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The Ubyssey Sep 14, 1973

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Array Wait, see attitude taken
Plant charges
AMS legal threat
'sabre-rattling'
By VAUGHN PALMER
The UBC administration has adopted a wait-and-see attitude after
Wednesday's Alma Mater Society rejection of a negotiated settlement
in the SUB lease dispute.
Board of governors member Paul Plant said Thursday he considers
'sabre-rattling' the possibility of the AMS resorting to legal arbitration
to settle the dispute over the agreement by which they lease SUB from
the administration.
"I would urge the society to take a long second look at arbitration,"
Plant said. "There are a lot of other things more important for them to
deal with."
Council is currently awaiting a legal opinion, due at the Sept. 19
meetiing, on AMS chances of winning their demands for increased
security and maintenance for SUB through legal arbitration.
The deal negotiated with the administration would have granted
these services in return for the administration gaining priority use for
#     SUB as a summer convention centre, and a 10 per cent cut of allJSUB
rental bookings.
Council members, who voted two-thirds in favor of rejecting the
agreement and awaiting the legal opinion, charged the percentage cut
of SUB bookings would set a bad precedent.
But Plant, who worked out the agreement with AMS negotiators,
claimed it is as fair as could be worked out, though he declined to
comment on specific clauses.
He said he would agree to continue negotiations if the AMS wishes,
but said he doesn't think there will be any more administration concessions.
"How do we know if we grant their demand (on percentages) they
4     won't demand withdrawal of another clause?"
F'lant said he is disappointed in the failure of the AMS negotiators,
including treasurer John Wilson and president Brian Loomes.
"Who do they represent?" Plant asked. "What's a deal? I thought
we had one."
Wilson admitted Thursday that his urging the AMS accept the
settlement Wednesday, represented a turnabout from his earlier
rejection of much the same settlement in June.
At that time Wilson had said the percentage clause would give the
administration a foot in the door from which they could increase their
cut.
"But I thought it over and realized they are granting a number of
services which we didn't have before," Wilson said.
^ "But at the same time, I admire the balls of council if they actually
take the administration to court."
AMS lawyer Brian Williams has estimated lease arbitration could
cost the society $2,500-$3,500.
Gov't to give
civil servants
strike right
^ VICTORIA (Staff) — In a throne speech bereft of detail, B.C.'s New
Democratic Party government Thursday gave its fall legislative
program a debut.
And at a pre-speech news conference, Premier Dave Barrett
refused to elaborate on his plans for the session.
Using the excuse that it would be inappropriate to comment on
specific bills until the opposition has had a chance to debate them,
Barrett would only admit to plans to grant civil servants the right to
strike.
A remark that it would be absurd to grant the right to strike while at
the same time telling them they weren't supposed to, indicated he has
no plans for an arbitration board.
For students there was no sign the government will move until the
» report of the John Bremer commission on post secondary education,
except some amendments to the public schools act which Barrett
dismissed as house cleaning.
Most important of the announced bills was a new labor code, though
no hint was given of what the code will contain.
At one point during the news conference, Barrett mentioned the
labor code would include a provision to ensure nobody will have to
compromise his religious beliefs to get a job.
In a departure from the traditional listing of bills, Barrett an-
m nounced his intention to hold a three-day public seminar on nuclear
energy.
Among those experts already invited to the session are Hannef
Alfven, a Swedish plasmaphysicist, J.L. Grey of Atomic Energy of
Canada, and John Gofman of California's Vida Medical Systems.
Barrett said he is opposed to nuclear power but he would like to hear
what the proponents have to say.
He said the seminar would help the government avoid the dangers
of rushing in too soon on such projects.
^       Other announced bills covered changes in the municipal and mining
acts, provisions to control price fluxuation of agricultural products and
debt protection for farmers.
RALLY TO DRAW attention to military revolution in Chile will be held at noon today in the south
entrance to SUB. Rally is organized by UBC students and members of the ad hoc Chilean solidarity
committee. Many people like this youngster have been put behind barbed wire as military means of the
government from Salvadore Allende's Marxist government.
Part-timers' load eased
ByKENTSPENCER
The senate passed a motion
Wednesday to put new regulations
into the university calendar
allowing part-time students to
receive course credits even if they
don't pass all their courses.
Students taking nine units of
courses or less in past years had to
pass everything to receive credit.
The new regulations say part-
time students must only pass 60 per
cent of their courses to receive
credit for the year. As a result,
part-time students passing 60 per
cent of their courses will also be
eligible to write supplemental
exams.
Students taking six units of
courses or less will only have to
pass 50 per cent to receive credit.
The new regulations give part-
time students almost the same
privileges as full-time students,
who are only required to pass 60
per cent of their courses and may
write supplementals.
However, part-time students are
still discriminated against as
they're ineligible for scholarships,
bursaries or loans.
And as the regulations now
stand, part-time students will only
Bremer
Education commissioner John
Bremer will be on campus between
9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. today in
SUB 207-209 to speak on the New
Democratic Party government and
the university.
He has refused to speak to a
public meeting, originally
scheduled for the ballroom. He will
instead speak in small seminars.
be permitted to take partial course
loads until their final year, when
most faculties have a residence
requirement saying students must
take at least nine units.
Assistant science dean Cy
Finnegan, chairman of the Senate
admissions committee, said
Wednesday the residence
requirement is under review.
"Faculties have been asked to
take a look at residence and only
keep it where it's absolutely
necessary.
"It's in the process of being
resolved. There should be more
changes coming throughout the
year," he said.
Finnegan said his committee has
nothing to do with scholarships or
bursaries, but admitted the issue
should be raised in senate.
See page 2: SIGNIFICANCE Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  14,   1973
Significance is
in failing courses
From page 1
"The most significant change as
I see it is now a part-time student
can take less than a full program
and need not pass the entire
program to obtain credit."
Finnegan said the rule changes
came about because of three
things: "The faculties requested a
change; There was obviously more
and more of a concern in the
university for part-times students;
Some people who work full-time
are unable to go to university."
"A student is a student," Finnegan said.
The senate's action Wednesday
came from recommendation of a
senate committee struck two years
ago to look into the status of the
part-time student.
The committee presented its
recommendations to the senate
admissions committee last spring,
the faculties were asked to submit
proposals and the admissions
committee then consolidated them.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sedgewick not
falling, just
adjusting
By BJORNSTAVRUM
No, Sedgewick library is not falling down.
f      But it is undergoing areas of adjustment.
Here. There. Everywhere.
Sedgewick head librarian True Erickson said Thursday he first
.noticed the doors jamming last April in the southwest corner of the new
$3.8 million building just three months after it opened.
"After adjusting the doors in that corner on three different occasions, someone noticed the 40-foot cantilevered beam above the doors
was dropping," he said.
"The six-by-eight pane windows threatened to shatter and we immediately had to close off that section and get the physical plant in to
look at things."
The pane windows have a 10-foot shatter radius.
All 14 reinforced concrete catilevered beams were subsequently x-
rayed. One beam was found to be missing some crucial reinforcement
but the others werjp all right. '
"It turned out the one defective beam was the first one the concrete
company made of that kind," said Erickson.
"As a safety measure, steel clamps were, subsequently put into all
the remaining beams nevertheless."
Franz Conrads, physical plant new construction superintendent,
said the problems has been fixed from a structural point of view.
"Total safety has been restored, but the broken cantilevered beam
in that corner has yet to be repaired.
"Our engineer is now looking at the problem for a second time.
Testing engineers whose first report was unsatisfactory to me, have
iftw been sent back to get more details of the problem, and find a
solution," said Conrads.
"Simply replacing the beam would be far too costly. It is safely
jacked up and supported, and the new report is expected any day as to
how it can be dealt with," he said.
Erickson also said there has been water leaking into the library.
"For instance, every tree drum leaks. The water runs down the
outside of the drums and into the library area. When it rains, we have to
place waste-paper baskets under the drips," he said,
y^^ere^ggiq damage to carpets, but it is an annoyance," said
"?jHe jackMniriferihg outside the main Sedgewick entrance'fe
another water problem. '
"Somehow water is seeping down through the sidewalk, through
various layers of concrete, tar, and insulation, and again dripping into
the library.
"Finding the point of leakage could be a long process, for the water
runs along the tar and insulation and eventually finds its way into the
library at points far away from where the Water enters on the surface,"
said Erickson.
Until the library is totally free of sinking beams, jackhammers, and
water, avoid the southwest corner or take the chance of being overwhelmed by noise and pollution — especially the sound,of dripping
water.
The Sedgewick library won the Royal Architectural Institute of
Canada award for being the finest building constructed in the nation in
1972.
DEADMEN HOLD UP cantilever concrete beams in lower eastern face of new Sedgewick
were put in as safety measure after x-ray of concrete beams showed one to be missing steel
Forty-foot beam threatened to drop away and shatter pane windows last April.
—kini mcdonald photo
ibrary. Clamps
reinforcement.
NUS policy — one university, one vote
One vote to every university or
community college regardless of
student population.
^ That was the national policy
adopted by the National Union of
Students over the summer.
This means UBC with 17,000
students will have the same
representation as Vancouver City
College which has about 5,000
attending.
Bonnie Long, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer,
also a member of the central
committee of NUS, said Thursday
"this move is meant to foster good
^co-operation amongst member
schools."
"The. bigger universities, including UBC, must make this
concession so the smaller colleges
will not feel NUS is being
monopolized," said Long.
Long said the student membership fee will remain at 30 cents
(SfSt student despite strong pressure
from some forces within the union
to raise the fee at UBC. The
allocation is part of the standard
$36 AMS fee..-
"I don't want to see so much
student money-poured into the NUS
that     it     becomes    • heavily
bureaucfatized,"    said    Long.
^"Thirty cents is enough."
The central committee of the
90,000-member union met three
times over the summer. Primary
purpose of the meetings was to
substantiate policy and direction
given the union by its first general
meeting last May.
Also over the summer the permanent NUS offices were
established at Carleton University
in Ottawa. The union has been
advertising for two people based in
Ottawa to act in the positions of
national co-ordinators.
The fall general meeting of NUS
is to be held Oct. 19 at the
University of Alberta in Edmonton.
Long said she hopes proposals on
student housing, financing of post-
secondary education, the high cost
of student loans and university
transfer credit problems would be
made at the upcoming meeting.
"The NUS financial committee
may propose an alternate system
of paying tuition fees as well.
NUS was organized in the
summer of 1972 with the intention
of providing Canadian university
and college students with their first
organized national voice since the
Canadian Union of Students
disbanded in 1969.
The founding conference of the
new union was held in October of
last year.
■ The founding members — mostly
from Ontario and the western-
provinces — determined to avoid
the political morass in which CUS
became bogged.
Instead it was decided extensive
lobbying with the various levels of
government and universities would
be the main course of action.
Enrolment report author says
decrease leveling off
W. Garnett Picot, author of a report that
predicts a continuing downward trend in
university enrolment, says he now believes
the trend may be levelling off.
The B.C. post-secondary education
enrolment forecasting committee report,
presented and tabled at Wednesday's Senate
meeting, noted that one of the most evident
observations which can be derived from
recent university enrolment data two "is the
declining preference of potential post-
secondary students for -an academic
education, at least on a full-time basis," over
the past two years.
The report goes:' on to name "students'
perception that the value of a bachelor's
degree in the labor market has declined" as
one of the most influential factors in the
decline in enrolment.
However, preliminary enrolment figures
indicate that enrolment this year is up at UBC
and Simon Fraser University.>
UBC enrolment is expected to reach 19,800
this year, an increase of 300 from last year,
according to assistant registrar Ken Young.
Enrolment at SFU has passed 6,000, an
increase of approximately 10 per cent over
last fall.
.Picot said Thursday the apparent
enrolment increase at the; two universities
seems to indicate his committee's repdri,
completed in March, forecasting university
enrolment will continue to decline was off-
base.
"A month ago I would have said that I think
it's a diminishing trend. Now I would say that
the trend is most definitely levelling off," he
said.
Picot could, however, provide no explanation for the seeming upswing in
enrolment in the face of the continuing bleak
job picture for university grads.
But Alma Mater Society President Brian
Loomes had a ready explanation.
"All those students went out into the world
and discovered it was the shits and decided to
come back." Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,  1973
—robert eyre cartoon
BoG gang muscles in
Letters
The administration has decided ft wants a
piece of the Afroa Mater Society's action.
The board of governors are already almost the only game west of Blanca, but now
they've decided to take a 10 per cent cut of
booking revenue in SUB as well.
Of course they're doing this all nice and
legal like — gotta keep things straight for the
feds you know.
The chunk of the student society's
revenue will be given to the administration
in return for them providing increased
maintenance and security in SUB — services
which they may very well legally be required
to provide under the lease.
The AMS could try and achieve those
services through legal arbitration of the
lease, and in fact council is now awaiting a
legal opinion on their chances of winning.
But the administration, led by board of
governors member and negotiator Paul Plant
are betting the AMS won't go to legal
arbitration.
This puts the AMS in the position of
having to call a big bluff.
They could shell out $2,500 to $3,500
for arbitration, thus forcing the
administration to do the same.
If they win they get the services and then
they could negotiate convention bookings
while holding all the cards.
If they lose, they'll have to pay for the
security and maintenance the administration
now provides.
But they really wouldn't lose much, grad
studies rep Bob Angus pointed out at council Wednesday because the administration's
offer isn't very generous.
(They would add additional proctors but
not pay for any damage caused by vandals,
presumably done while the proctors are
looking the other way.)
And that percentage of SUB revenue is a
bad precedent.
Once they've got a cut it will simply be a "
matter of demanding a bigger piece of the
action.
"Lissen, we got commitments, -inflation,
and we gotta make ends meet, so what say
you up our cut to 20 per?"
AMS president Brian Loomes and Plant
both say there are lots more important
things facing the society this year.
They're wrong.
While the AMS needs reform on many
fronts, * tossing this victory to the
administration could do major damage to
the society's already beleagured finances.
An expensive legal action may not be an
appealing alternative but we urge the council
to call the administration's bluff.
From past experiences we'd probably
find they're holding a busted flush.
Wreck II
half as bad
In our enthusiasm to condemn
Recreation UBC, we mistakenly said they
charge $10 to use UBC athletic facilities
instead of giving the correct fee: $5 per year.
Which means they are only half as big a
rip-off as we said they were Thursday.
We urged you to boycott Recreation
UBC.
Now we've got a better: idea, though a
boycott would still hplp.
Since UBC students already pay a $5
athletic fee for which we get nothing but the
satisfaction of seeing the T-Birds lose, why
not use that for Recreation UBC?
How, you say?
Well, there's an Alma Mater Society
by-election coming up Oct. 3 and included
in that package could be a referendum on
whether or not UBC students want their $5
athletic fee used to cover the cost of
Recreation UBC's $5 fee.
Now if some AMS councillor would just
move such a motion at next week's council
meeting, ■.«■'.''
Quote
I think I'll give you guys written
statements so imaginative
reporters and late-nite sleepy
editors don't quote me as saying
something I never said.
In Tuesday's Ubyssey, I'm
quoted as saying Bremer's
proposed interbody, whieh will
oversee the university budgets, is
"totally useless". The point I
actually made (even the reporter
was a little unnerved at the difference between what he wrote and
what appeared in print) was that
we should not assume that these
apparently rational changes being
proposed by Bremer and the NDP
have much to do with solving
students' problems. These are
problems of the kind of education
we get out here — facilities, course
sizes and especially content — and
what we can do with what we learn.
The problem of 'identity' is a
consequence of the manner in
which 'education' merely trains us
to work in a basically unsatisfying
and alienating job situation (and
society) and at the same time
promotes individualism, self-
cultivation and the notion of
knowledge  for  knowledge   sake.
These ideas prevent us from
; constructing aft alternative' to' the
current lonely state of affairs.
I said that we have no indication
the NDP intends to change this
situation except to "involve" us in
committee work. At the same time,
the NDP does have definite
economic intentions for the
province. We should examine what
these are and what they have in
mind for us after we graduate. At
this point, there's a growing doubt
that the NDP really intends to deal
with the basic problems of a
capitalist economy, dominated and
controlled by U.S. corporations.
The proposal for 'public accountability' of university money
should be seen in terms of what the
NDP actually plans to do since
they're in control of tax money.
Basically I was saying there'll
have to be some serious discussion
on campus this year of the kind
planned by the Speakers and
Education committees. I suspect
it'll be up to students to work out
strategies and content for any
significant changes in education.
I want to briefly say something
about the impression given by the
article  on  the hiring of  a   new
See page 5: LETTERS
r
THE UBYSSEY
September 14th, 1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges.
So,
">,
no
^^0
Bay.
*r
J Friday,  September  14,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
DSC charts decentralized AMS
The Democratic Students' Caucus was
formed early in 1973 to do battle against
the Students Coalition in the spring Alma
Mater Society elections.
The group presented a reform platform, concentrating on lowering
residence rents, re-organization of the
society bureaucracy and improving
services for students.
Opposed to them were the Students
Coalition, formed a year before, who
emphasized the service side of the AMS
and de-emphasized politics and confrontation with the university administration.
The caucus took four seats on the AMS
executive, the coalition three, but this
month two caucus members, Stan
Persky and Diane Latta resigned from
the executive leaving the balance in
favor of the coalition.
The following is a reply to an editorial
in the Tuesday Ubyssey, condemning the
resignations as damaging to reform at
UBC.
There   is   a   need   for   a   student
organization on campus. This
organization should provide leadership,
education and be responsive to students'
needs — a students' union. Does the AMS
serve this function? Many students feel
that they should not have to pay AMS
fees, (ie: the GSA executive is presently
being challenged by some grad students
on this issue) because they feel they are
not getting anything worthwhile in return
for the $24 they pay to support the
Student Society.
The Democratic Students Caucus ran
on a political platform. We feel that
political discussion is the top priority
activity. Given the present bureaucratic
structure of the AMS it is clear that attempts at centralized political leadership
from within the body gets snowed down
by time consuming administrative crap.
The thing we recognize is that the AMS is
not a unique structure, it is fashioned
after most bureaucracies in the country
and this is designed to inhibit the type of
political leadership we feel the student
government should provide. We have
come to believe more and more strongly
that problems faced by students can only
be effectively solved by struggling for
basic overall changes in society.
But, on the question of the AMS, it
might be possible to do a restructuring in
order to cut down on administrative
costs, give clubs and undergraduate
societies more autonomy and at the same
time allow the AMS to provide real
leadership for students on pressing
issues such as jobs, education, housing
etc. The most efficient AMS function at
present is as a training ground for up-
and-coming business people.
One main concern of students as far as
the AMS goes is the apparent wasted and
misdirected AMS administrative money.
For example, the ridiculous situation of
having to pay $5 over and above the
compulsory athletic fee to use campus
recreational equipment.
And the fact that The Ubyssey has to
print a 16-page advertisement insert, as
they did in the Thursday paper, to
provide necessary publishing revenue,
which the AMS cannot provide.
This is however, by no means a complete response to how we view the AMS
and the university as a whole. To go into
these analyses will take pages and pages
of discussion. Issues such as the Bremer
task force, the NDP's proposals for
education, the nature of social
democracy and its function in society,
the question of reforms and labor, and
other topics we want to promote
discussion on through the speaker's and
education committees' programs and
newsletters.
But, in response to students' demands
on restructuring the AMS, some members of the DSC do propose to take a
serious study of the society in order to
come forward with a plan for restructuring which will come before students in
a referendum. This will involve a lot of
discussion among students on what the
AMS is and how it should be changed.
Only with serious discussion on this issue
by students can any proposal for change
be presented that would be meaningful.
Letters
From page 4
General Manager. Current journalism manages to distort by
partial reporting. From the
meeting with Mr. Grady and
discussion with other selection
committee members, I agreed that
he was probably the best person for
the job given that students' council
had decided to fill it. A most important question however, is
whether or not the current set-up of
the AMS is making the best use of
students' money.
From that article, you can see
where a lot of it goes. Over the next
year, students should have an
opportunity to discuss this problem
of the purpose of student government and also make a decision
about what to do with the AMS.
(See the DSC statement in today's
paper.)
Brian Loomes
ams president
Munch
Only at UBC could the administration expect 19,700 students
all to eat lunch at 12:30 p.m.
All students who have-attempted
to buy their lunch at any of the food
services facilities on campus will
be aware of the ludicrousness of
such a policy.
Students who get an hour for
lunch are lucky if they manage to
get through the line-ups in half that
time. That leaves you 20 minutes to
eat your lunch and 10 minutes to
get to your next class.
This is yet another example of
the efficiency of UBC administration, always looking after
the interests of the students.
Gordon Mullin
arts 3
Correction
In our story in Thursday's paper
on the new Alma Mater Society
general manager, we mistakenly
said former general manager
Brian Robinson was fired.
Actually, Robinson resigned in
October, 1972.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
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4:30 6:45 9:00
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SHOWS AT 12:15 2:05 4:05 6:05 8:00 10:00
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money money money
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'LIMITED
Granville at Pender Since 1904
Budget Terms or Chargex
Illmjtrstioni mnUrgtdso ibow itttil
Askus about a Student loan.
It pays to get an education.
Education costs a bundle.
At the Commerce, we know.
And,we can help lighten the load.
Talk to a local Commerce
manager about a student loan.
He can help you get it. And,
he can help you keep it in check
with proper money management.
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
You and the Commerce. Together we're both stronger. GROWTH GROUP
An opportunity to learn through
experience how you relate to
others in the context of a small
group. This is a chance for you to
participate in a mutual
learning/teaching situation where
the emphasis is on growth in areas
■' involving personal, interpersonal
and group understanding. Contact
Don Johnson at 224-1614.
Tuesday evenings starting Sept.
25 at 7:00 p.m.
Lutheran Campus Centre
311$ ST#P
The Decision Matters
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for FASHION
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Status quo en
Chile's £reed<
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
Salvador Allende, the democratically elected president of Chile is
dead and so is his Marxist government.
Allende was elected president of Chile in October 1970, with 35 per
cent of the vote. No political party was able to get a majority of the vote
so it was left to the congress to decide who was to be president.
Allende gained the vote plurality and was declared president.
He headed a coalition of two leftist parties: the Communist Party
and his own Socialist Party — a coalition known as Unidad Popular.
Before taking office Allende was forced to sign a statement
promising that he would uphold the law of the land and the constitution
as well as leave the bureaucracy intact. The Christian Democratic
Party which had formed the previous government insisted the
statement be signed before they offered legislative support to Allende.
Allende began his term as president already severely handicapped.
He had to use the constitution and laws formulated by Chilean conservative and wealthy elements in order to implement his Marxist
policies.
Ironically, it is the same people, who were so concerned that
Allende uphold the law and the constitution, that have gone outside of it
in order to regain power.
The coup is of great importance to Chile and the future of its poor
and working classes whose lot was greatly improved during the Allende
administration.
Allende introduced sweeping land reforms which eliminated great
estates and gave the land to the peasants previously working it.
The workers were given increased wages, which despite inflation,
were still considerably higher than before.
All these measures were introduced within the old legal structures.
Allende used an old decree, introduced in 1932 by a two week long
"Socialist Republic". This decree allowed the government to take over
any factory or industry that "fails to supply the people" with its goods
and services.
The banks were nationalized when the government bought out the
majority of the shares, at the going market price.
All the changes introduced by
the needs of the Chilean economy ra
Some of the social changes intn
workers while salaries of public emj.
a month.
Rent was fixed at 10 per cent til ti
The copper industry was natioi
upon Chile. Then world bank head
credit in reprisal.
This measure caused severe <
elected government since it meant tl
needed to ensure a smooth transitior
Massive changes of the kind in
were bound to cause such difficultie
on every opportunity to organize rail
progress.
Clashes in the streets on Sarrtu
supporters and opponents of the regi
Truck drivers as well as small:
times during the three years Allend
speculation that these strikes were
The Chilean workers were cerl
strikes on their own since trade un
they are in North America.
Another factor that contributes
intervention is that the value of t
market decreased substantially dui
the time of the strikes there were ma
American intervention in Ls%':
socialist governments is not a new
In the 50s Americans backed
government in Guatemala. While ir
the Dominican Republic and in 1968
presence known in Brazil.
DOWNTOWN CHASE.. .riot-equipped police chase demonstrators.
^favett't tya *%easict
FOR NEW & USED
BOOKS
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPERBACKS
ir    MAGAZINES
* MONARCH  NOTES
* SCHAUMS OUTLINES
* COLES NOTES
* LARGEST SELECTION OF
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B.C.
•   WE TRADE USED
POCKETBOOKS
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 West 10th Ave.
(near Varsity Theatre)
224-4144 Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Hot  Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS - CHARBROILED STEAKS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
I Phone 2241720 - 224-6336 I
HOURS - MON. to THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
„FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.j
Page Friday
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,  1973 dsM
ds
»m
ride were explained in terms of
than ideology.
sd included 70 per cent raise to
:es were given a ceiling of $1,200
n#y's income.
ed, bringing American rancor
jrt McNamara, cut off Chile's
omic problems to the newly-
lid not have access to the funds
le economy.
jced by Allende's government
ie opposition was quick to seize
nd strikes to further hinder the
„#£ country's capital, between
/ere a common occurence,
keepers went on strike several
Id office. There has been some
iced from outside the country.
y not able to finance the long
are not as wealthy in Chile as
such speculation about foreign
imerican dollar on the black
the strikes. This shows that at
trculating in Chile.
r,*ican countries which elect
ig-
up that overthrew a socialist
5 American marines landed in
ericans once again made their
ARREST.. .police take demonstrator away as tear gas swirls through streets.
American intervention in Chile is much more subtle since American
people are in no mood to tolerate any intervention which might possibly
cost more lives.
During the last elections in Chile the American Central Intelligence
Agency was eager to pump money into the opposition parties.
Edward Korry, the American ambassador in Chile at the time,
discouraged the CIA on the grounds that Allende had no chance of
winning. Korry has since been recalled.
International Telephone and Telegraph tried later to give money to
political groups that would try and depose Allende.
The only American aid to Chile during Allende's term of office went
to the country's armed forces. The Americans supplied them with
weapons, now being used in the coup.
The effects of the Chilean coup will be felt not only in Chile but
throughout the world. Marxist politicians who had hoped to form
democratic governments in countries previously run by capitalist interests have much to think about at this time.
Allende's opponents proved that liberals, conservatives and all
other political elements interested in promoting the status quo are
eager to obey laws only as long as they are in their interest.
It is easy to look back upon Allende's term in office and criticize him
for not having been strong enough.
The fact is, if he had tried to bring in measures to censor the press
or to muscle his opponents, the army would have stepped in much
sooner.
Allende was perhaps somewhat naive in believing that his opponents would respect the same rules of conduct that they demanded he
observe.
Unfortunately he had few alternatives.
It is doubtful whether he could have won the civil war which would
have broken out, had he rallied the masses to support him in armed
conflict.
The regime which has currently installed itself in Chile is obviously
confident that it can win in an armed confrontation.
In the two days of the new regime, 1,000 of Allende's supporters
have been reported shot. Hundreds have been imprisoned. Those still
resisting have been told that they should surrender or be shot.
To show these threats are serious the army has launched several
attacks, including bombing raids on factories occupied by armed
workers.
Once again people can see that democracy works only if the wealthy
and powerful elements are able to freely pursue their interests, often at
the expense of the masses.
This was certainly the case in Chile.
For an entire century Chile was ruled by wealthy land owners and
representatives of big business. It wasn't until the 1950s that popular
suffrage as we know it was introduced into Chile by the Christian
Democrats.
When the roles were reversed and those previously on top found
themselves on the bottom, they showed a much lesser tolerance for
powerlessness than the workers and the poor had shown for all those
years.
What will happen in Chile now is difficult to predict.
Civil war is unlikely at this time. The masses are not sufficiently
well armed, nor can they count on assistance from anywhere.
Neither China nor the Soviet Union will risk intervention in Chile at
this time.
On the other hand if the new regime tries to reverse the changes in
the agricultural and industrial sector, they will be in trouble. The people
will not allow things to regress to the state they were at before Allende
took office.
But no doubt the United States will be quick in coming to the
assistance of the new regime, by offering substantial foreign aid and
investment.
Affairs will be chaotic in Chile for some time to come. Eventually
Allende's supporters will be shot or imprisoned and order will be
restored.
So the experiment in "democratic" Marxism will have failed,
thanks to the efforts of Chile's bourgeoisie.
ALLENDE.. .looking up in happier times.
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_.___   ARBUTUS AT 16th AVE.
RIDGE  738.6311  FREE PARKING
SUNDAY TO FRIDAY 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY 7:00, 9:30 p.m.
HUSSEV / 1E0NAR0 WHITING
Friday, September 14, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday h
Page Friday
Mayall
for gym
By VAUGHN PALMER
In a year when most popular musicians are
releasing and performing mediocre work, or
simply resting on laurels and doing nothing, it's a
pleasure to see someone work as hard and as
frequently as John Mayall.
Mayall must be getting tired of being called "the
Father of English Blues", but Thursday night in
the War Memorial Gymnasium, he once again
lived up to his billing.
In fact he may very well be a father of a family
which no longer exists.
True, he never went as far or as high as many of
his illustrious proteges such as Eric Clapton, Mick
Taylor or John McVie but few of them have
produced with his quality or capacity in the past
few years.
Mayall changes personnel like some people
change socks but he maintains his standards,
building a little more with each experience and his
current band is no exception.
Surprisingly they've been more or less intact for
over a year, a rarity for Mayall.
But it's easy to see why Mayall can attract such
an endless succession of talented musicians: —
like a good father he gives them plenty of room to
express themselves while always holding
everyone together and on the path he wants.
He's almost like a rather over-enthusiastic
ringmaster as he punctuates every piece with a
call for applause for the featured soloist: "Blue
Mitchell ... now Blue Mitchell trumpet".
Kveryone from Mitchell and guitarist Freddy
Robinson to saxaphonist Red Holloway, drummer
Keef Hartley and bass-player Fred Gaskin got a
long solo, yet Mayall's voice-harmonica kept the
music swaying along in his current mode.
He called the first album he did with this band
Jazz Blues Fusion thereby begging the wrath of
purists from both camps, but it doesn't matter
what he calls it, it's effective and it drew a strong
reaction from the sellout crowd of 3,700 in the gym.
The concert also demolished the misconception
I hat sound is lousy in the gym — actually it betters
the eolliseum or Agrodome and easily matches the
PNE Gardens.
The other shows in the Alma Mater Society
Concerts lineup, including Cheech and Chong and
Sha Na Na should be as good a deal in sound as
they are in price — $3 advance for students.
And the backup band to Mayall also demolished
(he notion that such time-fillers are always dull. It
was just not the case with Sid Warner and the
Teabags who played an amazing variety of music
in 45 minutes.
And they're from this here university too.
works
sellout
MAYALL. . .swaying harp.
ATTENTION
Volunteer Subjects required
for experiments in
Meditation &
Deep Relaxation
See table in SUB
or ph. 731-0773
Aqua Soc Scuba Courses
NAVI CERTIFICATION COURSE FEES: $40.
Membership fees: $12 -Total: $52.
Includes scuba equipment for pool sessions, text book and Log book
materials.
Classes start Sept. 24 —
8 sessions
See Aqua Soc in SUB basement, near Bowling Alleys.
St. Anselm's and University Hill Churches
ON UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
Ministers: Rev. Luis 0. Curran & Dr. W. S. Taylor
SUNDAY SERVICES:
8 a.m. Holy Communion at St. Anselm's Anglican
11 a.m. Holy Communion and Church School at both
St. Anselm's Anglican & University Hill United
INVITATION   TO   UBC STUDENTS - To an informal lunch
meeting Sept.  16 after the 11 a.m. Services at both churches.
Lunch held in University Hill Church.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PHONE: 224-7011 or 224-1410
Quality can be bought
at a reasonable price
We are small enough to give you
personalized service at the best
possible prices. And we only
stock quality equipment: E.P.I,
(the No. 1 rated speaker system),
Marantz, Pioneer, Tandberg,
Phase Linear, Klipsh, Dual, Elac,
K.L.H., A.R., Infinity, Quad,
Bose, Sherwood, Harmon-
Kardon, Stanton and Ortofon.
Jan's
Stereo
West Ltd.
2839 West Broadway
Phone 736-3696
EPI TOWERS
1. Elections   committee
returning officer.
COMMITTEE
VACANCIES
Four  vacancies  plus one
2. Board of Governors Advisory committee to select
candidates for the position of U.B.C. President —
One vacancy.
3. President's Ad Hoc Committee on Student
Counselling and Placement — One vacancy.
4. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre Management
Committee observers with intention of
becoming members next year.
Please apply in writing to the AMS President, room 256,
S.U.B. by 12:30 Tuesday, Sept. 18. Elections
committee members required as soon as possible.
ACT — ACT — ACT
Auditions for the Theatre Department's
Production of
THE ALCHEMIST
by Ben Jonson
to be presented October 31-November 10
will be held on
MONI
TUI
Y, SEPTEMBER
IESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
17
8
19
In Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
- Auditions Open to All UBC Faculty, Staff and Students -
Page Friday
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  September   14,   1973 Friday, September 14, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Hot flashes
PF seeks
tommies
Page Friday, weekly
supplement of critical review and
thought, needs critical reviewers,
and general thinkers (even fuzzy
thinkers). PF is looking for people
interested in covering events and
offering thoughtful comment on
dance, music, film and literature,
as well as timely, pertinent
features on relevant issues. If
you're interested in writing for
PF, come to room 241 SUB noon
Monday.
Distribution
The Ubyssey is attempting to
improve its distribution system.
We've expanded the number of
drop-off points to 35 from 20,
but all the bugs aren't ironed out
yet.
Tween
classes
TODAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Meeting 7 p.m. Walter Gage lounge.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
"The NDP one year In office — a
socialist view" public forum 8 p.m.
1208 Granville.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting every Friday noon.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Punch party and dance to welcome
new students 7:30 p.m.-l a.m.
AMS SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
John Bremer on "NDP plan for
students" noon SUB ballroom.
Small group discussions with
Bremer 9:30-11:30 SUB 205.
,SATURDAY
j SAILfNGrCLUB
I        Tiiam  -. regatta,    . new      members
welcome and free sailing is available
In Jazers and flying juniors. 10 a.m.
with    practice    session.    10    p.m.
Sunday Kitsilano Yacht club, foot
of Balsam.
KARATE CLUB
Practice gym E 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
SUNDAY
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship service, everyone welcome
Lutheran campus centre 10 a.m.
Birrbecue and folk serve at 6:30
p.Ti. Barbecue and folk mass 6:30
p.m.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
• Try-outs, 5 p.m. South campus
ft«.1ds.
KARATE CLUB
'"   Practice 7-9 p.m. SUB ballroom.
GOLF TEAM
Organization meeting noon
memorial gym room 213. Further
information call Tom Ripper,
224-9073 or 922-3572.
MEN'S TENNIS TEAM
Tryouts, tickets for Davis Cup trials
available at tryouts. Monday-Friday
4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Courts by
winter sports centre.
MEN'S INTRAMURALS
Referees clinic for touch football
Room 211 warmemorial gym noon.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Jill Johnstone weekly columnist in
* "Village. Voice" will read and talk
about the women's movement SUB
art gallery 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
Try-outs, 7 p.m. Memorial Gym.
GERMAN CLUB
Organizational   meeting  402   noon.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
W(sekly   testimony   meeting,   noon,
SUB 224.
ONTOLOGY CLUB
Buch. room 216 12:30 p.m. "Come
together."
KUNG-FU CLUB
Demonstration and registration for
club SUB ballroom 12:30 p.m.-l:30
'*   p.m.
Some buildings are getting too
many papers, while others aren't
getting any.
So if your favorite campus
hangout isn't getting any copies,
let us know and we'll try to do
something about it.
In the future we hope to add
boxes or distribution tables to
help you locate the paper on
publication days.
Currently the paper is
distributed between 10 a.m. and
noon Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday.
Cheap thrills
Cheap furnishings, appliances
and clothing are available at
Opportunity Rehabilitation
Workshop thrift stores.
The shop is a non-profit
training and assessment centre for
persons with vocational
handicaps. An on-the-job program
specializes in off-set printing, dry
afi
in
"King of
Corned Beef
rjElfCATESSEN   -   RESTAURANT
Phone 738-2010
***Sjy W. Broadway
Vancouver, b.c.
-%r
1
cleaning and finishing, small
appliance repair, and'basis clerical
skills.
Goods sold at 0RW thrift
stores are obtained through
donations. A box with blue and
red lettering will be installed in
front of SUB.
Two stores, one at 456 East
Hastings which specializes in
furniture and large appliances, and
another at 6669 Fraser which has
household and kitchen items, are
now open.
Hockey jocks
Attention would-be Bobby
Hulls!
Bob Hindemarch,
Thunderbird's hockey coach,
invites you to join Junior B.,
training camp composed of J. V.,
Varsity, and players making
neither team. For information
contact Hindemarch immediately
in the Memorial Gym.
*
Luthern Campus Ministry
Lutheran Centre
5885 University Blvd.
SUNDAYS
Worsh ip and Discussion Each Sunday at 10:00 a.m.
Barbeque and Folk Service this Sunday at 6:30. Our fall
opening Event.
TUESDAYS: Growth Group
For those interested in exploring who they are and their
personal relations within a group. Centre 7:30, starting
Sept. 25.
WEDN ESDAY^eommuhity IM ight
For those interested in guitar, batik, painting, weaving,
recorder, folk dancing and other things. Resource people
wHI help you. Starting Sept. 26.
SEPT.29and30
Retreat at Living Waters Centre.
For more information about these events and the centre cali
224-1614 or drop by.
FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT WOMEN
s.*"'8'%
«
ADMISSION FREE!
>
S.U.B. BALLROOM
Tuesday, 18th September, 1973
■<
7:30 p.m. — 11:00 p.m.
REFRESHMENTS
Entertainment: Women's Live Theatre
— Campus Women's Get-together night
— Meet old friends; Meet new friends
.»--,.      — Learn about Women's Groups
HILLEL OPEN HOUSE
FREE LUNCH
TUES. , SEPT. 18
12:30
(MDA WMl LOANS
AT THE*
ROYAL BANK
the helpful bank
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Dave Stewart, Manager
Terry Cotton, Loans
10th at Sasamat — 224-4348
TH€ CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office^ Room 241 S. U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Rides & Cat Pools
14
Special Notices
15
MINOLTA CAMERA SYSTEM:
SRT—101 witli 55 mm. fl.7 and
28 mm. f2.5 Rokker Lenses, 85-
210 mm. 200M lens, assorted filters,- -electronic flash, all items
" in «!3<aSte3nt condition. Phone
George    736-0311    day.    733-9630
eves. ■ ...      	
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
.-..: AM-FM. Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, list $200. Yonr cost
$125. 2-year parts guarantee.
CaU  325-0361!  for  savings.	
FOUR POSITIONS STUDENT
section leaders, senior choir,
WPG United Church, information
jre   fees   etc.   tel.   Irene   Sihmor,
733-5741. ■-, 	
-REGISTER   NOW  AT!-THE   .,
TUTORIAL: CENTRE.
Speakesy—SUB—12:30 to 2:30 or
call   22S-45;17   anytime. -
U.B.C.     BARKER     SHOP     (NEAR
Campus).   Open   9  a.m.-5:30  p.m.
, ■., 5736 University Blvd.
UBC BQWLING LEAGUE NEEDS
Sior.e tfajylers, especially girls.
New bowlers welcome — we are
a handicap league. For further
information or .to join call
Walter at  22S-S225.
Special Events
15A
OPEN HOUSE SEPT. 10-.SEPT. 14.
Film Society, Rm. 247. SUB.
New members welcome, or drop
by anytime.	
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY
SUTDENTS!) You are invited to
join us for a sandwich-lunch in
the, lounge at University Hill
Chuch on University Blvd. after,
the Sunday services held at 11
a.m. in St. Anselm's Anglican
and University Hill United. First
meeting on SEPTEMBER 10!!	
ALL STUDENT FACULTY STAFF
women. Come to Campus Women's night, Tuesday, 18 September, 7:30 p.m.-11:30 r,.m. S.U.B.
Ballroom,   mixer,   ge"t   together.
Travel' Opportunities
16
TBAVE££XHG   OVERSEAS   OH   A
XtlMITEP BTJD&ET?
— then attend a special travel
evening sponsored by the Canadian Youth Hostels Association
to. be held at the Vancouver
Youth Hostel at the foot of*T)i=<-
qovery Street on Tuesday, September 25th at 8 p.m. Advice
will be given on all aspects of
low budget travel and free check
lists will be available to all potential travellers. Those requiring
more details of the meeting or
its location should phone 738-
S128.
Wanted—Information
17
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'66 VW FOR SALE, $600. PHONE
731-3555 after 5. Ste. 102 1531
W.   16th   Ave.
Motorcycles
25
1973 HONDA CTO STREET MODEL
only 500 miles. Plus 2 helmets.
Offers.   733-6603.
11)71 YAMAHA l.r.Ocr. LITTLP; OT/
lady condition. S000 miles. Ph
731-3401).
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
40
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INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. AU
grade   levels   welcome.   731-0601.
Special Classes
62
"POT" AT POTTER'S CENTRE.
"Wheel-work instruction at all
ievels starting Sept. 17. Limited
enrollment.  Phone G. Alfred 261-
4764.
Tutoring
64
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-4557-12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
'64 FORD GALAXIE, $750. EKO
12-string .guitar $65. Phone 526-
9867.
Rooms
81
FURN. ROOM SHARED KITCHEN
priv., ent. Oak at 18th. Rides
avail, to U.B.C. 738-4062 eves.,
685-0725  day.
Room & Board
82
WANTED: YOUNG ATTRACTIVE
women, pref. UBC student to do
light housekeeping & occasional
cooking for 2 young businessmen.
Own room with all modem conveniences in lux. town house,
Kerrisdale area. Call Bob: 732-
3864 before 12:00 noon weekdays.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SEll — BUy — INFORM Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,  1973
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
SPOR TS
'New' key word
in UBC football
0 By RICK LYMER
Is it possible this year's edition of
UBC's football Thunderbirds will
be a winner? '
Well, the key word this lear is
"new" — new head coach, many
new faces and a new program."
With Frank Gnup's retirement
new held coach Norm Thomas is in
the process of revamping the UBC
football program.
Thomas has re-introduced the
concept of a junior varsity team. In
another new wrinkle the jayvees
are practising with the varsity.
"Everyone will get to know each
other and the junior varsity isn't
off in a corner somewhere never to
be seen again," Thomas said in
explaining the move.
Another indication of a change of
policy is the two-hour practices,
compared to the one and a half
hour scissions favored by Gnup.
Thomas said he felt the longer
practices allow more time for
fundamentals which the young
team desperately needs.
Among the key offensive players
for the Birds are quarterback Jim
Tarves, injured much of last
season; halfback Don Cameron;
and Bill Baker who broke for three
Women
start next
week
Intercollegiate sports for women
get into full swing next week with
the hope of repeating last year's
success story.
Last season UBC women won
seven of nine Canada West
University Athletic Association
sports they entered.
At the World Student Games in
Moscow 10 UBC women were
Canadian team members.
<y UBC's chances for similar
successes will be judged starting
this week as practices begin in
various sports.
Trials for UBC women's intercollegiate field hockey, badminton, volleyball and basketball
teams start Monday.
Field hockey coaches Barbara
Schrodt  and Margaret  MacLean
are   holding   hour   practices   for
hockey hopefuls at 5 p.m. Monday,
^Wednesday and Thursday.
Badminton coach Sharon
Whittaker will hold a practice for
potential players Monday in Gym
A of the physical education complex.
Marilyn Russel and Diane
Colman, coaches of volleyball will
hold their trials at 7 p.m. Sunday.
_ Ron thorson will coach the
"women's varsity basketball team
with practices also starting next
week. Exact times will be announced later.
People interested in all aspects
of women's athletics from playing
basketball to swimming in Empire
Pool should contact Russell,
women's athletic director, in room
♦202 - 203, memorial gym.
Team managers are needed
especially.
I've ever seen around here" according to coach Thomas, the fate
of the club seems out of the hands
of the coaching staff this season.
Inexperience, a suspect weak
kicking game, and lack of
adequate bench strength may
doom the Birds to another losing
season.
However, the chances for a
winner are good, both now and for
the future. The Birds can't do too
much worse and could well be a
dark horse contender.
They have the potential to win,
consistently        if        training,
organization and luck prove effective against inexperience and
injuries.
THOMAS.. .new coach.
touchdowns against Royal Military
College of Kingston last game.
One. touchdown came from a 90-
yard runback.
These two should provide the
inside and outside threat which
UBC has usually missed in the
past.
The defensive backfield contains
Ten Hon Choo, last year's
replacement at quarterback for
the injured Tarves while middle
linebacker Joe Gluska shores up
the second line.
While the team may be "best
Drinking the wine
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cost   $23.   Quick   maturingr fruit
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VICTORIA
1548 Fairfield Rd.
384-1741
SAANICH
1678 Poplar Ave.
477-9121
VANCOUVER
3417 W. Broadway
731-4726
NORTH VAN
1125 Lonsdale
987-8713
WEST VAN
Park Royal - North Mall
926-1610
BURNABY
452 5 E. Hastings
299-9737
NEW WEST
81S-12th Street
524-9066
SURREY
13575 King George Hwy.
588-5810
OFFICIAL NOTICES
GRADUATE
STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
A. REFERENDUM
September 19-20, 10:30-4:30
1. Are you in favor of continuing to belong to the Alma Mater
Society?
2. Are you in favor of paying the $29 Alma Mater Society fee?
Polling Stations: GSC, SUB, Buchanan, Bookstore, South Campus
B. GRADUATE REPRESENTATIVE
ASSEMBLY MEETING
Friday, Sept. 21, 12:30 p.m.. Garden Room, GSC.
If your department hasn't elected a representative, please do so
immediately.
burhe's
world wide travel
REGISTER NOW
For low cost
charters to Europe
in 1974
The best flights fill first.
Register now and you
will be the first to receive
next year's flight
information!
YES, WE
BOOK PENN
OVERLAND!
The exciting and
adventurous tours off the
beaten track to exotic
places at unbeatable
prices.
CALL NOW FOR 1974 DETAILS
224-4391
In the Village at U.B.C.
burfte's
world wide travel
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
The following SENATE and
AMS Executive positions are
now vacant.
Secretary
Internal Affairs
Three Senators At Large
One Arts Senator
One Applied Science Senator
One Education Senator
NOMINATIONS for the SENATE positions will be received from 12:30
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12 until 12:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 26.
NOMINATIONS for the EXECUTIVE positions will be received from 9:00
a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19 until 12:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 27.
Nomination and eligibility forms can be obtained from and shall be
returned to the office of the AMS Executive Secretary, room 246, S.U.B.
The election will be held on Wed.. Oct. 3. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,  1973
Bremer
promises
structures
By MICHAEL SASGES
John Bremer, B.C.'s new education commissioner, places two roily hands on
the small portable cassette and starts the interview off with: "I'm fascinated with
these things. Do you mind?"
So Bremer fiddles with the cassette, chuckling and smiling as he rewinds and
fast forwards until he comes to a small snatch of Marlene Dietrich and a few
obscenities.
Bremer, it turns out, recognizes the song and another song from the time he
served with the British Army on the Rhine as an instructor of former Hitler Youth
officers.
"We worked with them on the concept of democracy," he says. "But that was
a long time ago."
He smiles, spreads his arms, then his fingers, putting the whole movement
together as he joins his fingertips.
"What are we going to talk about?" he
asks.
The university, what you think about it,
what you want changed, why, is democracy
aborted by having an education commissioner, and will social democracy purge
the board of governors of the men who
manage the people who elected the social
democrats.
Bremer wants to talk about responsibility
and mediating the position of the government and the universities.
"My impression is that the government,
and I really don't mean this particular
government, but any government and the
universities in the province don't have a
proper way at this stage of mediating their
relationship.
"Since they're in a face-to-face
relationship the problems are really very,
very clear," he says.
The New Democratic Party government
sees problems existing between the
universities and the government.
That's why education minister Eileen
Dailly appointed Bremer, 46, to head up two
commissions in February.
She announced in November, 1972, the
commissioner would head two studies — one
of the public schools, the other of post-
secondary schools.
Bremer, when the announcement of his
position was made in February, was on a
fellowship at Dalhousie University in
Halifax.
He holds graduate degrees from Cambridge University and the University of
Leicester.
EDUCATION.. .this won't change.
Bremer created the Parkway program in
Philadelphia — the original school without
walls — in 1968 and served as its first
director.
A man experienced to look at education
problems, a student, a teacher and an administrator.
But his interest is public accountability.
"On the one hand, I think any provincial
government has the right to demand that the
very large sums of money spent by the
universities in the province — and it's more
than $100 million a year — that that money
be spent responsibly with some measure of
public accountability.
"Now on the other hand no university and
no university person, and I would share this
view, no university would like to be in the
position, permanently in the position, of
really being a direct servant of the particular government in power."
He says he wants to avoid a confrontation
between the government in power and the
universities.
"What we need is one kind of intermediate
body which would in a sense, mediate the
relationship between the university and the
government and which would make sure
public monies were being accounted for in a
reasonable way and that on the other hand
the freedom of the university to carry out its
researches and to conduct teaching was also
preserved."
Bremer admits to being a person concerned with structures. He says he intends
to set up a structure to ensure "public accountability".
He says he wants to "develop" a structure
which has particularly bothered and influenced his "university person", the board
of governors.
"From the discussions that I've had I
would say there is a fairly wide agreement
that the number and composition of the
boards of governors needs to be — how can I
say — developed and I would have thought it
would be very desirable to increase the
number of people sitting on the board to
make them more widely representative of
the social groups of the province."
Bremer chooses his words carefully to
cover every angle of inquiry and please
everyone.
"Certainly we should consider including
faculty members and students on the
board."
He says he wants more public meetings,
part of his "public accountability scheme".
"I am trying to say one of the reasons for
the lack of confidence and the lack of trust is
that it is thought many of the things are done
privately and secretly and that all I was
trying to say was one of the things that we
can perhaps do is to make many of the
meetings and deliberations more public so
that not only do more people have a chance
to participate, which will be the case in a
somewhat enlarged board of governors, but
also so that what discussions did take place
were there for public scrutiny. Then you
would know where people stood on certain
issues.
"If you disagreed you would know who to
talk to."
SKELETON.. .bare bones of education.
He says if university deliberations were
more public there would be more trust.
Yet as Bremer acknowledges the people
on the boards are mainly corporation
managers, people who do not want to deal
under public scrutiny.
But Bremer says he believes board
members are willing to accept an enlarged
board, a more public board.
"It's strange that if that is their view, and
it certainly is mine, that this has never been
really communicated to others.
Maybe it just hasn't been acted upon. Or
perhaps the previous government had not
wanted to act upon such a recommendation
even if the board had made it."
He refuses to believe the board members
are changing their position to meet new
political requirements.
"I'm long past, you know, scrutinizing
people's motivations. I think the fact is that
it's generally recognized that we need a
larger board, more widely representative,
and I would have thought it's likely we will
have it."
He has already set up a task force to
review the provincial Universities Act. It
will have to be changed if students and
faculty are to sit on a board of governors.
His structure to look after public accountability is, he says, high on the force's
priorities. He's determined that. He's also
determined legislation to change the
University Act will be tabled in the 1974-75
academic year, if not before.
The task force, he says, will gather
reports from anyone, but its job has already
been determined.
"I don't think the task force would want
to, how should I say, weigh evidence,
opinions and testimony that it receives to try
and see what is politically expedient. The
ultimate problem has to be what is the kind
of structure which will ensure the mission of
the universities is carried out.
"That's got to be the central thing and it
may turn out, for all I know — I'm not trying
to predict anything here, that there are
some surprising recommendations."
He says he believes as education commissioner he should not decide what the
function in society the university should
fulfil.
"The university has a lot of functions, and
there is considerable debate in any given
university and at universities at large as to
what these functions should be.
He says he will let the universities decide
their function, but if they don't decide
correctly, then the public will "not wish to
continue to support the universities at the
level of funding which they've provided up
to now."
"In a sense it's not a question of whether
that's good or bad. I think it's a decision the
universities and the people-in the universities have to make.
"You could say some of the functions of
the universities or the functions they perform can now be better served by the
regional colleges."
He says he fears universities may decide
they must be "high-falutin' trade schools".
"This could lead to a serious lag or failure
in the life of the province as a whole because
I do believe very strongly that in the long
run we need for social health some people
who are dedicated to the impartial pursuit of
knowledge.
"Now I don't want to be mistaken. Not
everything that is done at the university is
impartial nor is everything that is done at
university in pursuit of truth.
"Some of it is only the handing on of
convention — highly elaborate convention,
but convention nevertheless — I'm not
trying to say those things shouldn't be done,
but I want to be very, very clear that the
pursuit of knowledge if it is done in a
genuine way is a necessity for any healthy
society."
But, he says with a knowing smile, people
at the university are often willing to compromise the truth.
"If you've happened to be at a university
recently as a student, you begin to see how
that pursuit of truth is compromised over
and over again as it must be in any social
organization.
"At a certain point one must ask the
question, well if you look for it in its most
pure form in the university, where would
you look and you might not be able to find
it."
Silence.
He says rhetorically the problem of
compromise could be settled by turning the
university into trade schools — clearly an
undesirable solution he says he does not
want.
"If genuine scholarship is not going to be
in the universities, where it has been
traditionally located, then I think we have to
ask the question where is it going to be instead."
So there. The university does have a role
— pursuit of truth — but people in the
university are often willing to compromise.
Bremer knows he can't stop the compromise without changing the whole institution. This he is unwilling to do.
He wants to introduce, instead, a new
institution, which will only lead to further
compromise.
Vicious, most vicious.

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