
budgeting inequities of athletics at UBC, such as the compulsory $5 athletic fee, intramurals, or Recreation UBC funding. \
MAC currently receives the lion's share of the athletic fee—
$4.20; the remaining 80 cents goes to the women. Women get
$1.25 per meal when travelling while the men's teams get $1.75.
The $120,000 MAC receives from students is supplemented
by an additionah$150,000 grant from the board of governors.
With this money, together with WAC, they run a program for
about 1,000 extramural" participants.
Recreation UBC charges a $3 fee this year for. recreational
use of gym space-"on campus. Equipment loan, instruction,
supervision, court bookings, and a towel service are included.
New in October, Rec UBC is apparently! thebrainchild of
the sub-committee, it recommended an advisory committee for
campus recreation be established and an administrative head
for the program be appointed.     -
:   All that has already been done.
The intramural program, which draws about 3,000 participants, gets $7,000 a year from the Alma Mater Society.
The sub-committee was originally struck in April, 1971*to
review athletics at UBC.
Included in the sub-committee, which made its final report
to Gage last June, are: Don Anderson (faculty), Doreeji Ball
(student), Nestor Korchinsky (faculty), Phil Dockerill
(student), Tony~Hodge (student), John,Powell (alumnus), and
Marilyn Russeli (faculty). : • -
The report also suggested the formation of yet another
"broadly representative standing committee," to be called the
university sports council, to oversee and advise on the direction
of the total sports program.
Students occupy
York buildings
DOWNSVIEW, Ont. (CUP) — One occupation at York
University here is over but another continues.
The occupations began Tuesday at Gleridon College and
spread the next day to the registrar's office over the university's refusal to release student award cheques without first
deducting tuition fees.    "•'*      _L______      '
—sucha singh photo
ACADEMIC WITH MEATLOAF, is the magnum opus of suet sculptor Ignazio Coarsepore's one man show,^
Artsy-fartsy for everybody, on display now in sub-basement number four in Basil Stuart-Stubbs'
underground extravaganza — the new Sedgwick library.
This action blocked a
potential: 3,000 of 13,000
students from, taking part .in
the provincially organized fees
strike against the government.
But Thursday, in a complete
reversal of their original stand,
York administrators announced all student/, award
cheques will be released
without first deducting tuition
fees.-    :-■■■■•      .■•■- v.;-. ■ •   -.-.   •-.;■:■
York president David Slater
also announced fines for late
payment have been waived for
the term. At Glendon, students
who were forced to pay their,
fees in order to get their grants
will have the full sum of their
cheques returned to them. ,-/'.
Delegates from Glendon said
this satisfied their demands
and Glendon students voted-to
end the, occupation. But
students at the main campus
See page 2: DEMANDS
Alma Mater, Society council voted; Wednesday to
join, the National Union of Students as a founding
member,after councillors were told NUS lawyers
had declared the"union's bylaws invalid.       '    -   ■
This means a referendum is not necessary for
membership as this was covered in a bylaw.
However, an eventual referendum is still
necessary because of clauses in the AMS constitution
requiring a referendum for membership if fees are
charged. The date of the referendum has now been:
changed to March .7 from •• Jan. 17:
AMS external affairs officer Teri Ball stressed
membership at this time is an interim one> to be
approved or rejected when students vote in the
March 7 referendum.
She said the referendum will ask for approval of
NUS membership providing fees don't exceed 30
cents per student per year. This would mean a
maximum UBC contribution of about $6,000,
If fees eventually go above that figure, another
vote re-examining NUS membership will be taken,
Ball said. " '
UBC joins Simon Fraser University and the
College of New Caledonia in Prince George to
enables AMS to join NUS
become the third of the founding members,;all from
b.c- :   '■•-"    ..;•<.,■.-      '•'.■■<■.'.
Ball said some universities in other parts of
Canada are expected to endorse the union this week
to take NUS membership past the. five universities
required for incorporation. Once incorporated the
NUS will decide on a fee structure when the
executive has a better idea of membership and
organization costs, she said.
in other business, council broke with tradition to
set the dates of the two slates of executive elections
two weeks rather than only one week apart.
The makeup of the two slates was also changed
with the positions of president, co-ordinator, internal
affairs officer, and secretary being voted on in the
first slate Feb. 7 and the positions of vice-president,
treasurer, external affairs and ombudsperson being
voted on in the second slate on Feb. 21.     • -
Council also passed two motions condemning the
war in Vietnam. The first instructed AMS president
Doug Aldridge to send a letter of support to external
affairs minister Mitchell Sharp for his protest to
Washington.
'The second motion provoked considerable
discussion before being passed.
•.. It read: ' 'That the AMS express its support for the
Vietnamese people (particularly taking note, of the
; recent savage bombings of Hanoi and Haiphong by
the U.S. Imperialists) and supports the campaign
and demonstration Saturday, Jan. 13, 1:00 p.m.
launched by the Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist) and we demand that the U.S. sign
the nine point peace agreement."
The demonstration is scheduled to start at the
courthouse and will march to the U.S. consulate,
where a number of speakers will be heard.:
AMS co-ordinator Bob Angus told council the
listening lounge had been delayed because the carpet
had been "wrongly located", but he said he hoped it
would be ready by Monday. He also announced that
another public meeting concerning Pit expansion
will be held next week.
Council also reinstated. the music, commerce,
law, and librarianship undergraduate societies after
their representatives showed up at the meeting.
They were censured last week after consistently
missing council meetings. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973
Scholarship hike raw deal
By LORRI RUDLAND
The new $200 "no strings attached"
scholarship recently announced by the
provincial government for students at secondary schools, colleges and universities actually
means a lower grant for many university
students.
In most cases the government's $200 grant
completely covers tuition fees at public
colleges but doesn't even cover half of the
tuition at universities.
Students in a full-program of courses attending Vancouver City College pay tuition fees
of $200 per year ($250 for non-residents of that
school district), students at Douglas College
pay $200 per year, and students at B.C.I.T. pay
only $150.
In contrast to this, UBC general arts
students in a full program of courses pay $428
per year for tuition.
Seymour Archibald, director of the Student
Affairs Branch in Victoria, said "what the
student does with the grant is up to him.
"He can buy new shoe laces, a bottle of beer,
or use it for continuing his education."
Archibald said the scholarship is now given
as a prize for the student's immediate accomplishment rather than being tagged with
some stipulation for its future use.
In the past, it was applied against the next
terms fees if the student continued her
education.
The scholarship is being awarded to the top-
ranking 17 per cent of students in full-time
enrolment in the universties and public colleges
of the province and the top 17 per cent of
students in full-time enrolment in Grade XII
Academic-technical programs in B.C. secondary schools.
But in the past rather than a straight cash
grant, the scholarship was awarded as a percentage of the next term's tuition fees. The
grant to 17 per cent of students in full-time
enrolment was broken up so that five per cent
of the top-ranking students had 3/4 of their fees
paid, six per cent had 1/2 of their fees paid, and
another six per cent had 1/3 of their fees paid.
When asked if the government would consider fairer treatment for students paying
higher fees, Archibald said, "The policy is
under continuous review but it is impossible for
me to answer that now.
"The new regulations only come into effect
on the first of April 1973 and we have to see
what the reaction is then before we can think
about changing the regulations for 1974.
"But", Archibald said, "this type of a
change would be considered."
Byron Hender, the UBC financial aid officer,
said applications for the government
scholarship will be available from Buch. 207 by
the end of January. He stressed that students
have to apply for this award.
Hender said these applications have to be
returned no later than March 15, the absolute
deadline.
BINGO
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BUYING OR SELLING
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73^8181
Slater demands refused
From page 1
also asked the administration
to endorse the program of the
Ontario Federation of Students
in its cutbacks campaign.
Slater refused.
"I strongly support improving the lot of students. But
I will not commit myself and
the administration to your
package," he told 40 students
occupying the awards office.
The students later decided to
stay as the demand had been
ratified at a  meeting of 250
students   earlier   in   the   afternoon.
A meeting is scheduled for
tomorrow to discuss further
action.
Glendon students said
tonight in a press release that
the administration's changed
policy was "a small victory in
attempts to bring about major
change in government policy.
The occupation would never
have been necessary if York
had been a democratic institution.  We shall  now  con
tinue with the tuition fee strike
and our fight in university
financing and structures."
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Politics over principle in arts meet
By GARY COULL
An open meeting of arts
students Thursday opted for
political considerations rather
than principle in responding to
a recent faculty resolution
excluding students from a
faculty committee looking into
student representation.
Grad Studies senator Stan
Persky said the body may
alienate people by flatly
rejecting the resolution
because they would not know
why it was done.
So instead of outright
rejection, the meeting decided
to simply, "acknowledge" the
resolution and press for open
meetings of the faculty committee looking into the
question.
Persky said he was sympathetic to those who argued
for complete rejection but
cautioned it would mean
mustering up enough support
to return to a faculty meeting
and press for their original
demands.
"It is essentially for political
not theoretical reasons that I
support this motion," he said.
Discussion of the motion was
held up by debate on whether
or not to await the final results
of an AUS questionnaire
distributed throughout the
campus earlier this week.
Bill Moen of the AUS
executive said the questionnaires were overwhelmingly in
favor of student representation
and generally supported all the
other questions.
However other students'
argued the body should wait
for accurate tabulations before
making a decision for the
group which is being affected.
One person pointed out the top
part of questionnaires he had
seen were indeed positive but
questions towards the end,
such as inclusion of students in
tenure and promotion
decisions, were split 50-50.
The meeting also heard a
statement of support from the
Anthro-soc department.
THREE NUNS posing as urinals stand silently contemplating their
navels. Why they decided to stand in the SUB art gallery, pledging not
to leave until Jan. 27, is anybody's guess. Some have said the nuns are
—ed dubois photo
doing penance by suffering the slings and arrows of outrageous art
critics, a punishment devoutly to be avoided.
In a meeting Tuesday the
department passed a
resolution stating it reaffirms
its commitment to the principle of student representation
and recognizes the positive
contribution of students to
their department.
"This department supports
the principle of student
representation in the Faculty
of Arts and its committees
where appropriate and in the
departments and their committees where appropriate."
Faculty passed the motion 24-2.
Students also sent a
statement to education
minister Eileen Dailly urging
her to interpret the universities
act to determine whether
students can have voting
representation.
They hope a public
statement from Dailly will
clear up the ambiguity of the
Universities Act which confused the senate committee on
student representation in its
recommendations to the
senate.
Persky said "even if the
minister interprets against us,
she can move enabling
legislation in the spring session
to give students the right."
The faculty of arts committee, which students will
now ignore unless the meetings
are held in public, was struck
by arts dean Doug Kenny.
Members of the committee
are Margaret Prang, history,
(chairwoman), Robert Evans,
economics; Roy Daniells,
English; Joan Reynertson,
theatre; P. Suedfeld,
psychology; Peter Remnant,
philosophy; A. Caine and Ruby
Nemser, English.
Manitoba
faculty
unionizes
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
University of Manitoba faculty
association wants to make U of
M Canada's first English-
speaking university with
unionized teaching staff.
The association has asked
the university board of
governors to recognize it as the
collective bargaining agent for
U of M's 1,080 full-time faculty
members. It wants to be able to
bargain not only about salaries
and working conditions, but
over university spending
priorities.
Muck
By RYON GUEDES and VAUGHN PALMER
Those little gray Xeroxed sheets you got in
•your seminar last week could get someone involved in a lawsuit.
Recently, the U.S. government and several
universities have felt the sting of damage suits
launched by irate publishing companies for infringements of the copyright laws.
The most common manifestation of this infringement is the photocopying of articles, essays,
or excerpts for distribution to a large number of
readers.
Individuals, including professors and students,
are liable to legal action.
A resolution to clarify ambiguous copyright
laws in the U.S. is still pending legislation. In
Canada however, copyright regulations are much
more confining, if not less ambiguous.
Under copyrights, section 17, subsection 2d
there is an exception which allows copying such
works for certain purposes including "private
'study".
Of course, whether or not "private study"
includes distributing this material to a large class
is prone to courtroom debate.
Without the permission of the author and the
publisher, anyone copying and distributing such
material can be sued for damages.
Even with the permission of the author, the
copier   can   still   be   sued   by   the  publisher.
The publisher is entitled to sue the offender for
the amount he considers lost in profits from the
copying.
There is also a provision in the section for a
statutory charge.
If the defendant should happen to lose the case,
the costs of the court action will be paid out of his
own pocket.
At the Alma Mater Society council meeting
Wednesday, AMS president Doug Aldridge denied
a report by Exposure columnist Art Smolensky in
Tuesday's Ubyssey that former AMS president
Grant Burnyeat is the AMS executive's choice as
the student member on the provincial government's five man commission on the universities
act.
A motion that Aldridge and AMS external
affairs officer Teri Ball name Grad Student
Association president Stan Persky to the commission was tabled.
Aldridge says he prefers nominating three or
four candidates then allowing education minister
Eileen Dailly to select one. Since other universities and colleges in the province will also be
making submissions this would seem to be making
Dailly's job even more difficult.
Aldridge admitted later on in the meeting that
Persky and Burnyeat are probably the best
choices. Eliminating Burnyeat as a man who from
past performance is more interested in working
within established channels than in changing
them, that leaves Persky.
Over to you Doug. j Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973
HOCUS
Thanks to a legal technicality, UBC is now a founding
member of the National Union of Students.
For those of you without the benefit of a legal degree
we offer the following simple explanation:
The NUS, as a soundly-democratic organization, has a
provision requiring all prospective member student councils
to have their decision ratified by their student bodies.
However NUS lawyers claim this provision does not
apply in our case because it is a bylaw and is thus invalid
until the NUS constitution is incorporated, which has to be
done by at least five founding members of which we will be
one. Then, when incorporated the bylaws will pass, which
will require the Alma Mater Society to go to the students to
ratify a decision without which NUS would not have been
incorporated in the first place. Isn't it marvellous how the
AMS commitment to working through the proper channels
has allowed us to cut through all this red tape?
Since UBC is a founding member maybe we should be
honored.
It's not that we don't like the idea of a national
student organization. With the increasing involvement of the
federal government in financing, and such problems as
housing, quality education and other social consciousness
stuff, there's ample reason for such an organization.
It's just that the NUS is not the organization.
At its founding convention NUS was unable to decide
a system of representation acceptable to those who
demanded representation-by-population and those who
wanted equal representation on a regional basis.
The Atlantic provinces and Quebec argued for the
regional principle pointing out that it was a far more
accurate mirror of Canada's actual make-up Than provincial
boundaries or federalist political theories.
Faced with an un-compromisable issue, these
pragmatic planners decided to impose the will of the
majority and opted for a vaguely modified rep by pop.
The Atlantic provinces and Quebec walked out and
with them went the supposed national status of NUS.
The executive, elected by the remaining Half Of
Canada Union of Students (HOCUS) reflect the
organization's regional status. Three members are from B.C.,
one from Manitoba.and one from that far off oasis of the
mysterious east — Thunder Bay.
We also don't like the way AMS executive has handled
the membership of UBC in HOCUS.
First it gave $1,000 to an organization which has yet
to show it can decide anything including when its next
meeting will be held.
Then it slyly thought of springing the referendum on
us Jan. 17, hoping perhaps to catch everyone off guard. The
executive gave that up when members realized it left no
time for their own media campaign.
Then, using a loophole, council joined the HOCUS,
though at the same time going against the intent if not the
letter, of the organization's constitution.
Now, on March 7, UBC students will be asked to
formally approve membership, though by that time the
membership fee may still not be established, the
organization's principles, procedures and positions on the
issues it will supposedly be tackling will not be worked out,
and the date of the next meeting may not even be known.
There is no reason why UBC should not be one of the
founders, even prime movers, of a national student
organization, were this one.
But, in the case of HOCUS, why is the AMS executive
rushing to grant complete approval to an organization which
is undefined, unrealistic and still almost non-existent?
-V.P.
TMUBYSStY
JANUARY 12, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Present at the bazaar, held at the Mike Sasges Memorial Hall and Skating
Rink, were Ryon Guedes, Vaughn Palmer, Lesley Krueger, Forrest Nelson,
Kent Spencer,' Sandy Kass, Jan O'Brien, John Andersen, David Mars, Doug(
Higgins, and famed New Journalist Berton Woodward. Entertainment was
furnished by members of the Spuzzum Coarse Acting Troupe, starring Lorri
Rudland, Roger MacNeill, Simon Truelove, and Sucha Singh. Refreshments
were served by Janice McEwan, and a good time was had by all.
)
" THE   LAN£>
IS   STRAPS-r
CfaJbto:
Letters
False
In the Jan. 9 issue of The
Ubyssey there were two more
rebuttals of my original letter.
These letters display the stubborn
falseness which I attack. A false
logic is used when they say other
unproven things have been useful,
therefore religion is also useful
Reference is made to a philosophy of M. Polanyi which by its
own definition is incapable of
verification and therefore has only
trivial consequences. It may be
true, but it cannot compel us to
alter our reasoning processes.
Every theory contains a grain
of truth and science moves by
refining those theories, not by
discarding them. There has yet to
be and it would be an illusion to
think that another process exists.
Nothing is proven but this gives
no right to derive a statement of
truth from it. Scientists know and
use this logic, as should the
Christians. I do not maintain the
non existence of a God but I do
not maintain its existence, as do
the Christians.
Christianity exists under the
guise of right and good, but at the
same time allows immorality and
is itself immoral.
Ziff House
geology 2
A reply
A reply to a letter by Ziff
House.
Your dedication to the world
of logic and proof is indeed impressive. However, you appear
blind to the fact that a "proof is
commonly carried beyond the
physical realm to the metaphysical or spiritual. Because love, for
-a mundane example, cannot be
proven in a scientific method,
does not detract from the fact
that it is as empirically real as you
are. I am sure that without hesitation you would declare that
"love is."
Why? Because its reality has
been proven individually and spiritually. In the same manner it is
not illogical to state that "God
is."
Why Because He has proven
and still is proving Himself in the
spiritual realm of millions of individuals. God, like love, does not
require, and admittedly, has no
proof within the limits of the
physical.
Geoffrey Burrowes
geology 3
Crabs 1
The 'Crabs' letter in The Ubyssey before Xmas revived one of
my more unpleasant memories.
Last spring I too became the
proud owner of a colony of Crab-
bus pinchenshappus, commonly
known as crabs. I have reason to
believe that I picked them up
from the upstairs can in SUB.
My advice to all students here
is; if you've got crabs, get rid of
them and if you don't know what
crabs are, you've probably got
them. One of the most effective
methods of crab removal, not
mentioned by Mr. Pissed Right
Fucking Off, is to shave half the
pubic area. Next, you employ the
age old technique used in hunting
men and animals: light a forest
fire and pick them off when they
come out in the open. Traditionally this is done with tweezers,
but for large numbers using a
hammer is recommended.
Joe G. Nadley
fine arts 2
Crabs 2
Re: "Name withheld for fear
of finding out who my true
friends really are."
May I suggest, sir, that you try
a non-prescription emulsion called
Bornex? I was somewhat relieved
when, upon whispering my request for this emulsion, my
W.A.S.P. pharmacist informed me
that he had just ordered two cases
of the stuff, due to an epidemic or
head and body lice amongst elementary school children. He also
informed me that he had had several furtive middle-aged females
inquiring for Bornex.
I hope that this information
will provide physical and some
psychological relief.
Another "name withheld" Friday, January 12, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
A great step backward
By SANDY KASS
The rejection of an appeal by fired Campbell
River Secondary principal John Young leaves
in doubt the hopes of future teachers to change
the B.C. education system.
Young's appeal of his suspension by the
Campbell River school board was based on the
philosophy that progressive education policies
are needed to update a school system which has
lost touch with the communities it was designed
to serve.
That the same progressive philosophy is
being adhered to more and more regularly by
students at the three teacher-training institutions in B.C. is a fact which cannot be
ignored by persons concerned that schools
reflect the ideals of the society in which they
operate.
That Young's philosophy was supported by
the only teacher on the three-member board of
reference hearing the appeal is also a fact
which cannot be ignored.
But that the appeal was rejected by the two
lawyers on the board throws into question the
attitude of at least one professional group
toward education.
It cannot help but mar the hopes of persons
wanting to see the school system change to
reflect the attitudes of a changing society.
The question remains as to how representative of the community at large were the attitudes of lawyers B. J. Morahan, the reference
board   chairman,   and   J.   Gait   Wilson,   in
upholding the dismissal  on  the  grounds  ot
misconduct and neglect of duty.
The decision came a full month after the
close of hearing at which the controversial)
teacher defended his school's philosophy and
his administrative style.
So far the board of reference's 59-page
reasons for judgement has not yet been
released.
Young can appeal the decision again — to
the B.C. Supreme Court — and undergo another
set of judicial hearings and more red tape.
He is almost certain to launch another appeal within 30 days — the legal time limit in
such cases — to defend once more the
philosophy toward which education is
ultimately heading.
But if two lawyers were unanimous in their
opposition to progressivism, what attitude can
the public expect from superior court judges?
How much more well versed in education
are judges than lawyers? And how can the
lawyers justify their decision when Young's
peer on the board, teacher Robert Wilson,
upheld the appeal?
What influence over the future of education
do teachers have when the validity of
philosophy is being determined by members of
the legal profession?
The hopes of future teachers to change the
system are thrown in jeopardy by the outcome
to date of the Young case. As products of the
antiquated school system Young wants to
change, we should all be concerned.
Steaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatore[|
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Sun.
4 p.m.-1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS
HOME DELIVERY
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618W. Broadway'
(at DunbarL
738-9520   738-1 lh
Letters
Crabs 3
By far the best remedy for
crabs is DDT if you can still get it.
It is still legal for personal use but
not necessarily kept in stock.
Don't go to the gardener's for it,
go to a drugstore and ask the
pharmacist. He may give you a
large box of it containing instructions for putting it on flowers.
Use only a very little because it
is extremely effective. A light
dusting of the hairy regions in the
morning and at night will kill the
adult crabs. The eggs hatch in
about 24 hours so a couple of
days of treatment should get them
all.
DDT is a discreet, almost odorless white powder and won't burn
your crotch like the usual remedies. There is no evidence that it is
harmful to humans (a farmer in
California eats it) but since it is
harmful to birds, you will have to
store the rest or give it to the
government to bum.
Name withheld
Reality
I'm a former UBC student. I
liked it well enough out here. I
had some fun. But I always felt
like I wasn't going anywhere.
Somehow I was learning lots of
theories   and   seeing  no  reality.
Maybe you know the feeling.
I'm not studying here anymore. I'm learning, about myself in
a way they don't teach here. And
I'm better. Much better. And I
can handle my life more completely.
I'm not suggesting you quit
university. Keep going if it's right
for you. And I'm not suggesting
you embrace a faith. But there are
ways to develop faith in yourself.
Ways that work. And I'm learning
them. You can too.
Mike Landon
scientologist
Celery
In the past week, I have observed a very interesting phenomenon in the new Sedgewick library.
There seems to be a relationship between the new surroundings and the amount of talking
that takes place. Possibly the
colorful   surroundings   and   the
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be addressed to:
Letters, The Ubyssey, Room
241K, Student Union Building,
UBC.
openness have  something to do
with how much people want to
- talk. The fact is, however, it is a
library as well as a place to study.
So for those who still see the
new surroundings as a novelty,
please try and overcome your
excitement. I do not want to hear
about your brother-in-law or
about your chest X-rays. And if
you decide to eat your carrots and
-celery at 10 a.m. — go somewhere
else, or have breakfast — it is not a
cafeteria!
Janet Laloge
arts 3
DIAMONDS
ARE FOREVER
FRI. t SAI.
7:00 t 9:30 pjn.
SUNDAY 7 pjn.
SUB AUD. —50'
When a young man's fancy
lightly turns to thoughts of
•LOVE*
He should at least be clued up
on birth control. To get the
facts in plain language send for
the FREE How-Not-To booklet
by Julius Schmid, makers of
FOUREX, RAMSES and SHEIK
Quality contraceptives for men.
Sold only in drug stores.
JULIUS SCHMID OF CANADA LIMITED
32 Bermondsey Rd., Toronto 16, Ont.
Please send me FREE  -THE-HOW-NOT-TO-BOOK"
(Print clearly)
TO: Name	
Address	
City	
THE
HOW-NOT-TO
BOOK
Julius Schmid'sgutde
to modern birth control methods
_Zone_
_Prov._
YS-73 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973
Hot flashes
Operation
Doorstep
The Operation Doorstep mobile clinic will provide free tuberculin skin tests to all students,
faculty and staff, Monday to Jan.
24. The clinic will be located outside SUB, and open from 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. and 12:30 to 4:30
p.m.
Lounge opens
The SUB lounge re-opens early
next week after being closed since
last fall for renovations costing
about $60,000.
The "new" lounge won't have
a reading room but will have a
reorganized listening room, where
students will listen either to tapes
or F.M. radio.
Gordon Blankstein, Alma
Mater Society vice-president, said
Tween
classes
TODAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, upper lounge IH.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Discussion, MLA Allan Williams and
Karl on "Should there be a united
opposition in B.C." noon SUB 111.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
WOMAN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting, noon, Ed. 1211.
WESTWATER RESEARCH CENTRE
Lecture    on    the    Churchill-Nelson
River   diversion   3  p.m.   Woodward
lecture hall 1.
UBC CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Meeting,    noon    presumably,    SUB
211.
MONDAY
CUE
"How to apply for a job",   noon,
Mildred Brock room, Brock Hall.
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,  4:30-6:30,  SUB ballroom.
ANANDA MARGA
Yoga class,  7 p.m., X-Kalay, 26 W.
7th.
TUESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Slide show, noon, IH 404.
ECKANKAR
Lecture on  the ancient science of
soul travel, 7:30 p.m. SUB 211.
WEDNESDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
ANANDA MARGA
Lecture on  yoga, 7:30 p.m.,  1546
Balsam apt. 3.
JAN. 15th TO 19th
ROOM 125 SUB
10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
DIVERSITY OF WORK
BY ARTISTS UNITED
IN      CHRISTIANITY
the old listening-reading room
complex was taken out since it
cost $20,000 a year.
The new arrangement is not
expected to lose any money, he"
said.
legal aid moves
Starting Monday, UBC Legal
Aid will be relocated in SUB 110.
Hours are 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday, until the
end of the term.
Your income
Vancouver People's Law
School offers a free course on
personal income. The course will
be covered in four consecutive
evenings, Jan. 15 to 18, from 7 to
10 p.m. at John Oliver secondary
school, 530 East 41st.
Peter Mercer and Alison Morse,
chartered accountants from Price
Waterhouse and Co. will instruct.
Those planning to attend
should pre-register by phoning
732-0222.
B.C. economy      Pearse talks
A series of lectures on the B.C.
political economy will be presented Friday night and Saturday
at the graduate student centre.
Among the scheduled speakers
are UBC professors Phil Resnick
and Alan Smith, Simon Fraser
University prof Martin Robin,
Richmond MLA Harold Steves,
Mordecai Briemberg, Bill Johnson
and author Jack Scott.
Lectures, sponsored by the
committee on socialist studies,
begin 7 p.m. Friday and continue
Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
For further information contact the graduate student association office.
Peter Pearse, UBC resource
economist, will speak on "Growth
or a stationary economy?" 8:15
p.m. Saturday in Buch. 106.
Dealing with the feasibility of
zero economic growth, the talk
will open the Vancouver Institute
lecture series for this year.
Big money
Wanted: A young woman or
man with winged heels (or a car in
good working order) to run
Ubyssey copy on Mondays and
Thursdays. Pays $1.50 a run.
Please see Michael Sasges Monday
in SUB 241-K.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IIM - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
GIRLS ! f
NEXT FRIDAY -
THE ENGINEERS INVITE YOU
TO DANCE TO THE SOUNDS
OF PYTHON
MIXER IM SUB
The Playhouse Theatre
Company
Presents
Ann Henry's
LULU STREET
Directed by
Robert Clothier
Nightly at 8:30 P.M.
Sat. Mat 2:30 P.M.
To February 3
Tickets at
Famous Artists in the Bay
681-3351
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
$®
r=o*:
M
•>CP?c5ZP3"
SALE!
PANTS
fOPS
BELTS
ETC.
SHIRTS
SWEATERS
JACKETS
ETC.
20% to 60% OFF
|fL  ^g^s> 4431W. 10th <t^)>Jg|
■Z5^r
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines. 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads we nut accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication. ,
Publication. Office. Room 241S. U.B.. UBC, Vm.H,B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
ANNOUNCING TOTEM PARK'S
first annual Grease Ball with Slick
Dick and the Firestone Four. 9:00
Saturday, Jan. 13. Full Facilities
(appropriate dress).
Lost & Found
13
LOST BLACK CHEQUE BOOK ON
Jan. 5/73, name, address inside.
Please return.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE FROM NO. 1 ROAD &
Francis, Rich., on campus before 9,
leave after 4. Call Pam, 277-6764
(evenings).
Special Notices
15
RENT WHISTLER SKI CABIN
near gondola — day/week. Phone
224-0657 before 8 a.m. weekdays.
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
Special Events
15A
SPECIAL EVENTS FREE CON-
certs begin Thurs., Jan 18, 12:30-
2:30, SUB Ballroom. Performing
artists: Bob Hadley & Bim. BYOL.
No charge. Also note: Poppy Family
coming Feb.  9.
$75 FOR 75£
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY1
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
CHINESE LEAD GUITARIST FOR
leisure playing. Earnest, experienced preferred. Gall 224-6058 after
9 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'68 MUSTANG A.T. V8, 6 NEW
tires. Best offer to $1800. Phone
after  5  p.m.   980-1543.
MGB 1972, $2900 OR BEST OFFER.
17,000 miles. Excellent condition.
AM-FM, whitewalls radials, mags.
Rick,  738-7853.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Camera*
NOW IN
STOCK
DURST Color Analyzers
Also Sigma 200 mm.  F4
MACRO Telephoto Lens
$109.95
YS mount for most SLR cameras
Perfect for nature & wildlife
photography
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY OF-
fers fast, accurate typing service.
Electric typewriter. Helen Ash-
worth, 683-1161 (days), 681-8921
(evenings).
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
E ye   Ex a-n ma'ion >:
C on fa c t   Lt.'ns v s
3235   W.   Broadway
732-0311
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Government- of Canada
CAREERS IN AUDITING
AND ACCOUNTING
This competition is open to both men
and  women.
Register  for   an   interview   at   your
placement office.
Auditing responsibilities  include  the
general     examination     of     interval
auditing and accounting reports, and
the review of accounting documents
and supportive justification essential
to the correct statement of financial
accounts.
Candidates  must   agree   to   follow  a
recognized   course   given   by   a   professional accounting organization.
Please quote reference 73-4001.
MALE WITH ACTING ABILITY
for part time employment. Send
resume and time available to Skilled Personnel, 310-837 West Hastings,   Van.   1.
Work Wanted 82
Special Classes
62
- - POTTERY LESSONS - - -
Learn to pot at Huyghe School,
just outside the gates. Mornings,
including Saturday, evenings, all
levels. 12 week course begins Jan.
15th.   224-5194.
INSTRUCTION
fc
SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
TI
. - - - THE BOOKPINDER - - - -
4444W. 10th Ave., 228-8933. Shaum,
Coles notes, text books, paperbacks,
poster sale on. Open 11:00 a.m.—
9:00 p.m. daily. Sunday, 1:00—6:00
p.m.
HEAD STANDARD 205'CM; TYRO-
lia step-ins, $60. Buckle boots size
10, men's, $30. 733-0366.
EKO 12-STRING GUITAR, $125 —
Phone  261-6742.
GETTING ENGAGED?
.   SID HARLING LTD.
Diamond   Importers
Watches  and  Repairs
40%  Discount to University
Students on Diamond Rings.
SERVING  UBC  STUDENTS
SINCE 1954
543 Granville St.
Suite 800
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CAMPUS — DOUBLE ROOMS EST
former frat. house. Beautiful place
— only $60/month. Phone Frank —
224-9549.
Room & Board.
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity
House, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Color
T.V., laundry facilities, reasonable
rates. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:30 for
details.
R&B ON CAMPUS — ALL THE
finer amenities including color TV,
sauna, rec. facilities, first-class
food—apply at 5785 Agronomy Rd.
or call Garth after 6 at 228-9903.
Furnished Apts.
83
SENIOR GIRL TO SHARE TWO-
bedroom furnished apt. with one
other.  Call Cheryl, 224-4860.
Unf. Apts.
84
Communal Housing
85
HOME DESIRED IN WEST POINT
Grey area, by disgustingly mature
graduate student. Leave message
for Ian at 224-5393.
ROOM FOR RENT IN HOUSE —
female preferred. Available now or
Feb. 1st. Contact Irene at 876-1501.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86  YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. For GlatMtt
for that smart look in giants ...
look to
Plesclibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOUj
m
The University of British Columbia
Centre for
Continuing Education
READING & STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAMS
Reading Improvement Program
(RC 11)
The Reading and Study Skills Centre offers individualized courses
for those who wish to improve their reading and study skills for
academic, professional and personal reasons.
Course work emphasizes increase of reading comprehension and
rate, previewing, skimming and scanning, flexibility, study habits,
critical reading skills and special interest areas.
The   fee   scale   is  $30   for   secondary   students   and   full-time
university students and $60 for non-students. Classes meet for 18
hours and commence the week of February 5, 1973. Enrolment is
limited to 15 people per section. Classes meet in East Mall Annex.
CLASS SCHEDULE
Section
Time
Day
Room
Type
1
12:30-  1:30
M. T. Th.
119
Student
2
3:45- 5:45
M. W.
119
'Special Student
3
7:00- 9 p.m.
M. W.
118
Student
4
7:00- 9 p.m."
M. W.
119
Non-student
5
7:00- 9 p.m.
T. Th.
118
Student
6
7:00- 9 p.m.
T. Th.
119
Non-student
7
9:00-12 noon
Sat.
119
Non-student
8
9:00-12 noon
Sat.
118
Secondary Student
'Reserved for students with non-English backgrounds.
Writing Improvement Program
(RC 12)
Writing Improvement is an 18-hour non-credit course designed to
improve essay writing and composition skills. The course is open
to university and college students of all years, to persons who are
planning to resume their studies and to persons generally wanting
to improve their writing for personal or professional reasons.
The course will deal with common problems in writing such as
essay organization and structure and punctuation. Students will
be encouraged to bring their writing assignments to class for
discussion.
The fee scale is $30 for full-time students and $60 for
non-students. Enrolment is limited to 15 persons per class. Classes
commence the week of February 5, 1973 and meet in the
Buchanan Building (Room 3248).
CLASS SCHEDULE
Section Time Day Location
1 7:00-10 p.m.      Tuesday       Rm. 3248 Buchanan Bldg.
2 7:00-10 p.m.      Wednesday   Rm. 3248 Buchanan Bldg.
For further information on either program please write or telephone:
Reading and Study Skills Centre, Education-Extension Programs, Centre
for Continuing Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8,
B.C. Telephone 228-2181 (local 220).
REGISTRATION FORM
Reading Program (RC 11) Writing Program (RC 12)
Name of Program    Section	
Name (Mr. Mrs. Miss Ms.) 	
Surname Given Name
Address City	
Occupation     Employer 	
Student Student No  Institution    .. .
Telephone (Daytime)   (Evening)	
Fee:   $30.00 students Cheque Cash
$60.00 non-students enclosed $ ... .    paid $	
Please make cheques payable to the University of British Columbia and
mail with this form to REGISTRATIONS (RC 11, 12), Centre for
Continuing Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Records
Rocking Rivers
Johnny Rivers, L. A. Reggae UAS5650
Johnny Rivers is back, so roll up the rug,
break out the beer, and turn up the high-
fidelity ; this record was made for partyin'.
If you never caught on to the new freestyle form of dancing and yearn for a
return to the simplicity and drunken im
novations of the frug, the jerk, and
the'gator, then this is the record for you.
Johnny Rivers is discotheque and that's
enough. As Nick Cohn said in Rock From
the Beginning, "First and last, discotheque
records had to be dancing records and
that's just what Johnny Rivers turned out".
I,. A. Reggae is more of the same. This time
Rivers has the formula perfected, and
there aren't many records out these days
which play as smoothly and effortlessly as
this one.
The album opens with"Rocking
Pneumonia" which must be a car poole
staple, and if it isn't then university life has
really jaded a lot of people. The song is a
Huey 'Piano' Smith hit from 1957, and has
fared well at the hands of such diverse
talents as the Flamin' Groovies and Dr.
John, but Johnny Rivers infuses it with
more life than most, kicked along by the
standout piano work of Larry Knetchel.
"Knock on Wood", a new version of
"Memphis" and "Mother and Child
Reunion" are all rock steady. The Band,
led by Jim Gordon on drums and Joe
Osborne on bass, performs like a well-oiled
machine and there are no mistakes to be
found. But it is "Brown-Eyed Girl" which
Rivers really takes over and makes his own
—not in place of Van Morrison's version but
as a perfect complement to it. Rivers plays
up the Mexican aspects of the song which
were tentatively explored by El Chicano,
and the track fairly bubbles along.
"On the Borderline", a Rivers original, is
in his familiar ballad, true home-waltz
style, with a refrain that goes "It's in the
air, it's everywhere". It isn't, but it should
be. "Stories to a Child" and "New York
City Dues" are both remarkable for the
total energy they sustain from their classic
Stones — Kinks — Who guitar intros.
straight through to the prolonged instrumental endings featuring the dual
guitars of Dean Carlton and Larry Parks.
Throughout their duration these two songs
are packed with melodies, harmonies, wah-
wah guitars, flailing cymbals, and filling
horns.
The best comes last. "Life is a Game" is
an infectious singalong, replete with the
best party atmosphere since the Beachboys; background chatter, whoops, asides,
and vintage Lou Adler touches you're sure
to recognize.
With L. A. Reggae Johnny Rivers may
have recorded his masterpiece. It's not
high art, of Van Morrison, but it is at least
as good as recent Boz Scaggs, and it
definitely gets the job done. Do yourself a
favor and give the new-old Johnny Rivers a
try. He exudes life-force and musical fun
—Mike Biggs
Books
Canada Dry?
Canada's Water: For Sale? by Richard
C. Bocking [James Lewis & Samuel,
Toronto, $6.95 Hardcover].
While pursuing the question it poses
along with related aspects of water
resources and development, Canada's
Water: For Sale? explores as well some of
the premises and myths upon which our
technicalogical society is based. Sufficiently interesting to warrant the Sunday
reader's attention, the book presents its
case eloquently and shows evidence of
careful research.
Bocking explodes two widely held notions
about water resources: first that there is a
shortage of water in the American southwest and secondly that Canada has water to
spare. Southwestern politicians have been
clamoring for years for northern water to
enable them to continue their economic
boom but in actual fact enough water exists
there already. Their own water supply has
had a history of mismanagement, and
vital water rights issues are deadlocked in
legal wrangling. These politicians demand
water from the northwestern states and
utlimately Canada is a simple solution to
their problems.
Bocking points out to those in favor of
exporting Canadian water that water is not
a renewable resource, but is in fact a part
of the totality of the environment, a source
of life upon which great numbers of other
beings depend. If Canada were ever to
begin the flow of water south, that water is
gone forever. However, cutting off the
water flowing to the Americans depending
upon it would be inconceivable.
Enough insidious plots to link North
America together in a vast continental
water grid exist already and have for many
years been discussed with great earnestness at scientific conventions. It is
apparent that the proponents of these
schemes are more interested in the
mechanics of the thing than in the actual
consequences; they can be compared to
sophomoric engineering students carried
away by the concept of God as kilowatt-
hours and acre-feet.
. How true this is becomes clearer when
we learn that in all the decades of dam-
building and out of all the billions of dollars
spent on feasibility studies, there have been
virtually no follow-up studies of the effects
of dam-building. Bocking lists a few of the
consequences that accrued as a result of
the building of the High Aswan Dam in
Egypt and it is enough to chill the soul of
even the toughest building contractor.
It is the cultural aspects of selling
Canadian water that are to be most feared.
The flow of water southward would be the
greatest step towards continentalism short
of erasing the line off the map. With permanent physical ties to the USA, we would
develop more fully the branch-plant culture
some say exists in Canada today. Canada's
history is based upon the east-west flow of
water and this has had a great deal to do
with the shaping of our national identity.
Therefore, Canada's water policy will be a
crucial element in the future and in the
very survival of Canada as a sovereign
nation.
—EdCepka
RESERVE OFFICER
UNIVERSITY TRAINING PLAN
. for young men ages 17 to 23 attending university
. become part of Canada's active Naval Reserve
. learn seamanship, navigation & leadership skills
. one night a week during the academic year
. four months summer employment in the sea environment at
$400 a month
Interested? ■come t0 HMCS discovery,
^~^~^~~"      Stanley Park, Tuesday at 8 p.m.
- call Capt. Harrison at 266-4375
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973 Movies
Black Soap Opera
Sounder has been hailed as one of the first films to
present a complex picture of the black experience. If it
does, I missed it. To me it looked like a maudlin melodrama
whose only positive feature was that it portrayed the lives of
rural southern blacks. It does this with some authenticity,
but no depth.
Sounder directed by Martin Ritt, screenplay by Lonne
Elder III, based on the novel by William H. Armstrong,
starring Cicely Tyson, Kevin Hooks, Paul Winfield.
KEVIN HOOKS ... Sharecropper's son
The black experience has proved to be elusive to writers
, and film-makers alike. As far back as 1915, D.W. Griffith,
the father of North American cinema, was astounded that
anyone would object to his portrayal of blacks in Birth of a
Nation. Admittedly he showed a few bad "Coloreds" (an
animalistic rapist, runaway slaves) but he felt he had offset
this by showing "good" ones (a beaming nanny, faithful
servants).
This points up part of the problem. Most of the things we
see about blacks are shown from the point-of-view of whites.
This often creates a blatant superficiality that destroys
whatever other rnerits the work might have.
Another problem with works about oppressed minorities
is that they often have a specific social or political axe to
grind. There is nothing wrong with this of course, but since
■they are necessarily concerned with an abstract group of
people, they tend to simplify individual experience. They
tend to show what they think should be rather than what is.
Sounder does not fall down because of either of these
factors. It definitely sees the experience of a Louisiana
sharecropping family in the early '30s from a black point-of-
view. None of the characters in it are stereotyped along
racial lines.
Nor does the film deny its characters their individuality
in a search for political points. The frustrations of being
black and poor and of having no escape from it are
eloquently portrayed in the film. The sharecropping system
is designed so that the "man" gets richer while the croppers
get deeper into debt. And the law is simply used as an instrument of oppression. When the father steals a couple of
pounds of meat from a white man, he is given a year's hard
labor and his family is not even told in which work camp he
is imprisoned.
These things are shown not to convince us that blacks
are unspeakably oppressed — surely we no longer need
convincing — but simply as part of the normal experience
of the family. This quiet authenticity is the best aspect of
the film. We get a picture of black rural life that is an effective protest because it never becomes shrill.
So Sounder does not fail as a black film, it simply fails as
. a film. If it had been about a white family in the same
predicament, it would have received no critical acclaim.
Apart from its racial aspects, the film has no substance at
all. It is a weak, dull story that never rises above
meoldrama. It appeals to our emotions in the classic soap
opera pattern.
Hardships are introduced, the characters struggle to
overcome them, and they succeed in a limited way. We get
no real sense of the important human dilemmas of the
heart, only of the dilemmas of circumstance. No real
passion is displayed, no revelations are achieved and no
coherent vision of human life is offered.
— David MacKinlay
Movies
Cinematic Cliche
For all the world, Henry's aunt resembles an aged,
emaciated doll: the withered, thickly-painted face which
seems about to flake and peel, an improbable shock of red
frazzle serving as hair, and the jerky and erratic mannerisms of a marionette gone berserk.    	
Travels with my Aunt, with Maggie Smith and Alec Mc
Cowen, directed by George Cukor. Screenplay by Jay
Presson Allen and Hugh Wheeler.
Unfortunately, in recent years this type of character has
been grossly overused to the point that it is now little more
than a cliche.
In spite of this, Travels with my Aunt, with Maggie
Smith in the title role, succeeds both as entertainment and
as fine cinema.
Henry, a conservative London banker well into his
middle years, first encounters his aunt Augusta, a faded
'lady of pleasure,' at his mother's funeral. She is, he learns,
about to leave for the Continent on a secret mission of the
greatest importance: to save the life of an old flame, the
enigmatic Mr. Visconti, who has been kidnapped. His
captors demand as ransom one hundred thousand pounds, a
sum which Augusta is undertaking to raise by any means
available to her.
Enlisting the aid of Henry, aunt Augusta embarks on a
series of misadventures that take them through the High
and Low life of Paris, smuggling in Istanbul, and to a
climactic rendezvous on a Mediterranean island.
If the basic plot line sounds hackneyed, archetypal, even
corny, you are probably right. The screenplay, adapted
from the Graham Greene novel of the same title, is not the
film's strongest point.
No, the film's major strength lies in its cast. Maggie
Smith is superb as Augusta, from dreamy-eyed schoolgirl
and raw-boned hussy in the flashbacks of her colorful past,
to the dehydrated, amoral creature in her declining years.
Alec McCowan, known best for his role in Hitchcock's
"Frenzy" as the seriocomic Scotland Yard inspector, is
both boyish and bluenosed as Henry, giving perhaps the
most credible performance in the film.
Notable also is Lou Gosset's portrayal of Wordsworth,
Augusta's black 'escort', who serves in several scenes as a
perfect foil for Henry's bland reserve; and Cindy Williams
as a precocious and endearing adolescent travelling on the
Orient Express with Augusta and Henry.
The film is a fine piece of craftsmanship; director
George Cukor, whose past films have included Camille,
Born Yesterday, and A Star Is Born, does not for a moment
lose control of the camera or actors. He manages to get
from Maggie Smith an admirable performance from an
inherently weak part.
— Ryon Guedes
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BOOKS
Friday, January 12, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Books
Subtle Craft
Columbus.. . discovering
Columbus and the Fat Lady and Other
Stories. Matt Cohen. [House of Anansi,
1972, $3.25 paper/$8.50 cloth].	
Matt Cohen lives on a farm in Ontario.
He has written two novels, Korsoniloff and
Johnny Crackle Sings. Columbus and the
Kat Lady is his first collection of short
stories.
The stories are mostly humorous,
ranging in style from mock simplicity to
surrealism. In the first story, Cohen sets
the pace — slow and easy — to the pendulum of a grandfather clock. The humour
and irony unroll neatly. Though he introduces as many complications and twists
as possible, Cohen's craft never intrudes.
The characters', when they are not
entirely outlandish, are pocked with personal oddities. Arthur is from outer space:
he has opened up his mind to "let it all
happen spontaneously." As a result,
"talking to him is like taking a shower.
Writing about him is like trying to compose
the yellow pages from memory." Elmer is
a distasteful child who "regarded the world
around him with a beatific misanthropy."
"No one was sure if Elmer's course of
development was a sign of exceptional
genius or of stupidity. With Elmer, despite
his many accomplishments, such questions
always remained valid." Harold, six foot
two, was thirty-two years old and weighed
three hundred and eleven pounds. "They
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when they were making love. They noticed,
woven through their own noises,
threatening even to drown them out, the
sounds of an elephant in heat. Don't worry,
Erik said, it's Harold and he's fine. Who's
Harold? The elephant who's panting
through the keyhole."
Cohen isn't afraid to experiment. If the
stories are occasionally uneven, the
compensation of variety is more than
adequate. In "Spadina Time" — perhaps
the most tortuous — scenes slip away
rapidly, the characters' lives seeming to
elude them. In "Too Bad Galahad," the
conflicting Arthurian legends are vehicles
for a mish-mash of nonsense centered
around Galahad, the perfect knight.
Cohen's virtuosity as a short story
writer emerges when he destroys the rule
of brevity. In "The Nurse From Outer
Space,"the story line recklessly
degenerates into a puerile chat. The plot
seems hopelessly lost. Then, effortlessly,
Cohen retrieves every "wasted" phrase
and reveals its hidden significance. He
makes every word count, which, he tells us,
is the mark of a great short story writer.
—Jim Fowler
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973 Friday, January 12, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973
What this university
By STAN LOVELL
One of the more traumatic social events of the last
decade remains obscured to many westerners.
China's cultural revolution has been characterized in
the press as anything from an elitist power-grab
attempt on the part of some of China's top political
leaders to an irrational bloodbath characteristic of
totalitarian Communist regimes.
In truth, of course, the cultural revolution was
neither of these things, nor can it be expected that
the press, controlled as it is by those who own in our
society, could give an accurate, much less a
favorable, account of the tumultuous events occurring in the late sixties in the People's Republic of
China.
Liberation, in 1949, was a new democratic
revolution. Led by the armies of the Communist
Party, and fleshed by the strength of an organized
and aroused peasant movement, imperialist powers
were chased from China's shores, clearing the way
for a workers' takeover of state power. But, as Mao
was constantly pointing out, the real battle — to
transform China's archaic economy and politically
backward social system into a socialist model — was
yet to come.
Short of technology and resources, China looked
to the Soviet Union for help, and got what they
needed until 1959, when the Soviets pulled out. In
many ways, this act was a blessing in disguise, for
China was forced to be totally self-reliant in all
phases of her existence. It is perhaps at this point the
cultural revolution really began.
William Hinton, in Hundred Day War, this latest
attempt to uncover the facts behind the cultural
revolution, leaves no doubt that the main contradiction in Chinese society was between the toiling
masses in the fields and factories and a new elite
taking advantage of their expertise to form a new
ruling class. He has chosen to study the events at
Tsinghua University, China's most prestigious
university, and the locale of the most incendiary
moments of the cultural revolution, to clarify those
events.
Hinton has written other books about China, his
best known being Fanshen: Study of Revolution in a
Chinese Village. He has also written Iron Oxen, a
book about agrarian reform in China, and Turning
Point in China: An Essay on the Cultural Revolution.
Hinton has spent much time in China, and has a good
grasp of the twists and turns characteristic of the
rumbling upheavals in the last twenty-odd years of
Chinese history.
In many ways the events of Tsinghua, while
showing the currents and dynamic of the Chinese
Cultural Revolution, also have much to say about
education and students in capitalist countries.
Particularly in the realm of book-workship one
recognizes stunningly similar patterns of behaviour.
One of the big-character posters printed by the
student revolutionaries in the first phase of the
cultural revolution expresses this book-worship quite
succinctly:
In primary school dead serious about reading
books.
In middle school read dead books seriously.
In the university seriously read books to death!
Teachers and administrators in pre-cultural
revolution days fostered this attitude, resulting in
students burying themselves in abstract textbooks,
becoming "experts" totally divorced from the
reality of production and labor. The theoretical study
was functionally augmented by a system of grades
and examinations meant to perpetuate elitist approaches to problems, and to instill in students the
belief that they were better and more advanced than
the masses of people who fired the kilns and farmed
the fields.
Tsinghua, a pleasant rolling campus on the north
edge of Peking, was the centre of rebellion against
this type of educational system. William Hinton:
What was it about Tsinghua that the rebels
repudiated? Primarily the whole idea of "expertise in command", the pressure on the
students to strive for fame and prosperity as
brilliant scientists and engineers without whose
'genius' China could not advance.
The faculty of the university was made up of many
complacent intellectuals who had travelled abroad,
particularly to the United States, and who had
completely absorbed the western (and Soviet)
methods and goals of education. They generally
came from similar (bourgeois) backgrounds, and
shared common habits and tastes. Thus, as Hinton
points out, "There grew up over the years a core of
people in power at Tsinghua who were linked by the
common bonds of elite origin, college study together,
graduate experience abroad, and teaching at their
home school."
Professor T'ung Shih-pai recalled his attitudes
about education:
... I never considered whether what I wrote was
useful for the education of workers, peasants,
and soldiers. I wrote not to serve the people but
to  display  my  talents  and  demonstrate  my
learning. I used all those formulas and those
foreign quotes to inspire admiration, to show
how able I was.
Shih-pai's  cousin,   a   man  named  Lin-hsiu,   also
studied abroad, in the Soviet Union. There he found
the entire system career-oriented, and got a degree
in some very abstract area. On leaving the Soviet
HUNDRED DAY WAR: The Cultural Revolution
at Tsinghua University: William Hinton, 288
Pages, Monthly Review Press.
university, he was given three gifts which aptly
characterized their approach to academe. The first
was a leather briefcase to keep his Ph.D. thesis in,
the second was a wooden box with a handpainted
picture of the Kremlin on it to keep his awards and
medals in, and the third was a leather wallet, also
embossed with a picture of the Kremlin. As Hinton
says, the purpose of this last gift could hardly be in
doubt.
Hinton contrasts these with three gifts that Liu
Shao-ch'i had arranged to give high-level cadre after
the 1949 liberation. These were a woolen suit, an
American-made Parker pen and a Swiss watch.
After the cultural revolution, the ritual of gift-giving
continued, but this time the gifts reflected a more
proletarian appeal. On being elected to the May 7
Cadre School (for former officials and professionals,
where political study and labor combined to produce
more rounded leaders), the comrades would receive
a book of Mao Tse-tung's quotations, a notebook
inscribed with "let everyone speak" (a book, that is,
for recording criticisms and ideas of others), and a
carrying pole with four sentences burned into it:
"Put this pole on your shoulder; Remember Mao
Tse-tung's teachings in your heart; Never forget the
lessons of history; and Continue making revolution
and go forward always".
Clearly, what was being developed before the
cultural revolution was an educational system meant
to strengthen those in positions of power, foster
ideals of elitism and "only the experts can solve
problems", and develop in students the authoritarian
practical habits with bourgeois education.
*   *   *
Kuai Ta-fu was a student who become the leading
figure in the Red Guard movement and one who was
to eventually be linked up with attempts on Mao's
position of power. This where Hinton's book is most
valuable, in providing insights and information
about the twists and turns of the forces contending
for power in China. Unlike his earlier essay, Turning
PEKING UNIVERSITY ... Red Guards and students put up 'big character' posters Friday, January 12,  1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
really needs is ...
Point in China, in Hundred-Day War he deals in
depth with the personalities and class forces
mobilized to overthrow the entrenched Soviet-style
bureaucracy which had developed.
One thing is certain: the cultural revolution was
about class warfare. Large sections of the people
were pitted against each other on the basis of factions, both of which maintained they were pro-
Maoist. In fact, as it turned out, the faction
screaming Mao the loudest was the very one which
was trying to isolate him and thereby sneak in the
back door. By constantly referring to Mao and Chou
En-lai as the only party people in power with the
correct line, Liu Shao-ch'i and his followers hoped to
remove Mao from his base of support in the central
committee, thus clearing the way for their own
accession to power.
In order to do this, it was necessary to exploit
very deep divisions within Chinese society. What
began as spontaneous rebellion against
authoritarian bureaucracy was becoming usurped
by leaders who were confusing and simplifying
issues. It took years of protracted struggle, mainly
ideological but often-times armed, to sweep this
confusion aside, and allow the revolution to make
another qualitative leap forward.
The actual struggle at the university really
embraced four phases. Kuai Ta-fu instigated the
first, leading rebellious students against administrators and faculty who they considered
reactionary in practice and ideology. Large
character posters appeared throughout the campus,
denouncing individuals and calling fo mass debates.
Soon accused officials organized their own
factions, but it was clear that the rebel faction had
the support of Mao and leading central committee
members. Student groups, mainly from Tsinghua
and Peita (Peking University) struck out to the
countryside to take the struggle to the peasants.
They met with staunch resistance and severe
repression. As on the campus, they were denied
resources, printing materials, loudspeakers, and the
general wherewithal to carry out ideological battle.
Combined with repression and harassment, party
officials used co-optive methods to dull the issues,
such as offering the leaders prime accommodation
and good food.
In most cases, the students were able to overcome
both the harassment and the "sugar-coated bullets".
Red Guard units sprung up all over the country, in
the fields, factories and in the schools. Sharp debate
was carried out, and unfortunately, excesses
sometimes occurred. Individuals were publicly
humiliated and sometimes beaten. The seeds of later
trouble that opportunists were to take advantage of
in their quest for power were becoming visible.
* * *
Work teams had been sent in by the party committee to the university to calm the troubled
waters, but all they succeeded in doing was causing
more friction. The second phase of the struggle had
begun, with sharp factional fighting between student
groups. The main issue was that between
rehabilitation of wayward intellectuals, and outright
repudiation of them. The work teams, under the
hidden control of Liu's wife, attempted to take the
edgcoff the criticism. This act was later exposed as
an effort to protect "capitalist-roaders", those who
had much to lose by the type of criticism being
carried out on a mass scale. This absolute contradiction, either get rid of the person under attack
or totally accept him, led to some of the worst excesses on the part of the Red Guards, culminating in
the sacking of the British Embassy, and well-
documented cases of rather sadistic torture of
"prisoners".
The major split in the student movement came in
August of 1967, after Liu's wife had been publicly
denounced in front of half a million people in Peking.
By this time, ironically, many students had tired of
the infighting, and after such brilliant criticism of
the educational system, many headed right back to
he libraries to bury themselves in abstract textbooks once again, if only to get away from the heat.
3ut now, the pressure was on not only to criticize the
education structure, but to change it. The activists
ook as their model Resistance University in Yenan
vhere Mao had taught the Chinese to become well-
minded fighters for the people. William Hinton:
Realizing how divorced they had been from
working people and from production, the civil
engineers worked out plans to carry on designing
at various work sites where the workers too
could be drawn in. They also sent out teams to
investigate the graduates of their department —
how they had done on actual jobs since leaving
the university and what ideas they or their workmates  had   for   changes  in   the   educational
.system.
Only a minority of students took part in this effort,
however, and in the fall, Mao called for the formation
of "Big Alliances" between warring factions. To no
avail, really — at Tsinghua, the hard core of
militants refused to accept Mao's dictum, and en-
MAO ... with students and teachers
tered into a violent phase of armed struggle which
saw both sides progress from homemade spears and
catapults, to grenades and automatic weapons, and
ultimately, torture.
Why the fighting? Why the bloodshed?
The   faction   which   became   known   as   the
Regiment, led by Kuai Ta-fu, persisted in violence
right to the end. Tsu, a member of this group, explained :
At that time, what seemed the most important
thing in the world was to take over another
building. We studied works on guerrilla fighting
and we studied Mao Tse-tung on tactics, prisoner
policy, and every other aspect of war. With
regard to the cultural revolution, Chairman Mao
had made it clear over and over again that
violent fighting was not correct. But we reasoned
that this prohibition applied only to issues between factions of the people. Anything could be
done to the class enemy and we were fighting
class enemies! We saw ourselves as only one
front in a much larger national struggle . . . but
we thought we were the focal point of the
struggle,
This type of thinking allowed Kuai's group to
practice every sort of excess. In some ways, it is
analogous to early Weatherman tactics in the United
States, when they developed a "Fight the People"
line on the basis that the masses were too ignorant
and backward to understand armed struggle, and
were therefore the enemy. This thinking was
characterized in China, as it should be when it occurs
elsewhere, as ultra-left, as "waving the red flag to
oppose the red flag".
Tsu finally realized, after much criticism and
struggle, where the activities of the Regiment were
leading. It was the death of some workers who had
come to stop the fighting on the campus that changed
his mind. (Thousands of workers had come to
Tsinghua to put a non-violent end to the dispute,
raising the slogan, "Use reason, not violence". Five
of them were killed and hundreds injured for their
efforts by the Regiment who had become too blinded
to distinguish any longer who was their real enemy.)
"Why should we kill class brothers?" was Tsu's
response. He goes on to describe Kuai's evolution
from a rebel hero to an autocratic factionalist.
We intellectuals are inept. We thought, 'We'll
smash the other side'. But we found that we
couldn't do it. Kuai began with a campaign of
political suppression. When that didn't work he
tried violence. When that failed he gradually
changed from a revolutionary rebel into a leader
carrying out bourgeois reactionary line — he
turned into the opposite of what he had been, he
became an oppressor.
On July 27, masses of workers intervened to put
an end to the fighting, though not before they
themselves suffered death and injury at the hands of
the armed militants. Though it is unclear as to where
the idea of worker intervention arose, the focus was
the Hsinhua printing plant. The idea received enthusiastic and active support from other factories,
and the central committee and Mao approved of it as
well. The leaders of this movement to end the
hostility, felt that if they, as workers, had difficulty
solving their factional problems without outside
intervention, then it would be doubly difficult for
intellectuals "divorced from production and entangled in  fine distinctions  of theory'.'.  It  took
struggle and sophistication in the face of Kuai's
duplicity and deception to bring the bloodshed to a
halt, but the workers managed to do it.
All eyes were on the workers to see if they had the
maturity to hold to their non-violent line in the face of
extreme provocation. Indeed, their heroics would
result in the concrete transformation of the
educational system, with the workers obtaining
control of the university and exercising that control
to this very day.
Hinton tells the story of Ch'ien Wei-ch'ang, a
professor who went to the Capital Steel Mill to teach
and work. His personal, elitist philosophy took a
beating as he became integrated into a working class
life-style. One incident serves to expose his thinking.
As the steel ingots came out of the furnace, he
noticed the workers stamping them, and he immediately assumed they were putting their names to
the ingots.
After all, he had been reared to believe that the
most important part of one's work was having one's
name attached to the final product. In fact, that had
been the most satisfying part of his own work. The
fame that went with his completed work was
sometimes the only motivating factor in his completion of some abstract, boring paper.
Well, of course the workers were not affixing their
name to the ingots, but merely putting a batch
number on them. This seemingly trivial incident was
very meaningful to a man who had never really
thought in a collective way, but only in a personal
way.
As the academics, students and workers all felt
the changes wrought by the intense period of debate
and criticism, so that structure of education itself
was completely transformed in the image of the new
emerging society. Now workers' teams were in
command of the departments and curriculum of the
university, and the methods and content of study
reflected a new awareness in the necessity for
practical solutions to practical problems. The
distinction between mental and manual labour was
attacked. Professors toiled in the fields and workers
studied in the university.
Admissions policy was radically transformed
because of the cultural revolution. Examinations and
immediate university entrance on the basis of
middle school completion were seen as elitist, fundamentally class-oriented ways of selecting
students. It was decided that middle school
graduates would spend time working before possible
selection to university. After at least three years of
practical assignments in the factories, in rural
brigades or in the army the young people were
selected by their comrades on the basis of a number
of criteria: their study and application of Mao Tse-
tung thought; the quality of their links with the
masses; their work during their three year
assignment; their record in middle school; and their
age level — which was to be around 20. This last
criterion wasn't rigidly adhered to, though it was felt
that to be much older was a handicap in study.
The fact students spend so much time working in
factories or production units relative to their field of
study has necessitated complex relationships between industry and the university. For one thing, it
was difficult, if not impossible, to set rigid classroom
hours and course content. Lecture and lab time
became flexible in accordance with the varying
needs of the students. As Hinton notes:
Real   problems    formed    the    core    of    the
curriculum, and since some were big and others
little, varying amounts of time were spent on
each. The system tended to break down all the
formalism of the past and to establish in its place
a very lively atmosphere where theory and
practice nudged each other forward and faculty
and students alike became deeply involved in the
production problems of greater Peking.
This  study  of  Tsinghua  during  the  turbulent
period   of   the   cultural   revolution   mirrors   the
educational system of the west. Here, where expertise is raised to cosmic levels, where respect for
academic authority is based on the number of book-
feet   professor   so-and-so   has   published,   where
students cram useless facts into their heads so that
they   may   graduate    into   a    high-paying   job
(hopefully!) is exactly the type of system Liu Shao-
ch'i and his followers were trying to imitate. Such a
system can only produce people who fit into a ruling
class structure. That was the reason it was so
sharply attacked at Tsinghua, and why it inevitably
threaded its way back to the highest corridors of
power in China.
Of course the new system in China could never be
emulated in a capitalist society, for it is the few who
own that control the methods and content of
education. It is this understanding which will break
down the ivory walls of our own university and
present it to the inspection of our own masses whose
children never get to see the comfortable chairs and
numerous books. Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973
Booze,
awards flow
at banquet
GOALIE GREG WEBER
-. . . he'll be busy
WAYNE LARSON
... captain
HILLEL
MONDAY, JAN. 15 - 12:30
The Jewish Woman
—Law and Legend
TUESDAY. JAN. 16- 12:30
Free Lunch
THURSDAY, JAN. 16-12:30
Encounter with Hasidism
ALL AT HILLEL HOUSE
OPEN TO CAMPUS COMMUNITY
mop
SALE
KOSSIGNOL STRATO* 10? SKIS, reg.
$175, with Marker Rotomat $ if AA
bindings, reg. $55 .... NOW    **I5>
ROSSIGNOL EQUIPE SUISSE SKIS,
reg. $225, with Marker Roto- 9*% ACL
mat bindings, reg.$55. NOW    ■'I*
SPALDING SIDERAL SKIS, reg. $200,
with Marker Rotomat bind- $<% tt Q
iflfiP,*»g. $55.  NOW   <fc*57
SPALDING SPECTRAL SKIS, reg. $140, with  $ <f /_Xk
Salomon 404 bindings, reg. $30 NOW    ■■ *r%7
HART .COMPETITION U.S.A. SKIS, reg. $240,  $
with Marker Rotomat bindings, reg. $55. NOW
HART KNIGHT SKIS, reg. $200, with Marker $0 * A
Rotomat bindings, reg. $55 NOW   mm-V9
HART QUEEN SKIS, reg. $170, with Salomon  $<f ff%
404 bindings, reg. $30 NOW    * / 57
TRAPPEUR SKI BOOTS
All sizes available in Pro and Competition models
APRES SKI BOOTS 20% OFF
MONTANT SKI SWEATERS 10% OFF
Children's Ski Equipment Sale Continues
BRING IN YOUR TRADES!
Open to 9
Thur. & Fri. Nights
SKI DIVISION
3901 East Hastings — 291-4475
Victoria West guests Sat.
Weather and ground conditions permitting the UBC Thunderbirds will host Victoria West United 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 13
at Thunderbird Stadium.
The 'Birds face stiff competition in this coming game against
a team that is in second place in the Pacific Coast Soccer
League standings; the 'Birds are fifth slot in the seven team
league but have played two games less than the clubs ahead in
the standings.
The 'Birds have been holding their regular practices in
Memorial Gym during a five week lay-off due to weather
conditions and seasonal holidays. In a previous encounter with
Victoria West, the 'Birds lost 2-1 after leading at the half way
mark.
The team line-up is unchanged for the 1973 season and
they're looking forward to playing cross town rivals Simon
Fraser University 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15, at Thunderbird
Stadium. Simon Fraser are leading the inter-city soccer league
and play UBC of the PCL as both leagues have an inter-locking
schedule for the 72-73 season.
This half of the season has 76 games scheduled for the 13
teams involved.
Buchanan Trophy - 6th Annual
BASKETBALL
CLASSIC
UBC 'Thunderbirds' vs.
Simon Fraser 'Clansmen'
PACIFIC COLISEUM
Monday. Jan. 22 8 p.m.
Junior Varsity Preliminary — 6:00 P.M.
TICKETS - Athletic Office - Memorial Gym
Students $1.00 - Gen. Adm. $2.00
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
3123 W. BROADWAY
Jan. 22nd to 27th Inclusive
2 TERRIFIC HITS FOR THE "HIP" SET
1. "ZACHARIAH" at 9:15 (Mature)
(THE FIRST ELECTRIC WESTERN)
with John "Pippin" Rubenstein — Pat Quinn
Featuring — Country Joe and The Fish
The New York Rock Insemble White Lightnin'
ALSO
At 7:30-"DERBY"
(Warning — Some very coarse language)
"A STUNNER" says Judith Crist.
ADMISSION - STUDENTS AND ADULTS - $1.00 Only
Plan to see this great show & tell your friends!
By BRIAN MURPHY
Frank Gnup hosted his 15th
annual Pigskin Party Monday
night and it was, as usual, an
unqualified success.
Gnup was at his raspy best in
an evening featuring good
jokes, good food, and plenty of
liquid refreshment.
Despite efforts to the contrary, the evening did have a
. serious interlude. The coach
presented momentoes to: the
top offensive lineman — Jim
Vilvang; the best defensive
.lineman — league all-star and
team captain Brian Westall;
the best offensive back — Gord
Penn; top defensive back —
Doug Young; and most inspirational player — Bruce
Grist.
For the remainder of the
evening Gnup issued his
achievement awards to both
players and friends for their
more meritorious on and off
the field performances.
The Ubyssey was given the
scoop of the year award for its
"Mutiny" story, "Grid hands
abandon ship".
A special one-of-a-kind
award was also presented to
Gnup by Doug Mitchell,
highlighting the coach's unique
contribution to sports in
general and football in particular over the past years.
Vol., snook.,
hock., on tap
Interest in volleyball this
year is greater than ever, as
intramurals has 70 teams
entered.
Wayne Rains of engineers
wins the unit manager of the
week award for having entered
a record number of 19 teams
for one unit!
All games scheduled for
Sunday, Jan. 14 have been
cancelled due to some
American Pro football game.
It appears that people are
more interested in sitting in
front of a T.V. watching than in
actually doing something
themselves.
The games will be replayed
Feb. 2, same time same courts.
Hockey started Thursday
night, with a new Super-
League composed of the teams
that were too good for Div. I.
These are commercej grads,
phys. ed., law, gears, and'
pharmacy.
The entry deadline for
Snooker is today! So all you
pool-sharks had better get on a
team fast.
This term men's intramurals
also offers curling (entry
deadline Friday), basketball
(starting on the 22nd),
wrestling, tug o' war, cycle
drag, chess, and a track meet.
Signing up is easy.
Contact your Unit Manager
or (if you don't know who he is,
there is a noticeboard by the
men's washroom in SUB)
come to our office at Memorial
Gym 308. Phone No. 228-4648.
Intramural volleyball has
leagues ranging from skilled
competition to hackers
leagues, so if you want to join a
team come to our office. Friday, January 12, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
—sucha singh photo
PUTTING THE BALL UP, Mike Ireland of the Thunderbirds shoots for two in pre—Christmas win over the
University of Victoria Vikings. Ireland has seen a fair amount of action this year when the 'Bird starters
have had shooting problems.
The death of hockey
historical analysis of the game that most young
Canadian males have played for years. The
book explains the rationale behind a lot of
decisions that have led to the decline of the
NHL since the birth of the league, more
specifically since expansion in 1967.
The recent NHL-Russia series could have
sent the NHL money barons reeling had their
main source of funds (fans) still resided in this
country. Although the NHL won more games
than the Russians (4-3), the damage was done
by the lack of a Canadian sweep. The damage
was done by showing what type of people run
the league.
By CAM FORD
The first of a series.
The Death of Hockey
NEW PRESS
Bruce Kidd and
John Macfarlane
$5.95.
The myth of Canadian hockey died with the
Russia-Team NHL series. A game that
Canadians used to have a monopoly on has
shown this country exactly where the fans
stand in relation to big business. It has shown
the working class of this country that the NHL,
which is nothing but big business, has use of
only one part of the fan, the left hip pocket.
Since 1967, the number of professional teams
in North America of supposed major league
calibre has risen dramatically from six to 28,
with two more on the way for next season and
an additional six by 1980.
As youngsters, we heard little talk of exciting six figure salaries for underdeveloped
players and nothing of six million dollar
payments to put new teams in the NHL. While
the NHL has always been given to making
money, their perverse dream has come much
more to the public eye because of the league
owners lack of tact. They let their greed get
away from them.
On the heels of the recent Team NHL Russia
series and the start of another "exciting" pro
hockey season comes a book that studies, in
depth, the selling of the Canadian game.
The Death of Hockey, by Bruce Kidd and
John   Macfarlane   presents   a   very   good
The NHL exposed its true side during the
encounter. We saw, quite clearly, that they no
longer have the best game in town. The quality
of the game is too low for Canadian fans, but the
product is now being pushed at Americans in
cities like Atlanta where the fans first contact
with the game is their town's NHL team, the
Flames.
The question is what happens to Canadian
hockey? No longer needing Canada, the NHL is
moving south. The three NHL and four WHA
teams in Canada are pushing a product that
would have been virtually unsaleable six years
ago.
A product that was once aimed at the
working class and played by and for the
working class has become the game of a rich
few, no longer employing or entertaining the
average man on the street.
To be continued
More sports
Birds won't grow
! fat this time
By DOUG HIGGINS,
After years of fattening their scoring averages on the weak
sisters ot the league the UBC Thunderbird basketball team may
now find themselves in the position of being the potential
recipients of their former tactics. They play hose to the league
leading University of Lethbridge Pronghorns Friday and
Saturday night at War Memorial Gym.
Lethbridge has compiled an impressive 5-1 won-loss record
in league play compared to the 'Birds' record of 5-3.
The reason for the sucess of the Pronghorns is due mainly to
the presence of former U.S. major college player Phil
Tollestrup.
Last year Tollestrup played college ball for Brigham Young
University. While there he played against teams of the calibre
of the U.S. national championship team, the University of
California (UCLA) Bruins. Tollestrup has used his size (6'6")
and accurate jumpshot to dominate the league scoring race
with a per game average of 26 points.
UBC may have to concede Tollestrup his points and concentrate on shutting out the rest of the Lethbridge team if they
hope to win.
The Thunderbird hockey team is also at home for two games
this weekend, but unlike their basketball counterparts they face
less formidable competition in the University of Saskatchewan
Huskies. The Huskies are currently in fourth place in the five
team league with a record of 4-4.
Coach Bob Hindmarch is not about to take the Huskies
lightly; he feels they are vastly improved over the start of the
season. They are small, but like most prairie teams are excellent skaters.
Hindmarch feels that the defensive problems that hurt the
team last weekend have been resolved. Defenceman Bob
Trenaman has left the team but.Warwick Reid is back following
his honeymoon.
Basketball gets underway at 8:30 p.m. at War Memorial
Gym and the hockey starts at 8. tonight and Saturday at the
Winter Sports Centre.
In volleyball:
This tournament's good
enough for Chimos
The top three women's teams in Canada will be competing in
the 8th Annual Volleyball Tournament this weekend at UBC.
The Thunderettes, who placed third in the Canadian Open
last vear, will be attempting to upset the Canadian champion
Vancouver Chimos and second place Calgary Cals. The Chimos
are so good they don't ususally bother with local tournaments.
The UBC team is exceptionally strong this year with three
national team members, Betty Baxter, Sandy Vosburgh and
Maureen Fishleigh. However, the Chimos have five national
team members and haven't lost a game in five years.
If the Thunderettes can just win one game against the
Chimos it would rate as a major upset, as the Chimos consistently demolish their opposition by scores of 15-2 and 15-3.
UBC is the only team that has even come near to beating the
Chimos in the last five years.
The "Chimos" were the 1971 B.C. Sports Hall of Fame team
of the year, and their very name is enough to set most women's
teams trembling in their boots and probably a few men's teams
as well. However, the Thunderettes have been psyching
themselves up all week for the tournament and just may pull off
the big upset.
This year's tournament is the best ever, featuring the
Chimos-Thunderettes rivalry as well as 24 of the strongest
teams in the northwest. Tournament action should be exciting
and of high calibre.
The Thunderettes are playing in the A division of the tournament which commences 9 a.m. Saturday with the finals at 5
p.m. the same day.
The jayvees and the Totems will be playing in the B division
which takes place in the Physical Education Complex at the
same time. Admission is free to UBC students.
Columbia (s)quashes (U)BC
UBC's little known squash team played against Columbia
Squash Club Monday night in the nine team, city C and D
league, emerging with a 3-1 loss. Representing UBC were Bob
Shutz, John Beatty, Doug Olstead, and Bob McKenzie.
With just over half the season gone, the UBC squad is
presently in fourth place with a 19-17 win-loss record, one point
being allotted to each match played by the individual members
of the team.
League play takes place every Monday evening with UBC's
next home series starting at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 22 when the
Vancouver Lawn Tennis Club visits at the courts in the Winter
Sports Complex.
Also for squash enthusiasts, this coming weekend (Jan. 12-
14) will see the playing of the Jericho Club Invititational
Tournament, the results of which will be considered for Pacific
Coast rankings. For those interested, the finals can be seen at
Jericho in the morning and afternoon of the 14th. Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 12, 1973
NDP 'sensitive', 'defensive'
By BERTON WOODWARD
David Anderson, B.C. Liberal leader and
former maverick MP, leaned back against a
SUB meeting room table Wednesday and
delivered some observations on the current
political scene in B.C. and the country.
Among the insights he offered about 100
students at a meeting organized by the UBC
Young Liberals:
The New Democratic Party cabinet
ministers are too sensitive and defensive about
their legislation and this is their greatest
political fault;
The federal Liberals, bolstered by the NDP,
can hang on to power as long as they like,
provided the NDP is not trapped into supporting a non-confidence motion it cannot
reject. If the socialists are trapped, it will be
because of the incompetence of government
whip Allan McEachern — "the laziest minister
there is";
Highways minister Robert Strachan would
like to drop the government auto insurance
scheme because "it's virtues are widely
exaggerated", but cannot because he is
committed to it;
The great gains made in the recent federal
election by the Conservatives under Robert
Stanfield actually worked to the detriment of
the party because a pre-election plan by Tory
powers had former Ontario premier John
Robarts taking over the leadership after
Stanfield bombed out at the polls;
A marriage between the provincial Tories
and the Social Credit party would be hard to'
arrange because many Socred officials retain
"funny-money" economic theory and a fundamentalist religious base — which the Conservatives under Derril Warren hardly share;
And the NDP, which won in B.C. because of
a splintered opposition, must endeavor to keep
the three opposition parties alive in order to
keep its power, including trying to "restrain the
Social Credit's suicidal impulses."
Anderson said the sensitive and defensive
nature of cabinet members was shown during
October's special session when labor minister
Bill King gave himself sweeping powers in the
field of labor-management relations. The
NDP's defensive response, said Anderson, to
opposition criticism was : "You want to bring
back the bad old days of labor-management
strife."
300 sign anti-war petition
About 300 UBC faculty
members signed a petition
denouncing U.S. carpet
bombing of North Vietnam.
Amongst those who signed
were agricultural science
professors Jan de Vries and T.
A. Black, applied science
professors K. V. Bury and
Desmond Tromans, history
prof Jan Bak, fine arts
department head George
Knox, political science head
Walter Young, English prof
George Woodcock, commerce
prof Stan Oberg, education
profs Sam Black, Jorgen
Dahlie and John Young,
medicine profs R. L. Coupe,
Robert Krell and Ralph Spitzer
and science profs David
Suzuki, Ulrich Suter and Peter
Bullen.
At the end of December, two
members of the faculty of
medicine, Dr. James Foulks
and Dr. Thomas Perry, started
the petition which called for a
resolution   from   Parliament.
Over half of the signatures
collected came after the recent
resolution by Parliament.
Along with signatures, about
$1,000 has been collected to be
used for ads in the Sun and
Province. The excess will go to
Canadian Aid for Vietnam
Civilians.
"The petition was widely
circulated, to nearly all
faculty," said Foulks.
The petition reads:
We, the undersigned
members of the faculty of the
University of British Columbia, acting as individuals, wish
to express our revulsion at the
recent American carpet
bombing of Hanoi, Haiphong
and other heavily populated
centres in North Vietnam, and
our strong disapproval of the
way in which the United States
government broke off
negotiations to end the Vietnam war, when agreement
seemed so near at hand.
President   Nixon's   resort   tc
mass terror in an effort to
enforce his own terms for a
settlement will not bring,
genuine peace in Vietnam
nearer. Rather, it has served
only to compound death and
misery for a people who have
already suffered inordinately.
Fortunately, the timely
protests of a number of foreign
governments, including
Australia, New Zealand,
Sweden, Norway, Finland,
Denmark and Italy have apparently helped to persuade
the Americans to halt, temporarily, bombing North of the
twentieth parallel. We believe
that a forthright expression at
this time of Canada's firm
opposition to continued
American military intervention in southeast Asia
might help to convince the
United States to abandon
bombing for good, and to
persist in negotiations until a
peaceful solution has been
achieved. Past experience has
repeatedly shown that failure
to express publicly and for-
icibly the opposition to the
Vietnam war which is felt so
widely throughout the world is
apt to be followed by some new
American escalation of the
scale of death and destruction.
We call on prime minister
Trudeau to convey to the
President of the United States
Canada's firm opposition to
any renewal of the recent
American massive bombing of
North Vietnam. We ask
members of all parties in the
new Parliament to join in a
resolution expressing the
overwhelming desire of
Canadians that the war be
ended immediately. Finally,
we call on our students, on our
colleagues in other universities, and on Canadians
generally, to exert themselves
as individuals in every possible
way, to help secure an early
end to the killing in southeast
Asia.
Summer Employment Opportunities
FIELD SUPERVISORS
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
Vacancies exist from May 1st, 1973 to August 31st, 1973.
The Field Supervisor has broad experience in aquatics, and is a Red
Cross/Royal Life Saving Society Instructor. The individual is a self-starter,
able to work without supervision and has proven leadership abilities.
Responsibilities include supervision of approximately 30 swim programs,
conducting instructor clinics, and conducting public education programs.
Apply detailing qualifications and experience to:
Director of Water Safety Services,
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY,
4750 Oak Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
 Applications will be accepted until Feb. 5th, 1973	
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND
STUDENTS THAT THE
Second Instalment Is Due On Or Before
Friday, January 12, 1973
SPEAK-EASY- 228-6792
SUB, Anytime - 12:30- 2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now!... 12:30-2:30
BETTER BUY BOOKS
pays GASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY PAPERBACKS, ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - GOLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. 10th Ave. 224-4144; Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
FOR  APPOINTMENT  PHONE  668-0525
613 WEST PENDER   ST. VANCOUVER   2.  B.C.
Artist's Canvas Sale
2 DAYS ONLY - FRI. & SAT., JAN. 12 & 13
First Quality,
"PAINTERS DELITE"
8V2 oz., 36"wide.
Reg. $1.04 yd SPECI/
5 Yd. Minimum Purchase
IAL Oil    yd.
WESTERN CAPAS & COTTON LTD.
3594 W. 4th Ave. 731-8770
WAITING   FOR  GODOT
by Samuel Beckett
An M.A. Thesis Production
Directed by Don Briard
January   16-20        8:00   p.m.
Tickets: $2:00 Students: $1.00
Tickets: Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC SOMERSET STUDIO
t OPERATION ±
DOORSTEP T
Win *
FREE TB SKIN TESTS
Operation Doorstep mobile clinics will be located at the
University of British Columbia to offer free tuberculin skin tests
to all students, faculty members and staff.
Positive reactors — those showing the presence of tubercle bacilli
— will be given a chest x-ray to determine if any active infection
is present
CLINICS WILL BE LOCATED AT
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Monday, January 15th
Tuesday, January 16th
Wednesday, January 17th
9:30-11:30 & 12:30-4:30
9:30-11:30 & 12:30-4:30
9:30-11:30& 12:30-4:30
CHRISTMAS SEALS
FIGHT
RESPIRATORY
DISEASES

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