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The Ubyssey Sep 13, 1966

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VOL. XLVIII, No. 1
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1966
224-3916
BONNER BOUNCED
Bennetts  back,  but.
—powell  hargrave photo
'M REGISTRATION WEEK creates boredom and tears, both for advisors and students. Carol
lohnson, Education 3, wouldn't have had o beg and plead with Ed McMullen if she had
been able to pre-register, like her Arty buddies.
Housing crisis
• • •
By STUART GRAY
The director of UBC's International House fears a critical housing shortage may
force some new students into
distant Vancouver slums.
r John Thomas described the
housing shortage affecting
more than 300 foreign students^—including 100 families
—as a possible panic situation.
"Those coming in now are
sometimes forced by economics to live in poor, or slum,
areas of the city," he said.
Thomas did not say specifically which slum areas must
be used, but said they are be-
'r low-standard sections far from
UBC.
'DRAINED'
"Our housing resources are
already drained, and as a result the majority of incoming
""  students    have    to    live    off
campus," he said.
"But the biggest problem is
that since 1961, over 2,000
suites in the university district
• - and Kitsilano have disappeared, due to changes in city bylaws."
At present only about half
the  foreign students have  ar-
<v rived, he said.
Thomas' concern over lack
of student housing was echoed
by Ray Larsen, Alma Mater
Society housing co-ordinator,
and UBC housing director Dr.
Malcolm McGregor.
"It's  like the  jungle,"   said
Larsen, "like looking for food
by animal instinct.
^'EVAPORATED*
"We have approximately
800 married families now seek
ing accommodation, and the
accommodation on our housing list has evaporated."
Larsen said he personally
knew a married student with
three children who lodked for
a month and a half before
finding a home.
"And large numbers of people show up at the last minute," he said.
"It's very grim. Eventually
they'll find accommodation,
but many will end up travelling phenomenal distances."
One reason for housing
shortages is refusal of many
apartments to accept children,
said Larsen.
"Married students  also find
themselves competing with
groups of single students when
they try to rent houses."
McGregor summed up the
housing situation on campus
with a terse "it's bad."
He estimated at least 700
single men, 600 women, and
200 married students need accommodation.
"But we've been full up
since July," he said.
Reason for the lack of new
facilities, he said, is simply
lack of funds.
"If  you supply the  money,
we'll    build    the    residences.
We're walking' on • a financial
SEE: CRISIS
(Continued on Page 2)
NDP up to 16,
Grits grab six
Monday's provincial election cost Premier Bennett a
cabinet minister and gained him one seat to the opposition's
three.
Attorney-General Robert
Bonner was upset in Vancouver-Point Grey by freshman
Liberal Garde Gardom.
He and his incumbent running mate UBC neurosurgeon
Pat McGeer handily took the
redistributed riding.
Bennett announced in Kelowna a by-election will be
held to get Bonner back into
the legislature.
The Socreds won 33 seats.
The New Democratic Party
picked up two seats to win 16
and the Liberals added one to
raise their standing to six
seats.
The Social Credit party held
32 of the 52 seats in the last
legislature, the NDP 14, the
Liberals five and there was
one vacancy.
Redistribution raised the
total number of seats to 55.
Both opposition leaders,
Robert Strachan of the NDP
and Ray Perrault of the Liberals, were re-elected.
In Vancouver-Burrard, Dr.
Ray Parkinson and Tom Ber-
ger of the NDP were elected,
defeating Social Credit party
whip Bert Price and former
Vancouver mayor Tom Als-
bury.
Three UBC students were
defeated. NDP candidates
Garth Brown and Ed Lavalle
lost in Point Grey. Liberal
Rick Higgs went down in Vancouver-Burrard.
Commerce Prof. Ralph Loffmark topped the poll in the
new riding of Vancouver
South. Loffmark is trade and
industry minister.
Education Minister Les Pet-
W.
A. C. BENNETT
. . in again
erson was interviewed by The
Ubyssey at 9 p.m., just as his
re-election became evident.
"Social Credit will spend
more money on education for
more universities and colleges
in the next years," he promised.
Bennett has promised a new
college in the Interior and
2,500 new university classrooms by 1970.
Peterson also confirmed his
promise of an expanded
money - for - marks program.
First-class students will get 75
per cent of tuition fees, 50 per
cent goes to second-class winners.
"And we're going to double
the number of second-class
awards,"  he said.
•   •
so AMS plans co-op residences
By  ANNE   BALF
Well-worn dreams of student-
owned housing may soon be
a reality if the Alma Mater
Society  has its way.
The AMS plans a complex
of self-contained, self-financing
student-owned suites somewhere on campus in the near
future.
AMS president Peter Braund
said Monday the chronic shortage of student housing both
on and off the campus had
forced the AMS to seek feasible additions to the present
inadequate   residences.
"We shall hire an architect
within a few weeks to draw
up plans for the complex,"
Braund said.
"Student     funds     totalling
PETER BRAUND
'. . . AMS forced'
$1,500 have been set aside for
this."
Basis of the decision was a
report on the demand for
student housing at UBC by
Ray Larsen, AMS housing coordinator.
The report details the type
of housing best for the well-
being of the student and
studies ways of integrating the
residence with the university.
The report recommended the
low-cost apartment housing decided on by the AMS, with
community kitchens and washrooms and private bedrooms.
"There is a crying need at
UBC for low-cost housing convenient to  the campus."
There is a 1400-student
waiting list for UBC residences,
and 5,500 students are seeking
suitable accomodation outside
the gates, he said.
"The suites we are planning
will only accommodate 100 to
175   students,"   Braund   said.
"But if somebody doesn't
build something, we're not going to get anything done about
the situation."
The AMS plans to finance
the residence with a loan, to
be paid back by student rents.
The project will cost between
half a million and one million
dollars.
The AMS will present a
brief to the Board of Governors this fall outlining the co-op
project and asking for a land
grant. Page 2
-V
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1966
—dermis gans photo
CUT-RATE BOOKS are advertised on the outside wall of
the Field House. Inside are brand new ones, but Lisa
Lopianawska,  Arts  2,   is  trying  to  find   used texts for  her
courses,   rather than  pay those   high   prices.
Tommy trips out,
new post set up
A major shakeup in UBC's administrative organization
has been announced following the resignation of building
and grounds supervisor Tom Hughes.
Bursar   William   White   an-	
nounced creation of a new
position in the campus bureaucracy—director of physical  plant.
First appointee is James
Turner, 54, now a B.C. Hydro
employee.
Turner will take charge of
two presently separate departments—'building and grounds
and architect planner.
Previous chain of command
had Hughes and architect
planner J. C. Porter on an
equal basis under the bursar.
CRISIS
(Continued from  Page  1)
tightrope   right   now.     It's   a
matter of pick and choose."
During the summer several
improvements have 'been made
to campus housing, he said.
These include extensive
painting, desk lamps, and cafeteria lighting in Acadia, and a
new 40-cubicle study room for
Totem Park.
McGregor said he is highly
sympathetic with student complaints about residences.
'GOT TO  GO*
Asked what he thought of
older residences on campus—
the remaining huts at Acadia
and those at Fort Camp—McGregor said: "We've got to
get rid of them."
"I'd like to see complete
new housing in Acadia within
five years. Fort Camp must
go too, but it is impossible to
say when," he said.
Turner will be directly responsible to bursar White.
Hughes resigned during the
summer.
Turner, whose appointment
takes effect Mov. 15, is presently assistant project manager for equipment at B.C.
Hydro's Peace and Columbia
projects.
"We felt one man with wide
experience could better catch
the overall picture — both
maintenance and planning,"
said White. "This should
result in a smoother, more efficient operation."
Turner was among 102 applicants who responded to national advertising for the job.
THINK PIZZA
COMING SOON
Strike
delay
and
new
profs
texts
Class  changes
in  timetable
The following changes
have 'been made in the original  timetable:
Ec. 101 is in Bu. 106.
Geog. 100, Sec. 1, Practical No. 10 is at 8:30; Sec.
2, Practical No. 20 is at
4:30.
Geog. 306 has lectures
both terms, labs first term
only.
Hist. 420 has additional
hour 1:30 Friday in B.. 218.
By AL DONALD
If the text for your Ionospheric Mechanics 893 course isn't
in the Field House, try blaming something besides the bookstore. _____._...___...._____._.____i
Like the rail strike or your
prof.
Bookstore manager J. A.
Hunter said the week-long
strike has held up many book
shipments in eastern warehouses.
"We expect no Canadian
shipments for a week," he
said.
Profs who order late get
their books late, he added.
"A lot of professors don't
order until it's too late to get
the books for the beginning
of lectures," Hunter said.
The Field House, which opened its doors to students Thursday, will be the main book
distribution center until Oct. 1.
After that you buy your
books from the main bookstore.
If you have some books
from last year which will be
used for the course again, you
can sell them back to the bookstore for 65 per cent of the
original price.
Hunter's horde then adds
15 per cent to the price it
paid and puts the book on a
table by the west wall of the
Field House.
Hunter denied textbooks
cost less  at  downtown  stores.
"Paperbacks are the same
and textbooks are more expensive downtown,"  hesaid.
He said the bookstores paid
out $45,000 to $50,000 in five
per cent rebates last year.
To take advantages of the
rebate plan, still in operation
this year, save your bookstore
receipts and hand them back
at the end of the year.
You will get back five per
cent of the total.
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SPECIAL     EVENTS
presents
James Meredith
THURSDAY, SEPT. 22
Auditorium - 12:30 - 35c
ATTENTION
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SFU
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STUDENTS
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Specializing in
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For Your Discontinued Books
and Paperbacks
See The Book Buyer
at the
U.B.C FIELD HOUSE
SEPT. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 Tuesday, September  13,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
'Forget proposed vote,
SUB plans go ahead'
—kurt hilger photo
MUSIC BUILDING was supposed to be finished by now, says
tuba-playing Joyce Baker, Music 2. So she went in and
started to practice anyway. Too bad it had to rain.
ON CAMPUS
Building stopped
by strike-walkout
By ANN  BISHOP
Building projects across the campus have been slowed
up or stopped by the combination carpenters' strike and
lockout.
Buildings such as the new
dentistry complex, additions to
IvSedical Science, Metallurgy
and Music buildings are far behind schedule.
Forestry and Agriculture
building will be unable to open
•V
We offer
eager hacks
the greatest
Yes, Virginia, there is a
Ubyssey.
And even if your name is
Virginia, you can work for it.
The Ubyssey, Canada's
greatest student newspaper, is
distributed three times a week
on campus for free.
So we need free reporters
who can write, type, or just
look eager.
If you want to work for the
paper, come to the office in
north Brock basement and tell
someone.
When he has stopped laughing, fill out an interview form.
Then come to the first general
staff meeting noon  Sept.  21.
at    Christmas    as    originally
planned.
None of the new buildings
were scheduled to open this fall
so no students will be without
classroom and lab facilities.
UBC Buildings and Grounds
authorities say all work that
can be done during the labor
dispute is going ahead. Construction starts planned this
fall will be halted until the
dispute ends—carpentry work
is one of the first jobs done on
a new project.
In all cases but one, a strike
at the psychiatric wing on the
hospital, the disputes have resulted in lock-outs.
Because the locked - out
carpenters can't set up picket
lines on the construction site,
workers in other unions can
continue their jobs.
The psychiatric wing pickets
are having little impact—the
project is only at the first stage
when nothing can be done
without carpentry.
In building where most of
carpentry work has already
been done, plumbing and heating work can continue.
UBC's own unions have not
been affected by the dispute
and small alterations around
the campus are still going on.
Student council plans a
December beginning on construction of the proposed $4.8
million student union building.
Alma Mater Society president Peter Braund said Monday the board of governors
will approve Nov. 17 final
plans for the building, to go
up on the stadium site.
"We can open bids for tenders the next day," he said.
Braund said he believes the
tenders will be snapped up
within two weeks by construction companies eager for the
contracts.
AMS SIGNS
The AMS signed July 11 an
agreement with the B of G
providing for construction of
the building.
Although the agreement
states the cost of SUB will be
in excess of $5 million, Braund
said it will not go over $4.8
million if work begins by
January.
Students will pay $3 million of the cost through an annual assessment of $15 a student over 18 years included
in the $29 AMS fee.
The remainder is borne by
the university, which will construct a $1.1 million food service area, and a branch of the
Bank of Montreal, which will
pay $202,000 as 35 years prepaid rent for 6,000 square feet
of floor space.
LETTER SENT
Braund also expects grants
and gifts for the construction
of the building.
AMS treasure Lome Hudson, who is also SUB planning
committee chairman, sent a
letter Monday to B.C. premier
W. A. C. Bennett requesting
provincial government aid for
the construction.
Braund said he failed recently to obtain federal aid.
Student council Aug. 29
passed a motion to establish a
lO-member committee to supervise  construction.
NO VOTE
Braund said that although
the council passed at the end
last year a motion calling for
a referendum on the question
of holding up construction until a reassessment of the building could be made, such a
referendum is not likely to be
held.
"We don't talk about it any
more," he said.
He said the problems which
had initiated the idea had disappeared.
"There was the image that
facts about the building were
being withheld," he said. "And
there   was   no   definite   time-
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LORNE HUDSON
. planning chairman
table of construction and progress let out."
"Students thought they were
paying too much for something they didn't know enough
about."
And, Braund pointed out,
the costs of holding up construction now would be enormous.
"This is the major project
of the AMS now," he said.
"We cannot afford to stop it."
He said soaring construction
costs would add several hundred thousand dollars to the
price.
THINK OUR COFFEE
IS HABIT FORMING?
(IT IS)
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FROSH   SERVICE
SUNDAY,   SEPTEMBER   18th,   7:00  p.m.
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED CHURCH
5375 University Boulevard
"Secular  Man's  God-Talk"
Rev. Jack Shaver, Speaker
GIRLS!     GIRLS!
Receive  a
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On your new fall shoes.
Just present your A.M.S. card when visiting
our wonderful world of fashionwise footwear
This offer good until Sept. 30, 1966 only
Ladies and Teeners Highstyle Footwear
548 Granville St. UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by he Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
UniversityPress. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review;
and Focus, a weekly news magazine of world university affairs. Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS). _
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242= editor, local 25; photo **'
Friday, loc. 24; Focus, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019. .        , l
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
"The responsibility ot the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3, 1966
Socred education
Education, particularly of the post-secondary school
variety, was an inexcusably minor issue in Premier
W  A. C. Bennett's successful bid to stay in office.
However, blame for this glossing over of education
problems lies mainly in the timing of the election.
During the campaign weeks, the three B.C. universities were closed and students scattered, frustrating any
attempt by student leaders to force current education
problems into the forefront of election issues.
In fact, we wonder about the affection of the honorable member from Okanagan South towards September
as an election month.
Is it just a. coincidence that during the weeks of campaigning prior to this Sept. 12 election, the universities
were closed?
But in case the Socreds — and particularly Education
Minister Les Peterson — didn't hear the problems outlined by B.C. student leaders, we'd like to restate the
case. ii.
The Canadian Union of Students has discovered that
the economic top 10 per cent of the population produces
one-quarter of all university students—exactly the same
number that the bottom 50 per cent of the economic pile
send to university.
These figures nicely belie the myth that everyone
has an equal chance to reap the benefits of an affluent
society.
Sure, a smart slum kid can still have three-quarters
of his fees paid by the government money-for-marks
scheme, but he's not likely to have the other $1,500
necessary for a year at university or technical school.
Government ears are slowly beginning to hear the
economic problems, but they remain remarkably deaf
to the social problems surrounding education.
For some reason smart kids from poor and deprived
families don't finish high school, nor do they seek
further training at university or other post-secondary
institutes.
CUS, a.t its Halifax congress last week, suggested part
of the anomaly is not enough kindergartens overcrowded
primary schools, academically sub-standard high schools-
and a dearth of proper counselling at all levels.
Canadian student leaders also suggest education is a
right not a privilege, and the realities of economic survival make education beyond high school mandatory for
all capable people.
Thus, while premier Bennett's increased money-for-
marks plan is very nice, it doesn't solve the real problems. The increase amounting to roughly $100 is small
change in the name of equality of education opportunity.
It doesn't make university education more than an
elite privilege, even though the government's contribution to universities comes from the whole of society.
It doesn't do anything to improve educational quality
at all levels.
It doesn't do anything to make all people aware of
the benefits education has for them.
When students harried the old Bennett government, it
ignored them or responded with money-for-marks
tokens.
The new Bennett government has not yet heard student representations on the importance of universal
accessibility to higher education.
We are sure the new Bennett regime will not be as
difficult to reach as the old one.
Welcome, frosh
Last year, there was this Ubyssey editor.
In September, he wrote an editorial warning frosh
not to accept any hot tips from smart-ass upper classmen.
"Find out for yourself," he cried. "You are embarking on a great experience, university. And whether it
is a great time or a rotten one depends on you."
This September, he edited a glossy little handbook
called Tuum Est, which you probably have in your
other hand right now.
It's stuffed with hot tips.
We got a hot tip for you, frosh.
Don't believe all the hot tips everyone gives you.
Except this one,, as you nimbly leap construction
ditches some cold, winter dawn: maybe you should'a
been a plumber.
DANGEROUS  CLIMB
Fumble-footed frosh warned
DONALD
By AL DONALD
So you're a university student now, eh?
You've just put one foot
on the bottom step of the
spiral staircase leading to
the top. of the ivory tower.
Remember your high
school counsellor telling you
to get out there oh that
peninsula and learn things?
Well, this is the place —
just look around you.
Look at
that fellow in
the red
sweater.
He is an
engineer and
knows all
about sines
and tangents
and strength
of materials
and other
clever things.
He is also helpful. Go tell
him you're new here and
where can you find the
Buchanan building for your
Fine Arts 100 class.
Look at that tall distinguished man in an academic
gown with grey hair (the
man, not the gown).
Although he is the housing czar, he speaks only
Greek, so you won't be able
to understand him.
Tell him you have no
place to sleep. He will tell
you why you have no place
to sleep and ask you please
not to quote him in The
Ubyssey.
This is The Ubyssey. It is
Canada's greatest student
newspaper and has been for
the last five years.
Look at it. In the next
four years it will be a prime
influence on your life.
Leafing through its pages
three times a week, you will
be exposed to every form
of subversion, propaganda
and irrelevancy known to
the warped mind of man.
Under no circumstances
should you show The Ubyssey to your maiden aunt,
mother, small sister or pet
rabbit.
If you don't like us, join
us. Our office is in north
Brock basement.
While you're in Brock,
look at the fraternity men.
(They are the ones with narrow ties and no shoulders).
They join fraternities so
they can have friends. It
costs them at least $50 a
year to have friends. 'Nuff
said.
Look at the weirdie-
toeardies mingled with the
fraternity men.
They talk all the time
about Trotsky, and Kierkegaard and student involv-
ment and Berkeley.
Do not tell them they are
phonies. They will beat you
about the head with surplus
peace march banners.
Now sit down and have a
coffee.
Bad, isn't it?
Contemplate your future,
while your friendly ole
Ubyssey gives you some advice.
Remember that spiral
staircase in the ivory tower?
It leads you in circles, but
you're supposed to foe going up.
Enjoy your academic vertigo while you can.
At Easter 1967 we'll lose
about one third of you
teeny-boppers in the sessional exams.
After that you become a
native.
For you tourists, however,
ever, here are a few rules.
Don't  attempt   to   be   so
phisticated with persons in
higher years. You are expected to be naive because
you are naive.
Note that the first year is
for fun, the second for
studying.
If you're bright enough to
graduate, you should have
no difficulty getting through
these superficial first year
courses.
Act like a frosh so people
will know what they are
talking to. ( prepostion is
a legitimate thing to end a
sentence with.)
Act like a frosh by wearing white socks and black
shoes; having pimples, arguing with your prof about
irrelevancies; using four-
letter words when talking to
women; and loitering in
front of the library.
For some details on how
to be a frosh, attend frosh
orientation and all the frosh
lectures during registration
week.
Then begin smiling a lot.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing Richard Blair
Newt Carol Wilson
City Danny Stoffman
Photo Powell Hargrove
Page Friday Claudia Gwinn
Focus   George Reamsbottom
Ass't City Rosemary Hyman
Ass't News...Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Asst Photo Dennis Gans
A provincial lad, pro Stu Gray
worked manfully. Mary Ussner,
Ann Bishop, Ann Balf and Val
Zuker worked womanfully. Also
Judy Bing. Al Donald, rubbing his
beard thoughtfully, eyed the scene
and also produced immense inches
of copy. Reporters Bert Hill, Roy
Starrs, and Irving Fetish also polished prose. Among intruders were
a bearded pr for Tuum Est and a
smart kid from a downtown news
desk who waxed critical. No-shows
included U Thant, Sammy Davler,
Jr. and Larry Green. Tuesday, September 13,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
CUS Congress
WHEN'S PAYDAY?
Union creature
would fight free
HALIFAX — The Canadian Union of Students has invented a new kind of student.
He pays no fees and gets a
salary for attending university.
He probably doesn't have
middle-class parents.
He wants to learn,  and actively participates in what
he  learns by
attending
board of governor    meet-
ings     and
electing     representatives
to boards and
senates,    and
fighting   for
alternate ways
to administer universities.
KELSEY
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief John
Kelsey was one of eight AMS
delegates to the CVS Congress
in Halifax, N.S. last week. He
reports on two aspects of the
conference in these articles.
He fights to preserve academic freedom and improve
the quality of universities.
He is a creature of the
sweeping six resolutions
passed Thursday by 250 delegates to the 30th CUS congress
at Dalhousie University.
MAJOR  RESOLUTIONS
The major resolution of the
six is universal accessibility
to higher education.
The new universal accessibility move, calling for student
salaries, no fees, and improved
education at all levels, rolled
over the remnants of right-
wing opposition from McGill
University, Maritime and Universities of Alberta delegates
toy a vote of 86 to 36.
The other five resolutions
support universal accessibility
by advocating:
Increasing federal support
for education by granting new
taxation powers to the provinces, since education is constitutionally a provincial matter;
An end to secrecy at board
of governors' and academic
senate meetings,
Student participation in deciding questions of academic
freedom;
NEW COMMITMENT
A new CUS commitment to
higher quality education, full
student participation in university government and full
student responsibility to take
an active role in raising academic  standards.
Universal  accessibility   calls
for rejection of all loan plans,
bursaries, means tests and
other conditions on student
aid, favoring student stipends.
It urges student community
work to remove motivational
'barriers to higher education,
beginning at the pre-school
level.
The 24-point resolution was
drafted and moved by University of Victoria student president Stephen Bigsby.
Bigsby said: "This resolution contains both long-term
financial and social goals, and
i m m e d iate implementation
steps."
He said it could, if implemented with the rest of the
six university affairs resolutions, change the entire character of Canadian universities.
UBC Alma Mater Society
president Peter Braund spoke
strongly for all six resolutions
and said UBC and the University of Victoria would work
together for their implementation.
"START MAGAZINE"
In other council business,
UBC moved that CUS start a
national student news magazine, to cost the union $10,000
an issue.
Consulting with McGill's
Victor Rabinovitch, CUS associate secretary for communications, AMS president
Braund told the congress the
first issue would appear on all
campuses in early 1967.
The congress also approved
money to hire two new travelling  field secretaries.
One will work exclusively
in the Maritimes to help
strengthen student councils at
the small Atlantic schools.
The other new field secretary will work with all member institutes to create student
housing co-operatives across
Canada.
Left fights right
on CUS policy
HALIFAX — The 30th annual Canadian Union of Students congress nearly dissolved itself and the union out of
existence on the third day of sessions.
Sparked by the withdrawal
of Memorial University of
Newfoundland, powered by a
growing right wing-left wing
split and exhausted by 15
hours daily of intense discussion, something had to break.
It broke when the university
affairs commission, one of
three standing CUS commissions, reached a deadlock
while discussing a universal:
accessibility resolution,
sibility resolution.
The commission dissolved
into   three   sub-commissions.
The deadlock was joined by
the other two commissions,
Canadian and international affairs.
• •     •
On Monday, the 250 delegates moved into rotating sessions of commissions, sub-
commissions, regional caucuses
and university caucuses.
To the left, for expansion of
student council activities into
all areas of education and society at large stood UBC's
nine-man delegation led by
AMS president Peter Braund;
University of Victoria, University of Toronto and Waterloo University.
To the right, urging CUS
members to pull back to
campus services only and stay
out of outside society sat the
University of Alberta at Edmonton, Montreal's McGill and
the entire Maritime region of
CUS.
But when Thursday's plenary
finally arrived, the left had
ground the right to a nub and
only minor opposition remained to nearly all motions.
• •     •
With the rest of Monday and
most Tuesday spent on these
questions, the sweeping six
resolutions were drafted as
answers and the conference
resumed with only one day
left.
CUS president Doug Ward
attributed the right-left polarization to an articulate right
wing.
"This was the first time
there's every been one," Ward
said in an interview, referring
to Edmonton's Branny
Schepanovich and McGill's
Arnie Aberman.
"There's never been a caucus
of the right, there's never been
'any connection between the
personalist-individualist groups
such as McGill and Edmonton.
Advance Mattress Coffee House
(An imperative student effort in bankruptcy)
• Wednesday Nights: Poetry
• Thursday: Blab Night
(Make your own harangue or comedy on stage)
• Fridays: ?
• Saturday: Foiksinging
• Sunday: Film Night
8:30 NIGHTLY
TENTH  &  ALMA
-        228-8122
"Except for last year, there's
not really been astrong left
wing   either.
"The conference is usually
quite moderate and nicely
progressive."
Ward said he was delighted
at the passage of the left wing
caucus's resloutions when
plenary sessions resumed
Thursday.
Observers and delegates interviewed by The Obyssey
agreed that the Atlantic
caucus' position was determined by its unique situation
— many small universities
whose student leaders have no
role byond service to the
campus.
Said one Toronto delegate,
"They need some years of hard
work to catch up to the rest of
Canadian students. It's not that
they basically disagree with
the policies of CUS, it's just
that these policies really aren't
relevant to the small Maritime
schools."
BAD BOYS
RAGGE SHOPPE
Russian   Shirts
— puffed sleeves
— puffed bodies
315 Seymour St.
THE
Sir4 Cage
"FOR DAMSELS"
Swedish  Poor Boys
New Shipment Arriving
TODAY
New Colors — Pure Wool
Only $9.95
—in North America, only at
BAD BOYS
Bird Cage
315 Seymour St.
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and  Sales
McCUISH
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAILS - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
STUDENT   RATES
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st
PH. 263-3610
Guess who has the BIG
College Selection of Clothing?
You're Right!
Try
KiriHIIIIS & FARISH LTD.
786 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Phone: 684-4819
Also
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 Granville St
"TWO CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN SHOPS —
ESPECIALLY FOR  YOU"
r
\ Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1966
O
O
0
l-l
H
%
"N
TWEED   J**™^ shapes deep-.ex.ure1
ported herringbone «dD- "     ^ loI col.
young ^-^^rJjLl because they're
U W» «***£,* -rfh pan. or «*
8Wi.chable . • • »■** ^ to matching t—*
BWea.ers.oco^-*ackycaffipo.ihio»
See  these  «"*«** ...30 ^d 3:30 in *• Bay
j_n_d Saturday at u-J"
™„e Shop, third floor.
CoUegiennebhop.
NO
front zipper
EACH
-s  seen
in   the
picr,   rREPE  BLOUSE   •   •   ■ u   into  the
RUFFL? Vogl-   WM y°U black   sizes 10 to 16.
S/' look- In white or black,       ^ _fi ,5
_„t  in  the  BaY
..  no  dawn  pay«"«'tMr(, floor
/-_u_.nienne snap,
Budge* v/ith  a
Co»eg">enne
**«52»fer» Tuesday, September 13,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
He said students must take
a consciously radical political
position, and said it is students'
duty to society to be intellectual and political leaders.
Left-wing student
CUS president
By JOHN KELSEY
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief
HALIFAX — Hugh Armstrong, a graduate political
science student, Friday became president-elect of the Canadian Union of Students.
Armstrong, of Carleton University and presently president
of the Ontario region of CUS,
takes  office next summer.
He won a majority of the
first ballot at the final plenary
session of the 30th annual
CUS congress at Dalhousie
University, defeating Don
Mitchell of Jtegina and Wyne
Hankey of King's College
Halifax.
In other business delegates
accepted a five cent per captia
fee hike, from 60 to 65 cents
and approvecfa budget of $377,-
000, bringing UBC's contribution to the union to more than
$10,000 a year.
Armstrong was nominated
by Waterloo University and
represents the left wing CUS.
He pledged full support to the
sweeping six resolutions passed Thursday's sessions and
urged CUS activity continue
in its present direction.
Mitchell, nominated by the
right-wing remnant of McGill
and Edmonton, also backed the
move to universal accessibility
to higher education, but urged
more concentration of CUS effort in services to individual
campus.
Hankey, a graduate philosophy, student, asked delegates
to support the Aristotelian
position and elect a
philosopher-king.
HUGH ARMSTRONG
. . CUS president-elect
In other elections, Dave
Sanders became president of
CUS' western region.
Sanders is president of the
Manitoba council and probably
the last part-time Western regional president since delegates also moved to find funds
to hire a full time field-secretary - cum - president next
year.
Yorkeen mansion converted,
renamed for benefactor
Yorkeen is out. Dr. Cecil H. Green is in.
The former, name of the old estate of Sen. S. S.
McKeen, will be renamed for the latter, a UBC alumnus
who recently donated $200,000 to convert the estate into
a university-community centre.
Yorkeen includes a large mansion and 3V2 acres of
cliff-top land next door to UBC's School of Social Work,
another ex-mansion.
Offices of the University Resources Council, Alumni
Annual Giving Campaign, and Three Universities Capital Fund are being moved into the mansion.
Said UBC president John Macdonald: "The centre
will provide a hitherto-lacking specialized area at UBC
for seminars, conferences and other university-community contacts."
Since acquired by UBC, Yorkeen has been used for
extension department seminars and conferences, and to
accommodate short-term guests.
Director now
plans families
The director of UBC's extension department for 13
years is resigning to help
plan populations.
John Friesen, 54, will
leave UBC Nov. 30. He'll
spend a month in India before joining the Population
Council in December in
New York.
His first assignment will
be with a population project
in Turkey.
To his extension department successor, Friesen advised: "Continue the intimate liaison with the faculty
which is the lifeblood of the
extension program."
An extension head must
'be thoroughly educated and
keep up with important issues of the day, he said.
THE
SiM Cage
"FOR DAMSELS"
DRESSES
Soft, alluring, simple lines; each
dress style can be made — consult
our  library of dress ideas.
—in   North  America, only  at
BAD BOYS
Bird Cage
315 Seymour St.
BAD BOYS
RAGGE SHOPPE
Unique
Rawhide Suede
JACKETS
in Fall colours
39.50 to 45.00
315 Seymour St.
mmt
?i||ftiU
n">f^)
"The all-male toiletry that interests women"
AFTER SHAVE   COLOGNE, SOAP, DE0D0	
HAIR TONIC, TALC, SHAVING CREA ...
Welcome Students
from your UBC BOOKSTORE
Get all of your
STATIONERY SUPPLIES
with ease and at a saving
at the University Operated Bookstore
BUY ALL TEXT BOOKS
Except -
Medicine
Rehab.  Medicine
Pharmacy
Social  Work
Law
Architecture
Dentistry
Librarianship
at THE FIELD HOUSE
(Next to Brock Hall)
During September-Hours 8:45-5 p.m.
Monday to Friday
REBATE POLICY
University of British Columbia students get a 5% rebate on
all items purchased at the Bookstore.
All registered students, including GRADUATE and UNDERGRADUATE students in regular attendance at the winter and
summer sessions, will be eligible for the rebate.
To obtain the rebate students should save their CASH REGISTER RECEIPT SLIPS and present them within 12 months of the
purchase date. Rebate dates will be APRIL 1 TO THE LAST DAY
OF EXAMS FOR WINTER SESSION STUDENTS and AUGUST 15 TO
AUGUST 20 FOR SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS.
Students presenting their Alma Mater Society card or Summer Session Association card with accumulated CASH REGISTER
RECEIPT SLIPS will receive the five percent rebate  in cash.
STUDENTS ARE REMINDED THAT POSITIVELY
NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES WILL BE MADE
WITHOUT   PRESENTING   THE   CASH   REGISTER   RECEIPT  SLIPS Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 13, 1966
Summer roundup-
Staff,   computers,   classes,
UBC, May to September
RETURNING      STUDENTS
will find the university-approved medical plan has been
changed to the provincial government plan from Medical
Services  Incorporated.
University President John
Macdonald announced early
this summer the switch was
made because of lower rates
under the provincial plan.
Unmarried students can
expect to save $4 a year;
married students will pay
from $12 to $15.
THREE UBC professors
have joined the ranks of society presidents.
Dr. Anthony Scott, head
of the economics department, has been elected president of the Canadian Political Science Association; Dr.
Gideon Rosenbluth, of the
same department, president
of the Canadian Association
of University Teachers; and
Dr. Stanley Pech, of the department of Slavonic Studies,
president of the Canadian
Association  of Slavists.
THEY'VE   GIVEN   you   a
number. — and another —
and another — and taken
away your name. UBC took
a $335,000 step toward complete computerization this
summer with the installation
of a Honeywell computer
unit with a printing capacity
of 650 lines a minute.
Codes will be established
to sort individuals by name,
address, or geographical location; the computer prints
as many as 60,000 address
labels in half an hour.
Each of the computer's
tape reels can record up to
15 million characters, the
equivalent in human terms
of an eight-storey-high stack
of punch cards.
The computer will be used
in library, registration and
other administration work.
It  takes its coffee black.
DR.   LEON   J.   LADNER,
Q.C., member of the university's board of governors for
the past nine years, has donated $100,000 for a clock
tower.   The  tower   will   top
THINK YOU
WILL VISIT
JhsL Jhiak. . . I!
IS INN
4423  W.   10th
BAD BOYS
RAGGE SHOPPE
Genuine
Coats
Exclusive Military Loom
Some Brass-Button Models
315 Seymour St.
the projected administration
building at the corner of
University Boulevard and
Wesbrook Crescent.
A $20,000 National Research Council grant has
been awarded to two faculty
of agriculture researchers
for an aminio acid analyser.
DR. JACOB BIELY is studying the food value for poultry of wheat and fish products. Dr. Warren Kilts is
examining the food value of
various crops used to supplement  livestock   rations.
DR. JAN LEJA
.  .  .  fingerprints molecules
Work on the $36 million
Health Sciences Centre began early  in July.
The Hon. Allan MacEachen.
federal health minister; the
Hon. Eric Martin, then provincial minister of health services and hospital insurance,
and P. A. Woodward, donor
of $4 million for the centre
marked the start of construction by planting three trees.
First stage of the centre
is a wing to house most of
the psychiatric research,
teaching and care.
TWO PROFS will start the
year playing happily with
new academic toys. Assistant phys-ed prof Eric
Banister has a respirometer
— only one of its kind in
Canada.
The machine will be used
to pretrain athletes for contests at high altitudes. The
respirometer simulates high
altitudes by changing the
oxygen level inside the
machine.
Mineral engineering prof.
Dr. Jan Leja is waiting for
an interferometric infra-red
emission spectrometer worth
$35,000.
Purchased with a Canada
Council grant, the machine
records sets of wavy lines
called spectra.
Dr. Leja hopes UBC
research with the machine
will lead to new advances in
attacking metal corrosion
and lubrication problems.
MORE NAMES coming
and going: Dr. George H.
Winter has succeeded Dr.
Walton J. Anderson as chairman of the agricultural economics department, and Dr.
Malcolm Tail comes to the
faculty of agriculture from
Newcastle-on-Tyne, England.
Tait, an expert in animal
production and nutrition,
will arrive on campus in
October.
And two UBC professors
have taken a year's leave of
absence for research and
teaching in Europe and
India.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost &  Found
11
Greetings
12
Special   Notices
13
FRUSTRATED BY FIRST WEEK
line-ups? Relieve your tensions.
Attend the first big bash of the
year. Dance to the "Nocturnals"
Friday, Sept. 23 in the Armouries,
8:30-1:00 a.m. The first of all
mixers.
UPPER TENTH BARBER'S SPEC-
ial for September —10% off all
Toiletries. 4574 W. 10th—1 blook
from  the gates.          	
COMMERCE: 4 OUT OF 5 ROYAL-
ists  approve CC.  Wed, in Angus.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB AN-
nual Splash & Dance. Memorial
Gym,   Sept.  24.	
NEW!   NEW    "THE   BIRD  CAGE"
—Bad   Boys   Shop  for  damsels  —
315 Seymour St.	
GIRLS! GIRLS! RECEIVE A 10%
discount on your new fall shoes.
Visit a wonderful world of fash-
ionwise footwear. The Pump
Room,  548  Granville.
Transportation
14
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
Motorcycles
27
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Beauty  Salons
31
Orchestras
35
Scandals
39A
Sewing—Alterations
40
Typewriters  8e  Repairs
42
Typing
43
EMPLOYMENT
Help  Wanted
51
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RE-
quires experienced clerk-typist for
eight months employment per
year, Sept.-April. Due to this fact,
the campus location, and the work
involved the job La especially suitable for a lady married to a
senior student or a staff member.
No children. Applicants must be
available for at least the next two
years. For further information call
Manager of Student Publications,
224-3242.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
In the Armouries or Publications
Office  in  Brock.
PURE COCONUT OIL — UPPER
Tenth Barbers & Toiletries. 4574
W.   10th.
RENTALS  & REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
Furn. Houses & Apts.
82
"83
Unfurn. Houses    &Apis.
Halls For Rent
84
~85
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
~l
THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS
by Carlo Goldoni
Classic farce of the Italian commedia dell'arte
SEPTEMBER 23 — OCTOBER 1
Student Performance — Monday, Sept. 26 — 7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75c
Tickets Available — Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
Note  —  Some  tickets at 75  cents  available  for  all  performances
SUPPORT YOUR OWN CAMPUS THEATRE
THIS SPACE
FOR
THE MAN
WITH
RESERVE
The  "WHO'S  WHO"   at   U.B.C.
"Sir4 Call J"
UBC  STUDENT  TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
Order Your Copy NOW
From  Phrateres Club Members
in the Armouries
During  Registration Week
"Ar Complete alphabetical listings for all students, including
name, faculty, year, local address, telephone number,
and home address.
if Calendar of miscellaneous and athletic events.
■jfc- YELLOW PAGES guide to campus telephones and
needed business services.
Available Mid October — Limited Number Printed
SO  ORDER  TODAY
250 Pages — Pre Sale ONLY 75c

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