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The Ubyssey Nov 2, 1967

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 we've got
eyes in
/ol. XLIX, No. 19
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1967
224-3916
DBG REMAINS
-iiij'U
— kurt hilger photo
THE STATUTORY TISSUE issue got dire in a Hallowe'en hang-over. Rolls like this are enough
to bowl you over, said a flushed gull who dropped in to see if he could handle two lax students
who became all wound up in Tuesday's paper.
Drez probe of student policymaking
MONTREAL (CUP) — Student power got the
>d from university presidents here Tuesday.
At the annual conference of the Association
! Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC)
e issue of student representation on academic
nates received high priority on the agenda.
Most presidents said after the closed meeting
e trend toward student representation is inevi-
ble.
They said representation could be most signifi-
int in matters such as bookstore policy, curricu-
m, parking, on-campus housing, and other such
mcerns by participating on bodies below the
vel of the board of governors, particularly on
e senate and its committees, faculty councils
id departments.
G. C. Andrew, executive director of the AUCC
said there was too much emotionalism surrounding the issue of student power.
He said universities should be governed on a
rational, rather than on an emotional basis.
H. D. Hicks, president of Dalhousie University
admitted that students are growing up quicker
than ever before but "they still have a hell of a
lot to learn."
He said student involvement in policymaking
could toe taken to ridiculous lengths.
Most university presidents agreed that students had little or no contribution to make at
the iboard of governors level.
Seven in ten
favor union
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
UBC students Wednesday overwhelmingly reaffirmed their
membership in the Canadian Union of Students.
A total of 5,565 students voted 70 per cent in favor of
UBC's remaining in CUS in an Alma Mater Society-sponsored
referendum.
Of these, 1,743 voted yes to withdraw from the national
university students' union, and 3,811 voted no. There were 11
spoiled ballots.
Only two polls—forestry and agriculture, and engineering—
voted to reject CUS membership.
CUS president Hugh Armstrong, at UBC for the referendum,
said Wednesday night CUS will now be able to move ahead
with strong new programs.
"These results will be well-received by the rest of the
country," he said.
"We now have a job to get done, especially in the area of
educational reforms. I look forward to strong UBC leadership
in CUS."
Wherever there is a tradition of strong student government,
CUS is supported, he said.
"The other two schools which held CUS referendums this
year, Windsor and Acadia, did not give strong support to CUS
because they do not have the strong student governments."
Armstrong said he hopes UBC's council will take the lead
in effecting CUS policy.
"How this is done depends on the local style. We recognize
the local councils as the spokesmen for the students on a campus.
"Shaun Sullivan is the head of CUS at UBC," he said.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said he was pleasantly surprised students here wish to remain in the mainstream of
Canadian student thinking.
"I hope the interest that students have shown in this
referendum will be carried into council so we may implement
CUS programs and achieve active results," Sullivan said.
Law president 'Jim Taylor, who supported the withdrawal
from CUS, said he never expected the referendum to pass.
"I still think CUS membership is an issue which we will
have to face," he said. "It is still an organization irrelevant to
local needs."
That we had a referendum at all, Taylor said, is enough to
make CUS sit up and make some changes.
Doors opened to thefts,
$6,000 in supplies gone
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
There are 40 new openings in Acadia Park.
Forty double doors are among $6,000 worth of construction materials stolen so far from the family housing
building site.
Housing administrator Les Rohringer criticized the
lack of security at the project.
"The contractor is responsible, and he has done nothing
about providing theft protection. There wasn't even a
watchman or a lock on the door," he said.
Emerson Mitchell, construction supervisor for Laing
Construction and Equipment Ltd., which is building the
Acadia Park units, said protection was difficult because
of the site's isolation.
"We can expect some security," he said, "but we can't
control the whole area."
Watchmen had been present sometimes, he said.
Mitchell did not suspect UBC students of the thefts,
and denied that there has been any vandalism.
Rohringer criticized Mitchell for not reporting the
loss to the university. His department found out about the
thefts in what he called an offhand way.
"When I learned of it, I phoned Franz Conrads (supervisor of construction) at the physical plant," said Rohringer,
"but he knew nothing about it." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 2, 1967
SMALL SIZE AN  ADVANTAGE
Totem classes a success
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
By mistake, two English 100 classes are enjoyable this year.
Held Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday mornings in Totem Park lounges, they have only
about a dozen students each.
The size, say their professors, Dr. Lee Whitehead and Dr. Roger Seamon, is their chief advantage.
Whitehead did not see how his class would
work with the normal number of students to a
class.
Although he would like to see the experiment established on a permanent basis, he said
it would not work on a university-wide scale.
Those presently enrolled in the Totem sections applied especially for it.
"These people are interested in English. On
the basis of their writing, I would say that they
Sir George tops
senate rostrum
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students at Sir George
Williams University have been given four seats
on a senate of 22 faculty and administrators.
This is the most significant senate representation yet achieved in any Canadian university.
The senate also approved recommendations
allowing for two students on each faculty council, and also provides for student participation at
the academic department level.
All student representatives are to have full
voting rights, duties and responsibilities.
The recommendations were drawn up by a
joint committee of students, faculty and administration, which began sitting a year ago.
The announcement was made by academic
vice-principal Douglas Clarke, on behalf of the
senate, after it passed the recommendations at
its regular meeting Friday.
Students staged a one-day boycott of classes
last Thursday, but this is in no way connected
to the announcement, which had (been expected
for some time.
Student union president Jeff Chipman said
Saturday the recommendations represented a
major breakthrough in Canadian university education.
"We are most pleased that Sir George is
assuming a role in the trend toward a responsible
student voice in university governmental bodies.
"It is a big step that will bring students into
total involvement and greater harmony with
the university," he said.
are better students than I've previously had in
first year courses."
Quiet discussions of the students round a
circle of armchairs and couches are digressive
and spontaneous. The professor sits as one of
them, and guides the conversation by suggesting
topics and posing questions.
Towards the end of the class, the discussion
shifts away from the main topic to other writing
and ideas.
After class, those who have other lectures on
the main campus leave while the others continued talking. Scheduled to end at 10.20 a.m. the
sessions often extend another half hour.
Getting from the lounge to other lectures
across campus on time is a problem, but the
students take the inconvenienve lightly.
Totem's isolation affects the professors, too.
"But I would rather drive there to teach 15
students than stay here in Buchanan for 30,"
Seamon said.
An expansion of the program would be economically impossible, he said, as the university
would have to triple its English faculty. That
would mean tripling its budget.
"It is not a serious idea on a mass scale,"
said Seamon. "What we have now is merely
tokenism."
The program for the Totem classes is the
same as that for regular English 100 sections.
Seamon said the lounge setting had one main
effect on students — "They talk more."
Whitehead agreed: "They leave behind the
public school mentality of being told, and start
asking for themselves.
"Of course it's a very expensive way of
teaching a first year course," he said, "but it's
a good way to spend money if the government
wants a first-rate university."
No chess, no bridge-
its not a newspaper
UBC math professor Dr. Nathan Divinsky
apparently doesn't think The Ubyssey is Canada's
greatest student newspaper.
When he came into his math 200 class one
day, his students were reading The Ubyssey.
"What's in it?" he asked.
"Nothing," said a student.
"I can't understand why that newspaper wins
awards  every year,"  Divinsky said.
"There's nothing in it. Do they have a bridge
column? No. Do they have a chess column? No."
He shook his head and went on with the class.
the International
at the
International
House
all
students .50
• Japanese tea ceremony
• international fashion show
• floor shows       •  international restaurant
friday, nov.  3rd, 7 pm.
Saturday      4th, 2 pm.
Film Soc Presents
LARRY KENT'S
HIGH
B   Nov. 2 & 3
A Nor. 7 & 8
{J   72:30 & 8:00
E   Adm. $1.00
D   Auditorium
Restricted to Students, Faculty, Staff,
AMS, Faculty, or Staff Cards must be shown.
ARTS - COMMERCE - ENGINEERING
Have you considered a career as a
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT?
Our representative will be on Campus
November 13 and 14, 1967
Please contact the placement office for further information
and to arrange an interview*
PEAT, MARWICK, MITCHELL & CO.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE - NOV. 6 & 7 at 8:30
'a jOy tO WatCh' London Daily Telegraph
'Sheer delight' Cleveland Plain Dealer    f^j[\
&P
"* 4.50, 4.00
3.50, 2.50
Choreographed
PROGRAM
NOV. 6—"ROSE LATULIPPE"
by Brian Macdonald.
Music:  Harry Freedman.
NOV. 7—"PAS DE DIX" — Choreographed by
Balanchine. Music: Glazounov.
"THE STILL POINT" —Choreographed
by Todd  Bolender.
Music: Debussy String Quartet.
"MONCAYO  I" — Choreographed  by
Gloria Contreras. Music: Pablo Moncayo
"DAYDREAM"  (a Pas de Deux by Leo
Ahonen). Music: Minkus.
"LES PATINEURS"—Sir Frederick Ash-
ton—choreographer. Music: Meyerbeer.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE—NOV. 19 AT 8:30
it 9«j- Carlos
Montana
4.50, 4.00, 3.50, 2.50
TICKETS THE BAY BOX OFFICE,
MAIN FLOOR, THE BAY—681-3351 Thursday, November 2, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
TOO IMPERSONAL
UBC conducive to suicide
— kurt hilger photo
KEEPING WATCH over the local polling station can be a
drag. Especially when Diane Karanko, arts 1, decides to take
the notice seriously and casts her vote for posterity.
Bedpanners vs homewreckers
in annual sacred madness
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
A most sacred rite of madness will take place In the Thunderbird Stadium today.
The ceremony,held annually, is widely known as the Teacup
game.
The protectors of the hearth fires (home economics students)
will do battle at noon with the changers of the bedpans (nurses)
in what is touted as a football match.
Receipts will be used to aid the crippled children at the
Children's hospital.
The warring priestesses have been in holy retreat for a
month, preparing and purifying themselves for the conflict with
the help of UBC football teams.
At half time, when the players of the honored game will
pause to refresh themselves, the red servants of Mars (engineers)
and the green giants (foresters) will entertain the watching gods
with a chariot race.
This feat of muddiness will be followed by one even more
Olympic, a boat race which is actually a drinking contest.
New gallery coming
UBC will have a new art gallery in two years, says B. C.
Binning, head of the fine arts department.
An off-campus fund raising campaign, now under way, will
provide the gallery as part of the Norman MacKenzie Centre
of the Fine Arts, Binning said.
He said the gallery has been held up by the university
administration, which he says puts top priority on teaching
buildings.
f "A university gallery should be a teaching gallery and an
experimental gallery. It can try things that the city gallery
can't because  it won't  have  to  please  a  membership."
By FRED CAWSEY
The atmosphere at UBC is conducive to suicide, says campus psychiatrist Dr. Conrad
Schwarz.
"The fundamental reason for most suicides is
isolation, the feeling that nobody cares," Schwarz
said in an interview.
Large campuses like UBC tend to depersonalize students by giving them large lecture classes
and impersonal registration numbers, he said.
"With the system as it is, however, there is
not much we can do except let people know there
is someone who cares."
"People who are contemplating suicide need
Students, faculty
arrested in sit-in
IOWA CITY (CUP-CPS) — More than a
hundred University of Iowa students and faculty
members were arrested here Wednesday in the
course of a sit-in to stop marine recruiting.
The demonstration, organized by Students
for a Democratic Society and the Iowa City Draft
Resistance Union, blocked the entrance to the
Iowa Memorial Union where recruiting was being carried on for the marine corps. Occasional
violence broke out during the morning as
students and counter - demonstrators from off
campus attacked the sit-in line. Some students
going to interviews charged the human blockade,
and others crawled over it, stepping on demonstrators in the line.
Early Wednesday afternoon dean of academic
affairs Bill Hubbard and Iowa vice-president
Willard Boyd tried to talk both demonstrators
and anti-demonstrators into leaving the area.
They were not successful, and so called in outside police.
A phalanx of over a hundred law officers
from around eastern Iowa marched in formation
against the hecklers and anti-demonstrators,
scattering them." They then gave the sit-in group
two minutes to clear the area. Some took advantage of the offer, but most stayed on the
line. Police then dragged them away to waiting
cars and wagons. Most went limp, but one girl
lashed out with teeth and feet at police officers.
Some faculty members have made complaints
to the American Association of University Professors about the administration's failure to control violence among contending factions of
students during the morning.
Persky pestered
At least two members of the student council
are unhappy that arts undergraduate president
Stan Persky has severed formal relations with
the Alma Mater Society.
Don Munton, AMS first vice-president, said
Wednesday he was sorry arts would no longer
have a voice in student affairs.
"It will also damage the AMS," he said. "Radical opinions are healthy in any organization."
"A person should not withdraw because he is
disagreed with or opposed. Persky has brought
up some valuable points for the council to
consider."
Mike Coleman, chairman of university clubs,
also lamented Persky's decision Wednesday.
"It's unfortunate if he represents majority
arts opinion. I don't think he has the support of
a great many arts people," he said.
to know this. They want someone to care enough
to help them."
Last year there were four suicides and 17
attempts reported to the university health service.
"There were probably more that we didn't
hear about," Schwarz said.
There have been no suicides at UBC so far
this year.
"The percentage of suicides among students is
higher than in the general public."
A psychiatrist is on call 24 hours a day at the
health service he said. "If anyone needs help,
all they have to do is phone or come in."
But talking to any friend or acquaintance is
also helpful. "Most people will take the time to
help if someone in trouble phones them."
Last year 400 students went to the psychiatric
clinic in the health service. Peak numbers were
during November and January.
"Anyone who needs help only has to call us
or come in and we will see them immediately
or make an appointment if they wish," Schwarz
said.
Legal aid a right
Students don't have to appear before the
faculty council without legal aid.
So said Alma Mater Society president Shaun
Sullivan Wednesday.
The council has the authority granted by
senate to act as a student disciplinary body.
Sullivan said it meets in secret and sometimes deals with what could be alleged criminal
offences against students.
"Students don't have to appear without legal
counsel," he said. "If anyone is given notice
to appear before the faculty council he can come
to the AMS and we'll arrange legal counsel for
him."
Altered cataloguing
may cause confusion
By HEW GWYNNE
Don't panic next term if your favorite book
on Ethiopian ant eaters isn't Catalogued where
you're used to finding it.
Major systems changes in library cataloguing
and filing will be fully operative by January,
said cataloguing head J. M. Elrod.
The changes are incorporated in new cataloguing and filing rules laid down by the Anglo-
American Cataloguers Association in Canada, the
U.S., Great Britain and Australia.
Studies Of catalogue use in public and academic libraries from 1934 to 1967 revealed that
the present international system has always been
troublesome Elrod said.
The planned change, the first since 1911,
is due to the advent of the computer.
Simplicity is the basis of the new rules because computers, unlike humans, are unable to
make detailed subject distinctions.
In future more importance will be placed on
direct authority from the book, he said.
For example, to find Mark Twain now, a
student looks under Samuel Clemens.
Under the the new rules the book will be
catalogued under Mark Twain.
A questionnaire developed by the UBC library
staff will be distributed to five hundred students
between Nov. 6 and Nov. 28. These will help
determine how the new rules can be best applied
at UBC. f T//   Vv ,«&**■£' %-\    **.
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays andl Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press'. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
NOVEMBER 2, 1967
Action
Wednesday's overwhelming vote of confidence in the
Canadian Union of Students was a vote for action.
It was a rejection of the concept of students as non-
citiizens without the right to organize for educational
and social reform.
The most remarkable thing about the referendum
was the interest shown by UBC students in their national
union.
One-third of students voted — a large turnout in any
UBC poll — and 70 per cent of them wished to continue
as CUS members. This interest was previously untapped.
CUS affairs have been shuttled aside by Alma Mater
Society councils into CUS committees which were rarely
consulted.
But as CUS president Hugh Armstrong pointed out
after Wednesday's impressive victory, the local head of
the national union is the student council president. AMS
president Shaun Sullivan and his executive — as chiefs
of the UBC local of CUS —must now take on responsibility for making the organization work at UBC.
The last CUS congress passed some important resolutions — particularly concerning educational reform.
It is time for these resolutions to be put to work.
The Ottawa office can advise and ihform — but the local
level is where the action is.
No way
Cutting enrolment is no way to tackle UBC's financial problems.
For the only way to cut enrolment is to raise entrance standards. And the standards now used in the
university's admissions policy — based chiefly on high-
school marks — are badly inadequate.
Student performance in the ugly atmosphere of B.C.
high schools, we feel, does not indicate what admissions
officers claim it indicates.
Education in most high schools has become a peripheral concern only. Primary aim of today's secondary
institutions is to inculcate students with the tribal habits
of the lower middle class — the home culture of high
school teachers.
Nothing else than this conclusion can explain the
perverse obsession of school principals and teachers
to do away with long hair and mini-skirts. Nothing else
can explain the backwardness of curriculum and of teaching methods and the false insistence that authority is
always right.
In the process of high school "education", creativity
end curiosity are likely to be dulled if not killed. The
most creative students are likely to drop out.
For these reasons we urge UBC's administration to
avoid the proposed plan to cut enrolment next year. The
university should try to salvage — not shut out — the
talent damaged in public high schools.
Chess/ anyone?
Math prof Nathan Divinsky says The Ubyssey is no
good because it doesn't have a chess or bridge column.
We agree with the learned professor that The
Ubyssey could use a good chess or bridge column.
We also agree with the growing feeling in Canada
that student papers should not be student papers — they
should serve the whole university community, including
faculty,
We extend, therefore, an invitation to write a chess
column for The Ubyssey to UBC's top chess player —
Dr. Nathan Divinsky.
let's vu inter ftT
THE SELL TovsjeR,
ISABEL.
"I agree, Captain — that load will either rock the boat or sink the ship."
UNTHINKING  RESPONSE
;trj.*'f, ■■'  <,f^ '
Maple
Leaves
SlliSiyp'S
And then voe startedb wonder uihctt" the
tell is the qood of ahate axwuiau ?
Reception proves need
for loudmouth senators
By MIKE BOLTON ception     in     senate.     Senate could   they?    Senate    secrecy
chairman   Dean   Walter   Gage prevented it.
torf Cby   si:? efd^senXr" ^^^tEL^ "   <**"»   *«*"   Mm
and by   conservative  opinion- lT^eZSL"sZ *** ^^ Why n0t CaU them
leaders in the downtown press the students   Proposals, articulate?  They were elected
confirms   that   students   chose The   mere  fact  of  senators members delivering their con-
the right people. ^ke  Lefeaux  and  Healy   con- stituents' demands.
Picture the consternation in firms   the   need   for   student it speaks of the "noisy and
the face of poor, baffled sena- senators   who   are   fearlessly p0werful minority of student
tor Stuart Lefeaux when stu- vocal and candid, who may in- opinion »   Does   tne   Province
dent senators  dared  to  speak duce    these    unwilling    elder editor mean the majority who
out loud at their first meeting, senators to look at themselves voted fQr the senators? Is ms
Lefeaux complained he had Candldly- majority a powerful minority?
sat in senate for a whole year ™»t student senators  need ARROGANCE
without   saying   a  word.   Pre- fese qualities is also apparent ^   ^.^.^   ^   c          s
sumably,   if   the   senator   had ^J^ J^Pp^"   ?* student   senators   entered   the
anything   to   say,   he    would f^J^rTToZ'. "er     bearing     concealed
have said it- 2g    conta.ns   cur.ous              _ weapons. It reads: ''(Tneyent-
Like most alumni senators, tiong about active students ered) . . . fully armed with the
however, Lefeaux probably natural arrogance of their gen-
has nothing to say. I* the editorial was an at- eration and the self-righteous-
STARTLING tempt   to   derive   sense   from ness  of their  activist philoso-
nonsense,   it  was   barely   sue- phy"
Far  more startling  was the cessful. If notj  it was merely Tn ..m   T _„„„„_.   a11 ctl]
reaction  of  arts  dean  Dennis glutted with illoeic nonsense future, i suggest, all stu-
Healy to student senators. **** ^     °g° dent   senate   candidates   must
Gabor Mate asked when the SENATE SECRECY ^turTSoSce^TnTactiv-
committee    considering    dele- The   editorial   suggests   stu- naturai   afr°*ance   and   actlv
tion of the two-year language dent    senators    should    have ls   se  'rlg     ousn ss'
requirement for the B.A. pro- known money had been donat- When   people   react   in  this
gram would report. ed    specifically   for   a    clock kind   of   unthinking   manner,
Senator Healy replied- "The tower,   and   that   they   should students   almost   feel   obliged'
report will be ready when it also have known there was a to elect representatives likely
will be ready" senate   committee   considering to   cause   upset.   The  reaction
-„ „              .,   ,,                , deletion     of     the     two-year accents   the   need   for   strong
Well  now,   that s very  dra- _                                              „ .   ,    ^
,.             .'      ....   _;       ,4. language    requirement.    How student senators,
matic,  senator,  but  it  doesn't ->-=•_
really help much. -_,.„.-«.< -             -
Probably academics don't al- EDITOR: Danny Stoffman who had a bulbous nose.  Ann Arky
,                 ,        ,         •„„_. was   skewered   on    a   scythe,    then
ways   make    good   admimstra-        city   Stuart Gray flew   off the handle.
tors.      But     almost      everyone        News   Susan Gransby Meanwhile    trembling    truants
u.„__!„„                       jui...--_- u-um... traipsed   toward   two   towering   tur-
knOWS   committees  must   SOme-        Managing   murray McMillan _etg   teeming   with   testy   terrorists,
..       _  .               , j j     .         ,    ,,_„         Photo    Kurt Hilger and grotesque glowering giants glee-
times- be  prodded.  Any  house- A^^nt. .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott fully gobbled greasy goblins. Feeling
Wife    organizing    a    tea    party       Senior   Pat Hrushowy M^.F^a^'No^'Gfdnir&n^e!
knows   it   is   sometimes   neces-        Sports   Mike Jessen Hsu,    Paul    Knox,    Steve    Jackson,
,               .     ,   ,,                  .        ,             Wire          . Charlotte Haire Jane   Kennon,    Fred   Cawsey,   Irene
sary  to remind  the  angel  Cake "'" ""■ "  "                              j"hv Bina Wasilewski,     L a u n n e     Armstrong
halrpr   tn   arrivp   nn   timp                                           '          y        ' Patrick   Dean,   Laurie   Dunbar    and
baser to arrive on time.               Ass,t_ City  r Boni Le. Judy   Toung • Hew   Gwynne   was
Perhaps   the   senator   Should without   reaii_ing   the   gravity   of ""into the jock  shop wandered Mike
consult   his   Wife    on    adminiS- their  act,   the   gods   turned   the  edi- Fitzgerald    and    John    Twigg,    who
tr-ati-wo  tPoVmimio torlal     room     upside     down.     Just promptly dozed off.
uctuvc   icuuuquc. weight   and   see,   cried   Jade   Eden, As    the    hours    passed,    numbling
_. __  _--_ who hit the ceiling and pounded the moans   emitted   from   the   darkroom
GAGE   FAIR plaster in fury. Irving Fetish rasped as   Lawrence    Woodd,   Chris   Blake,
his nails against a light fixture  and George   Hollo   and   Bob   Brown   did
Generally,   the   Student  Sena- got into a scrape with an electrician pushups.
tors were happy with their re- ~^,.        ,._,,,         . Thursday, November 2, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO  THE EDITOR
Hallucination
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I must repeat my complaint
re your report on my lecture
of Oct. 18 "UBC places of
sweet hallucination" in your
paper on Oct.  19.
This report has done me
much harm — anybody can
point to it in order to prove
me an irresponsible fool.
I wish to repeat that I am
convinced that your reporter
fell victim to his confusion and
did not intend to report
wrongly. Still it is your duty
to try to undo the harm as far
possible.
I never said that the "publishing Laws of Canada" are
similar to those of Nazi Germany and allow publication
only of something pleasant to
the government!
What I did say was that the
attitude of Canadian editors—
based on primitive   prejudice
— Ubyssey included — has
prevented me for twelve years
to get such facts published as
"the Crown can do no wrong"
— compares in theory with
Hitler's position.
KARL BURAU
Censured!
The President & Secretary,
The Alma Mater Society,
Dear Sir:
The Acadia Camp Residence
Council, as a body independent
of, but representing 490 individual members (from a wide
variety of Faculties) of the
Alma Mater Society has, for
the following reasons, passed a
motion censuring the AMS for
its financial policies with regard to its budget allotment to
the arts undergraduate society:
1. The arts undergraduate
society is the largest of the
undergraduate societies
(having 5,646 members)
and therefore should re-
ceive a proportionally
larger allotment than other
undergraduate societies.
2. The arts undergraduate
society is proving itself a
viable and responsible organization, showing evident concern for its members by providing:
a) responsible democratic
government in its Jef-
fersonian sense.
b) the valuable information in the free arts
anti-calendar..
c) the convenience of free
locker space.
d) entertainment in the
form of free dances.
It is understood that they are
planning further beneficial
programs.
3.   By the very nature of its
operation, the arts undergraduate society has led to
a valuable discussion and
examination of the concept
of student government, its
composition,     and     its
methods.
It is  therefore felt on the
basis of numbers, benefits offered, and general value,  the
arts undergraduate society was
unjustly   dealt   with   in   this
year's   Amla   Mater    Society
budget.
Yours sincerely,
ACADIA CAMP
GENERAL COUNCIL
Enough
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Along with The Ubyssey
there appeared last Friday
some copies of a sinister "document" called Enough, put out
by the Frosh Orientation Com- TnhfM
mittee  of UBC. ' uuw
governments are institutions
which serve the interests of
the dominant class in society."
It goes on to say: "The most
beautiful thing about the process of the Vietnamese revolution . . .is that they will win
in the end." The idea of imminent victory is a favorite
psychological pitch used by
communists, and re-occurs persistently in writings of Marx,
etc.
The Frosh Orientation Committee has just done a fine job
of producing 16 sheets of communist propaganda, which
means sadly enough, that what
they produced isn't even original.
What I resent most, however, is the fact that such a
publication must have cost
money.
And where did they get that
money?
From unsuspecting, innocent
students like myself when I
payed my AMS fees.
BARRY GAETZ
ed 2
President of The We're Not
Going To Let The Communists   Get   Aw'ay  With  This
Society
What was said in Enough
can be read in any communist
publication, and one can only
conclude that the FOC most
possibly has connections with
the local communist party.
Although this interesting
pamphlet flits from one topic
to another in a most unrelated
and chaotic manner, it does
maintain a semblance of unity
in that it attacks "imperialism"
and the "U.S. capitalists"
(words heard quite frequently
over Radio Hanoi) throughout.
It contains the usual rash of
quotes from Marx, Hegel, Ho
Chi Minh, and of course, even
Mao.
It succeeds quite well in inferring that fascism and the
present American government
are synonomous.
It blithely makes the most
ludicrous statements without
even attempting to prove
them: eg. Malcolm X was murdered by the CIA.
Then it comes out with some
beautiful half-truths that one
would swear were copied right
out of Das Kapital: "... all
Editor, The Ubyssey
As in many letters to the
editor I read, the criticism of
articles often amounts to nothing more than the personal condemnation of the writer, in
this case John Mate by critic
Robert Shaw, arts 2. The subject — obscene four letter
words.
I think that what Mr. Shaw
fails to see is that such words
are merely a part of the great
taboo concerning all things
sexual. It's only human to veil
sex with an aura of secrecy.
The word f-u-c-k may as well
be s-h-o-e for all it really matters (or if you will "A rose by
any other name would smell as
sweet") for it is the iconoclasm
of just saying the word that is
really important.
And of course the more you
attempt to screen it, the more
important, risque, and audacious the word becomes..
As Mr. Mate says, f-u-c-k is
not obscene in itself; it is rather
the connotation of the sexual
act which is obscene.
But of course the sexual act
is not obscene, if anything it is
a natural, possibly beautiful,
and obviously most necessary
function in life.
But if people like Mr. Shaw
continue to be offended by
words connoting sexual intercourse, they will continue to
connote sex as obscene, and
the taboo will remain, and
children will continue to whisper and giggle at "dirty" words
in back alleys.
Moreover, if Mr. Shaw and
his fellow Victorians really
want a truly obscene four letter word to get hot and bothered about, may I recommend
the word K-I-L-L.
MARCIA MACAULAY
arts 2
Mike  again
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Well done, Dr. Goebbels.
I am writing this letter before the CUS referendum
polls close, to say your Tuesday CUS issue (which the AMS
president assured council on
Monday would be "objective")
had a far from impartial impact. (Boylan's personal diatribe didn't bother me; in fact
his castigation of my record
was delightful, in that he served two years on my council
and another as AMS VP, and
never got beyond empty rhetoric and interdepartmental
memos on the same issues.
But your failure to print an
anti-CUS article by a member
of students' council after you
had promised to print it disturbs me.
And I would appreciate a
printed apology from whoever
was responsible for the frontpage story that included my
name as a CUS rally speaker,
since the first I had heard of
this "commitment" was on
reaching campus at 1:15 p.m.
that day.
(Which is Ubyssey policy: to
print falsehoods deliberately,
or merely not to bother checking the truth of their information with the people concerned?)
Now that the fuss and
feathers have settled somewhat, I presume (perhaps optimistically) that you will permit a few remarks as to the
pro-CUS Big Lie technique so
ably utilized:
(1) CUS is still  opposed to
the student loan plan in principle (source: CUS pres. Armstrong at council Monday),
despite recent claims that it
engineered the plan (pardon
the pun).
(2) CUS did not get the
provincial sales tax taken off
texts (a provincial tax! The
authors of this blatant balderdash didn't even restrict their
lies to areas of ambiguity.)
I'm not sure which is a
greater problem — an ineffective CUS or an irresponsible
Ubyssey.
MIKE COLEMAN
President University
Clubs Committee
U.B.C. Beauty Salon
In The Village
Hairpieces
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Open  Tues. - Sat. Tel. Q28-8942
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FALL FAIR
EVENT:
"THE FLOODING
OF FLORENCE"
NOV.  4th.   1967   MARKS  THE   FIRST
ANNIVERSARY   OF  THIS   EVENT.
The film will be shown:
Friday—7:15 p.m.
Saturday—4:45 p.m.
FALL FAIR
EVENT:
THE
JAPANESE TEA
CEREMONY
AUDIENCE  LIMITED BY SPACE
FRIDAY: 8:00 P.M.
SATURDAY: 2 AND 5 P.M.
DR. LAURIER LAPIERRE
Speaks on
The New Politics Confronting Canada
THURSDAY - NOV. 2 - NOON (12:30) - ANGUS 110
Lecture - Discussion - Questions
SPECIAL EVENTS Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 2, 1967
^PART/V//C.
OF
PRAVDAfi^
"/Is f see if, Yevlushenko, your problem is
that your poems don't lose enough in the
translation.''''
—from the Peak
ANOTHER
LETTER
Why?
By VLADIMIR VASCHEK
It's a small point Miss Blair.
Being hungry and short of cash, Ruthie, I risked my money
on your bacon and tomato sandwich. (The price has dropped a
nickel to 35 cents in recent days!)
But when it arrived, Miss Blair, the sandwich was bare.
Of bacon, that is, except for one shrivelled slice. Huge slabs of
tomato. Delicious tomatoes!
But only one slice of bacon?
It is maybe like the proverbial pork and beans, Miss Blair,
with a small rind of pork thrown in to avoid the more stringent
of our misleading advertising laws?
(My guess is food services got stung with a car load of
tomatoes and the price of pigs being what it is the student gets
shaved when he buys a bacon and tomato sandwich.)
At least, Ruthie, mark it on the menu, "Tomato with Bacon."
Nobody wants to mislead diners about food services food. Right?
As I said, Miss Blair, it's a small point.
Editor, The Ubyssey:
As an arts student and a
member of the arts undergraduate society, I would like to
point out to all Alma Mater
Society members what is being done by the AMS budget. The AMS budget, which
is a statement of where the
$29, each of you pay to the
AMS will go, has not allocated any money to the largest
undergraduate society o n
campus.
The AUS, representing 4,709
students, was elected by the
students of the arts faculty
last year to plan a program
for them. Naturally they
understood that any such program was to be subsidised by
the AMS with part of the $29
each of them paid. They even
realised that such an amount
was not going to be sufficient
to carry on the plans that
were pending and voted to
have another $2 from each of
them go directly to the AUS.
Now, the budget committee to the AMS has submitted
a budget which grants nothing to a body of students who
have already paid them over
$135,000!
Why must we pay for nothing? Aren't we, in effect, subsidising other undergrad societies without being given
the same consideration by
them? Why is this kind of
discrimination allowed to go
on in a democracy?
S. MITCHELL
arts 4.
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
THE BEATLES ALBUM
"OLYMPIA"
PIZZA
SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
2599 W. Broadway
DINING ROOM
Take Out
Service
BUY 3 PIZZAS
GET 1 FREE
Only $3.58
The Record Gallery
at
ROBSON NEAR BURRARD
Dine with music till two a.m.
1312 S.W. Marine Dr., Vancouver 14, B.C.       -     261-7951
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
COMMERCE
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held with
Geology and Geophysics students in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and
post-graduate years.
On November 22, 23 and 24
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONTARIO
THOMPSON, MANITOBA
rr
CHELSEA GIRLS
Andy Warhol's Shocking Movie !
A Masterpiece ?! Or a Put-on !
YOU MUST SEE IT-ONE OF THE MOST TALKED-
ABOUT ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN YEARS.
3 Showings in UBC's Aud.
NOV. 10 — FRI. — 1:30 & 7:30
NOV. 14 — TUES. — 7:30
AT S.F.U.-NOV. 18-7:30
Students & Staff $1.50
Others $2.00
SPECIAL   EVENTS Thursday, November 2, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
TIMES   A-CHANGING
CYC  means social  change
By BILL GRAF
At a time of year when campus interviews for
positions in selling toothpaste and manufacturing
napalm are taking place, the role of the Company
of Young Canadians seems particularly significant.
The CYC offers $35 per month wages plus room
and board and a monthly honorarium of $50 on
completion of two years' service. Fringe benefits
include medical expenses, two weeks' vacation,
life insurance, transportation costs and an annual
$100 clothing allowance.
CROWN CORPORATION
A crown corporation created by an Act of Parliament in July, 1966, the organization offers Canadian youth direct and personal involvement in the
immediate problems of poverty, racial discrimination, unrealistic education and underprivileged social
groups.
Essentially CYC is concerned
with social change.
In a statement of its aims the
Company deplores the dehumanizing aspects of technology, the proliferation of bureaucracies and
"the blatant contradictions of the
modern world — the existence side
by side of poverty and plenty, of
justice and oppression, of freedom
and authoritarianism."
"Yet these contradictions," the'
statement continues, "strike at the very heart of
contemporary technological thought; namely, the
inevitability of progress ... We doubt the criteria
which people use to justify this concept. Too often
these criteria appear to be quantitative things.
"Often 'progress' seems to foe defined only in
material terms, with little or no reference to human
values or relationships   among individuals."
The Company seeks to better the social, economic
and cultural needs of individuals and communities
to help people learn to control their own destinies
and to establish "a society in which diversity and
variety are at the basis of human life."
To do this, it operates from a maximally decentralized system of Organization which is in fact
run by its members and in which ultimate responsibility rests with the individual volunteer worker.
INVOLVEMENT AND SELFHELP
The CYC's methods are total involvement and
self-help. Volunteers live and work among their host
communities, working with and not for them; assisting, not imposing.
Most of its projects originate as requests from
citizens' groups, government departments or voluntary agencies who supply the materials or funds
while the CYC pays the salary and expenses of its
personnel.
One of the Company's five national offices is in
a second-floor office at 1929 W. Broadway. Headed
GRAF
by ex-social worker Geoff Cue, the Vancouver office
co-ordinates the eight CYC projects in B.C.
Dorothy Hill, 28, a registered nurse and one of
the Company's first volunteers, described these projects in an interview.
A Vancouver post-release center for Indian ex-
convicts operated by Ross Eadie aims at compensating for the shortage of probation officers.
Eadie's job is to assist the ex-con in returning
to "normal" society — giving advice, finding jobs,
arranging further training and, according to Miss
Hill, "mainly just being there when he's needed."
Volunteers in Project Outreach work with Vancouver Boys' Clubs on street programs for teenagers. Under Jim Patterson of Halifax the group
formed a dance band that played with others at the
PNE last summer.
Maeve Hancey helps public-housing tenants in
developing their own self-help measures. In Penticton, Roy Daniels works with youth in originating a
coffee-house and teen drop-in center.
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
The Victoria project has assisted in housing and
finding jobs for destitute hippies, and in promoting
youth activities of all kinds.
The Cormorant Island Project in Alert Bay
under Dal Brodhead was the subject of a Star Weekly (Sept. 2, 1967) feature article. In this project
Brodhead has succeeded in becoming involved in so
many activities that the project might be termed
"community development."
Within a few months Brodhead has become
an accepted member of the community, been
"adopted" by a local Indian family, organized weekly teen dances, provided sports and games for
younger children, formed a study group of ex-
dropouts while persuading others to return to school,
participated in community activities from cleaning
bees to chopping wood, supplemented the area's
social services, acted as legal counsel for underprivileged juveniles and assisted in rehabilitation
effort, and acted as intermediary between the community and higher levels of government.
FREE SCHOOLS
And the Company works in two "free schools,"
one in North Van, the other — termed "Knowplace"
occupies a large two-story house at 2426 York, employs a staff of 22.
Conceived and developed by a group of Point
Grey parents and representatives of the CYC, Know-
place represents a revolutionary approach to education at the high-school level.
There are no structured classes and students learn
what they want to at their own pace. Field trips,
direct experience and creativity are its methods.
"At Knowplace," says Miss Mill, "the teacher
will ask the student 'Will you help me do so-and-so'
and not 'Do this!' "
Characteristic of CYC projects, the free schools
attempt to give individuals the equipment to develop
their own latent capabilities.
No one pretends that the Company has enjoyed
an unbroken string of successes.
"Any new public agency is bound to be controversial to the extent that it receives government
aid," says Miss Hill.
In its first year the CYC has been granted a
$1.2 million budget, which it has managed to reduce
to $850,000 or about $12,000 per volunteer, which
is expected to drop to $8,000 in two years.
GREATEST PROBLEMS
One of the greatest problems is defining projects
and the role of the volunteer. Since the CYC stands
outside standard government agencies, is relatively
new and not yet popularly accepted, the individual
worker often complains of being isolated, unable to
define his role, and of lack of support.
Occasionally volunteers unsuitable for the Company's demanding work have been randomly
selected and placed in difficult situations, which has
resulted in a number of resignations and abandonment of projects.
There are no formal qualifications for volunteers.
The Company recruits from campuses, from labor
and white-collar, from minority and majority groups,
wherever young Canadians are.
Young means anyone over 18. The oldest CYC
volunteer is 52.
On the other hand volunteers must be energetic,
idealistic and realistic. They must be more than
aware of social problems; they must have a sincere
and active desire to correct them.
But the volunteer's activities, in Cue's words,
are a two-edged sword. On the one hand, he helps
solve human problems. On the other he receives
a learning experience which can profoundly affect
his own life: working with all types of people,
translating theory into practice and doing selfless,
dedicated work.
WHITE MIDDLE-CLASS
"Most of us come from white middle-class environments," says Miss Hill, "knowing little of the
rest of society.
"Here we learn to work with and understand all
types of people and get immersed in something we
believe in."
Miss Hill eloquently summarized her reasons for
joining the CYC, reasons which more or less apply
to most volunteers.
A former nurse, she felt that even her profession
was too depersonalized and unrewarding.
"I think people are more worthwhile than machines and computers," she says, "and I wanted to
get directly involved in humanity.
"Financial support is important in helping
people," says Miss Hill, "but is strictly limited. You
can't rehabilitate an alcoholic or restore an Indian's
dignity with money. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 2, 1967
— Jvan tomlyoi photo
THE EDUCATION FLOAT in Saturday's Homecoming parade was of PNE calibre according to
the judges. EUS officers say they have been offered substantial amounts of money for their
first prize float.
Child day care centre vetoed
A day nursery for UBC's married students'
children at St. Anselm Anglican Church has been
vetoed by the church's vestory.
The vestory, or executive of the parish, turned
down the proposal for a day care centre after it
was opposed toy the sanctuary guild.
The guild is a group of 39 women who prepare the church for Sunday services, funerals
and weddings.
Guild president Majorie Rae said members
would not be able to carry out their work if
the centre was instituted.
"We have ironing to do, flowers to arrange
and kitchen duties to attend to," she said.
Guild vice-president Dory Best said the daycare centre was the university's responsibilty.
Jim Marshall, in charge of church insurance,
asked in a letter why the church should help university students when the hall could ibe used by
the parish.
"Now we see what kind of a parish we are,
unwilling to inconvenience ourselves for the sake
of others,"  said C.  P. Taylor, member  of the
church committee of St. Anselm's.
Gov't hush heaved
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (CUP-CPS)—The U.S.
air force has cancelled a research project at the
University of Minnesota which was so secret that
the university's newly selected president didn't
even know what it was.
When the president, Malcolm Moos, found out
about the project, he objected strongly, and said
he didn't want the university to be involved in
secret  government  research.
But the air force said it cancelled renewal
of the two-year $200,000 contract because of lack
of funds, not Moos' objections.
The Minnesota Daily learned the contract
involved methods of interrogation, humans were
used as subjects, and the campus police were involved.
THE INTERNATIONAL FALL FAIR
PROGRAMME
FRIDAY, NOV. 3rd
7:00 p.m.
OPENING
7:15
FILM: The Flooding of Florence, Italy
(Upper Lounge, International House.)
8:00
JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
(Lower Lounge, I.H.)
9:00
FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
10:00
FASHION SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
11:15
FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
SATURDAY, NOV. 4th
12:00 midnight    CLOSED until 2:00 p.m. Saturday.
2:00 p.m. JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
(Nitobe   Memorial   Gardens,   Admission    at
International House.)
3:30 Combined FASHION and FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, International House.)
4:45 FILM: The Flooding of Florence. (To be intro
duced by the Italian Consul General.)
5:00 JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY
(Lower Lounge, I.H.)
6:30 FLOORSHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
7:30 Final Combined FASHION and FLOOR SHOW
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
9:00 DANCE to the Trinidad "MOONLIGHTERS."
(Upper Lounge, I.H.)
Stop in any time for a light snack in the
INTERNATIONAL RESTAURANT
Lower Lounge
STUDENTS .50 ADULTS $1.00
West Mall at
Northwest Marine on Campus
BANNED
HIGH
BANNED
NOV. 2, 3, 7, 8-12:30 and 8:00
AUD. — ADM. $1.00
Restricted — AMS, Faculty or
Staff Cards must be shown
@ Westinghouse
Will Be on Campus November 7, 1967
to Interview 1968 Commerce Graduates
(Marketing and Industrial Administration Options)
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility in:
COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS
PRODUCTION
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional  salary  scale  and  increases  based  on   performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information, brochures and interview appointment.
IT'S MORE FUN TO
SEE WITHOUT GLASSES
<m> CONTACT LENSES
Vent-Air lenses have no frames to slip or slide. They're virtually unbreakable while worn. They have four air vents for
better circulation of the eye's natural moisture and air so
necessary for proper wear. And best of all, they don't "hide"
your eyes.
NOW BY POPULAR DEMAND!-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you Will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today. . . you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Mon. A Thurs. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg.
1030 W. Georgia Street        u BC 11/z
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
Please send me your fret Illustrated booklet
and the cost of invisible lenses.
CALL
MU 3-7207
FOR
FULL
DETAILS
▲
BIFOCALS, TOO!
SM
miss?
Mrs.
Miss-
Address-
City.
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OFFICES THROUGHOUT U.S.*. AND CIWM Thursday, November 2, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
PANGO-PANGO (UNS)—The purple suede blopgs Wednesday approached the -opalescent puce blorgs to establish porna-
graphic relations. First reports indicate these hitherto unindulged
actions were a horny success.
— kurt hilger photo
THINGS ARE ROUGH all over. Even buildings and grounds workers are forced to take to the
wagon to rake leaves for something to do. We've heard of make work but this is ridiculous.
Parking control plan 'unacceptable
LONDON (UNS) — Parking controls will not
be instituted at the University of Western Ontario
as planned.
In a letter to facutly, staff and students
Oct. 25, university president D. Carlton Williams
withdrew the deadline for a temporary system of
fees and controls announced last week.
The letter said: "Obviously my proposal has
Safe  to  sniff?
One can't be too careful when checking what
.ne sniffs these days.
iDu Pont of Canada has issued a strong warning about sniffing vapors from products labelled
safe to use for other purposes.
Fluorocarbon 12, used as a refrigerant and
aerosol propellant, has harmed many people
who inhale concentrated quantities for phyche-
ielic effects.
turned out to be unacceptable. It has been widely
interpreted apparently as a 'foot in the door'
dodge."
Student cars were barred from the UWO
campus Oct. 24 following a protest park-in.
Students were protesting the parking regulations and the way they were imposed. A $12 students fee was imposed with no student consultation.
Western had never previously had parking
fees.
Western had never previously had parking
ations with the staff association, university students' council, society of graduate students,
masters of 'business administration association
and the faculty association on the parking question.
Williams said that since summer meetings
"everybody has changed their mind so they're
squawking. We'd better get back to the drawing
board."
£2£____l:_ ___P' lJ|i»d_:_4__fc_fJ_£_C___Ei____
.^m$
for-cliemisJs and engineers in the
only solution potash mining company
in the world today
Our representative will be on your
campus for interviews
NOVEMBER 7th
Details are available in the student
placement office.
Kalium Chemicals Limited
@ Westinghouse
will be on Campus November 6, 7 and 8, 1967
to interview 1968 Engineering Graduates
ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL - PHYSICS
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
QUALITY CONTROL AND TEST
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit plans.
Contact rhe Placement Office for detailed information,
brochures and interview appointment.
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY
BIRD CALLS
1967-!«*•
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Publications Office, Brock Hall
or UBC Bookstore
Pre-Sale Ticket Holders Must Claim Their Books
at Publications Of lice. Page 10
THE      U BYSSEY
Thursday, November 2, 1967
LAW JOURNAL
A flea to irritate the mind
A new law journal designed to make students
and faculty scratch their heads has appeared on
campus.
Carey Linde, editor of the Flea, said Wednesday he hopes the new law students' association
publication will irritate people's minds.
An editorial in the first edition released this
week says the journal aims to bring law education up to date and end traditional teacher-
student rivalry in the faculty of law.
"The faculty must concern itself less with the
game of being faculty and the students should
concern themselves less with being students," it
says.
Linde said in an interview that the faculty
U of S works it out
SASKATOON <CUP) — Officials from the
University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan government have agreed to -work out a
system of fiscal consultation.
Education minister J. C. Mclsaac, and chairman Allan Tubby of the U of S board of governors, said changes in university budgeting
procedures can be made without altering the
university's independence.
Saskatchewan premier Ross Thatcher stated
Oct. 18 his intention to "reform our university
act in a major way."
"The government is satisfied that the past
budgeting procedures of the university have resulted in careful scrutiny of university expenditures," said the Mclsaac-Tubby release.
"With increasing costs, it is mutually agreed
that there should be developed an even better
and more continuous system of consultation and
reporting."
The release is viewed by some observers as
as a step back from the original government announcement of direct financial control.
of law must come into closer contact with the
rest of the university.
"We hope the Flea will contribute to a cross-
faculty dialogue that will also bring law students
and faculty closer together.
"Law has been steeped in tradition for 100
years and law education has suffered as a result.
People don't give money to law schools like they
do to libraries and medical schools."
The Flea will try to help students get more
out of their three years in law school than they
do at present, Linde said. "Many laws students
aren't as serious as they should be."
Although the law student's association actively supports the Flea, it can't spare enough money
to publish the mimeographed journal.
"We'll have to solicit donations from students and faculty.
"We hope to avoid selling it by the issue."
The first issue has a circulation of 200. This
will be doubled next month.
Meanwhile, articles from law students and
faculty members as well as other students will
be welcome, Linde said.
Staff  crisis  seen
VICTORIA (CUP) — Canada will soon be facing a university staff crisis.
Harry Scargill, head of the University of
Victoria's graduate school, says Canadian graduate schools must expand quickly to prevent
undergraduate programs from suffering.
"Canada is not turning out enough graduates
to staff three British Columbia universities next
year," he said.
He said approximately half UVic's staff was
trained outside Canada.
"How long can we expect American universities to throw open their doors to Canadians
when their own students are clamoring to get
in ?" asked Scargill.
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
Tutoring in All Subjects-
Individual
No  Contracts
Mr. L. J. Leddy
B.A., M.A.,  B.L.S.  Director
Canadian Tutorial Centre        736-6913
NEWLY RENOVATED
Featuring Canadian and Greek Cuisine
For your evening enjoyment a great
new band from Greece.
Introducing one of the famous
singers from Athens
GEORGIA KUVLOUKAKI
ASTOR RESTAURANT
921 GRANVILLE
685-8714
THE INTERNATIONAL FAIR
Bring Your Spoon
This Friday and Saturday at
International House
50
PAPA BEARS
LOYALISTS
FRI. & SAT. 9-2 A.M.
RETINAL CIRCUS
1024 DAVIE
c
FOR GIRLS
X
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offers careers in
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
campus interviews on
November 6 and 7
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
Engineering
(Chemical, Mechanical, Civil)
Honours Geology
Geological Engineering
(Options 1. 2, 3)
Geophysics
Physics and Geology
Mathematics and  Physics
Honours Physics
Engineering Physics
—Permanent employment in
engineering.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geology.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geology
and/or geophysics
—Permanent and summer
employment in geophysics.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geology
and/or geophysics
—Permanent and summer
employment in geophysics.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geophysics.
—Permanent and summer
employment in geophysics.
Arrangement for Personal Interview may be
made through the
UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE
. "ft ivifi
**otteiioi<f
^"tfbagr'
:n»
RICHaRD LESTER'S ff
TiKlfttTC ©am
starring
jWCH^ iJlSJII II jyi I|;fIIDill.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT ONLY
L
Vogue
685-5434
CONTINUOUS SHOWINGS
FROM 12 NOON
SUNDAY FROM 2 P.M. Thursday, November 2, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
IF  YOUNGSTERS
. GET  INTERESTED
Field hockey has future here
Contrary to what you may
believe, field hockey, unlike
pregnancy, is not restricted to
women.
A good example of men's
field hockey was given the
few spectators who turned out
a week ago to see the touring
Australian National team play
the B.C. seconds at Spencer
Field.
Australia won 4-0 but as
coach Eric Broom, who also
coaches UBC's field hockey
program, said, the B.C. youngsters were not outplayed.
"They were under pressure
but they came through well,"
said Broom.
In fact we could have tied
the score at one-all early in the
game but David Johannson
missed the open net with a
wild drive. A wholly different
game may have resulted.
Almost the entire B.C. team
was made up of UBC players.
When these same Australians
played the much tougher B.C.
firsts on Saturday at Brockton, there were two present
members of the Birds and
seven former members in the
B.C. lineup.
The Australians won that
one too, this time by a 5-2
scorfe but three of those goals
were scored on an empty B.C.
net.
In international field hockey,
substitution is not allowed so
when B.C. goalie Harry Preston  was   ejected  for   arguing
with the referee, the Aussies
were able to score three cheap
goals.
Broom says it should have
been a draw or 3-2 for the
Aussies.
"The 5-2 score was a little
hard to take," said Broom.
UBC players have dominated the field hockey scene in
Vancouver for years. This
year the Birds were split up
into two teams to even out the
competition.
But in spite of their domination here, Broom says they
need      to play    international
competition to remain sharp.
Private schools have field
hockey teams for boys but not
so at local high schools.
When four high schools
form boys' field hockey teams
then the Vancouver Athletic
Association will put the game
on a league schedule.
"It will be good for Canada
to have these young developing players with international
experience," said Broom.
"In a couple of years, Canada will be a force to be reckoned with in international field
hockey."
Braves win second
of hockey season
The UBC ice hockey Braves put on their scoring skates
Monday night at the Winter Sports Center and left the ice with
a 12-3 victory over the Richmond Flyers.
The Braves fired 48 shots at the hapless Richmond goalie
while UBC goalie Mike Luchenko stopped 38 in a wide open
contest.
Dwayne Biagioni led the Braves with three goals. Wes
Borkowski had two and Ernie Lawson, Wayne G'Froerer, Frank
Lanzarotta, Mike Darnbourgh, Chris Latham, Tom Lewis, and
Larry Watts had one each.
The Braves were leading 2-0 after the first period and had
a 4-0 lead going into the third frame.
Coach Andy Bakogeorge was impressed by the team's win
although he said it took them till the third period to really get
going.
"They're a much improved team," said Bakogeorge. "AU
three forward lines are going well."
The victory was the second straight in league play for the
Braves. They had previously beaten Ladner 5-2.
Soccer story remains same
It was the same old soccer story on Saturday.
With a chance to move into sole position of
first place in the Pacific Coast Soccer League,
the Birds made some basic errors and played
to a 0-0 tie with North Shore United.
"Our team felt they could win easily but
didn't play good tactical soccer," said coach Joe
Johnson.
He added he was happy with the tie since
North Shore could have won the game.
"We underestimated the opposition," said
Johnson.
As a result the Birds are now tied for first
place with Westminster and Burnaby Villa. Each
team has four points.
Columbus is second with three points. Victoria has two, North Shore one and Firefighters
are pointless.
According to Johnson, the league is going
to be very close and competitive this year. The
number'of ties in play so far seems to bear out
this prediction.
The Birds will try to break the first place
tie in their favor when they play Westminster
on Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium.
The Tomahawks beat North Burnaby Legion
2-0 in their Sunday game.
Miyron Rozumiak and Many Vartnou scored
the goals for the Tomahawks.
POST HALLOWE'EN
BASH
VUqhL J/tavv (FLswhiv
UNITED EMPIRE
LOYALISTS
ARMOURIES, SAT.. NOV.   4     8:30-12:00 / d*$1.50 / 0 $1.00
ApoJit talk
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyscey Sports Editor
Another chapter was written on Saturday in the continuing
story of the Blunderbirds.
For those of you who didn't see the so-called football game
in Thunderbird Stadium, the Blunderbirds is the new name
for the UBC Thunderbirds.
It was a stupid call by coach Frank Gnup which lead to the
Birds' loss but he was not the lone goat. A few of the UBC
players have to share the horns with Gnup.
The boners started when the Birds received the first Saskatchewan'punt. We received the ball and a penalty for having
too many men on the field.
The Birds continued to have trouble with punts for on
their first punt of the game, Gnup apparently forgot to tell the
team they were playing Canadian rules not American.
The result was a no-yards penalty against the Birds.
But did they learn from this booboo? No. The Birds got
two more no-yards penalties in the first half.
Statistically, the Blunderbirds won  over the Huskies.
They had more first downs: 7 to 6; more yards rushing:
116 to 62; and more yards passing: 47 to 19.
If they had had more brains, they would've beaten the inept
Saskatchewan team.
The call to try a field goal from the Saskatchewan 42, with
two minutes left in the game, was Gnup's mistake and it led to
the silly Saskatchewan touchdown.
Gnup's promised secret offense didn't materialize. Said
Gnup, after the game, "We were going to run it on the very
first play of the game, but we ran some other damn play
instead."
The Birds have two games remaining in which to make up
their minds and start playing football.
Birds wrestle with problem
in Saturday s muscle meet
The UBC Thunderbird wrestling team faces its first competition of the season this Saturday in the wrestling room of the
new Thunderbird Stadium.
The Birds will be fighting a team from Royal Roads which
includes several experienced wrestlers from Ontario. They are
expected to give the Thunderbirds strong competition.
The UBC team will be composed of Wayne Gilmer at 123
lbs.; Wayne Cave at 130; Denny Boulton at 137; Peter Rom-
bough at 145; Dave Gray at 152; Dirk Heiss at 160; Paul Degraff
at 167; Les Burgener at 177, and Bill Boyd at 191.
Chris Nemeth will wrestle in the heavyweight division.
First bouts begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday.
eon*
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
• Full Dining
Facilities
• Take
Home
Service
• Try Our
Pizza
"Pick Up"
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS
12:45 to_2:45 pjn.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
♦Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205 Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 2, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
The new politics
a la LaPierre
SPECIAL EVENTS
Dr. Laurier La Pierre speaks
on  the  new  politics  confronting Canada today, noon, Ang.
110.
ARTS COUNCIL
The new issue of the Moon
is now available in JSM
lounge, Buchanan building,
(free, of course).
Hear a reading performance
in JSM lounge (formerly Bu.
lounge) of Macbird, starring
John Linton as the infamous
LBJ. (free) Thursday noon.
CIASP
Finance meeting for all members, Friday, noon, Bu. 1221.
PHOTOGRAPHIC  SOC
Important general meeting
for all members, today, noon,
Bu. 202.
SEX AND PORNOGRAPHY
COUNCIL
Mayor Campbell — fraud or
enlightened censor? Copies of
Playboy will be distributed tonight,, 8 p.m., Place Vanier
lounge.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Karl Burau on What Is
Wrong with Canada and Human Nature, today, 1:30-2:30,
Bu. 202.
Fees upped
for quality
at Stanford
STANFORD, Calif. (UNS) —
A year's tuition at Stanford
University here will increase
to $1,920 from $1,770 starting in September, 1968.
Room and board, $1,140 for
1967 - 68, is not expected to
increase, said vice-president -
finance, Kenneth M. Cuthbert-
son.
Tuition income covers less
than half the private university's educational costs, he
said.
"The costs of providing a
high quality education are
high and becoming higher,
particularly in the areas of
faculty compensation and supporting services such as libraries, computers, and laboratories.
"Like many of our sister institutions, we have relied on
tuition to provide approximately 40 to 50 per cent of
annual educational costs.
"Unlike many others, Stanford, as a younger university,
has been unable to rely on endowment income to the same
extent and has had to make up
the difference by attracting
expendable gifts from alumni,
friends, foundations, and corporations."
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ED US
Folk concert with Ann Morti-
fee and Joe Mock, noon, today,
ed. 100. Admission, 25 cents.
DEMOLAY CLUB
General    njeeting    for    all
Demolays,   Friday,   noon,   Bu.
223.
SQUASH CLUB
Fall squash tournament, Jericho   Tennis    Club,    Saturday,
6 p.m. Members only.
COMMERCE UNDERGRAD
Starting tonight,  an informal   sports   evening   for   commerce students, 9:30 - 11 p.m.,
women's gym.
GERMAN CLUB
Booth    decorating    for    fall
fair in Pan Hellenic house, today.
ATC ALUMNI
First organizational meeting
will   be   held   at   1450   S.W.
Marine Drive, tonight, 10 p.m.
Refreshments will be served.
SAILING CLUB
Come to hut B-3 to find location of the party Friday night.
SCM
Billy    Liar,    scheduled    for
Sunday  night,   has  been   cancelled.
GOLF TEAM
Girls   interested   in   playing
golf   should   contact   Marilyn
Palmer,   261-0017,   or   Lauris
Annes, OR 8-1115.
CARIBBEAN  STUDENTS
General   meeting,   noon   today, IH music room.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Gymkhana   meeting,   today,
noon, chem. 250.
EL  CIRCULO
Meeting today, noon, IH 402
or 404.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Discussion on the problems
of modern Japan and speaker
John Howes of Asian studies
at the meeting, 8 p.m., Friday,
1032 Davie.
MUSSOC
Anyone   interested  in   doing
publicity for Half a Sixpence,
meet    in    clubroom,    Friday,
noon.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Regular     meeting,     Friday,
noon, IH 206.
NEWMAN CLUB
Hard Times mixer with live
band, Friday, 9 to 1, St. Mark's
College lounge. Bring a pal.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
PuST-HALLOWEEN BASH, November 4th, Armouries: Night Train
Revue, United Empire Loyalists.
8:30-12:00,   $1.50,   Girls   $1.00.
THE YARDBIRDS (ANTONIONI'S)
choice for "Blow Up". Mother
Tuckers Yellow Duck, The Wiggy
Symphony plus Just Everybody will
be at the P.N.E. Garden Auditor-
ium Nov.   10 and  11.  8:30-1:00  p.m.
CHECK THIS PAPER FOR THE
Pall Pair programme: Thirteen programme Items over two days, all
for .50 per day. Dance at 9:00 p.m.
Sat.,   Nov.   4th   at I.H^	
HARD TIMES MIXER, LIVE BAND
Fri., Nov. 3, 9 to 1 in St. Mark's
College  Lounge.	
GOLDILOCKS! LEAVE YOUR PC-lT
ridge and come to see Papa Bear,
this weekend at Retinal Circus.
Also United Empire Loyalists Friday and Saturday 9:00 p.m. til 2
a.m.   Girls   50c.   Guys   $2,00.	
TOTEM PARK DANCE FRIDAY,
Nov. 3. 9:00-12:30. Band Intensions.   Admission  A.M.S.  75c.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956   CADILLAC   4-DOOR  GOOD  EN-
gine,     trans.      P.B.,     P.S.     Radio,
W,W.'s,   $525.  Phone   291-1059.
WALKING? THEN BUY 1956 DODGE
good running order, tires, clutch.
Big V-8. $120.00. 987-3997 after 7
p.m.
1959 VANGUARD IN EXCELLENT
condition. City tested. Call Wendy
261-4653.
FOR SALE 1957 TR-3. GUY, 224-7858-
4968 Chanc. Blvd. $600. Radio. Disc
brakes.  New  paint.  S.  belts.
Greetings
 12
RICK: MANY HAPPY RETURNS OF
your 22nd Birthday. I shall love
you always.  Your Missy.
HAPPY   21st   TO   THE   LOVELIEST
pair  of  brown   eyes. Francis.
Lost & Found 13
LOST   A SLIDE    RULE   WITH~~ VIC
Wilson on   outside   of   case.   Phone
Brenda please 224-9871.   Reward  offered.
LOST OCT. 23, BETWEEN ANGUS
Bldg. and lot behind Freddy Wood
Theatre or 4300 Blk. W. 10th. Gold
Link Chain Bracelet. Family keepsake. Reward. Mrs. Reljic. HE 3-
8759, 6550 St. Charles PI., Burnaby
B.C.
LADIES WATCH LOST 3rd LEVEL
stacks. Sentimental value. Reward
offered.   CR   8-6460.
LOST OCT. 22, 1967. GOLD GRUEN
Watch in Curriculum Lab. Education Bldg. Reward. Contact 298-
1155.
FOUND GIRL'S WATCH FIELD
House Fri., Oct. 27. Phone Joe
EUS   228-3818.
BRACELET FOUND SAT. NIGHT
at Homecoming Dance in Armour.   Claim   at   Publications    Office.
Motorcycles
26
BMW   1963   250cc   $450.   EXCELLENT
cond.   224-0534.
FOR SALE NORTON 650cc. NEW
tires, chains, compet. clutch. Motor
perfect.   731-9630.   Aft.   6   p.m.
BULTACO LEASE TO OWN, $9
per week. No deposit required. Repairs all bikes. Open 9-9. 54th &
Victoria    Drive,   Amor,   327-9111.
Copying & Duplicating
31
Miscellaneous
32
STATIONERY - ART SUPPLIES -
Gift & Party Shop. See Walter's
Stationery, 2910 W. Broadway. Ph.
733-4516.
JETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
6671   anytime.
SEX ! ANGLICANS UNITE ! A.T.C.
alumni residents meeting at the
Arms tonight at 10:00 p.m. Topic
discussion — "Benefits of Life
at   A.T.C."
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandals
 37
LARRY KENT'S HIGH TUES., OCT"
31 to Fri., Nov. 3. Nov. 1 & 8 12:30,
8:00.   Aud.   $1.00.	
FREE—KITTENS WILL DELIVER.
Phone   732-6719.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
84
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.	
WILL TUTOR IN SPANISH—
also conversational Spanish.
Please   phone   688-1898.	
SPECIAL INSTRUCTION BY NIGHT
Train Revue, United Empire Loyalists: Saturday 8:30-12:00; $1.50, girls
$1.00.   Armouries.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliance*.
Also complete repair service for all
makes and  models.
McIVER Appliances Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931. 	
STUDENT DESK, TYPEWRITER,
new electric Sunbeam shaver, golf
clubs. One dozen new 1.50 golf balls.
Electric shoe shiner. 733-2088 after
7 p.m.	
WOODEN SKIS — NEW BASE
complete with Harness — also
girls double boots. All for $40.
AM  6-2784.	
OLYPUS PENF HALFRAME SLR
with normal lens and 105mm tele,
$125; Nikon 28mm wide, $125;
Sixtar lightmeter, $25; or offers?
Phone Bill,  224-1869.   	
A SLIDE RULE IN A BLUE CASE
in the vicinity of Hebb. Reward
offered. Please return. Phone 435-
1168.
FOUND IN BU. 106 AFTER NEED-
hams talk on Mon. Umbrella, Claim
in   Ubyssey   Office.	
JOHN    TURNER
Here   next   week.
LOST PAIR OF BROWN GLASSES
near MacMillan Building. Phone
224-1509.	
LOST SPANISH 100 TEXT IN E.M.A.
Finder  please   call   owner,   733-5400.
THE
FAIR IS NOT
JUST A
NAME
FIND OUT
WHY
THIS FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY
RETINAL CIRCUS IS NOT LOST.
You can find it and lots of other
n'ee people and things to do at
1024 Davie. Friday and Saturday.
9-2 a.m.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30 - 6 p.m., Saturday 'til
5:30.
NOT JUST ANOTHER CAMPUS
Event! Come to the International
Fair  and  see  for  yourself.
WE DONT TRY VERY HARD!
BUT WE WILL VENTURE OUT
ON COLD RAINY NIGHTS
(Or   almost   anytime   for   that   matter)
TO  DELIVER  YOUR  SCHOOL  SUPPLIES,   SHAMPOO,  FILMS,
FLASHBULBS, SOME MORE MIXER OR EVEN PRESCRIPTIONS
•  ANYWHERE  ON   CAMPUS • AT   NO  CHARGE  TO  YOU
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
IN THE VILLAGE PHONE 224-3202
ALL THOSE INTERESTED IN
participating in the Japanese Tea
Ceremony at International Fair
this weekend. Sign list at I. House.
Number   of   participants   is   limited.
GET HIGH IN THE AUD. TUE sT,
Oct. 31 to Fri., Nov. 3. 12:30, 8:00.
Aud.   $1.00.
BARTY AND HAGER ARE SO
pleased that P.C. had such a giant
time  at the  Wed,  night  affair.
IS SOCRATES DEAD ? Where hid-
eth the six-toed mystic ? The IHJB
naf   blue.	
LARRY KENT'S HIGH IN THE
aud. Nov. 2 & 3, 7 & 8, 12:30, 8:00
adm.   $1.00.
Typewriter  Repairs
39
ANDERSON   TYPEWRITER
SERVICE
TYPEWRITERS
ADDING  MACHINES
NEW    AND'   RECONDITIONED
REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
Free   Estimates Reasonable  Rates
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
185   West   Broadway 879-7815
Across  from  Zephyr  Motors
Service  Centre
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER — SMITH
Corona. Electra 120. Like new, used
less than 1 year. $140. Dr. Melton,
22.8-3536.	
SIZE 10 HADERER SKI BOOTS $140,
new $60; also Kastle and Head skis.
Contact   Al Vittery  988-8868.	
THIS WEEK ONLY. "CHARTER"
brand Recording tape, regular $2.74,
%"x900', 5" reel — Kam-Tap Sales
price $2.35 each. We also carry a
complete line of tape-recorders,
radios, etc. Call Bob Williams, 263-
9679  anytime.	
NEW TWELVE STRING GUITAR
and reverb, amp. for sale. 816 W.
Sth   Ave.   874-0744.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th   &  Granville).   263-4530.
FURN. STUDY-SLEEPING ROOM.
4593 W. 14th, 224-5410 after 5:00 p.m.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS FOR RENT.
Close to meals. 225-9662 (male) @
$40  mo.;  2250 Wesbrook.	
ROOM FOR RENT WITH OR WITH-
out board, student girl, non drinker.
Dunbar   area.   263-3143.	
MAIN FLOOR ROOM WITH KIT.
priv. for girl, at 24th & Macdonald.
Phone  733-4670.
Room & Board
82
FILM: ON THE FLOODING OF
Florence, Nov. 4th, 1966 will be
shown Nov. 4th, 1967 at the International   Fair,   4:45   p.m.
POST-HALLOWEEN BASH / November 4th / Armouries / Night
Train Revue, United Empire Loyalists / 8:30-12:30 / $1.50, Girls
$1.00.
CHECK THIS PAPER FOR THE
Fall Fair programme: Thirteen programme Items over two days. All
for   .50  per  day.
BANNED Larry Kent's HIGH. AUD.
Nov. 2 and 3, 7 and 8, 12:30, 8:00.
$1.00.   Restricted   to University.
DIRECT FROM BUNKER HILL
after a four hour battle — the
United Empire Loyalists, Friday
and Saturday at Retinal Circus.
Papa Bear's Medicine Show will be
there too! 9:00 p.m. 'til 2:00 a.m.
Girls  only  50   cents;   guys  $2.00.
Travel Opportunities
16
50 IS YOUR TICKET TO A UNIQUE
travel experience to over fifteen
foreign countries. This weekend at
the   Fall   Fair.
DON'T MISS THE JAPANESE TEA
Ceremony at the International Fall
Fair." Three performances only.
Friday. 8:00 p.m., Saturday, 2:00
and  5:00 p.m.
Wanted—Texts
17
INTRODUCTORY MYCOLOGY B Y
Alexopoulos. Used. Phone Shirley
876-1850   after   6.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type at home. Please contact
688-1898.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
page! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison  Rd. at University Blvd.  Mon. to
Fri.   9   to  5.   Phone:   228-8414.	
TYPING, ESSAYS, ETC. LOW
rates. Two drop points. (On cam-
pus   &  West   End).   Phone   683-2859.
ROOM AND BOARD, MALE STU-
dent, on campus. 5475 Agronomy
Road,   224-9667   after   six.	
QUIET PRIVATE STUDY — NO
children, good food — only serious
student need apply. 266-4056, near
McDonald bus, reasonable.
TYPING
Phone    731-7511—9:00    to   5:00.    266-
6662   after   6:00.
EXP. TYPISTS for MMS, THESES,
20c page. Call Betty 433-0669..
Bonnie   433-8190.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
EXPERIENCED TYPIST NEEDED
4 hours a day. Apply Prof. Dicker-
son,  Faculty of Daw.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male  or Female
53
Maths.  Tutors,  4th year or graduates,
GRADES   7   to  13
736-6923  —   4:30   -   7:30  P.M.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY — THE
Ubyssey requires a copy runner to
transport material to printers. Car
essential. Apply Murray McMillan,
Managing Editor, The Ubyssey,
Brock   Hall.
QUICK DRIVERS WHO KNOW
the campus needed to deliver one
or two evenings. Phone 224-0833
after   6   p.m.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED: GIRL TO SHARE FURN.
apt. with 3rd year student. Phone
Pam  732-5751.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished apartment near 4fh & Alma.
Phone  Judy,   733-6994.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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