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The Ubyssey Nov 24, 1964

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Array THE UBYSSEY
VOL. XLVII, No. 28
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1964
CA 4-3916
—don kydd photo
TO BE OR not to be, that was the question Monday when hardy Arts Council donned
sheets to publicize Academic Activities on campus. It rained all day, but toga-wearers
met anyway in informal forum in front of Library. (See story Page 3.)
After RCMP raid
Second student
faces drug rap
Another UBC student has been charged with possessing
narcotics, after a RCMP raid Friday night in Vancouver.
The   owner   of   the   Bunk
house where Miss Hughes was
folksinging, said if she is convicted she will not be asked to
perform here again.
George Dallas Selman, 23,
Arts IV, who gave his address
to police as 2400 York, will
appear in magistrate's court in
Vancouver this morning.
He appeared in court Saturday, but was remanded to today on his own recognizance
and a $500 bond.
Selman was charged jointly
with Helen Lynne Hughes, 24,
of Seattle, and William Fred
Bissett, 24, artist, of 3317
Fleming.
The trio was arrested by
RCMP at Bissett's home.
Last Tuesday, Barbara
Budd, a second-year arts stu-
UBYSSEY
SKI ISSUE
(See insert)
dent at UBC, was charged
with possession of marijuana.
She will also appear in magistrate's court in Vancouver
today.
Ubyssey stops
as year ends
Stop!
The presses will.
The   Ubyssey  stops   its
press  Friday,  with   its   last
edition this year.
Any   plugs,   notices,   vital
information, or such should
be in the hot hands of The
Ubyssey    as    of    Thursday
noon.
All   staff   members,   editors
or  not,   are  cordially   invited
to   drop   in   at   the   printers
Thursday night.
Ambulance
repairs slow
aid for girl
By DON HULL
An ill co-ed waited for an ambulance for nearly an hour
Monday while the university emergency vehicle was being
repaired.
Trudy Monk, P.E. I, lay in
Dean of Inter-Faculty Affairs
Walter Gage's office from 1:10
p.m. to 2:05 p.m. while the
traffic office obtained a downtown ambulance to take her
to Wesbrook Hospital.
Miss Monk fell on the stairs
in the cafeteria at noon and
struck her head on a banister.
A companion, Lyn Mackenzie, Arts IV, said Miss Monk
didn't seem to be injured.
However about 1 p.m. Miss
Monk began to feel ill, her
friend said.
She was taken to Dean
Walter Gage's office nearby in
the Buchanan building.
(More   mix-ups Page  3)
At 1:10 p.m. Doug Plum-
steel, Arts I said he phoned
the health service from Dean
Gage's office.
A doctor from Wesbrook
Hospital arrived fifteen minutes later with a nurse.
When no ambulance had arrived by 1:45 p.m., Buchanan
janitor Paul Gowerluk said
he phoned the traffic office
to enquire about the campus
ambulance and was told it was
downtown for repair.
A downtown ambulance arrived at the Buchanan building at 2:05 p.m.
A health services spokesman said the ambulance had
been called by the traffic office after health services had
called them.
Miss Monk was taken to
Wesbrook Hospital where she
is under observation.
Traffic director Sir Ouvry
Roberts said the shambulance
left the campus for battery repairs at 11:30 a.m.
KYLE MITCHELL
. . . will quibble
AMS bows
to union
demands
The AMS bowed to protests
from the Musician's Union and
cancelled the performance of
the Playboy Combo at the
Frosh Sadie Hawkins Dance
Saturday.
The Playboys, a non-union,
non-student band, were scheduled to play at the dance Saturday night, but were cancelled Friday noon when a union
replacement band, CFUN Classics, was found.
The AMS has an agreement
with the Musician's Union that
non-union bands may perform
for AMS functions only if the
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE: UNION
Basically honest
Rare cheaters have easier time
It's easier to cheat at UBC.
But students don't.
This is the opinion of Registrar John Parnall, whose office is just finishing the
scheduling of hundreds of
hundreds of Christmas exams.
• • •
The schedules will be posted
at various points about the
UBC campus on Friday. Corrected timetables follow these
ones, as students report exam
clashes in the first set of timetables.
"Our students are basically
JOHN PARNALL
. . . we're honest
honest and we don't need to
be as careful about cheating
during   exams   as some  universities are," Parnall said in
an interview Monday.
•   •   *
"The method of giving exams here is basically an honour system even though it
isn't called that," he said.
"While cheating is not as
prevalent at UBC as it is on
some campuses," he said, "it
does exist."
"We take a serious view of
it and students caught cheat
ing are usually required to
withdraw.
"The student who cheats is
usually in danger of failing
anyway," Parnall added.
Students writing exams are
seated in alternate seats.
•    •    •
Large lecture theatres like
Wesbrook 100 and Buchanan
106 have three supervisors.
Other rooms usually have
two.
The Armory, with 600 students, is supervised by five
to seven people. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 196^
—mouth photo
GIRLS WORKED off frustrations on Sadi e Hawkins' Day Friday in Brock Lounge.
Comely Freshettes shone shoes and gave backrubs for 10 cents. Sadie Hawkins dance
followed  Saturday night in  Brock  Lounge.
First time round
Wooten drops
Coming clues
The Second Coming has never been here before.
CUS digging for
sparkling types
Are you articulate, intelligent and representative of
a broad spectrum of student
opinion?
CUS is looking for a seminar chairman to head the
nine representatives it is
sending back to the national
seminar in Calgary at the
end of August.
"It will be its first time at
UBC," said Special Events
chairman Chris Wooten Monday.
"This is perfectly serious,"
he said. "It is not a prank."
Wooten also urged students
to be alert Thursday morning
for more information on the
Second Coming.
The Second Coming is
scheduled to take place Thursday in the Armory ar noon.
"You'll know by then who
it is," Wooten said.
(2) Westinghouse
Will be on Campus November 30 and December 1 and 2
to interview 1965 University of British Columbia graduates in electrical engineering mechanical engineering
and engineering physics.
A well-defined training program is
offered  to prepare candidates for
positions of responsibility in:
Design Engineering
Research and Development
Manufacturing Engineering
Industrial  Engineering
Apparatus Marketing and Sales
Field  Installation
Service Engineering
These positions will afford opportunity for career
development to Engineering graduates with potential. Professional salary scale and increases based on
performance as well as excellent employee fringe
benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Officer for detailed information, brochures and interview appointments.
opINNing
November 27
West kept out
by Wall-Zuken
The Berlin Wall was built
to keep West Germans out, not
to keep East Germans in, a
Communist alderman from
Winnipeg said Friday.
Joseph Zuken, an elected
municipal official in his eighth
term, spoke on Democracy and
Communism in Canada.
"Nazis, and pro-Nazi thinkers are still firmly entrenched
in the government of West
Germany," said Zuken.
"They must be kept from
undermining the socialist
People's Republic of Germany.
The Wall is a symbol of this
battle."
Zuken said the Communist
party  of  Canada  had a  long
record  of fighting  for  democratic freedoms.
"Democracy is the vehicle
by which complete socialism
will come to Canadian life,"
he added.
Have a Musical
Christmas
Recorders 99c
Guitars from $11.99
Tuneable Bongos    $14.99
6 Transistor Radios
complete  from $9.95
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"SUNDAY IN NEW YORK" — 9:20
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Also:
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Every UBC Student Will Really Enjoy This Outstanding
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Adults Evenings Only 50c
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
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offering careers in
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and Data Processing Education
Will Conduct Campus Interviews
on November 30th,
December 1st and 2nd
For Post Graduates and Graduates
in
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MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
HONORS MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
COMMERCE
Arrangements (or Personal Interviews
May Be Made Through
The University Placement Office
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES  COMPANY  LIMITED
1445 West Georgia     -     Vancouver, B.C. 682-5515
IBM Tuesday, November 24, 1964
Left view
Girls not
always
right
By JOAN GODSELL
Ubyssey Women's Angle
Left-handedness  has  got  to
go-
Why? It's causing havoc,
that's why.
Example—The other day I
was sitting at a table corner
in the library, minding my
own business.
The next thing I know,
someone with an over-active
right arm is sitting beside me,
pumping his elbow like it was
going out of style.
Amazing!
Amazing — because I was
doing the same thing.
But I'm left-handed. Inevitably we bumped elbows.
I flashed him a toothy grin,
turned crimson and moved my
chair over.
Again we bumped elbows.
(He had a big elbow.)
Again I moved over. Again,
again I moved over. We were
still bumping elbows.
Of course, I eventually came
to the end of the table and
spilled my books all over the
place. Of course everybody
glared at me.
I felt awful.
If someone would invent a
left-handed desk, I'd beat a
pathway to his door.
On the other hand, I'd give
my left arm to be right-
handed.
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
UNION
(Continued from Page 1)
band members  are  university
students.
The five member CFUN
Classics band was signed to
play for $150, the same price
the Playboys charged.
AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell said: "We've asked the
Playboys to submit their costs,
but we'll argue about paying
the full price of $150."
Under the contract the AMS
is obligated to pay the Playboys $75 if the AMS cancels
their performance within a
week of the dance.
Frosh president Kim Campbell described the dance as a
tremendous success, with 250
couples attending.
She said expenses totalled
about $265 and receipts $375
making a net profit of about
$100.
This is the first frosh dance
in many years which has made
money or broken even.
Sitar strummer
plays Saturday
One of India's leading
musician - composers sounds
the strings of his sitar Saturday in the Auditorium at
8:30 p.m.
Ravi Shankar has won
international prizes for
movie scores, opera and ballet, and movie themes. He
has played with American
jazz  musicians.
Admission is 50 cents for
students.
Emergency mix-up
Aid slowed in
comedy of errors
By MIKE VAUX
A comedy of errors kept a UBC co-ed from immediate
emergency treatment of a mouth injury she suffered in a
fall at the Sadie Hawkins dance in Brock Saturday night.
duty,
Toga out as
campus style
—don hume photo
LIBRARY RUSH is on. Exams start Dec. 8, and many
students are rediscovering the Library. Some nap. Some
talk. Some even study.
Even Negroes' in
UBC fraternities
Inter-Fraternity Council president Dean Paravantes said
Monday he doesn't worry about discrimination in UBC
fraternities.
The Brock proctor on
John Wilson, didn't know how
to call the UBC patrol wagon-
ambulance after hours if there
is no one in the patrol office.
So he called the hospital in
the Wesbrook building, got a
nurse, then a doctor, who told
him to get some one to bring
the girl—Jill McBride, Arts I
—to the hospital in a private
car.
But the student who volunteered his car had trouble
getting it going, so the girl
had to wait a little longer,
bleeding badly from the
mouth.
But when the car arrived
at the hospital, they found
there was no equipment to
carry the girl up to the emergency centre.
Finally a wheelchair on the
third floor of the hospital was
brought down, and the girl
was taken up.
She was treated and released.
The proctor said Monday he
has since learned the shambulance is equipped with a radio telephone, and can be contacted at any time through the
B.C. Telephone Radio Operator.
The toga probably isn't the
coming campus fashion, Bill
Bier, Arts IV decided Monday.
"It's very comfortable but it
has a tendency to trip you
walking up stairs," he said.
Monday was Toga Day at
UBC, and Bier and seven
other members of the Arts
Council and the Academic
Activities Committee wore togas to draw attention to academic activities on campus.
'I think I've caught a cold,"
Bier sniffed, as he stood in the
rain.
"Reactions to the hardy Toga-
clad ranged from dumbfounded stares to appreciative
whistles," Bier said.
"One bearded passerby commented: "It's very you!"
Bier said he didn't think it
could have rained very much
in ancient Greece.
WEDNESDAY NOON — NOVEMBER 25
AUDITORIUM
IMMORTAL    LAND
a film of Greece
Colour — Narration in English
He said he has yet to meet
anyone who complained about
being kept out of a fraternity
because  of  discrimination.
"I haven't given fraternity
discrimination at UBC any
thought," Paravantes said
Monday.
"There are Chinese, Japanese, and even Negroes in fraternities," he said.
A Board of Governors regulation at UBC prohibits any
form of discrimination in
fraternities at UBC.
opINNing
November 27
Clothes
Fine material and
painstaking craftsmanship combine
to give you a suit
of impeccable cut
and lasting quality.
Price? A pleasant
surprise!
Clinton's
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742 6raaviUe Street Ul-SttS
What do you want in a
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Graduates who've been out a few years say the important things
to look for in choosing a job are good training, an unrestricted
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responsibility and a stimulating environment where intelligence
and enthusiasm are recognized. The points are not always in that
order, but these are the main ones. What, then, can Procter &
Gamble offer you?
1# An outstanding record of individualized,
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2« Responsibilities and promotion based on
a man's ability — not seniority.
^# A growth company which controls 30%-
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which it competes; at least one of our
brands is in 95% of all Canadian households.
4# Among other benefits, highly competitive
salaries and profit sharing.
Obviously, you need to know facts before making an intelligent
choice of your career. We'd like to tell you more about us. Descriptive brochures are available at your Placement Office and
company representatives will visit for interviews on
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4
for positions in
ADVERTISING - BUYING - FINANCE - SALES MANAGEMENT and TRANSPORTATION
PROCTER  & GAMBLE THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Pounding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1964
Two worlds
, The following is exerpled from the McGill Daily. Three
French Canadian universities pulled out of the Canadian
Union of Students in September and formed the core of
the Union Generale des Etudiante du Quebec. (UGEQ).
The founding convention of the Union Generale des
Etudiants du Quebec raised questions whose importance
transcends the limited field of specifically student
interests.
It clearly revealed that the student elites of English
and French Canada are now living in almost totally
distinct reality-worlds, marked by a nearly complete
absence of valuable communication.
This fact is unlikely to yield to simple or dramatic
solutions, and it is not our intention to propose any. But
the fact itself must be taken into consideration by all of
us who are concerned with the future of the Canadian
experiment.
We tend to assume that all French Canadians, for
better or for worse, spend much of their time thinking
about the English speaking half of the country. Even
separatism presumably demands an awareness of Anglo-
Canada, if only for the purpose of rejecting it.
The impression received from the recent convention,
however, was that most of the participants tended to
define their goals entirely without reference to English-
speaking elements.
No one said, like Claude Ryan, that Quebec's interests
were best served by accepting a Canadian solution.
No one said, like Maurice Sauve, that he wanted to feel
at home in the other nine provinces.
Only one of ten candidates for executive positions
mentioned Canada at all, and one mote advised the
English-speaking people of Quebec to co-operate with the
majority. It seemed as if psychological separation had
already taken place.
Also noticeable at the convention was the extent of
identification with the recently independent states of
Asia and Africa.
This was shown not only in the reference to "the
abolition of all forms of colonialism, imperialism an'd
discrimination" in the UGEQ charter, but by the suggestion that UGEQ will attempt to organize the student
groups of the "uncommitted" world as a third force
analogous to the existing communist and western
federations.
This general acceptance of quasi-revolutionary rhetoric probably conceals differences of opinion on specific
issues which will only become obvious as the organization begins to function.
It symbolizes, however, a situation which is real
enough. The disaffection of most Quebec intellectuals
with the internal status quo creates an awareness of
problems which, by their very nature, cannoifbe shared
with, or fully understood by, English-speaking Canada.
In these circumstances a transitional period of psychological withdrawal becomes inevitable as Quebec concentrates on solving its own problems.
Hopefully, when these are solved, a more self-
assured French Canada, and a more understanding
English Canada, can establish a relationship of genuine
equality.
EDITOR: Mike Horsey
Managing   Janet Matheson
City   Tom Wayman
News  Tim Padmore
Art _    Don Hume
Sports _  George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts
Asst. City   Lorraine Shore
Asst.  News  Just Miss Munroe
Associate  Mike Hunter
Associate Ron Riter
Magazine    Dave Ablett
working like dogs while the time
runneth out were Mike Vaux, Richard (letters) Blair, Bob Wieser, Don
Hull, Brian (signing) Staples, John
Kelsey, Robbi West, Carol-Anne-
Baker, Lome Mallin, Corol Smith,
Al Birnie, Steve Brown, Mona Hel-
cermanas, Art Casperson, Sheri
Galen, Sharon Rodney, Bob Burton,
Robin Russell, Tim Roberts. Yeah
Well O.K.
And working night-side for the
great and glorious Ubyssey (rah):
Harold McAllister, Norm Betts, and
George Railton. God rest their souls.
<4A
rlMM| .  . . MR I Wmj I (■■■ fN ■••
W^HM^SKKUBK^i
We're irresponsible
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I cannot protest strongly
enough against the thoughtless and irresponsible methods used in reporting the case
involving the "UBC Coed" of
Friday's Ubyssey.
It seems to me that the reporter's function is not only
to report the facts of a particular case but also to use
discrimination in his selection and presentation of them.
This involves simply a rational judgment as to what is
relevant, a judgment sorely
lacking in the article referred
to. When given alone, any set
of particulars can be made to
distort the picture of the
whole; the dragging in of descriptions involved an implicit
condemnation, and connotations which have no place in
anything but tabloid journalism of the lowest order.
SUZANNE MOWAT
Arts III.
•Ji     sji     eje
And tactless
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to object to the tactlessness and the cruelty of
the front page story in last
Friday's Ubyssey.
I am objecting to the slanted, sensation-seeking and unnecessary exposure of a girl's
difficulty.
I do not know the young
lady but surely anyone can
understand some of the anguish she may be going
through. Would not kindness
have been more appropriate?
Drugs on campus is a good
issue, a significant issue. Significant enough to provide
material for a series of articles. And in a university
newspaper there would be a
chance for solid analysis,
even meaningful exposure.
But on Friday The Ubyssey
chose the cheap way, chose to
be sensationally cruel, chose
a shoddy black headline regardless of who was hurt.
The story was essentially
empty.
It raised no issues, analysed
no problems, provided no significant information.
Technically, Mr. Blair, you
are a good reporter.
But, please, Mr. Blair,
please, start to learn that
journalism is much more
than mere technical expertise.
Start to learn some of the
things that tried newspapermen respect—a compassionate understanding of people,
a knowledge of what hurt
means, a grasp of relevancy
and a -sure instinct of when
to kill a story.
Please Mr. Blair, start now
for you have much to learn.
PETER   FLEMING
Unclassified.
rp    ^f»    Sfi
And gobblers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Is this a newspaper or just
another "Garbage-Gobbler"?
I am referring to the reporting of the drug raid, Friday,
Nov. 20. Was it necessary to
go into the personal details
of the girl's apartment? It's
apparent that your reporter,
for obvious reasons, is a frustrated author and will snatch
at any opportunity to display
his  limited literary  abilities.
Or is it the policy of this
paper to grind its hobnail
boots into the backs of unfortunates? Surely going into
these unhappy details has not
furthered the spreading of
news, just the "mongering"
of malicious gossip—a sad effort for the voice of this seat
of enlightenment and, I believe, of tolerance.
MAIDA LONG
Arts III.
Too much Bains
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Recently a great deal of
coverage in the Ubyssey has
.been made in connection
with Mr. Hardial Bains. I
wonder if Mr. Bains and his
statements are so significant
as to receive such a coverage.
Mr. Bains has been quoted
as stating (Ubyssey, Nov. 20,
etc.) that he is anti-bureaucratic and is not interested in
elected positions. However, he
has run and been defeated for
at least the following campus offices: presidencies of
the GSA, Indian Students Association and the former IH
Club, and the directorship of"
the Board of International
House.
He has organized the Internationalists and the BCSF,
both of which do not hold elections but Mr. Bains has become the president of the latter.
Mr. Bains is generally credited with initiating the Academic Activities Committee
under the AMS bureaucracy.
The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit letters for brevity, relevance and taste. Letters to the editor can be left
in a box at ihe front of the
Ubyssey office in the basement of North Brock.
Yet he is anti-bureaucratic.
He is anti-clique but there is
a "nucleus" in the BCSF.
There is a "secretariat" but
no bureaucracy.
From what it has done and
from the leaflet it has distributed, the BCSF under the
leadership of Mr. Bains seems
to intend to raise a hell but
to do nothing constructive.
The Ubyssey has done enough to publicize Mr. Bains
and the BCSF and perhaps
should devote its coverage to
more worthwhile endeavours.
R. S. TSE. #?; W^^ff^^r- '*..
* .^,4*a „-';-;„>,
Let's ski
with
tot rawj y
«%
«U
This is the first of what
The Ubyssey hopes will
become an annual issue.
In addition to our regular column we are trying
to present some to the ski
activities that are open
to UBC ski-bums.
We think you can see
by the number of jackets,
stretches, casts around
campus and the empty
Saturday lectures that
skiing is becoming UBC's
largest participant sport.
Inside you will find
stories and pictures of
university ski trips, the
Thunderbird ski team
and the problems of the
cabin skier.
This picture was taken
toy Carol Russell on Mt.
Price near Garibaldi
Lake.
• «****,«„. -<.x Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1964
VOC members find Xmas
ski trips can be cheap
The Varsity Outdoors Club
Christmas trip program offer
skiing from yo-yo to touring,
for the novice or the expert.
This year ten trips to resort
or yo-yo areas have been organized and over 100 people
will set off to the cabin on
Mt. Seymour or as far away
as Schweitzer basin in Idaho.
The biggest group is making
their base camp in Kelowna
near Big White Mt. and from
there they will tour the Okanagan.
The club has the use of a
large building that will house
over 30 people.
With this sort of arrangement the club has the real idea.
The girls do the cooking, wish
washing and cabin cleaning,
while the stronger sex handle
the firewood, water carrying,
etc.
•   •   •
The group trips cut the cost
down by one-third, as most of
the grub is robbed from
mother's kitchen shelves.
Another large group will
make headquarters in Banff
and from there they will ski
Norquay, Sunshine, Temple
and Whitehorn.
Up to this year the most
popular trip was to the Kim-
berly-Rossland area, but this
is dropping off in favour of the
Okanagan areas.
A splinter group of the club
is anti yo-yo and usually uses
their Christmas holidays for a
ski touring trip.
Garibaldi's Black Tusk
meadows has provided the
closest touring for VOC members. The club has used the
cabin at Garibaldi Lake and
from there they have climbed
and skiied Price, Panorama,
Sphinx Glacier and the Tusk
itself.
The club has run three very
successful tours into the Yo-
Ho Valley. Here a cabin
owned by the federal parks is
used.
Last winter the club ventured into the Bralorne area
for a combination of rope tow
and touring skiing.
This year the trips on the
program are to Forbidden Plateau, back of Courtenay on
Vancouver Island, and into
the Jasper Park area.
The ski-tourer is special
breed, he seems to find fun in
packing a 40-pound pack for
twenty miles into some remote
spot, camp in a cold tent on
a glacier, and a few days work
his way out to civilization.
The  most  popular   trip the
FELLOWS
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Make it in your spare time
Contact: S. Brounstein
Phone: 277-7209
AUTO INSURANCE AT
SUBSTANTIAL  SAVINGS
For Drivers 24 yrs. & up
Call Bab Baker of A. R. laker Ltd.
1327 Marine, W. Van.       M2-41M
—dermis holden photo
For two years Varsity Outdoors Club members have gone
into the Premier Range south of Jasper on touring trips.
The mountain pictured is Sir John Thompson. The ice fall
in the foreground is over 200 feet high.
"CHRISTMAS TIME IS SKI TIME"
Going Skiing?
Visit Our Complete Ski Centre For
* QUALITY EQUIPMENT
* EXPERT REPAIRS
* SKI RENTALS
Lowest Prices in Town
SKI OUTFIT:
GRESVIG SKIS
COMPLETE SAFETY BINDING
METAL POLES - Reg. $38.95
$29
95
SKI BOOTS SKIS
if Val Dor 29.95 * Yamaha Epoxi   89.95
it Tyrolkrista        39.95 if Nevada Metal    89.95
if Gresvig Skis from $21.95
"Stretch"
Ski Pants
Ladle's & Men's
Imported
Ski
Sweaters
ICE SKATES
C.C.M. - BAUER - DAOUST
Western Sporting Goods
10th & Alma
CA 4-5040
club takes is to their cabin located above the CBC tower on
Mt. Seymour.
Here members seem to forget the idea of skiing and
spends most of the time
partying. At the cabin at any
given time one will usually
find 40 or so people dancing
and whooping it up.
• • •
The club plays host for a
giant New Year's party each
year in the cabin. The club
girls have a three course turkey dinner ready for the hungry mob returning from the
slopes.
As the dishes are cleared
into the kitchen the cabin
settles down to the party that
should last until dawn.
The usual climax to the
bash is the climbers that leave
before sunup to start the day
from the peak of Seymour.
1965   GRADUATES
seeking employment
register NOW with the
EXECUTIVE and PROFESSIONAL DIVISION
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Phone Mr. W. L. Roberts who will mail you
an application and arrange an interview to
discuss employment opportunities.
UNDERGRADS—will be registered later—
Watch for notice.
1145 ROBSON STREET
MU 1-8253
GRADUATE   INTERVIEWS
Ontario Hydro
will interview on
December 2-4
for
Scientific and Commercial Data Processing
Postgraduate and Honour Mathematics, Engineering Physics, Commerce
and Business graduates with preference for those who have taken
course in digital computers.
Nuclear Plant Operation
Metallurgical, Chemical, Mechanical and Electrical Engineers for training
in plant engineering in Nuclear Power Stations. The 200 mw plant at
Douglas Point is scheduled for service in 1965.
Coal Fired Thermal Plant Operation and Maintenance
Mechanical and Electrical Engineers for training in the R. L. Hearn or
Lakeview Generating Stations on programs leading to plant operation
and management. A new station with 500 mw units is under construction.
Planning, Design, Construction, Research, System
Operation and Maintenance
Mechanical, Electrical and Civil for a variety of assignments in Toronto
and on field locations.
Ontario Hydro's expanding program nuclear, coal-fired steam and
hydraulic plants provides a variety of opportunity hoth on a training
basis and through immediate assignment to one of the above functions.
For further information and interview appointments contact
The University Student
Employment Office Tuesday, November 24, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
A cabin skier says:
This is the true sport
Everyone says that you have
to be brave to be a good skier.
It takes a lot more guts not to
be a good skier.
Any idiot with the meat in
his coconut loose can wedlen,
mombo, or schuus, but it takes
a man with real guts to meet
some wench on a mountain
peak and talk her into going
back to your cabin to cook
your  dinner.
A skier can be sloppy in his
technique and get away with
it, but a shier must be faultless in form if he is to get
over all the jumps and through
all the gates that stand between him and his objective.
A cabin skier must have
extraordinary reflexes in order to get to the side of a
snow bunny in trouble before
those godamm ski patrolers
get over and do their good
deed for the day.
A cabin skier must have
fantastic physical stamina if
he's to last through a night of
twisting, cabin hopping, poker
playing, bunny trapping and
all its associated pleasures, and
still make the supreme effort
and get to the slopes before
the sun goes down the next
day.
You'll note that I said get
"to the slopes" and not "up
the slopes" as the latter is
strictly vorboten to the cabin
skier. There's no use in ruining a carefully built-up reputation.
Last, but by no means
least, a cabin skier must have
vast financial resources if
he's to be really successful.
An accomplished cabin skier
must of course have a cabin
of his own (it is permissible
to share it with a couple of
buddies, provided they don't
ski) and this is the largest initial outlay and also requires
periodical outlays for such
items as gas for the power
plant (an essential for comfort
and efficiency) repairs, paint
(a bright little used color to
get attention is preferable).
Another necessity that requires a fair sized outlay is
clothes. A wardrobe of the
latest ski fashions is a must
in order to create the impression that you're a skier without having to hit the slopes.
Sweaters should be patterned
with bright colors predominate. Pants must be of stretch
nylon in order not to impede
your twisting and chasing.
A car is another must, but
this does not have to be fancy
as you want to create the impression that you spend all
your money on skiing and be-
man
has
CONflMHCE
You, too will hove confidence in
CONTACT LENSES
^m fcy LAWRENCE
Calvert
"He specializes"
|70S BMs »Ufl.   MU 3-18T4J
■'_    t;SO-S:»» (Sot. Noon)
—a. k. cabin skier photo
A likely candidate for ah evening's cabin skiing chuckles
our cabin skier as he rushes to aid her with the bindings.
You will note the result of cabin skiing near the bottom
left of the picture.
sides an old car (1940 or earlier) gets a lot of attention from
the younger set, many of
whom have older sisters. The
car should be small (two
seats) so that you can only give
a ride to one person at a time;
obvious advantage.
Finally a successful shier
must pay for such things as
:hairlifts (it's not proper to
hike), badges for his jacket
showing the places he's (if
you'll excuse the expression)
skiied at, sun tan lotion, food
(at least until you meet enough
bunnies who can supply the
food as well as cook it), and
the requirement of all requirements -BOOZE.
U of Wash, ski club
sponsors ski swap
Transfer an Arabian bazaar to a snow scene and the
result is the giant ski sale that the University of Washington ski club held last week.
The club invited local shops and university skiers
to exhibit their used equipment in a Ski Swap held in the
student union building.
The skier's best friend
SKIS
*flti/it
Hart Standards - a joy to ski on. Hold
wonderfully on hard pack, plane beautifully in
powder. Engineered for effortless turning. And
Hart's safety edges cannot... we repeat...
cannot ever come off! In black or red or blue.
124.50
Hart Pros — Lightning-fast performers for
every skier from beginner to expert. Super-speed
and instant maneuverability on sapphire-hard
HARCO speed, base. No waxingl Hart safety
" L" edges can't ever rip off. 139.50
Bindings expertly mounted.
Arlberg
SPORT HAUS
816 W. Pender St.
Vancouver, B.C.
— SKI —
Diamond Head
Garibaldi Park
3 TOWS TO SERVE YOU
it Overnight
Accommodation
it Ski Rentals
it Ski Patrol
it Ski Lessons
it Road to base camp now
in top condition
it New! Base Camp Inn
for light snacks
FOLDER and  INFORMATION
Vic Stevenson
5638 Holland St., Vancouver 13, B.C.
Phone 263-3108
ALPINE
OF VANCOUVER
is the largest stretch
slack manufacturer in
Western Canada
. ... for Western
Skiers and Curlers
Alpine of Vancouver Supplies
• Racing Slacks for the UBC
Ski Team
* Western Canada's Top Ski
Instructors
Using top-quality material and the best in workmanship,
ALPINE OF VANCOUVER gives you long wear, style and comfort .. . plus all-weather protection.
• RACERS • • SKI KNICKERS
• SKI STRETCH SLACKS • CLIMBING KNICKERS
• CURLING STRETCH SLACKS • STRETCH SUITS A SLACKS
(Seam* and zippers are guaranteed by Alpine ef Vancouver)
Available ah
Arlborg Sport Haus
Blue Line Sporting Good*
All T. Eaton Sporting
Goods Departments
Hudson's Bay-
Active Sportswear Dept.
Earle Petersen,
New Westminster
George Sparling Stores
West VancouverSporting Goods
Western Sporting Goods
Ivor Williams, Kerrisdale
All Woodward's Stores
Sporting Goods Depts. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1964
The Thunderbird ski team finds it takes
T'Bird ski team . . . strengthening the legs
ATTENTION
— ALL SKIERS
/ Here is a new economical way
to go skiing
Special
Package Plan
to   Mount   Baker
Starting November 21st through March
Buses Leave 7:00 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday
THE PLAN INCLUDES:
■& Return trip by bus (with other congenial experts
and snow-bunnies).
-fo A 1% hour ski lesson by Franz Gobi's certified
ski school. (New American technique).
-fr All day rope tow tickets! (All day chair $1.50
extra).
it 20% off rentals.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:
♦Eaton's Ski Village—downtown
♦Eaton's Sporting Goods—Brentwood, Park Royal,
New Wes&ninster
*Tepee Sporting Goods—1017 Robson
—3279 W. Broadway
♦Blue Line Sporting Goods—154 W. Hastings
All Inclusive
Only
$9.50
Take A Trip and Save
Is there something inspiring about running for three or four miles at night in 32
degree weather with car headlights glaring
at you?
Or perhaps "running in the rain" with sodden sweat pants, or along the beach on rocks,
pebbles, logs and sand which undermines
your steps and fills your shoes?
The inspiring element is supposed to be
that vision of grandeur as you win first prize
in the combined Alpine events in every intercollegiate ski meet.
When training it seems rather like the carrot on the stick before the panting ass, and
they say fools can't make choices.
So you don't; every Tuesday and Thursday
from 6:30 - 8:00 p.m. and on Saturdays from
1:30 - 3:00 p.m. you run, run and run and
then return to the equipment room in War
Memorial Gym to do interminable conditioning exercises.
But after each session your outlook brightens a measure.
You feel a damn sight better after a good
workout; the sore "muscles and blood and
skin and bone" gradually "tone up" and running doesn't seem quite the chore it did initially.
Besides, it is inspiring to exercise with the
girls' ski team after those runs on Tuesday
and Thursday nights—somehow you're not
quite as exhausted as you thought you were.
The simple fact is, it's a good program from
which both the team and the individual benefit.
Under the excellent and rigorous coaching
of Allan Fisher, an engineer formerly from
U. of Washington, now in the pulp mill division of a local engineering firm, the team
has been training since the opening week of
the term.
Fisher has stressed long distance running
up to six miles for stamina, including running
along the beach below the campus on Saturdays to build up leg muscles.
The usual course on Tuesdays and Thursdays leads from the gym, down Wesbrook to
Chancellor, out Chancellor to Acadia, up
Acadia to University boulevard, out the
boulevard to the gates and back to the gym.
Upon returning to the gym the group
works through a number of exercises, primarily with an eye for skiing techniques.
One of the routines involves jumping from
side to side over a row of benches, simulating a slalom course.
At mid-November the prospective ski team
separated from the general skiing conditioning program and concentrated more on developing reaction, coordination and balance
through exercises, working on the trampoline
and gymnastics.
Soccer will be added to the Saturday workouts for coordination.
Heading the alpine team in its special
training is Don Bruneski, former Olympic
competitor, and Joe Czismazia, who has had
considerable gymnastic and ski racing experience.
Among those seriously competing to make
the four man alpine team are Leigh Brousson,
Tom Jenkin, Martin Kaffka, Tim Roberts,
Eugene Ruelle, Bill Shaak, Gary Taylor and
Dave Turner.
The prospective team will train in Rossland from Dec. 20th until the New Year, when
the final team will be chosen.
And that brings us back to our inspiration
—-the meets themselves.
UBC plays host to the other colleges (primarily northwest American teams) Jan. 1st -
3rd in Rossland.
U. of Alberta takes over from Jan. 29-31
in Banff, and on Feb. 12 -14 the University
of Idaho will host a meet in McCall, Idaho.
Probably the last meet of the year will be
Feb. 20-21 in Bend, Oregon, although two
other meets in Montana and Washington are
held perilously close to exams.
So all that running, although depressing
beyond expression at times, provides an indescribably rewarding thrill during the meets
—that of competition, emotion, acquaintances
and of skiing with quick, mechanical reactions—and besides, like Guinness—it's good
for you!
UBC Jumper . . . iakw to the air Tuesday, November 24, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
re than snow to produce a winning team
_ it
»
UBC racer
late for classes
Christmas training
snow, lessons and
offers
parties
Remember that airline stewardess that
walked out on the hill in her nylons and ski
boots, dragging her skis behind her?
She was one of the many who've gone on
the Rossland Ski Week in the past nine years.
I have been in the lodge as a high school
student, when the UBC group was having one
of its annual Christmas weeks, and I soon
found out that my approach to life was somewhat philistine. There is such a variety of
people that go for the week (Dec. 20 - Jan. 1),
both from UBC and downtown that it's bound
to be an experience for anybody.
You don't have to be able to ski; the ski
team gives daily lessons, and if you're as
hopeless as the airline stewardess, as we hope
you are, we'll give you private lessons all
week.
And of course if you're expert we'll still
teach you, but the whole of Red Mountain is
yours if you wish—all 1600 vertical feet of it.
The chair-lift, poma lift and rope tow cater
to any skill or lack of same, and the snow
promises to be good.
It's only $74 for the bus trip, tows, breakfast, supper, lessons, party and accommodation.
The accommodation is in town now—that's
where everybody used to end up at night
anyway—and the bus will take you to the
hill each morning and back each evening.
Meals are just half a block away. There'll
be a New Year's bash in the Red Mountain
Lodge as in past years.
Any more information is available on the
numerous posters around campus, but the
deadline is Dec. 4th.
It's fun; it's organized.
Ask anybody from last year who went up,
or better still go yourself on the best Christmas trip on campus.
You Are
Invited
NORTH STAR
MOUNTAIN
•
•
KIMBERLEY, B.C.
MORE GROOMED SLOPES
HALL T-BAR LIFTS
Now 2 lifts operating daily at North Star!—Ride to
the top of the mountain on North America's longest
T-Bar lift, where 7 miles of ski-perfect slopes await
you.
* QUALIFIED SKI INSTRUCTION
Learn to ski on 1,200-ft. long, 600-ft. wide specially
designed beginners' slope, or advance to the expert
stage with leading   instructors.  Private   or  group
instruction.
* SPECIAL STUDENTS' GROUP RATES!!!
Plan now for a fund-filled excursion to friendly
North Star at VERY reasonable rates. The more the
merrier! Special tow rate $20 for entire Christmas
holidays.
* EXCELLENT, REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION
if SKI RENTAL, PURCHASE SHOP ON THE HILL
* ALWAYS SKI-FUN AT NORTH STARI
The Land of Blue Skies and Reliable Ski Perfect
Powder Snowl
For Information and Reservations write:
TOBY RAYNOR,  Kimberley Ski  Club
BOX 407, KIMBERLEY, B.C.
SKI CHARTERS
.. .for skiers who want the best
MU 1-6381
Pacific Stage Lines
. . THE QUALITY LINE
MU 1-6381 Page 6
THE     UBYS5EY
Tuesday, November 24, 1964
'65 ski fashions are color, color, color
By CAROLE MUNROE
From Todd to Timberline,
Seymour to Sun Valley, the
accent of ski fashions in 1965
is on color, color, color.
And it is color in an unbroken line from head to foot.
That could mean a soft gold
V-neck sweater over tight
stretch pants of the same color,
V   ;•'
... '.,jA5f
topped with a perky knitted
hat in matching gold tones. Or
it could be explosive red pants
paired with en equally bright
red parka, perhaps streaked
with a stripe across the chest.
Or the effect could be in
blue: aquamarine stretch pants
and matching top completed
by a knitted jersey.
jtS*****^
AU these outfits are locked
in color continuity. This is
the axis; your imagination and
sense of color can revolve
around it endlessly.
Brighten a black sweater
and slacks set with a daring
parka of pink-flowered design.
Add a matching pink headband and the vivid picture is
complete. Play matching
emerald green parka and pants
against a bright navy sweater;
or foil wine sweater and pants
with a stark white parka.
Once established this one-
color look can lead to a limitless variety of go-fast looks.
Parallel sets are another
new look in '64 ski fashions.
Men and women's outfits mate,
but only closely enough to be
smart, not identical. Fresh
fashion parallels begin as look
alikes, then proceed to distinguish between builds and figures, guys and girls.
He can wear a black stretch
suit with traditional ribbons
of sky blue across the shoulders and down the pant legs.
Her outfit combines the blue
stripes on a white background.
Both wear matching knit hats
topped by a bouncing pompom.
Or they can both wear sleekly tapered knickers which fit
precisely and blouse briefly
just at the knee, his camel-
colored and hers a royal blue,
both with matching socks and
sweater.
"Western stretch suit parallels are also destined to hit the
slopes. For her it's a true
khaki with pants white-stitched up the sides and into a low
dipped V-yoke across the hips.
The matching jacket covers a
white turtleneck. His navy
suit is outlined in white and
stitched into a broad yoke that
curves  across   the  shoulders.
So here they are: lively
sweaters that coordinate or
contrast with the tautest ski
pants and smartest parkas,
worn with peppy hats or
matching headbands.
This is ski fashion 1964 . . .
ready to spring into action
with the first fresh powder.
TEPEE
SPORTING GOODS
1017 Robson St.
Vancouver 5, B.C.
681-0511
3279 West Broadway
Vancouver 8, B.C.
731-5122
A COMPLETE
LINE OF SKI
EQUIPMENT
LARGEST SKI
RENTALS IN
WESTERN CANADA
Ski Rentals Also Available at:
DIAMOND HEAD, GARIBALDI PARK
TWO    GREAT    NAMES   ASSOCIATED   WITH    SKIING
sMpro as societies
SKI REPORTS ANYTIME
CALGARY PHONE
289-0271
VANCOUVER SKIERS DIAL
BRITISH COLUMBIA 431-4180
CASCADE 431-4181
NORTH WEST AND  ROCKY MOUNTAIN 431-41 {
BOX 4052       VANCOUVER 9, B.C.
FEATURING - News and events of
interest to skiers in the provinces of
Alberta and British Columbia.
SUBSCRiPTIONS-One year (8 issues)
$1.00. 3 years $2.00 Special rates to
ski clubs.
jK
Name	
Address	
City	
Zone Province.
Information and Accommodation Service
Area Code 604 — 431-2442
sMpro associates
Box 2531, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Western Canada's Only Monthly
Ski Magazine
■pi" Tuesday, November 24, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
—don hume photo
An early fall of snow last week found students like the one above skipping classes
and heading off to Mt. Seymour. The picture is taken in the meadows looking towards
Goldie Rope tow.
In Garibaldi Park
The best in spring skiing
For a post exam bash most
UBCers head toward the Arms
but members of the Varsity
Outdoors Club release their
tensions by heading into Garibaldi Park.
For several weeks in May
the club rents the Airways
cabin on Garibaldi Lake and
this is used as the base camp
for the 100 odd spring skiers of
the club.
From the cabin, six miles inland from Garibaldi Station on
the PGE, ski parties head off
to Sphinx glacier, Panorama
ridge, Price Mt., the Black
Tusk meadows and Sentinal
glaciers.
The cabin is built to accommodate ten people (not too
comfortably) but usually over
30 are crowded into it at one
time.
Others are sleeping in tents
near the cabin or out on trips
up the various mountains.
Preparations begin early in
March when the cabin is booked and group train rates are
arranged. Club girls go on a
giant shopping trip to buy enough food to feed a logging
camp. An airplane is hired
to drop the food and tents on
IS   ENROLLING
IN
THE
ROTP
Contact
Flight Lieutenant
R. B. ROBINSON
The Armoury
CA 4-1910
the frozen lake near the cabin.
At the cabin and in the
camps the girls do most of the
kitchen chores, while the boys
handle the firewood, water,
etc.
Two routes are used to get
into the lake area. Skiers
climb into Diamond Head,
cross Garibaldi Mountain, then
over Spinx glacier down to the
lake.
The other and most popular
route is from the PGE dropoff
point at Garibaldi Station.
From here skiers can choose
two routes, one up and over
the Barrier, a fantastic rock
wall or up a switch back trail.
This hike, using skins on
the bottom of the skis most of
the way,    takes    around    six
hours although it has been
done in much less. Some have
taken over two days.
Snow conditions are not always the best as the hot spring
sun turns the surface of the
lake and mountains into a
sopping mess.
Most skiing is done in the
earlier part of the day when
the snow is firm. Last year
the heavy snow fall and cooler
weather kept powder snow on
the upper slopes until the end
of May.
To participate in this bash
most skiers need special equipment. Ski bindings that will
allow the heel to lift are essential. Seal skins are used to
prevent the skier from sliding
back when climbing up hill.
LEARN TO SKI!
BEGINNER'S SET
SKIS, HARNESS, POLES
Excellent value for the novice. Fine
quality skis with steel edges, enamel
finished tops. Double safety harness,
installed, plus good quality aluminum
ski  poles.    Special	
yr
FRENCH & AUSTRIAN
SKI  BOOTS
Invest in the finest boots, and save
substantially now. Best quality black
cowhide uppers, full double boot
with hinged heel, extra heavily
padded for comfort. Sizes
for women  and  men.
heavily _   _
6   to   12 J4'
50
Learn to Ski" Special
COMPLETE OUTFIT
Skis - Poles - Boots
$65
00
Arlberg
816 W. Pender St.
MU 2-4288
Vancouver's Largest and Most
Complete Ski Store
Easy  Terms Mail   Orders  Welcome—Trades   Accepted
Free Parking—D. P. C. lot, Hornby and Pender
*.   *
fly
So Who Skis?
She has a point! Today ski fashions go wherever the
snow blows cold . . . even if it's just to enjoy the brisk
air walking 'round the block. So the Bay's gathered
Swiss sweaters, flowered jackets, bold trimmed boots,
head-hugging helmets ... a fabulous collection of;
fashions that ski when they have to . . . but look great
if they do nothing more than loll around the lodge.
Whether it's action or fashion you're interested in . . .
you'll find the fun-to-wear clothes at the Bay. P.S. We
have men's ski clothes to make him look good too . . .
on the slopes or off!
In The Bay Active Sportswear and Sporting Goods,
second floor
INCORPORATCO SI   MAY  1670.
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
Shop Daily 9-5:30 - Friday 9-9 MU 1-6211 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1964
Skiing
is
SKIING
SKIING
SKIING
SKIING
SKIING
SKIING
is getting up at 5:30 and packing ten people into a
Volkswagen.
is lying on a wet highway putting on your chains
200 feet from the parking lot because some cop
says so.
is forgetting your money for a lift ticket.
is pinching your fingers in your cable bindings.
is forgetting your poles.
is having your goggles fog while all the girls are
fastening their bindings.
SKIING is having everyone walk over the top of your new
skis.
SKIING is watching the three-year-olds schuss by.
SKIING is waiting in a tow line while the ski school classes
crowd in front of you.
SKIING is coming out of your bindings in deep powder.
SKIING is your bindings sticking when you have to go.
SKIING is having your stretch pants split.
SKIING is squirting wine from your bota bag on- your new
sweater.
SKIING is a long lunch line and cold chili.
SKIING is putting on cold, wet gloves after lunch.
SKIING is falling off a rope tow.
SKIING is itchy long underwear.
SKIING is snow melting in your boots.
SKIING is crossing your tips.
SKIING is losing a contact lens in the snow.
SKIING is the ice melting on the chair lift seat.
SKIING is forgetting where you hid your beer in the snow.
SKIING is a frozen radiator.
SKIING is GREAT!!
—Courtesy U. of Wash. Daily
GET INTO THE SWING OF THINGS
WITH A SMARTLY STYLED
SKI JACKET
from the
QoUaqA$lrwp
only19.95
it 100% Terylene and Nylon
it lightweight But Warm
it Styled By Syntax
After That Day On The Slope, Slip Into A
DUFFEL COAT
To Fight Those Cold Winter Night*
only 24.95
it 100% Virgin Wool
it Attached Hood
it Choice of 5 Colours
REMEMBER, THE COLLEGE SHOP IS THE
PLACE TO BUY CLOTHES QUALITY CRAFTED
THE COLLEGE SHOP
Hours: 11:30-2:30 Brock Extension
Closing For The Term December 4th
Mt. Baker builds
new  chair  lift
Mr. Baker is installing a
new 2,300 foot chairlift in the
Heather Meadows area.
The lift, designed for intermediate skiers, will be ready
for Christmas skiing.
The resort will be running
for the Christmas week and is
offering special prices for
Vancouver skiers using their
bus service.
Get the point
Norm Betts, noted alpinist,
says skis generally work better when they are pointed
downhill, except when one is
going uphill, of course.
r r
9 Kf *H0P tm
Telephone 681-2004
336 West Pender St.
VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
EATON'S
SKimiAGE
Fashions For Fun On The Slopes
A. Pedigree  Instructor's  Jacket
Reversible quilted nylon, with
Terylene fill. Heavy slide fasteners at front and pockets. Knitted
collar, elasticized cuffs. Hidden
hood. Black or navy. S, M. L, XL.
Each   ...-- 39.95
B. Alpine Instructor's Jacket
Tubular quilted nylon 2-way slide
fastener, elasticized cuffs and hidden hood. Slide closures on pockets. Black, red, royal blue. S, M,
L, XL. Each  19.95
C. Alpine Cortina Ski Pants
Stretch Helanca, with "zippered"
side pockets and adjustable belt.
Black, brown, royal blue, powder
blue, green. S. M. L.
Each   ...-- 39.95
Ski Instructors in Attendance
Liev Kennedy, Grouse Mountain
instructor: Mondays through Fridays. Al Kovats, pro from Mont
Tremfolac: Fridays and Saturdays.
Also a complete line of Ski Fashions for Women, Boys and Girls,
in this one convenient location.
EATON'S Ski Village, Downtown.
Similar selection at all four Stores. Tuesday, November 24, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
BACKGROUND
Rock bit like Britain
By   AL   DONALD
GIBRALTAR—The Ameri-
can woman in the Gibraltar
post office leaned over the
counter.
"Does anyone here speak
English?" she asked.
"Yes, Madam," replied the
clerk.
"Oh, good. Can you tell
me what a dollar is worth in
your money?"
"Seven shillings."
"How much is a shilling?"
"Twelve pennies in one
shilling; twenty shillings in a
pound, madam."
"Oh, you're English, then!"
exclaimed the woman.
The statement was more or
less true.
Gibraltar is a copy of a
small English town, from its
inhabitants to its physical
features.
The narrow, crooked main
street that winds through the
town is bordered by news
stands, pubs and English style
groceries.
An English "bobby" directs
traffic at a crossroads, and the
Union Jack flies over the
Governor's residence outside
of which a Royal Marine
stands guard.
Ubyssey staffer Al Donald
is touring Europe. Here is
another  of   his   reports.
Most of the people are
British, although the merchants and shopkeepers are
Spanish, and the common
language is English with clipped, nasal accent.
There is the occasional
Irishman, and kilts are a common sight on the streets.
But despite the British flavor there is an air of the cosmopolitan. American and
Spanish sailors mix with the
British and Gibraltar's second
language is Spanish.
The restaurants sell Spanish food, hamburgers and
milkshakes as well as fish
and chips, and very English-
looking     uniformed     school
AL DONALD
. . . roving reporter
boys speak to each other in
Spanish.
Because of Spanish influence, it is surprising that
Gibraltar has remained British so long.
Since 1703, the large two-
peaked rock jutting out into
the Mediterranean has been
under the Union Jack. And
the Spanish Government,
since that time, has tried
many times to put it under
the Spanish flag.
The most recent attempt at
a partial blockade of Gibraltar began on Nov. 6 this year
when the Spanish customs at
La Lineu, the town just behind the border, put an embargo on many products coming out of the peninsula.
The blockade continues and
many cars are being held up
for more than three hours at
the border.
When you stand on top of
the Rock, the strategic importance of the position is
obvious.
To the east and west the
Spanish coastline stretches
away; to the north are the
mountains of southern Spain
and across a few miles of
Mediterranean are the mountains of Morocco.
A STORY OF LOVE BEFORE MARRIAGE
ThEVhiNG Ipvers
A SAMUEL GOLDWYN, Jr. Production From M-G-M
. . . deals with the revolution in campus
morals . . . COMING SOON.
"BIRD CALLS" OMISSIONS
cut out this list and paste onto Page 205 of your directory.
ZOHARI MOHAMAD B.,  224-7822       Talping,  Malaya.
ZOTZMAN, DIANNE G., HE 1-7595       3390 E. 49th Ave,   Vancouver.
ZRAL,   DINNIS  HOWARD,  HE  3-0608.        2565  E.   45th  Ave.,  Vancouver 16, B.C.
ZUBRECKI, ALICE, Box 819, Prince George, B.C.
ZUCCOLIN,   ALEXANDER,   TR 2-1997.
couver 12, B.C.
3761  Nanaimo St.,  Van-
ZUEST, DAVID A.,   736-4667.
ZUEST, PATRICIA A.,  736-4667.
B.C.
2524 W. 1st Ave., Vancouver 9, B.C.
2524 W.  1st Ave., Vancouver 9,
ZUMPANO, FREDERICK, Box 706, Revelstoke, B.C.
ZWARICH,  RONALD J.,  RE 8-5400.       RR 1 Westsyde,  Kamloops,
B.C.
ZWARICH, AUDREY A., Lyne Rd., Westsyde, Kamloops, B.C.
ZWICK, EUGENE, 224-5681.    Box 823, Kitimat, B.C.
ZWICKEL, FRED C, 277-9571.      543 Francis Rd., Richmond, B.C.
ZYBLUT, E. R., BR 7-7256.        470 Steveston Hwy., Vancouver, B.C.
ZYSBLAT, ALLEN A., 1408 Colleen Ave., Calgary, Alta.
Every ship which passes
through the straits of Gibraltar can be seen from the Rock.
Roads to the summit are
patrolled by police and army
vehicles.
From the side of the Rock
you can see modern gun emplacements pointing west and
south. Part of the east side is
tiled and used as a water
catchment area.
The slogan painted in red
on the side of a building facing travellers coming from
La Linea says: "Gibraltar—
260 years British and still going strong."
Whether Gibraltar has the
same strategic value it had
100 years ago is open to question, but from the attitude of
the present British government it seems likely that it
will stay in the hands of the
British for a long time yet.
WANTED
STUDENTS
WITH
CARS
and
SATURDAYS OPEN
THE GLOBE AND
MAIL
CANADA'S NATIONAL
NEWSPAPER
requires
YOU
on Saturdays
GOOD PAY
Call Mr. Hall After 4:30 p.m.
684-1714
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
The
Copenhagen String Quartet
NOON TODAY - AUDITORIUM
Don't Miss This Once-a-Year Attraction
• ••••••••
Lecure on 'Indian Music'
by Dr. Ida Malpern
Tonight 8:30 p.m. — Hut 017
FREE
•   ••*•••••
RAVI  SHANKAR
Saturday, November 28
AUDITORIUM — 8:30 P.M.
RAVI SHANKAR, the great Indian sitarist and composer,
winner of practically all of the international awards for
his scores for films made in India, will be heard here on
his first tour io the Western Hemisphere since his spectacular successes at the Edinburgh, Festival, the London
season and a Continental lour, which followed.
Often called "India's Man-of-Music", he is classed
with the greatest virtuosi of the world. He was chosen—
with Casals, Oistrakh and Ansermet—for the International
Broadcast to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the United
Nations and—with Menuhjn and Oistrakh—for some of
the most important International Music Congresses of
Paris and other European capitals.
Shankar has proven that his improvisional techniques
have a very close kinship to modern jazz.
RESERVE NOW
At AMS, Vancouver Ticket Centre or at the Door
Students: 50c.   —   Adults: $2.00
• ••      ••••••
THE  SECOND  COMING
IS COMING
Thursday,  November  26 — Armouries —12:30
The best- Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1964
Ex-editors
start own
paper
LONDON (CUP) — Seven
students who last month resigned from the Gazette, student newspaper of the University of Western Ontario, have
started their own  paper.
The seven students, three
editors and four writers, left
the Gazette Oct. 21 after a
policy dispute with editor-in-
chief Rob Johnson.
Johnson had refused to run
a satire on a fraternity during
Silence Week, a period when
fraternities are forbidden to
rush future members.
First edition of the mimeographed paper appeared under
the name Veritas and was distributed to about 1,800 students.
Shortly after, Western's student council issued a statement supporting Johnson in
his right to exercise control
over the content in the Gazette.
opINNing
November 27
MMSCRIPTION I
EYE GLASSES
16
95
lw
All Doctor i Eyeglass Prescriptions
filled. First quality materials used.
All work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville      MI 3-8921
BM MoiMy-QacV Ouorant«e BH
DAVE
BROADFOOT
Canada's No. 1 Comedian
ttm songs by
DONNY WRIGHT
Monday through  Thursday
af Hie
BUNK HOUSE
COFFEE SHOP
812 Davie
Reserve Now . . . 683-9790
. . . and remember
Jazz every Sunday Afternoon
2-5:00 p.m.
the
drunkard
(SOLD OUT TONIGHT
AND WEDNESDAY.
RESERVE EARLY FOR
FUTURE    SHOWS)
3607 West Broadway
Reservations: RE 6-6011
STUDENT    HARDIAL    Bains
and Dr. Keith Clifford attended the second annual
academic symposium at
Victoria College last weekend.
Birth control
Pills go on sale
STOKE, England (CUP) —
Contraceptives will go on sale
in a university shop at a
Northern   England   university.
Student leaders at Keel University said that a poll of
1,000 students and professors
showed they wanted contraceptives to go on sale.
•    •    •
Authorities  at   the   university are firmly opposed to the
plan.
The vice-chancellor said he
told the president of the students' union the proposal must
be abandoned.
•    •    •
However student president
Roy Moore said contraceptives
will be available to those who
want them.
"We want to deal with modern problems in a modern way
and we don't want to impose
a morality ban," he said.
Blorg selections go
KNOCKMAROON (UNS) —
Most hated men on campus
will tonight terrorize this quiet
residential street for their annual green, hairy blorg selections.
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.   10th Ave.
24 Hr. Service      CA 4-0034
BELL
MEEDS
MALE GRADUATES
TO HELP MANAGE TOMORROW'S WORLD OF COMMUNICATIONS
Take the long view when you graduate.
Plan a career offering scope and responsibility in the management of a
leading Canadian industry.
Consider the potential of a position at
the BELL if you are graduating in
COMMERCE  -   BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Ask at your Placement Office for
informative booklets, and arrange to talk
with one of our representatives when
they visit your campus.
Built, managed and owned by Canadians
BELL
Make a date to discuss a career
in telecommunications on
Monday through  Friday
November 30 to December 3 Tuesday, November 24, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
BANNO'5
EYE VIEW
OF BIRDS
By ROBERT BANNO
The problem of the apathetic UBC sports fan opens,
once  again,   the matter  of
athletic scholarships.
We must be realistic and
face the fact that no amount
of juvenile, rah-rah school
spirit garbage will revive fan
support (if it even existed) at
UBC. What is needed is clear:
• A vastly improved calibre of play, with schools like
Washington, Oregon, UCLA
and Southern California.
• A complete overhaul of
our present system, making
university athletics a community, not just a university institution.
• An adequate stadium,
seating at least 20,000 fans,
an enlarged gymnasium and
hockey arena.
To accomplish this, a system of vigorous recruiting
and athletic scholarships
must be instituted.
The prospect appears
bright.
In a Ubyssey article last
•March 26th, UBC athletic director Bus Phillips stated
that "the Men's Athletic Committee has had the question
of Athletic scholarships under consideration for some
time." Phillips went on to
say, "We are pleased that Dr.
Gordon Shrum plans to implement our ideas into Simon Frase'r's athletic program."
The encouraging article
also stated that several MAC
members favored scholarships, including Alumni representative Dr. Gerry Nest-
man who said, "there need be
no conflict between Academic and Athletic scholarships."
•    •    •
Let us hope that " ideas"
will be also implemented by
UBC   within a   few years.
For our present program
is not only half baked and
hypocritical, but is an outright failure which does not
achieve   its   objectives.
It fails to attract student
interest and it fails financially.
We should eliminate our
present hypocritical system
and embark on one of two
directives: the one suggested
in this article and supported
by Phillips, Nestman and
most people connected with
university; or the complete
elimination of inter-collegiate
competition.
UBC third
in track meet
UBC placed third in the
senior Varsity team event of
the Pacific Northwest cross
country tournament held at
UBC last weekend.
Washington State won the
senior event with 12 points,
followed by Van. Olympic
club with 42 and UBC with
61 points.
Individually the first place
finishers were Chris West-
man and John Valiant, both
of Washington State, who
tied for first place.
UBC's HOCKEY BIRDS showed Olympic class against
Rossland Warriors. Saturday night in their first game of
the season they tied 4-4 with the Warriors. Sunday they
downed  Rossland  by  a   4-0  score.   UBC  defenceman  Al
In Hockey
Happy debut
for UBC crew
It was a happy debut for UBC's Thunderbird hockey
team as they tied and defeated the Rossland Warriors in
two games over the weekend.
SPORTS
Saturday in their first game
of the season the .Birds took
two periods to get their timing, then exploded for three
goals in the final period to
come from behind and tie 4-4
with the Warriors.
Sunday the Birds showed
their Olympic class as they
shut out and outscored the
Warriors in a 4 - 0 victory. The
Birds were never in trouble,
punching out a two-zip first
period lead and adding single
tallies in each of the final two
periods.
MARTIN  GREAT
In both games Rossland's
outstanding goalkeeper and
playing coach Seth Martin
made like a magician as he
mystified the Bird's would-be-
scorers by coming up with
some unbelievable saves.
Saturday, with seconds left
in the game, Martin deftly
plucked the puck from Gary
Dineen's stick as Dineen tried
to drive home a quick rebound
from a low, hard, point shot by
UBC defenceman Ab Merlo.
But the Birds' goaltender
Ken Broderick also came
through with fine performances, especially Sunday when
he blanked the Warriors, turning aside thirty shots.
Top point collector for the
Birds was centre Dineen with
six assists in the two games.
Sunday he assisted on each of
UBC's goals.
Birds' scorers Saturday were
Bob Forhan, Bill Bowles, Al
McLean and Les Johannensen.
Sunday Forhan added his second and third goals of the
weekend and Bowles and McLean each scored their second.
EDITOR:
GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Soccer Birds
cant find
scoring eye
UBC's Thunderbird soccer
team fell nine points off the
pace losing 3-1 to league-leading Columbus in PCSL action
Sunday.
Once again the UBC club
was unable to locate the enemy's goal with John Haar
scoring the Birds' only goal in
the second half when his hard
shot deflected off a Columbus
player into the net.
The Birds head south Wednesday travelling to Berkeley
for a game with the University
of California and another in
'Frisco against a local All-Star
squad.
GUITARS
FROM SPAIN '
Instruction - Group & Private
Music - Strings - Repairs
Mediterranean Shop
4347  West 10th  Ave.
Phone 228-8412
McLean is shown here checking Warrior Gary Morris as
Rossland's famous goalkeeper Seth Martin views the
action. Morris, actually a UBC type, was loaned to
Rossland for the game.	
Charging rugger Birds
cross off another victim
Ex-Britannia was crossed off UBC Thunderbirds' list in
a free-wheeling rugby game Saturday before a surprisingly
large crowd at Wolfson field. The Ex-Brit squad came up
with a great effort, but the 'Birds proved too powerful for
them.
UBC scored early in the game, when Chuck Plester, on
a fifteen yard run, broke three or four tackles to score.
Mike Cartmel, whose kicking of late has been excellent,
made the convert good. Five minutes later, Cartmel added
a 35 yard penalty kick.
The score was 8 - 8 at half time.
In the second half, Ex-Brits came out playing inspired
ball, but UBC held them without a score, and the tide
turned.
With ten minutes gone, Tetsuhiko Kariya picked up a
loose ball, dodged half the Ex-Britannia team, and scored
in the corner. Cartmel converted another tough one.
Gary Rowles and Tom Fraine added a try each and
Cartmel made good another convert to give Varsity a decisive 21-8 Victory.
The Thunderbirds play a league game Thursday against
the Braves in Varsity Stadium, and the Braves would like
nothing better than to shoot down the high-flying Birds.
YOUR  CAMPUS CHRISTMAS
HEADQUARTERS
For A Wide Selection Of
Christmas Gifts & Cards
University Pharmacy Ltd.
5754 University Blvd. Phone 224-3202
dcacbunic tfcfwitieA
International House is in the news this week. Coming up
this week are two important noon-hour events. This Wednesday
the 25th in the Auditorium at 12:30 you'll be able to see the
Greek picture "Immortal Land". The next day the Indian Trade
Commissioner will speak at International House, also at 12:30.
Also in the works is a Hootenany Dance scheduled for
Friday the 27th at 8:30. And for those who will be near campus
during the Christmas holidays, two parties are planned. One
on December the 18th, at 6:30, and a following one December
29 at 8:00. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1964
DONALD SMILEY
... seminar speaker
CUS offers
Xmas cram
on union
Let your Christmas include
Confederation — sign up for
the Canadian Union of Students seminar.
Then you can spend your
Christmas holidays reading all
about Confederation in preparation for the seminar Jan.
14 in International House.
"It is based on a seminar
on Confederation held last
summer in Quebec," said UBC
CUS committee chairman Gordon Gaibraith.
-"Also we will have some of
the same speakers, for instance Dr. Donald Smiley of
the department of political
science."
Application forms are available in the AMS office or the
CUS Committee office, room
258, Brock extension.
'tween classes
Students string
along with Danes
Copenhagen String Quartet plays in the Auditorium noon
today. Event, sponsored by Special Events, costs 25 cents
•
• •   •
AFRICAN   STUDENTS
Film African Awakening,
Thursday 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. in
Bu. 102.
• •    •
CURLING CLUB
Grey Cup Curling Party,
Saturday from 8:30 to 1. Tick-
ets $2 per couple at AMS or
from curling executive.
• •    •
CHORAL SOC
Interested singers can join
Choral Soc Wednesday from 6
to 8 p.m. in Bu. 104.
• •    •
GREEK FILM
Immortal Land, in colour
and with English narration
Wed. noon in Aud.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
BBC film, On Call To A
Nation, Wednesday noon in
Wes. 100. Admission for non-
members 10c.
• •    *
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Richard Thompson speaks
on Vigorous Living, Wednesday noon in Bu. 221.
• •    •
YOUNG BOURGEOIS
Piquers congregate today
noon in Brock Conference
room.
• •    •
MARDI GRAS
Chorus line auditions this
week. Males: Mon., Wed., and
Fri. Females: Tues., Thurs.,
and Fri. Time: 11:30-2:30.
Everyone welcome.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242. -	
LOST — One strand of cultured
pearls, Tuesday. Reward, phone
224-9805, Carolyn Allan. Lost Hebb
Theatre, BI, Sciences, Forestry &
Geology.       	
Automobiles For Sale
21
'61 ALPINE new oversized engine.
Excellent condition. HT, ST., T.C.
wire wheels, black with red upholstery.  Phone Geri,  CA 4-9258.
EMPLOYMENT
LOST—Arrow-shaped sorority pin.
Jewels on shaft. Greek letters
Pi Beta Phi on head. Phone Carole
Munroe, CA 4-9070 after 6.
Reward.
POUND—Duffel coat at Zate House
on homecoming weekend. Will exchange for mine which is smaller.
Phone  Josie,   RE   3-1566.     .
FOUND—Man's glasses, dark grey.
Apply circulation div. office Library.
Special Notices.
13
IF  YOU  are   suspected   of   being  a
study  space  hog—BEWARE!
MOON RIVER PROM featuring "The
Sinners", Dunbar Heights, Kairos
24th & Collingwood, Nov. 28, 8.30
p.m. $1.50 per couple. Tickets at
the door.
HEAR the young lovers in action.
731-9108. Soon you can SEE the
young lovers in action.	
OBTAIN CUS Life Insurance now
and you won't cuss later. Enquire
Rm. 258 Brock or phone TR 9-2924.
Transnortalion
14
WANTED ride to Ottawa or vicinity
Xmas. Will share expenses & driv-
ing.  Phone Mel 224-9011, Rm.  170.
RIDE WANTED Mon|-Fri. 8:30's,
18tb & Arbutus area. Phone Dave,
733-1265.
RIDE WANTED for 8:30 lectures,
vicinity 12th & Macdonald. Phone
Elaine, RE 8-1607.	
Ski Trips
16
MT. BAKER Ski package every Sat.
& Sub. for $9.50. You get return
bus trip, l'/2 hour ski lesson, all
day rope tows, 20% off rentals.
Deadline to sign up Thursday eve.
Tickets at all Eaton Stores, Tepee
Sporting Goods, 1017 Robson and
3279 W. Broadway, and Blueline
Sporting Goods Ltd., 154 W. Hastings, or phone CA 4-395S.
Help Wanted
51
HOME EC field work? Domestic help
wanted, 5138 Maple. Phone 266-4740
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SMART QUALTTY clothing for all
the family, like new, at terrific
savings. Ex Toggery Shop, 6246
E.  Blvd. AM 6-6744.
FOR SALE—Metal Blizzard Reisen
slalom skis, 200 cm. Hardly used,
new $150. Sell for $100. Call Helen
Stirling CA 4-9090.
CHEM. 101 lab. guides to Chem 101
available in the College Shop.
These have been compiled from
the labs of the top chem. students
at UBC. Perfect for in and out of
lab studying & Xmas exams.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED ROOM (garage if
wanted). AM. 6-9487 evenings after
6.    3794 West 37th.
Room & Board
82
ATTRACTIVE ROOM & board for
one or two, vacant now, own wash
room. AM 1-6863.
ROOM & BOARD now available at
Phi Kappa Sigma House, excellent cook, 2 blocks from University
gates.   4506 West  9th.  CA  4-3601.
AVAILABLE NOW, ,aingle room &
board, male student. AM 6-2593.
Furn. Houses 8c Apis.
83
FURNISHED home, students, teachers, five adults, spacious rumpus
room, TV, etc.; warm, near UBC.
Home for students for years, Telephone AM 1-4332, 12-1 p.m.
OPERATION CROSSROADS
Gary Mullens of the Geography department shows slides
and discusses his experience in
the African country of Malawi
noon today in Bu. 217.
•    •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Lecture on Indian Music by
Dr. Ida Halpern, tonight 8 p.m.
in Hut 017. Free.
• *    •
Last minute tickets available for The Taming of the
Shrew, Don Crawford and
Daniel Shaffron from the Special Events Office.
• •    •
Ravi Shankar Saturday 8:30
p.m. in the Aud. Tickets at
AMS and at door.
• •    *
NATIVE CANADIANS
Meeting with guest speaker
Wednesday noon in Bu. 218.
• •    •
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Part five of CBC Metropolis series: How Things Get
Done, Wednesday noon in Bu.
102.
Science name
their building
The   Science    Undergraduate  Society   has  suggested
a  new   name   for   the  new
Student Union building.
SUS    Monday    suggested
the building be called SUB,
Science Undergraduate
Building.
About   fifty   science   students signed their names to
the letter in support of the
name.
At present the SUS has its
quarters in Hut M 21. "We
are trying to  get room for
the SUS in their building,"
said   AMS   president   Roger
McAfee.
opINNing
November 27
STROKE:
Can This Killer
Be Curbed?
It used to be thought that
strokes occurred suddenly...
without warning. Now doctors know that 3 out of 4
victims have been warned by
"little strokes" ... bur didn't
know it! Here are the symptoms... and what to do about
them...plus some good news
about rehabilitation for the
millions of stroke survivors.
Don't miss this informative
article in December issue of
Reader's Digest, now on sale.
csa NEWS
An  introduction  to   Canadian   University   Service   Overseas:
Thursday, 26th November; coffee served in the Lower Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre.
A talk and slide show describing the activities of C.U.S.O. Information on application procedure, fields of foreign aid, and
countries concerned will be available.
ADVANCE NOTICES
Annual Kiddies Chirstmas Party now being planned. Similar
to the one held last year. New Year's Party in G.S.C. Details
to be announced later.
REGULAR
and
KING SIZE
du MAURIER
o product  of Peter  Jocfcson Tobacco  Limited —  makers of fine cigarettes

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