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The Ubyssey Apr 5, 2012

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Array  21 Page 2104.05.2012
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
5 THU
#LDOC»
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AMS Block Party: 2-9pm @ Maclnnes Field
If you haven't yet bought tickets to the fifth annual Block Party, better
hit up the Twittersphere if you want a chance to see Mother Mother.
MSTRKRFT and more. With cheap(ish) booze and live music within arm's
reach of the SUB. what more could you want? Check out www.arnsblock-
party.com or follow @AMSUBC for last-minute ticket opportunities.
6 FRI
#PLDOC»
Sleep Off Hangover: All Day @
wherever you passed out
Wowza. Wasn't Block Party the
perfect (pre-)party to celebrate
the last day of classes? Today
is the post-last day of class and
thereby hangover celebration
day. You earned it. champ.
7 SAT
MOA»
6th Annual Anthropology Film
Festival: 11am-3pm @ Museum
of Anthropology
The UBC Ethnographic Film Unit
presents a festival that chronicles
Occupy Vancouver through the
analysis of cultural norms and
politics. Free admission for UBC
students.
8sun
RETREAT»
The Ubyssey goes to Yale, BC!
As a thank you to all of our editors and staff members over the
year. The Ubyssey is taking the
weekend off to celebrate a year
of solid campus journalism in
Yale. As a result, we will not be
publishing our Monday issue next
week. We apologize for this interruption to your typical schedule.
Ifyou're feeling a little lost without
us. follow our retreat via hashtag
ItUbysseyYale
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>3
Frat D J
Trasolini on
making Trax
Lisa Anderson
Contributor
Ryan Trasolini a.k.a. RYAN TRAX
is set to take the Maclnnes Field
stage at 7:25pm at Block Party.
Ryan grew up in Coquitlam,
then moved to Anmore, north of
Port Moody, which he called "the
village in the city." His parents
liked the escape from suburbia.
In his sport coat and mustard-
coloured jeans, sipping an iced
chai tea latte, Ryan is the epitome
of hipster-meets-preppy. He says
his style sets him apart from your
average DJ. And unlike his parents,
Ryan loves the bustle ofthe city. It's
no wonder he moved to Gastown
with its award-winning bars, restaurants and music scene.
"I've been pretty musical my
whole life," said Ryan, who played
the bagpipes for 12 years. He also
successfully ran Tipsy Karma—a
mobile DJ company—in high
school.
After he graduated, the company
broke up. Ryan headed to UBC to
study political science.
In his second year, Ryan got
involved with the AUS, and was
president for a controversial six-
month span. He hit a few bumps,
and regrets not getting out of
student politics fast enough. "It's a
very gruelingbody, and it's somethingthat really wears on you."
You might not guess it from his
baby-faced Bieber look, but Ryan
has taken on a lot of responsibility
at UBC. He's also served as president ofthe Inter-Fraternity
Council, which oversees all UBC
fraternities.
"I was the 'anti-fraternity' I
hated fraternities," he said. "[But]
it's an invaluable experience if
you just get involved in something
you're passionate about."
Phi Delta Theta seemed down-
to-earth to Ryan, and he went on to
become president ofthe chapter. "I
just never thought I'd be involved
in the Greek system at all. I've done
a complete 180 and found it's really rewarding for the people you
meet," he said.
"Part ofthe reason I joined the
Greek system," said Ryan, "is because you're exposed to the really
extroverted, really involved people
who love what they do."
And it's all about who you
meet, he said, advising new DJs to
JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
"saturate the industry, and become
friends with all the different promoters in the city..If it's someone
I have an established relationship with, and I know what kind
of person they are, then I'm more
inclined to hire them."
In his first year DJing in
Vancouver, Ryan was runner-up
for Top 40 DJ ofthe Year in the
Nightlife Awards hosted by Club
Vibes.
When asked what sets him
apart, Ryan said, "I have a bit of a
unique twist on things...I bring a
sharp lyric with a dirtier, darker
electronic edge."
Ryan said he might go into politics, but for now he'll stick to what
he loves: music. "I was passionate
about student politics...but it was
nice to do something more creative
that I truthfully had more of an
unconditional passion for." tH
9 MON
SPORTS»
Tennis 1.0 Clinic: 9:30-11:30am
@ UBC Tennis Centre
We promised ourselves it wouldn't
come to this, but not much else is
happening on Monday. So if you're
feeling energetic, the UBC Tennis
Centre has an introductory clinic
to tennis. This Is offered, like, every
day of the year for only $295.68/
month!
Know of any events you wanted listed during exams? Send
the event and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
April 05,2012, Volume XCIII, Issue LI
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
orinteciitor@ubysseyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writer
Will Johnson   1
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca    *
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@u bysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@ubysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joel@ubysseyca
Webmaster
Riley Tomasek
webmaster@u bysseyca
STAFF
Bryce Warnes, Catherine
Guan, David Elopjor
Chiang, Josh Curran, Wil
McDonald, Tara Martellaro
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria:
Peter Wojnar, Tanner
Bokor, Dominic Lai, Mark-
Andre Gessaroli, Natalya
Kautz, Kai Jacobson, R_
Reid, Colin Chia, Mine
Wong.CJ Pentland, Laura
Rodgers, Jeff Aschkinast
Collyn Chan, Anthony
Poon.ViniciusQd,
Veronika Bondarenko,
Yara De Jong, Evan Brow,
Zafira Rajan
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
ousiness@u bysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@u bysseyca
Accounts
Sifat Hasan
a ceo u nts@u bysseyca
LEGAL
CONTACT
Business Office Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office
604.822.6681
advertising
@ubyssey.ca
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society
The Ubyssey is afounding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 w(   :   :---- iludeyour
phone number, student number anc
signature (notfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertisinc
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the I. IPS will not be greater
than the pr'^e paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
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Tel: (718) 456 6446 News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
04.0520121 3
TA UNION »
TAs hold workshops to train picket captains, but no strike called yet
Micki Cowan
News Editor
UBC's TA union is holding workshops to train picket captains as
preparations increase for a possible
call to strike overthe long weekend.
While no strike has been called,
CUPE 2278, the union that represents UBC's TAs, posted on their
blog that they would hold workshops for picketing on April 4 and 5.
"These workshops will be about
how to run a picket, scheduling, and
the legal requirements involved in
successful job action," it said on the
blog.
Should a strike get called over the
weekend, the repercussions could
be felt as early as Tuesday, as only 72
hours notice is required.
UBC remains tight-lipped about
what would occur in the event
of a strike, although Lisa Castle,
AVP Human Resrouces, sent out a
campus-wide memo stating "the
University has intensified its efforts to prepare for strike activity by working to convene the Ad
Hoc Senate Strike Preparedness
Committee." She also wrote that
"The union's apparent movement
towards job action is perplexing."
Last week, Public Affairs Director
Lucie McNeill said that contingency
plans for invigilating and marking exams would be sorted out on a
faculty-by-faculty basis.
"Regarding whether or not UBC
would ask faculty to invigilate or
mark exams, if we were to assess
that job action is likely and could
disrupt exams then we would be
having discussion with the deans,"
she said.
McNeill added that if picket
lines aren't set up, the strike itself
wouldn't theoretically stop people
from going in to supervise or take
an exam.
Further complications could arise
for commuter students if TransLink
drivers follow suit with refusing to
cross picket lines, as they did in the
2003 TA strike where buses turned
around at Blanca Street.
"As unionized workers, we always
honour other unions' picket lines,
and we do not cross those picket
lines," said Gavin Davies, VP ofthe
Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) local 111, which represents TransLink
workers. "A lot ofthe time, even
non-union people won't cross the
picket line, out of respect."
Davies clarified that the transit
workers would not likely be affected if the picket lines were at
buildings around campus and not
the bus loop.
"If they picketed the bus loop or
the exchange there or a roadway,
the buses wouldn't cross the picket
line, and that's usually the rule of
order," he said. tH
RESIDENCE »
Totem Park buildings due for renos
Scott MacDonald
StaffWriter
The 50-year-old Totem Park residences are set for a facelift.
UBC is planning to renovate the
six original Totem residences-
Dene, Haida, Kwakiutl, Nootka,
Salish and Shuswap—over the next
three years.
"Over the years there have been a
number of problems for sure. We've
had a number of hot water issues
at Kwak and Shuswap in the more
recent past," said Student Housing
and Hospitality Services (SHHS)
Managing Director Andrew Parr.
Kwakiutl and Shuswap will be
targeted for the first round of renovations this summer, followed by
Haida and Salish in 2013. Nootka
and Dene will be the last pair renovated in 2014.
The six buildings were originally
built between 1964 and 1968 at a
cost of $5.68 million.
"We need to get in there and upgrade the plumbing and mechanical
systems," Parr said.
"The bathrooms are goingto be
completely upgraded, the common
blocks are goingto be completely
upgraded, the elevator is goingto
be modernized and there'll be some
fresh paint on the walls."
But some buildings will need
more work than others, he said. For
example, Haida and Salish are currently in need of roof repairs.
The renovation efforts come as a
welcome change for Totem Park residents, who say they've suffered due
to the aging buildings. While these
improvements won't be of benefit to
students currently living in Totem
Park, they will significantly improve
life life in residence for those entering UBC over the next few years.
"The odd time they have to shut
News briefs
New members appointed to
Board of Governors
The provincial government has appointed two new members to the
UBC Board of Governors.
Gerry Karr. a nephrologist who
began the first kidney dialysis program in the Okanagan Valley, and
Jason McLean. CEO ofthe McLean
Group and former director of the
Vancouver Board of Trade, will each
serve two-year terms. Both attended their first Board of Governors
meeting as members on Tuesday
April 3. The 21-member Board has
11 representatives appointed by the
province. 3 elected reps for each
of faculty, staff and students, and
includes the president of UBC and
the chancellor.
KAITLYN TISSINGTON^HE UBYSSEY
Kwakiutl and Shuswap houses, shown above, will be the first two Totem Park buildings to undergo renovations this summer.
the water off for a day. And the bathrooms are certainly nothing special," said Britney Lentz, a resident
on the sixth floor of Shuswap.
Sophie Marshall, a fifth-floor
resident of Shuswap, shared similar
complaints. "The bathrooms are
pretty bad...and our elevator has
broken down a few times."
The problems for Shuswap and
other old Totem buildings are
similar to those in newly built
hsm'lsssm and q'slsxsn. However,
though residents ofthe new houses
received financial compensation,
U-Passes available at Robson
starting April 16
Starting on April 16. UBC students will
be able to pick up their U-Passes at
the UBC Bookstore's Robson Sguare
location in downtown Vancouver.
"We're certainly hoping that those
who can't make it out to campus...
will be able to pop in to the Robson
Sguare location." said Debbie Harvie,
the Bookstore's managing director.
The Robson Sguare store is open
Monday to Friday from 10:30am-
5pm and 11am-4pm Saturday.
Due to the high cost of the U-Pass
vending machines, passes will be
distributed by hand. Harvie said the
Bookstore will continue to distribute
passes at Robson throughout the
SHHS has said residents ofthe older
buildings don't deserve the same.
"Based on the impact and disruption to date in those older buildings,
that's not being considered," said
Parr. "I would not define that as significant disruption."
But the problems in these houses,
Parr said, are being recognized.
"When a student signs a contract
with us and commits to living on
campus there's a few expectations
that they should come with, and
one of those would be a quality living environment where access to
Three years later, Pacific Spirit
Park death remains unsolved
Four years after a murder in Pacific
Spirit Park, police are once again
asking the public for any information
pertinent to the case.
This month marks the fourth
anniversary of the death of Wendy
Ladner-Beaudry, whose body was
found in Pacific Spirit Park on April
3.2009. The 53-year-old was killed
while jogging. Investigators have
identified potential suspects, but
no arrests have been made, and it
has not been revealed whether the
death was targeted or a random
attack.
Anyone with information is urged
to contact the RCMP tip line at
1-877-551-4448.
heat and hotwater is a constant. So
I would acknowledge that there's
been some issues with that over
time and students have had to deal
with that.
"That's not good and that's being
corrected."
SHHS has also ensured that
construction, which might normally
disrupt student life, shouldn't be too
much of a problem.
"It won't commence until students depart after exams and it will
be done before their arrival in late
August," said Parr. 13
UBC to create new art centre
through $5 million donation
A $5 million donation from UBC
alumnus Michael Audain will be used
to establish a new visual arts centre
on campus.
The new Audain Art Centre will be
tied to the department of art history,
visual art and theory, and will feature
16 art studios, new media labs, an art
gallery and academic space that can
hold up to 500 students. UBC plans
to locate the centre in the Ponderosa
Housing Hub commons block, currently under construction. It is set to
open September 2013.
The facility will replace an underground art gallery in Koerner Library
and existing studios currently housed
in temporary buildings. 13
LEGAL»
UBC asks Supreme
Court to review
discrimination
complaint
Jonny Wakefield
Managing Editor, Print
UBC has applied to the BC Supreme
Court for a judicial review of a professor's discrimination complaint.
A BC Human Rights Tribunal
(HRT) decision called for a full judicial hearing of a complaint made in
May 2010 by UBC Education professor Jennifer Chan. But the university is arguing that UBC's internal
review process has already put the
case to rest.
Chan alleges she was a victim
of racial discrimination when she
was considered for a research chair
position. Chan, who is of Chinese
descent, was a finalist for the Lam
Chair in Multicultural Education but
was not selected.
She argued that sloppy appointment procedures allowed racial bias
to creep into the process. Earlier this
year, the HRT declined UBC's application to dismiss the complaint.
"The university believes the BC
HRT made some important errors in
its preliminary rulings," said Lucie
McNeill, director of UBC Public
Affairs.
McNeill said the university
disagrees with the HRT's decision
because they believe Chan's case
was dealt with by UBC's equity
procedures.
"The HRT is essentially saying
[that] irrespective ofthe internal
process we have through our Equity
Office, that somebody is entitled to
that last final appeal at the human
rights tribunal," said McNeill. "But
things should only go to appeal if
they're justified to go to an appeal."
In writing the decision, tribunal
member Norman Trerise argued
that requiring an employee to go
through an internal process and
then denying them the right to an
appeal with the HRT "essentially
pulls the rug out from under that
faculty member."
"The university believes that this
case is actually not correct and that
interpretations at the HRT were not
proper," said McNeill. "[The university] has a responsibility to stand
up and say, 'No, we cannot let this
stand as precedent.'"
In an email statement to The
Ubyssey, Chan said she has exhausted her pro-bono legal support and
will have to self-represent.
"UBC is further delaying the
complaint process, adding legal
costs and stress," she wrote. "UBC
should play fair and let the HRT
hearing go ahead as scheduled with
full disclosure of evidence."
McNeill denied that UBC is trying to delay the case. 13 4 I NeWS I 04.05.2012
MOVIES»
Norm Theatre to unreel, get digital projector
IL
GEOFF LISTER^HE UBYSSEY
Grace Shaw
Contributor
The Norm Theatre will finally be
projected into the future after 44
years of using 35mm film.
The UBC Film Society approached the AMS lastyear requesting an upgrade from their 35mm
film projector. The AMS decided
in February to commit $90,000 in
funding for a new digital projector.
"We project all of our film with
a 35mm projector, but it's been
increasingly difficult to get 35mm
prints...We need to go digital if we
want to continue showing new movies," said Evan Gillespie, operations
manager at the FilmSoc. "It's very
cheap for a projector.. We got a good
deal," he said.
It's a brand new technology that the whole
film industry is shifting
towards and we're just
adapting as well.
Caroline Wong
AMS VP Administration
Since the only local film distribution company, the Vancouver Film
Depot, stopped distributing film last
year and will shut down completely
in May, the FilmSoc has had to ship
all their films in from Toronto.
AMS VP Administration Caroline
Wong said that the Norm's upgrades are essential for movie-going
students. "The Norm Theatre has
a deep history. It provides a huge
service," she said.
Apart from showing Hollywood
movies, the Norm also provides
many services for the UBC community. "The Norm represents one of
the few remaining cultural gathering points at UBC for students and
within the AMS. There's been a decrease in clubs that have events, and
the FilmSoc continues to have two
events a day by showing movies,"
said Gillespie.
The Norm, built in 1965 and originally dubbed the SUB Auditorium,
was a part ofthe core vision ofthe
SUB in the 1960s. "Porter Butts
thought the idea of having a theatre
would be a good idea for students,"
said Michael Kingsmill from AMS
Design. "It was always planned as a
multi-purpose venue." Butts was the
original SUB designer.
A new digital projector is just the
beginning ofthe big changes in store
for the Norm; the theatre space itself
will undergo a physical transformation along with the new SUB, which
is set for completion in 2014. But the
Norm will stay in the old building.
"The [current] design ofthe Norm
has quite a bit of sophistication...it's a
bit like Ronchamp Cathedral inside.
It's more than just a theatre box;
I've always thought it was a well-
thought-tout] space," said Kingsmill,
who has been involved in remodeling
the Norm over the past two decades.
But the Norm plans to upgrade
its concession stand and lobby, and
the area where The Delly is currently located will be transformed into a
new entrance to the theatre.
Wong said the AMS hopes to continue adapting to new technology,
which may even include providing
3D viewings in the future.
"It's a brand new technology that
the whole film industry is shifting
towards and we're just adapting as
well." 13
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STUDENT                         ^
essay         (m^
CONTEST
2012 Topic
Are the Rich Getting Richer
and the Poor Getting Poorer?
1st Prize:                              $1,000
2nd Prize:                            $750
High school category:         $500
1
1          SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JUNE 30,2012               ^^^^^H
For complete contest details, visit
studentessaycontest.org.
For more information call:
1.800.665.3558 Ext. 533
<NSTiTUT£ 04.05.20i21 News 15
BUDGET 2012-13 »
Sn
Breaking
down the
ubc^d
budget U
International students, investment revenue and scrounging for cash are goingto fund
UBC's new spending—as well
as a possible wage increase.
In early April, the Board of
Governors approved UBC's 2012-13
operating budget.
UBC will see $19.7 million in new
yearly money, including $6.4 million
in recurring surpluses from last year,
$3.3 million in cuts to administrative
structures, and new revenue streams
such as tuition increases and larger
international student enrolment.
Most of that will be tied into
projects in the Place and Promise
strategic plan, while $7.2 million
will be put into a contingency fund,
likely to be used for wage increases
that come out of collective bargaining with UBC's unions.
Some ofthe new spending includes an Early Alert program to
address student mental health,
$900,000 to fund the opening of collegia lounges on campus, $1.5 million
for classroom upgrades and funding
for the Ponderosa commons. 13
Revenue increases, new spending
S19.7M
in new revenue
$6.4M: recurring surplus
$3.3M: administrative efficiencies
$1.1M: domestic tuition increases
$3.6M: int. tuition increases
$ 5.3M: investment and other
income
S19.6M
in new spending
$12.4M: Place and
Promise strategic plan
$7.2M: contingency
could be used for bargaining with unions
New investments to watch
In the Place and Promise spending
• $1.5M: upgrades to classrooms
• $0.9M: Early Alert System to monitor student
mental health
• $1.2M: construction of Ponderosa
Commons residence
• $0.2M: for two offices in India
Fl
• $2.6M: alumni engagement "Start an
Evolution" fundraising campaign
• $10M: "BC Integrated Research Library"
• $1.2M: new international student recruitment in
India, South America, Europe and Middle East
■ $0.7M: collegia project
New buildings and infrastructure
• 167.4M: Ponderosa Commons-1100 new beds
for students, slated to open between 2012-14.
•$824M: Brock Hall Commons*-685 beds,
slated to open in 2015.
• $2.5M: University Centre*-renovations for
Sage Bistro, and a new lounge for staff, faculty
and emeriti, slated for 2013.
• $2.5M: Old SUB refit*, slated for 2015.
• $85M: Hot water conversion-the university
will move from steam to a hot water heating
system to save energy.
*Subject to Board of Governors approval
How much for each
faculty?
UBC has approved $13.8M
for faculty funding increases
• Applied Science
$1.9M
• Arts
$2.3M
• Interdisciplinary Studies
[no increase]
• College of Health Disciplines
[no increase]
• Dentistry
$0.2M
• Education
$0.3M
• Forestry
$0.5M
• Graduate Studies
[no increase]
• Land and Food Systems
[no increase]
• Law
$0.2M
• Medicine
$3.1 M
• Pharmaceutical Sciences
$1.4M
•Sauder
$1.7M
I
• Science
$2.2M
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Athabasca University^ Sports»
B Editor-Drake Fenton
04.052012 | 6
OLYMPICS »
London calling: UBC's road to the 2012 Olympics
After winning five CIS titles, UBC star Kyla Richey will be an underdog on a national team fighting to qualify
Ginny Monaco
Culture Editor
Kyla Richey sits down across from
me at an empty table in UBC's War
Memorial Gym. Her hair is pushed
back from her face with a black
headband and she looks remarkably
composed for someone who's spent
the last hour running and diving
around a volleyball court. She puts
her feet up on an extra chair. Her
Converse sneakers are a dark purple
and look new. She rolls up one pant
leg, then the other and drops a bag
of ice on each knee.
"It's preventative," she says. "We
go through a lot of ice bags every
practice because we get so many different injuries—shoulder, back. And
when you're practicing every day..."
She presses down on the ice bag and
winces.
Richey is a fifth-year kinesiology student and an outside hitter
for the UBC Thunderbirds women's
volleyball team. On March 5, the
Thunderbirds beat the University
of Alberta Pandas to take home
their fifth consecutive national
championship.
With her time as a university
athlete coming to a close, Richey is
now focused on helping the national volleyball team qualify for
the London Olympics.
Canada will face
Cuba, the Dominican
Republic and Puerto
Rico at the end of April
in hopes of securing a
spot for the Games.
The national volleyball team is stacked
with UBC players
and Leah Allinger,
the T-Birds assistant
coach, attributes part
of that to the university's recruiting process.
"We recruit in terms
of character first and
volleyball second," she
says.
"We don't recruit
players that can't fit in
with a team environment—where the team
is always most the
important piece. But
once you're on, it's impossible not
to be a team player. Ifyou sat in our
locker room, I think one thing you'd
notice is that there's no talk about T
or individual statistic. It's all about
the team dynamic."
Most Valuable Player
Richey was raised in Langley, BC.
Her mother Jan was a UBC volleyball champ as well. In fact, the
Thunderbirds'win in 2007 was
their first since Richey's mother
played for the team in 1978.
"I come from a really competitive family, really sports-oriented,"
Richey says. "Both my parents were
teachers and coached me in various
sports."
She did track and basketball up
until Grade 12, but she knew early
on that volleyball was her calling. "I
think it's important to be 'sports-
rounded,'" Richey says. "The kids
that specialize so early, you just
see so much burnout. Through elementary school and high school I
played as many sports as I could, but
I knew that volleyball was what I
actually wanted to pursue."
Richey has been a part ofthe
team since she started at UBC in
2007. In that time, she racked up
some ofthe best stats in the country—3.54 kills and 4.42 points per
set in the Canada West conference
this year, third and fourth overall—
and was named the CIS player of
the year.
Richey is quick to emphasize that
her success, and the Thunderbirds'
success, isn't a solo effort. "You
have great teammates around you.
They're high quality athletes, so
you're really getting pushed every
day and you're bound to get better.
If I hadn't won MVP and we just
won nationals, I don't know that
I'd feel any different, but it's always
nice to get personal recognition,"
she says.
"It's a pretty good way to end
off your career, being named MVP.
You don't really think about it all
together. There was such a focus
this year on winning this championship that I sort of forgot the four
that I'd won previously. So now that
I'm done and now that I have the
five gold medals beside each other, it
becomes more real."
KYLA IS MORE THAN A VOLLEYBALL PLAYER.
SHE'S A FRIEND WHO MAKES YOU LAUGH
AFTER YOU'VE MADE A MISTAKE. SHE'S A
COMPETITOR WHO MAKES HER TEAMMATES
BETTER WHEN SHE BEATS THEM, A BIG HUG
WHEN YOU FEEL IT WAS ALL YOUR FAULT
AND MOST OF ALL, A LEADER WHO TRULY
BELIEVES IN EVERY MEMBER OF HER TEAM.
KYLA'S TRUE SUCCESS AS A VOLLEYBALL
PLAYER IS NOT HER COLLECTION OF MEDALS,
BUT THE RESPECT, ADORATION AND LOVE
SHE IS GIVEN BY..EVERYONE AROUND HER.
Brina Derksen-Bergen
UBC volleyball teammate
Leading a team of leaders
There are, of course, those players
on any team that stand out and step
into a leadership role. Richey is one
of those players. She attributes most
of that to the fact that she's been on
the team for so long, but Allinger
says there's more to it.
"We have girls that do not get
any playing time that could start on
any other team in Canada," she tells
me. "I think the challenge with this
team is managing talent. All these
girls were the best players on their
teams and we have 16 true leaders. With someone like Kyla, she is
the heart and soul ofthe team in so
many ways. She has so many talented and strong leaders to lead."
"The past four years, I've been
one of those 'lead by example'
people," Richey says. "I'm not a very
loud person on the court or off. But
because this is my fifth year, I've
taken a more natural leadership
role."
Part of that role, she believes, is
keeping her teammates focused on
the game. "When we come in to
practice, I want to make sure that
there's nothing bothering anyone so
we can just focus on volleyball."
It's somethingthat doesn't go unnoticed by her teammates. Allinger
mentions a quote written by setter
Brina Dersen-Bergen for an award
Richey had been nominated for.
"This is who Kyla is to her teammates," Allinger says. "I asked Brina
for a quote about the impact Kyla
had on her team and this was the
response: 'Kyla is more than a volleyball player. She's a friend who
makes you laugh after you've made
a mistake. She's a competitor who
makes her teammates better when
she beats them, a big hug when you
feel it was all your fault and most
of all, a leader who truly believes in
every member of her team. Kyla's
true success as a volleyball player
is not her collection of medals, but
the respect, adoration and love she
is given by her coaches, teammates
and everyone around her.'"
Allinger says that what the
Thunderbirds will miss most about
Richey is her presence—on court
and off. During our conversation,
Richey's teammates trickle out
ofthe gym. She smiles and waves
when they call to her. "You were
great out there," she shouts.
The learning curve
Going from the Thunderbirds to
Team Canada isn't exactly a smooth
transition. It's a "big fish in a small
pond" kind of scenario. UBC dominates the CIS, but the national team,
historically, hasn't fared so well.
Allinger says it can be a difficult
situation for players like Richey. "I
think that will be their challenge.
They go from a program where they
just believe that they're going to be
successful to a team that historically
has not had that much success. The
feeling is that they have to do something quite different to be successful. There are so many UBC players
on the national team who have that
experience."
Arnd Ludwig, the head coach for
Canada, says, "I believe we have
a chance, but we have to be at 100
per cent. It's goingto be a tough
qualifier."
Ludwig took over the team three
years ago and he's seen Richey
grow as a player. "She was young
and inexperienced...And lastyear,
she was a starter for Team Canada.
You could just see how her level
improved over that time. When she
plays, she's really, really good. The
lastyear, she did a good job getting
a little more stable on the court.
She has the right mindset and she's
learning more and more what to do
to get there."
"We haven't peaked yet," Richey
says. "But I do love that underdog
feeling. What's different about our
national team is that our team—together—hasn't really learned how to
win, or how to push through those
nitty-gritty situations. Volleyball is
a sport where anything can happen.
You could be down 15 and that team
could still technically come back. I
really love playing with the national
team because there's such a huge
learning curve. There's so much to
do. Every single day you're coming
in and it's never boring.
"Two years ago, we were at the
world championships. We were
playing with these teams that have
RICHARD LAM/UBC ATHLCTICS
Kyla Richey holds her five CIS gold medals. Team Canada begins gualifiers on April 30
the best players in the world. It
makes you work so hard because
you're looking across the net and
that's the equivalent of Kobe Bryant
and you're playing against them."
Allinger believes Richey will
thrive with the national team.
"She'll bring a few things," she says.
"She'll bring a really dynamic offensive force. She'll bring a true sense
of team. She'll bring people together
for a common goal."
Right now, Richey is focusing her
efforts on training for the qualifier. But she isn't sure what she'll
be doing after that. "I'll definitely
keep playing for at least another
five years," she said. "Whether it's
between pro and national, or just
focusing on one or the other. I used
to say no, but now I feel [coaching] is inevitable. I love kids, I love
teaching. I think growing up with
both my parents as teachers, I'm
accustomed to that. So I say no, but
I think that's a silly answer.
"I definitely see myself as an
athlete, but hopefully, not just
remembered as an athlete," she
said. "When I eventually [retire], I
think it will be hard, but there are
so many things I am passionate
about." 13
THERE WAS SUCH
A FOCUS THIS YEAR
ON WINNING THIS
CHAMPIONSHIP THAT
SORT OF FORGOT THE
FOUR THAT I'D WON
PREVIOUSLY. SO NOW
THAT I'M DONE AND NOW
THAT I HAVE THE FIVE
GOLD MEDALS BESIDE
EACH OTHER, IT BECOMES
MORE REAL.
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Comicsmasterby Maria Cirstea
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' am - 10 pm daily 04.052012 Games 13
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Available online and at fine retailers across the universe Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
04.052012 | 14
JEFF ASCHKINASI^HE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Storming March Madness
Well, the results of UBC March
Madness are in, and after tens of
thousands of votes, you've decided
that the quintessential UBC experience is Storm the Wall.
Defeating Day ofthe Longboat,
Wreck Beach, Imagine Day,
Construction, and then finally
Block Party in the final, Storm the
Wall fully deserved its win. It's a
UBC tradition, unique to this campus, highlighting our West Coast
attitude.
And yet...it's true that during
the two weeks of voting, Storm the
Wall was right outside the SUB. Did
this affect the voting? It must have,
though the total effect will forever
be unknown.
Still, congratulations to a worthy
victor. If we ever do this again, we'll
look forward to seeing whether the
results will be the same at a different time of year.
Block Party is a hit—but it could
still be bigger
The good news is that Block Party
has sold out, except for a few last-
minute tickets available at the gate.
The bad news is that a sold out year-
end outdoor concert at UBC now
has only 5000 students attending.
We aren't goingto complain much
about this; Block Party is the biggest beer garden and concert that
happens at UBC all year, and 5000
students rocking out in Maclnnes
Field will still be a sight to behold.
Furthermore, it looks like the
weather is goingto cooperate, which
is perhaps the most important factor in whether Block Party is a good
time for all.
But we also know that Maclnnes
Field could hold nearly twice as
many students as will be attending
this "sold out" show, and it feels like
a lost opportunity to grow Block
Party into an event that could really make a lasting impression on
students.
In this case, the AMS was playing it safe in setting the attendance
limit fairly low. This makes sense,
given that the last few Block Parties
did not sell out. But this year a few
prominent local bands were put
on the lineup, as opposed to just a
smattering of DJs (or, you know,
The Barenaked Ladies), and now
they actually can't keep up with the
demand for tickets. We hope this
encourages the AMS to think even
bigger for next year—booking bands
that are capable of drawing up to
10,000 students. We have the largest
student union in the country; we
should be able to attract big-name
talent.
But even if the AMS does try to
fill Maclnnes Field to capacity, it's
unclear whether the RCMP would
even allow it. As is well known to
regular readers of The Ubyssey, the
combination of market housing residents and RCMP staffing shortages
has made large student concerts on
campus a difficult proposition.
But the AMS and the RCMP have
been making progress on relaxing
the liquor restrictions on campus,
and with the success of this year's
Block Party, there is at least reason
for optimism.
Student representatives should
take clear stands on tuition
In this issue, Sean Heisler, who is
stepping down after two years as
a student member ofthe Board of
Governors, provides some background for UBC's annual two per
cent tuition increases. We would
like to see a lot more of this when it
comes to tuition debates: well-informed, measured, policy-driven arguments about the cost of education
and how to mitigate the negative
impact on students.
Instead, what usually happens at
UBC is that a few people get very
angry about tuition at certain times
throughout the year—usually during
the AMS elections—but then nobody
shows up to the consultation sessions, or to the meetings where the
Board is actually voting on the issue.
Yet there is one thing in particular we would like to see our student
Board members do: cast a clear vote
on tuition increases. Student Board
members have, in the past, abstained
on tuition votes, which strikes us
as an unacceptable cop-out. This
year, all ofthe students on the Board
voted in favour. Though it may rub
students the wrong way, a yes vote is
preferable to an abstention.
If a student Board member thinks
that the two per cent raise is the
right thing for UBC to do—which
is what many student politicans
think—then vote yes on it, and be
prepared to justify your vote to students. Ifyou're inclined to oppose
tuition increases, then vote no and
be prepared to justify it to the rest of
the Board.
We should always call on our student Board members to take strong
and clear stands on issues that
matter to students, and the cost of
tuition is perhaps the most important issue of all.
The potential danger of Bill 18
With the passage of Bill 18, the
governing boards at BC's universities now have the ability to oust
elected members. In practice, this
means that the student and faculty
members are now subject to being kicked off the Board bythe
provincially-appointed members. If
you think this sounds odious, you
aren't alone.
The likelihood of this being enacted at UBC is, we hope, remote.
Times may arise when an elected
member does something so extreme
that their ouster from the Board
is uncontroversial; in such a case,
the outcry will be fairly small. But
if UBC's Board of Governors ever
exercises this power outside of a
situation where it's clearly called
for—in other words, a situation in
which there is significant debate-
then the Board will lose much of its
legitimacy in the eyes of students
and faculty.
In the meantime, there is always
the danger that Bill 18 will have a
chilling effect on discussion at the
Board. The elected members maybe
less likely to speak their mind, given
the ability ofthe other members to
have them removed. If this is the
result, then Bill 18 will have made
UBC's governance substantially
worse. 13
Why your tuition
keeps rising
Perspectives
» Sean Heisler
With students taking a stand in
Quebec about proposed 75 per cent
tuition hikes, and a rising fear across
the country of steadily increasing
rates, the annual two per cent tuition
increases at UBC have been steadily
drawing more and more attention.
Although BC is the fourth-lowest
province for tuition, and UBC has
the lowest tuition of all BC research
universities, nobody likes to see their
tuition rise.
I have been a student member of
the Board of Governors for the past
two years, which means I was among
the people who approved the recent
tuition increases at the April 3 Board
meeting.
In my experience, there is a lot of
misunderstanding over why tuition
rises by two per cent every year. I
hope to shed some light on the matter here, and I'll leave it up to readers
to choose whether to support the
two per cent annual increase, or use
this information for better lobbying
against tuition raises.
In BC, the recent history of tuition
goes back to 1996, when the NDP
government opted to mandate a
freeze on all tuition rates within the
province. This held for six years, until the Liberal government lifted the
freeze in 2002.
Over the next few years, institutions around the province sent tuition rates soaring, with some raises
as high as 30 per cent. This resulted
in a strong political backlash, which
pushed the Liberals to bring back
tuition regulation. In lieu of a full
freeze, however, they opted to impose a maximum cap of two per cent
within any year.
So for those wondering why every
March they get an email informing
them ofthe proposed two per cent
increase, that is why: the provincial government does not allow any
higher. For those who have asked
why they do not simply raise it by a
larger amount and then leave it for a
while, it's the same reason. Within
the current legislation, if UBC chose
not to raise it in one year and later
found itself in a financial bind, there
is no mechanism to recover the gap
in revenue.
There is a larger question, however: why doesn't UBC simply choose
to not raise the tuition for a time and
save the students further financial
pressures? The short answer is inflation. UBC needs about $25 million
a year in additional revenues just to
hold constant against it. UBC's VP
Finance Pierre Ouillet has said that
"tuition is the only protection [UBC
has] against inflation." In other
words, UBC operates in a world
of effectively constant provincial
government funding, and their other
revenue streams have restrictions
that tuition doesn't.
External donations are an important revenue source, but they almost
exclusively come tied to specific
projects, such as buildings, programs
or scholarships. This helps UBC, but
doesn't solve the inflation problem.
The development of market housing and the revenue from land leases
is another strong revenue stream, but
those profits are now dedicated to
financing student housing projects.
Future land lease revenues may also
be decreasing as UBC develops its
Housing Action Plan and investigates
subsidizing faculty and staff housing
to help its workforce live closer to
their jobs.
It is sometimes suggested that
UBC can find the income through
cutting costs by finding efficiencies,
but there is a limit to what can be
found—and UBC has already capitalized on most ofthe areas that offer
these efficiencies. UBC is steadily
being pushed to a position where the
only further gains that can be found
are to lose, or not hire, personnel.
To fill the gap between the tuition
increases and the needed $25 million
for inflationary protection, it would
mean roughly 150 faculty or staff
would need to be downsized, bringing definite reductions in service
quality.
The actual dollar figures ofthe
tuition increase are also often misrepresented. In the budget, domestic tuition represents $234 million, which gives the two per cent
increase a revenue figure of $4.7
million (not a massive sum of money
in UBC's budget scale). The part of
the story that is missed is that the
increase is $4.7 million everyyear,
not just this once. When you consider
each single increase as a perpetuity
over the lifespan ofthe university, it
adds up to $82 million—a very different number to be talking about.
Tuition raises also come under
fire because they force one generation to pay more money than the
previous one. To a certain extent
this is unavoidable; inflation means
universities have to raise tuition
eventually. But the absence of a
tuition cap often makes this worse,
as some students will be forced to
pay MUCH more than others, rather
than a steady increase across generations. If the consistent two per
cent raise had been in place since
1996, instead ofthe freeze following
the large raises in the early 2000s,
students would in fact be paying
36 per cent less today than they are
now. The very nature of a freeze is
that universities become increasingly agitated with fiscal pressures and
then over-adjust when given an opportunity to recover some revenue.
So some constraint around tuition is
very beneficial; UBC's stance is just
that any number below inflation is
simply too low.
I understand why students
get agitated about annual tuition
increases. Many of us are experiencing increasing financial strain,
made worse by ballooning housing costs and a failing student loan
program. But university administrators are also in a very difficult
spot, with budgets becoming ever
slimmer and tuition being one of
the few revenue sources able to
combat inflation.
Many of these fiscal problems
can only be truly fixed in the
Legislature, not at UBC's Board of
Governors—but that doesn't mean
that students shouldn't take an
intense interest in organizing politically to solve them. While tuition
may always be a source of conflict,
I hope that the university administration and students at large are
still able to align themselves on the
points they agree on—such as the
need to improve the student loan
program—and can lobby for those
issues as one loud and effective
voice. tH
Sean Heisler is a departing student
representative on UBC's Board of
Governors » Making UBC
A BETTER PLACE
=CUPE2278
Teaching Assistants
at The University of British Columbia
#fairnessfromhere

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