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The Ubyssey Oct 10, 1969

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Array -How and where is university going in 5 years?
By PETER LADNER
Ubyssey Senate Reporter
Eighteen months after its inception, the senate
committee on long-range objectives has finally given birth
to a 132-page, one pound-four ounce baby squeezed
between two pink sheets.
The committee, headed by anthropology and
sociology department chairman Cyril Belshaw and
including ex-student senator Don Munton, presented its
final fat report at the senate meeting Wednesday night.
The point of this awesome creation is to figure out
where this university is going in the next five years and
how it will get there.
It reaches into possible changes in admissions policy,
curriculum, and educational philosophy, but the gut issue
is its debate between a "federated colleges" proposal and
reformed "status quo" supporters.
A minority of the committee (five of eleven) feels
only a system of small colleges, with 500 to 2500 students
each, can provide an adequate basis for building the
university.
"The model is one of an intellectual and
cosmopolitan city, rather than a small town," the report
says. The majority doesn't want to go that far. Let's retain
"the present type of structure of faculties, departments
and schools... with modifications to make the system
more responsive to changing conditions," they say.
The main changes advocated point to more
possibilities for a general education. They want an
orientation college for first and second year students, a
4—year college of general education, and a new
interdepartmental program.
They also want the faculties reorj^nizedtotry to even
out the number of students in each faculty.
The stress on general courses to combat creeping
specialization comes out again in the committee's
recommendations on curriculum.
The recommendations are to study possibilities of a
general education program, and have better explanation of
existing interdepartmental programs in the calendar.
When  it  comes  to  students and   curriculum, the
authors are careful not to let the pesky critters get too
much power.
i
The Belshaw report is expected it have far-reaching
ramifications for the development of UBC. Interested
students can obtain a copy from the registrar's office. The
report will be considered by senate at a special meeting
Nov. 1, from 9 to 12 ajn.
Ubyssey senate reporter Peter Ladner will present a
series of detailed examinations of the major issues
contained in the report in upcoming issues.
"Student demand should not be ignored, nor should
its importance be unduly exaggerated," the report
cautions.
The same approach lurks between the lines when the
committee urges specific measures to give teaching ability
an equal footing with research in promotion, pay and
tenure for profs.
They suggest sneaking past anti-calendars (without
ever mentioning them) to have teacher-controlled
evaluation of teaching and curriculum. Students should be
consulted "by means of professionally designed
questionnaires" to be passed up to the deans.
The committee here recommends a unique excursion
of senate into a sacred domain of the board of governors:
finances.
Recommendation number five (out of 39) advocates
including budget estimates in curriculum changes brought
before senate.
In the much yattered about area of enrolment policy,
the committee says the answer is limiting total enrolment
to 27,500 on the present campus. This mass would consist
of 22,000 undergrads and 5,500 grad students, the latter
to be let in at a 15 per cent increase per year.
The main issue in enrolment is: Which should be
decided first, resources available or the numbers that
See page 2: CHRISTMAS
Belshaw's
briefs
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 10
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1968
228-2305
—dirk visser photo
BOMB SCARE at the psychiatric hospital brought out firemen, campus cops and RCMP just before Dr.
Victor Frankl was about to speak. Building was evacuated and searched but no bomb was found.
Anti-war campaign halts classes
A teach-in on the Vietnam war Wednesday at UBC
will coincide with a moratorium on classes at colleges
across the U.S. and at least one Canadian university.
UBC's teach-in and a voluntary supension of classes at
the University of Waterloo are an extension of a U.S.
national campaign aimed at ending the way.
The program at UBC will include a series of speakers
during the day in the SUB ballroom and a film on how the
U.S. became involved in south-east Asia. The film will run
hourly from 4 to 10 p.m. in SUB 207.
The moratorium on classes at Waterloo will be
augmented with marches, meetings and teach-ins on what
can be done to help stop the war by a growing number of
faculty and students.
The campaign was originally planned by anti-war
student organizations in the U.S. and has received support
from some 500 students councils, campus newspapers
editors, several administrations and at least 24 senators
and congressmen.
The Alma Mater Society council has approved in
principle actions at UBC in support of the moratorium.
The project calls for a cessation of regular
activities—by students, workers and businessmen—to
discuss the war and its implications.
It would escalate one day per month until
"significant" peace efforts are made by the U.S. Thus
there is a one day moratorium Oct. 15, a two-day
stoppage Nov. 15 and a three-day moratorium to start
Dec. 15.
The Waterloo action was organized by three
professors who explained "there is a growing feeling that
academics, including those in Canada, are not doing all
they could to stop the war in Vietnam.
"We feel a day off from the regular functions could
be a good start," the three said.
SFU under
'McCarthy
regime
By JIM DAVIES
BURNABY (Staff)-Simon Fraser University
students are pushing faculty up against the wall.
The long-awaited joint faculty meeting at SFU came
to a sudden end Thursday when 450 students refused to
leave the lecture hall where it was held.
SFU vice-president Lalit Srivastava moved that
students should not be in attendance at the meeting
which was to discuss the strike situation at SFU. The
motion passed and the students were asked to leave, but
they refused.
Upon this refusal, an immediate motion for
adjournment was moved and passed. About 250 of the
341 professors on campus were in attendance.
A joint faculty meet means students are permitted
to attend a general meeting of the faculty, but do not
have voting privileges.
As SFU president Kenneth Strand rushed from the
meeting, students chanted, "McCarthy-Strand,
McCarthy-Strand." Strand was off campus and
unavailable for comment within minutes after the
meeting adjourned.
Meanwhile, the striking political science, sociology,
and anthropology department has been gaining
additional support.
Harold Hickerson, the PSA prof who struck, then
reconsidered, has re-joined the strike. He said he has
made a final decision on the issue and that is to support
the strike.
See page 2: MORE PSA
Under the Covers
Library extension  p.. 3
PSA gathers support p. 5
Enrolment figures  p. 5
Senate election statements p. 6
Page Friday film special p. 7
AMS budget p. 21
The Ubyssey editorial board has arbitrarily declared
Monday a holiday in honor of Irving Fetish.
Therefore, there will be no paper Tuesday. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10,  1969
FRANKL
—dave enns photo
. 'a greater cause'
'Man thinks of
outside - not self
The crowd laughed, applauded, and stayed for more when it was
all over.
Dr. Viktor Frankl, a Viennese psychiatrist, talked on 'Youth in
Search of Meaning' to a capacity crowd in SUB ballroom Wednesday.
In a lively lecture with much arm-waving and several jokes, Dr.
Frankl said it is not true that man is primarily concerned with
pleasure, happiness and success.
"Being human means having a meaning to fulfill or having
another human being to encounter. The main feature of human
existence is self-transcendence—man is mainly concerned with
something outside rather than inside himself," said Frankl.
Frankl said self-interpretation is often overdone in North
American culture. "People lie on analytic couches trying to amass
their underlying motives and become disheartened and disgusted. You
should forget yourself to an idea or a cause greater than yourself.
"The more man tries to pursue happiness, success or pleasure,
the harder it becomes to achieve it. These things must not be set up as
goals, but must come about as by-products," he said.
"The same applies to sex, in which case 95 per cent of the cases
of sexual neurosis can be traced to patients striving for pleasure rather
than just letting it happen."
"If you are in love, sexual pleasure will fall onto your lap as a
side-effect," said Frankl.
Dr. Frankl will speak again tonight at 8:30 p.m. in Hebb
Theatre. Admission is $2 for general public and $ 1 for students.
Montreal rioting
leaves two dead
MONTREAL (CUP)-Canadian army troops and Quebec
provincial police will remain in Montreal for "some time yet."
according to Premier Jean Bertrand—until he is sure the city's
police are willing and able to maintain order.
Almost all of Montreal's 3,700 police and 2,400 firemen
were back on duty Thursday, but the premier was still leery
:|   after six hours of rioting Tuesday which left two dead, scores
injured, and at least two million dollars damage.
The police refused to report to work Tuesday due to wage
||   grievances, and left the city unable to react against violence
I   which begun that evening at the Murray Hill limousine depot
and  raged  through   downtown areas until early Wednesday
s   morning.
Quebec authorities are waiting for briefs outlining the
|   grievances of police and firemen, and it is believed that neither
the troops nor the QPP will be withdrawn until action is taken
i   on the briefs.
And at least one insurance  company spokesman said
I Thursday that many policies on looted shops in Montreal may
not be renewed unless the businesses were guarded 24 hours a
II day.
"In certain areas of the United States," he said, "we have
started selling property damage policies as a seperate package at
II   an additional fee."
Christmas exams pooh-poohed ~'
From page 1
should be accommodated?
The majority recommendation
opts for settling numbers first, the
working our how to allocate
resources.
This view is blasted by Belshaw
in a minority report, where he
calls a 27,500 student limit
"arbitrary and unjustified." He
prefers deciding how many
students each academic program
can handle, and then letting that
number of students in.
Specifically, the report calls for
a 65 per cent entrance
requirement for first year, and
possibly a 60 per cent passmark
for second year.
Then in fall 1970, the
committee wants enrolment
quotas set for the first two years
in five faculties, including arts,
science, and education.
Final decisions on admissions
have to be made by the board of
governors.
The introductory section on
the goals of the university remains
unchanged from the preliminary
MORE PSA
After
yesterday,
attempted    a
administration
were   met  by
From page 1
a   joint  strike   plenum
200 students
mill-in at the
building.    They
campus   security
Norm Wickstrom, SFU student
society president has said he will
move for a general student strike
at the next council meeting.
guards and pinkertons but the
conflict was short-lived and
students departed without any
incidents.
The only violence occurred
when Hugh Mcintosh,
photographer for the Peak
newspaper, was grabbed and
thrust against a wall by Fred
Hope, head of campus security,
and Pinkerton guard number 423.
Mcintosh suffered a dislocated
arm.
He is considering taking legal
action and will meet with his
lawyer today.
Thursday morning, 35 students
picketed the office of Dale
Sullivan arts dean at SFU.
Non-striking members of the
PSA faculty have appointed a new
chairman, Robert Wyllie. Wyllie
does not support any of the
striking issues.
AMS turns
against PSA
The Alma Mater Society
executive has refused to pay $50
for circulation of information
concerning the strike of the
political science, sociology and
anthropology department at
Simon Fraser University.
UBC student John Davies said
Thursday the AMS refused to pay
$50 to have issues of the Peak,
SFU's student paper, made
available at UBC.
Davies said an information
centre would be opened today in
SUB regardless of the AMS
refusal.
When the strike began at SFU,
the AMS pledged full support to
PSA.
Davies said it appears the AMS
has changed its position on the
strike by not paying for the
papers.
He said he felt the fight for
democratic decision-making was
as much their fight as anyon
else's.
AMS external affairs officer
Mike Doyle said that as a political
science student he disagrees with
PSA tha^ a university can be
democratic.
He said PSA is getting what it
deserves and a just and open
dismissal process is fair.
Doyle said the consensus of
Wednesday's AMS executive
meeting seemed to be that PSA
has failed to convince UBC
counterparts of their position.
The executive also felt that
perhaps their initial reaction had
been premature, he said.
report published last May. It says
the university should strive to
preserve and extend knowledge,
develop the individual, and serve
the needs of society.
At the end of the massive
report, in a catch-all chapter
called "What Else", the reader is
treated to recommendations on
international studies, (needed),
the trimester system (not needed)
and a standing long-range senate
committee (needed).
One interesting section in this
chapter pooh-poohs Christmas
exams, urging instead that the
first term's work should be
assessed on the basis of term
assignments and tests. „
Standby for complete
chapter-by-chapter analysis of the
report in upcoming issues of The
Ubyssey.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS
Professional production of all
kinds of Graphs, Charts, Illustrations, Maps and Formulations.
Scientific Displays and Advertising.
Ph. 733-4506 (evenings)
CURRYHOUSE
invites you to Int. House for
"HOT CURRY" lunch every
Wednesday  —  11:30.
3934 Main St.        879-7236
EAT IN   -   DELIVERY   -   BANQUETS
VANCOUVER
FILM SOCIETY
1969-70
STARTING SOON:
West Van Odeon: INTERNATIONAL SERIES
Oct.   19-Shakespeare Wallah (India) 1966
Nov. 9 —Grazie Zia (Italy)  1968
Nov.  30  —  Intimate  Lighting  (Czechoslovakia)   1965
Jan.   11 —La Poupee (France) 1962
Feb. 8 — The Naked Light (Sweden )(Bergman) 1953
Mar.   1 —Two or Three Things I Know About Her
(Godard) 1967
Centennial Museum Series:
FRENCH MASTERPIECES
Oct.  5 — Carnival In Flanders — 1935
Oct. 26—Hiroshima Mon Amour — (Resnais) 1960
Nov.  16 — Labas Fonds — (Renoir)  1936
Dec.   7 —Therese Desqueyroux — 1965
Jan.   18— The Earrings of Mme. De . . . — 1953
NIGHTS OF NOSTALGIA
Jan. 4 —Evening With the Musical (U.S.A.)
Feb.  1 —The Last Laugh (Germany)  1924
Feb. 22 —A Horror Evening (with Frankenstein)
Mar. 8—The Sly Rene Clair (France)
Mar. 29-Trouble In Paradise (Lubitsch) 1932
MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
Phone 731-6940 for Information
BouTtQUB
HAS-
-Wool Pant Suits
-Italian Knitted Tarns
-Scarves
-Ties
-Dresses of
Brushed Nylon
-Candles
-Incense Burners
ETC.
So do your thing . . .
come and see us at
3372 CAMBIE
(Between  17th &  18th Aves)
879-0121 Friday, October 10,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—david bower-man photo
VICTORY SIGN is flashed by members of ace Ubyssey boat racing team. Jim Davies, John Twigg,
Brian McWatters, and John Gibbs celebrate after defeat of highly-touted engineer team in the first
round and continued, on to win the beer bash for the 51st year in a row.
Music for city
theatre queues
By LESLEY MINOT
The musicians' union is blocking attempts of a small group of
students to entertain the grim theatre crowds on Granville street.
Adrian Stott, a computer science student, and some of his
musical friends came up with the idea of entertaining the enormous
theatre queues in the tradition of the "buskers" of Europe.
Stott's group wrote to city council presenting their suggesting
and was told it would have to get the permission of city prosecutor
Stewart McMorran and the musicians' union.
According to Stott, McMorran seemed enthusiastic about the
idea.
But Bob Reid, an officer of the Musicians' Mutual Protective
Union, told The Ubyssey:
"We would have no objection to music on the streets in
Vancouver as long as it is performed by union members who operate
under contract. We would like the students to become union members
and be hired at union fee."
Stott's group will now ask city council for permission to play
without authorization of the musicians' union.
"There is no legal reason why the union need be consulted. The
decision should be up to the city since we intend to operate like the
other non-union bands in Vancouver."
i  SDSer to lecture
A special lecture to inform UBC students of the politics
Il behind student unrest in California is being sponsored by CLAM
1  today at noon in Bu. 106.
Guest speaker will be Judy Leiss from the Northern
1  California Regional Office of Students for a Democratic Society
1 (SDS)*
I She will provide new information on People's Park, the
|| Berkeley campus and the San Francisco State College strike as
§| well as describing recent internal developments in SDS.
Accompanying the lecture will be a 20 minute film on the
II San Francisco State College strike.
The film has shots of SFSC president S. I. Hayakawa
1 ripping wires off a student soundtruck and of numerous shots of
I  student-cop conflicts.
It was produced by the same radical movement
film-makers who made the film on the Columbia University
riots.
GS still survives
in spite of troubles
By MURRAY KENNEDY
The Georgia Straight has survived an attempted postponement of
its latest trial, a postponement which would have cost the Straight the
testimony of its main witness.
The paper went to trial Wednesday on obsenity charges stemming
from the "HIPpocrates" column in the May 20-27 issue.
Prosecutor Sean Madigan tried to have the trial postponed at the
last moment. The Straight had brought the column's author, Dr.
Eugene Schoenfeld, to Vancouver to testify in defence ofthe article.
Had Madigan been successful, the paper would have lost its main
witness in the case.
However, defense lawyer, Leo McGrady, was able to go ahead with
the case as planned.
Madigan did win an adjournment until November 4, but only after
all the evidence had been submitted.
Judge Harvey Sedgewick adjourned the case pending the outcome
of a crown appeal against the acquittal of the Straight on another
obsenity charge.
McGrady said in an interview Thursday that doctors are treated
with kid gloves by the legal profession.
"Doctors are respected for their expert opinions and lawyers
traditionally use a certain amount of professional integrity in dealing
with them," he said.
Madigan knew that Schoenfeld was planning to appear at the trial.
He also entered his appeal for the previous case a week ago.
However, he did not reveal his intensions to attempt to adjourn the
case until late Tuesday afternoon. By that time, Schoenfeld was in
town, and no other arrangements could br made.
In the trial, Schoenfeld testified he wrote the column in question
because the dyspareunia problem is little known or understood.
The column was based on a letter which described the complaint in
plain,  simple, and unadorned language. Dyspareunia is otherwise
known as "tight pussy" and causes extreme pain during intercourse.
Dr. Murray Cathcart, a local doctor, also testified in defence of
the Straight. He said that the letter quoted in the column was:
invaluable it described the complaint in candid, plain language.
. The final defense witness was a twenty-three year old bank teller
who has been married for three years. She testified that she had
experienced the dyspareunia problem and had been helped by the
article.
Proposed library extension
to be built under the trees
By GINNY GALT
Better library conditions are coming, but
students will have to wait two years to see them.
A press conference was held in the UBC
information office Thursday to announce the board
of governor's approval of plans for a new Sedgewick
undergraduate library.
The architectural firm of Rhone and Iredale
plan to build a new library under the main mall,
between the old library and the mathematics
building. ,
"We want to build over 100,000 square feet of
usable area and yet maintain the park-like character
of UBC which exists now," said Rhone and Iredale
spokesman, Bob Todd.
The library will be on two levels with
landscaped courtyards on either end. The top will
be a plaza with walkways, trees and seating areas.
A new library is desperately needed. "As it is
now, the faculty's and students' demands for books
are far higher than the existing library's ability to
supply them," said UBC's head librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs.
He said the present Sedgewick library has
80,000 volumes while the new one will have space
for 200,000 volumes.
Because of the great demand for books in
Sedgewick, a reserve book system has been set up
which allows students to borrow some books for
only two hours.
"We hope to be able to eliminate the reserve
system  completely   with
Stubbs.
the   new  library,"  said
Another problem with the existing libraries is
the lack of study space. Present study space in
Sedgewick accommodates 486 people. The new
library will have room for 2,400.
"We have asked the Alma Mater Society to
form a committee of students to make comments,
offer suggestions and get in on the planning,"
Stubbs said.
AMS obudsmanj Sean McHugh, said the library
committee is now being formed.
"It is an advisory committee which will carry
some weight and indicate what students want,"
McHugh said.
Any students interested in serving on this
committee should submit their names to the AMS
secretary along with a letter stating why they would
like to be on it.
"We would prefer that the applicants not be in
their grad year so they will have at least another
year of continuing interest in the project" said
McHugh. "Also, I'd like to hear any bitches students
have about the library. All complaints will be
reviewed by the committee."
Stubbs would like interested students to send
letters with suggestions or ideas to him as well.
If the costs ofthe new library are approved and
there are no major hitches, the construction will
start in about one year. Stubbs said it is still too
early to estimate the cost of the project.
ARCHITECT'S PLANS have been submitted for the proposed extension to the Sedgewick Library.
Students will have to wait two years for this facility. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1969
THEU8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
OCTOBER  10,1969
Frogs upon you
I have this thing against thieves.
Thieves make my life even more difficult than it
already is, which is actually saying a helluva lot. They
take things, which, for one reason or another, I have
acquired and wish to maintain. This annoys me.
Which is not to say, necessarily, that the person
who now has my copy of Man in the Glass Octopus is a
thief. As a matter of fact, I can remember willingly
lending the book to someone.
But now it has been four months or so and I can't
remember who took the book and I would like it back.
It's not that it's a particularly good book or
anything, but I had to pay five bucks for the thing and
wasting money goes against my grain. Besides, I now
have a hole exactly the width of Man in the Glass
Octopus in my bookshelf.
And while we're on the subject of thieves,
somebody stole Steve Hollett's lunch Thursday and he
would like it back. The lunch, if anyone sees it
anywhere, consists of two cheese sandwiches and an
apple.
Furthermore, Paul Knox says somebody's stolen
his em ruler—used by all self-respecting
newspapermen—and come to think of it, mine is gone
too. P. Moan had her $125 leather coat taken from a
car. We'd all like these back.
Therefore, we hereby condemn thieves and
thievery and wish a plague of frogs upon them all.   M.F.
Slop, slop
Walk through the cafeteria, sometime.
See the beautiful wooden tables.
Notjce that every table—well, almost every
table—has one or more wet rings on it. Some have large
patches of a watery substance splashed across them.
Notice, too, that the diameters of these rings
correspond roughly to those of the bottoms of Ruth
Blair's teapots.
Could it be, we ask, that Miss Blair—the
university's head growly—should be taken to task for
her egregious choice of teapots?
The spouts on the little green devils are exactly the
wrong length.
If you tip the pot a little, the tea runs down the
outside of the spout. If you tip it some more, it still
runs down the outside. This makes a mess, not to
mention depriving you of tea.
If you tip it some more, the tea comes out the top
of the pot. This is responsible for the table-top puddles
vaguely reminiscent of the University Boulevard in
mid-winter.
It's impossible to do it without making a mess—and
more work for the food services growl ies.
Come on, Ruthie. For an extra nickel we tannin
freaks at least should get decent teapots. P.K.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire  Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't City John Gibbs
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert.Ruebsaat
Alas, once again The Ubyssey is
forced to disappoint that loyal horde
of masthead fans.
Eager as you may be to hear of the
Icrises. birthdays and general
debauchery that went on in the office,
we only have room for the names of
the hardworking(?) crew.
Here goes: John Andersen, Murray
Kennedy, Bill Dodd, Lesly Minot,
Ginny Gait, Shane McCune, Sandy
Duke, Dave Keillor, Jim Davies, Brian
McWatters, Colleen Hammond, Robin
Burgess, Jan O'Brien, Christine
Krawczyk, Sandy Kass, Phil
Barkworth, Jennifer Jordan and Urve
Torva.
Dirk Visser, Dave Enns, Walt
Barnscher, Barry Narod and David
Bowerman perpetrated their usual
animal act in the darkroom, while
Tony Gallagher, Steve Millard, Scott
McCloy and Dick Button labored in
the jock shop (how about that, first
time we've used that phrase thisyear).
Editorial board meeting today at
noon.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Oops
The Ubyssey apologizes
profusely for certain comments in
its September 26 issue of Page
Friday.
In an article entitled "The
Gallimaufry", it was stated that
the members of the Gallimaufry
Theatre lived "communally
together" in the African
Methodist Episcopal Church on
Jackson and Prior Street. Also, it
was stated that the priest of this
church was "somewhat of a
freak".
The Gallimaufry Theatre
Company does not live together in
the church. The members have
their own individual places of
domicile, and only work together
in the church.
The priest of the church is not
a "freak".
He is a responsible citizen, and
is actually quite straight.
Peace
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would appreciate it if you
would pass this letter among any
groups representing students
opposed to the war in Vietnam.
Unfortunately, I had to come
all the way over here before I was
convinced of what they had been
saying all along.
I would be pleased to offer any
support possible to their cause. I
cannot see the whole situation
over here, but I can offer a first
hand look at some of the goings
on.
I would appreciate it if any
replies were sent with a personal
return address, as censorship,
although not extensively
practiced, is authorized.
I am looking forward to the
day when I can return to
Vancouver, and, if the money
holds out, to UBC.
Peace,
L/Cpl. THOM WESTCOTT
H & S Co. 2/7 Marines S-2
FPO San Francisco
99602
We assume the writer is now in
Vietnam, with his mailing address
as the above—Ed.
AMS goof
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to take this
opportunity to express my
opposition to remarks made by
AMS council members which were
reported in your paper.
It is erroneous to say that 95
per cent of the demonstrators
were opposed to the actions of
the breakaway group in Blaine. By
that logic, five per cent of 5,000
demonstrators would number 250
people. More than 250 people
went over to the truck crossing to
demonstrate. You can't tell me
that 750 people out of the 1,000
people at the truck crossing were
protesting the actions of the
breakaway group.
In a taped interview (available
at CYVR) AMS president Fraser
Hodge stated that one of the
reasons the AMS council
organized the demonstration was
to show their dissatisfaction with
the weak protest made by the
Canadian government to the U.S.
government.
In your paper AMS
co-ordinator Dave Grahame was
reported as saying he thought the
importance of the demonstration
lay in the number of people who
made a committment to
"symbolically close the border."
Apparently the AMS council is
condemning the Canadian
government for their weak protest
on one hand, and congratulating
themselves for their symbolic
closure of the border on the
other.
I wonder about AMS
vice-president Tony Hodge's
definition of violence when he
referred to the actions of the
breakaway group with the
statement: "violence won't have
any effect in stopping violence."
I personally agree that the SFU
group had no right bringing up
their educational grievances at the
demonstration but I feel strongly
that the demonstration at the
truck crossing was more effective
than the AMS extravaganza at the
Peace Arch. I think it is time
the AMS council quit
whitewashing the students and the
public with cries of grandeur.
KEN MANN
arts 1
Ineptitude
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Fraser Hodge—or should it be
Premier Hodge in the local
trite-autocratic manner?—has
commented on the weekend
fiasco, which closely followed the
midweek one, that: "We can only
conclude the poor attendance (10
reputedly) indicates passive
support   for   the   Alma   Mater
Society." The comment would be
as ludicrous if the man had said
massive support: since when has
no action been construed as
positive action?
A further piece of AMS
ineptitude is the Boyd bungle. As
a student is now doing Boyd's
former work, and council is
having to create work for Boyd
until late January 1970 when he
may be fully employed as building
manager, money is being wasted.
This is not efficiency; it is
Campbell's ineptitude:
incompetence in timing, even if
not outright bad faith. Should we
not now ensure that the salary of
the 'surplus student' be taken
from Campbell's renumeration, if
only to keep budgets in line! You
know: "Let justice be done, and
be seen to be done." There is
shortly to be a referendum for
election of student councillors, so
there will be scant extra cost if
this were put to all students as a
motion of confidence.
It will be intriguing to observe
how the Alma Mater' Council
whitewashes this latest fiasco, the
most recent Hodge podge!
H. EARLE
arts 3
Shucks
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I believe that a large number of
students share my sentiments,
but, be that as it may, I wish to
protest the misuse of student
money in the publication by The
Ubyssey of misinformation, of
material insulting to humanity in
the degradation of sex, and of
propaganda for a political
philosophy which many students
do not share.
Can The Ubyssey, without
resorting to arrogance or
obscenity, give one rational reason
that any students should be
compelled to give financial
support to a publication which is
devoted to propaganda they do
not agree with?
For the information of the
students, who you presumably
expect to pay the shot this year,
kindly publish the total amount
given The Ubyssey be AMS for
the past academic year, including
both costs of printing and
payments to editorial staff.
TED HEWLETT
grad studies Friday, October 10,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
'Strand fears students'
PSA gathers support
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
As administration and non striking
faculty at Simon Fraser University refuse to
talk with striking political science, sociology
and anthropology faculty members, support
for the strike grows.
The administration showed its
"willingness" to discuss the issues by its
behavior at the joint faculty meeting
Thursday.
Students were quietly sitting in room
C900, where the meeting was to be held, when
faculty started to arrive at noon.
Students refused to leave
As soon as the meeting was declared
open, administration vice-president Lalit
Srivastava, put forth a motion to declare the
meeting closed to students and press.
"I have before me two rulings: to install
closed circuit TV and to declare meeting
closed to students," Srivastava announced.
With no debate, the motion was passed.
Students refused to leave and the meeting
was suspended, with all decisions on any
issues being left to Srivastava and, possibly, a
committee.
Mordecai Briemberg, deposed head of the
PSA department, had only one comment on
the meeting. "It was a typical meeting,
displaying total fear of students and total
inability to discuss," he said.
"No trusteeship with Wyllie"
Dennis Roberts, SFU information officer
and Strand's right hand man, said the faculty
was not unreasonable in wanting the meeting
closed to students.
"If all students had wanted to do was to
observe they would have been satisfied with
TV coverage," Roberts said.
When asked to comment on the entire
situation, Roberts simply parotted Strand's
statements.
Before the joint faculty meeting the
students strike committee held a meeting of
its own. A motion was passed stating students
would not disrupt the joint faculty meeting.
During the student meeting Bob Enoch, a
member of the student strike, expressed the
opinion of the striking students on the
appointment of Robert Wyllie as new
department head.
"It is plain to see the criteria used by the
administration," he said. "With Briemberg a
leftist we have a trusteeship; with Wyllie a
rightist we have no trusteeship."
Wyllie was appointed in an
off-campus meeting by the six non-striking
professors.
"This nomination violates student parity,
an essential part of-the PSA department, and
is therefore illegal" said John Cleaver, another
member of the strike committee.
Despite the failure of the joint faculty
meeting the students did win a small victory.
Strand as puppet
"At least Strand didn't get the motion of
confidence he was counting on" said Tom
Davies, editor of the strike newsletter.
When asked what he thought of Strand's
actions Davies said: "I see Strand as a puppet
of the government. Otherwise his actions are
impossible to explain.'"
Despite the large number of PSA students
who are actively involved in the strike, Davies
said students not actively involved in other
departments.
"I agree, with the strike in principle but
if they try* to stop me from going to my
classes I'll hit them" was the way the way a
certain third year English student put it. "This
is not an unusual attitude," said Davies.
A very different sort of attitude was
expressed by Professor Harold Hickerson.
Hickerson has been undecided in his position
and in this statement issued tdfhe Ubyssey he
explains his position.
"I was committed to a policy of
opposition to the administration's policy
regarding tenure particularly that of Professor
Aberle, however not to a strike. Also I was
also disappointed to arrive in a department
with a trusteeship over it.
"Students will suffer
"I felt like a Greek chorus, reflecting each
sudden new turn of events. In the end all
solutions must come as a result of
negotiations. These negotiations should take
place under the arbitration of the Canadian
Association of University Teachers.
"I feel that students are the ones who will
suffer the most by this. At the same time
students are playing such a prominent part
that they will benefit in the long run by an
experience which to them must seem very
revolutionary.
"Strikes are developed in labor, and the
relations between labor and capital. This
strike is born of a kind of conflict of ideas and
therefore cannot be a real strike.
"But I would repeat that the right to
strike is inherent in strikes and that punitive
action cannot be taken."
The strike now in its third week. Each
day it gains new supporters but no one can
predict the outcome.
"... gone far beyond PSA"
Briemberg summed up the opinions of
those that are striking when he said: "At least
we have managed to raise the essential issues
of student participation."
Teaching assistant Sandy Lockhart
expressed a similar opinion in his statement.
"The issue has now gone far beyond PSA.
It is now a question of what we want the
university to be today and what we want from
it in the future," he said.
982 didnt return to school:
employment crisis to blame?
By STUART RUSH
Statementsbythe administration at the senate
meetings frequently reveal some rather interesting
admissions on the part of our administrators. At
Wednesday night's senate meeting, the registrar,
Jack Parnall, circulated enrolment figures as of Oct.
2. These figures showed the total university
enrolment to be 21,018, which is 982 students
fewer than the official predicted enrolment of
22,000. In explaining the difference between the
actual and predicted number, Parnell said that fewer
students were coming back to university, but failed
to offer any reason why.
This same reticence, however, was not
demonstrated three weeks earlier on Sept. 17, when
Parnell assuredly told the Sun that the decrease in
enrolment resulted from the fact that "some
students managed to obtain high-paying jobs during
the summer and may have decided to retain them
for the winter to earn money." Interestingly,
Parnall's counterpart at SFU, Harry Evans, gave a
completely different explanation. He said that
"students were unable to find good jobs and might
have discovered they did not have enough money by
September." Who sounds more plausible?
Certainly there must be a number of reasons for
the drop in university enrolment his September, but
the emphatic shortage of summer jobs (and good
paying summer jobs) this past summer is the only
one which looms up as an adequate explanation.
And it is this reason that Parnall chose to ignore on
Wednesday night.
Throughout the summer, a group called The
Action Committee for Unemployed Students
endeavored to arouse public awareness about the
summer job shortage and its probable consequences.
Indeed, motions were twice brought to the UBC
senate to spur that group into recognizing the
problem, and to provide relief by way of a
reduction of tuition fees to those students hurt by
it. The issues raised by TACUS were largely passed
off with the comments that the crisis wasn't as bad
as was charged, and that the government was the
only body capable of acting. And yet now we are
faced with visible effects of that job shortage.
Of course, those 982 students who are not at
the university will never be heard from, and will not
raise their voices to dissent. And the university
administration, the faculties, and many students will
breathe a sigh of relief that the 982 didn't make it
and our resources are not further taxed.
But consider the way those students were cut
out. It was a matter of money, and money alone.
The 982 didn't have any so they got the axe. It sort
of makes a mockery of the airy theory of universal
accessibility, doesn't it? It also makes a mockery of
the recommendation in the recent report of the
senate committee on long-range objectives which
says that admission to this university will be on the
basis of academic excellence alone. What is most
despicable is the blithe way that Parnall and the
administration of this university can rationalize the
enrolment decrease.
But then perhaps, it is easy to see why they
must rationalize it as they have, since to do
otherwise would be an admission of their inaccurate
enrolment predictions, and of the dubious policy
deciions which flew out of those figures.
The 982 students who didn't make it to UBC
this fall (the number is likely greater) are victims
not only of government but also of this university's
complete insensitivity to the effects on students of
widespread summer unemployment, and of the
inadequacies of the loan and grant system.
The attitude of the administration as voiced by
Mr. Parnall blatantly points to the fact that the
university is capitalizing on non-academic criteria in
order to keep out more students and hold down the
student population. But what a helluva way to do it.
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The seven per cent overall
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  10,  1969
Hi-skoolers
organizing
MONTREAL (CUP)-Nearly
100 Montreal high school students
from 19 local schools have
launched what they hope will be a
movement for "constructive
reform" of the educational
system.
As a first step, the students
met Saturday at a student-run
symposium to discuss grievances
with the current high school
system.
The group, which has
disavowed violence as a means of
change, will likely hold another
symposium in November, attempt
to create a city-wide newspaper
for high school students, and
eventually form a city-wide high
school students union.
"We have lost all faith that this
type of change will ever come
from the top," said one of the
students. "We've learned that,
above all, it must come from the
bottom. And that means us."
r^^V'.-*" ■- ■'■■■\" "■
) »■**»#
h*\r ' _** -*" i ;■ ■*■"
■•**■ * .■        «.*?■
,*:■.■*£■■.. *.*■ ■   ■
&^-^ ■: ■■'■
l*  a*** -J' J"    J*      Ji'.       '■
—bruce stout photo
GRUESOME TWOSOME, Larry Folden (left) and Darrell Evans, stand with knives poised, ready to
slit innocent throat of Rona Altrows. Trio is part of the cast of The Revenger's Tragedy, an Italian
play by Cyril Tourneur, which will be playing at the Dorothy Somerset Studio from Oct. 15-18.
Student performance will be next Thursday at noon. All other performances begin at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are $1.50 (students $1) from Freddy Wood Theatre 207. Phone 228-2678 for reservations.
9 running for 5 at-large senate seats
Nine students are running for
the five vacant seats on senate.
Alan Dobrey, education 4, was'
elected education student senator
by acclamation.
Nominations closed Thursday
for senate representatives of arts,
science, engineering, commerce
and law, and grad studies.
The following are statements
from candidates in next
Wednesday's at-large senate
elections. No statements were
receieved from Morley Jacobs,
science 9, Brian Debeck grad
studies, and Ken Waldman,
science 3.
The usual purpose of a
campaign statement is to tell you
what you want to hear to get your
vote. In this case that is a
particularly difficult problem
because I'm sure the last thing
you want to hear is a campaign
statement from me. So I will be as
brief as I can: I want to find out
why the university's problems are
not being solved. Is the basic
problem money or people? I feel
that the senate is the place to find
out. PETER BROCK law 1
Five years experience of
classes, coffee confabs, and all
other facets of university life.
Gained experience on AMS
finance committee, commerce
curriculum committee, etc.
Wish to promote student ideas
primarily in the following areas of
senate: Academic Building Needs,
Curriculum, University Library.
Vote Next Wednesday.
STUART BRUCE commerce 4
In running for the position of
senator-at-large, I have one basic
aim: to press the administration
into presenting to students an
objective long-range policy
regarding student participation on
decision-making bodies. This
entails a complete revaluation, as
well, ofthe role ofthe AMS.
Also:
• abolishing all language
prerequisites for B.A. degree.
• consideration of extending
the academic day, making greater
use of facilities.
• maintaining a standard 65
per cent entrance requirement.
• pressing for greater emphasis
on the professor's teaching role,
and less on research.
JOHN CHERRINGTON arts 2
My knowledge of university
politics is limited to four years of
observation on campus with my
only real insight coming from
work with The Ubyssey.
There are umpteen things
wrong with UBC-large classes,
bad teachers, inadequate library
facilities, and a ridulous housing
situation.
Enrollment cuts are not the
answer. We must communicate to
our government that we aren't
enjoying "the good life".
The Senate has been quiet for
too long. Student tokenism won't
be tolerated. We must be heard!
JIM DAVIES  arts 4
The main reason I'm running
for senate is to inject an informed
student voice into the crucial
upcoming decisions about UBC's
future.
I favor a federated colleges
system. It will give our concrete
plant a few cells of life through
more decentralization, more
experimentating in curriculum,
and maybe even some courses to
help the manipulated in our
society instead of the
manipulators.
I'm for more student
participation on senate, in
departments, and in evaluating
teaching and curriculum.
Even if my token voice is
stymied, I'll keep you informed
on what's up with the senate.
PETER LADNER i arts 4
I believe in responsible
representation.by students on the
senate. By responsible I do not
mean lack of action, but rather
action with responsibility. Within
the applied science faculty a head
of a department has been removed
and a number of courses have
been altered or dropped entirely.
Also a number of mathematics
professors are not permitted to
teach engineering math courses
solely based on student
objections. I believe as a senator I
can bring forth student opinion
without the threat of sit-ins or
strikes. Vote O'Brien for senate.
THOMAS O'BRIEN
engineering 4
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LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Gronvill* at Pendtr Since 1904
By FRAN McGRATH
Recently I went to the Centre for
Communications and the Arts to talk to Resident-in
Film Stan Fox about the university's Film
Workshop.
The Film Workshop is a non-credit program
open to any student. There are no prerequisites. It
exists to develop creativity in the film medium. Fox
talked about the underground film scene in
Vancouver and at SFU in particular.
"The underground scene in Vancouver is more
lively per capita than any other place in Canada," he
said. Fox said in Canada there are only three places
that films are made, Montreal, Toronto, and
Vancouver. Montreal has the National Film Board,
while Toronto and Vancouver make most of the
underground films.
"Here we have a couple of institutions whieh
support underground film. There is SFU and
Intermedia. Intermedia, 1900 West Fourth, is an
artists workshop supported by the Canada Council
for artists who want to use mixed media. That
means modern technology as it applies to the arts,
things like triple screen. It is very difficult for them
to acquire the equipment they need for this sort of
thing. Intermedia has the film editing facilities and
tape recorders that film makers need."
Students come to SFU to do what interests
them. They take the introductory film workshop
and go on. When they are finished they don't have
credits. They have films and have developed in the
process as a human being. By the way they have
acquired a skill. If someone wants to hire that
person, he has the films as proof of what he can do.
I won't say that this system will work for
everything, but so many wonderful things happen
when you don't give credits and degrees. People
don't take it because they want a ticket to
something. The atmosphere is wonderful. The
program is over subscribed.
"We are making arrangements that if a student
wants to he can have his participation in the film
workshop recorded on his transcript on a pass fail
basis. It would be his choice. I have travelled a lot
and know what happens in film workshops. SFU is
unique in film schools. It is open to every student at
the university and at no charge. At most schools
outside the Iron Curtain students have to pay for
their film stock. At the University of California
students have to pay for stock and since the
equipment provided is poor they have to rent their
own.
"I find it most exciting out here.'.
"I really believe that you can only learn by
doing. That is why we use Super 8. We get people
working as quickly as possible. Lecturing for about
10 weeks is of no use. Everybody is going to make a
certain number of mistakes so let them make them
on the cheapest equipment and film. Students learn
very quickly in this workshop whether they have
any talent and more important the teacher can find
out, wheras in a regular education institution in
which people can memorize and do less practical
work students can go on for a long time before they
find out whether they have any actual talent in film
making. Talent is either there or it is not there.
Many people take the workshop for a semester and
just fade away. It is the most painless way of
handling it."
He mentioned the people who were working
successfully at the SFU workshop.
"Brian Small is the only student film maker to
have sold one of his films to Universal for
distribution to university campuses. The film is
Lullaby, four minutes long, satirizing married life.
All Brian's films are ficititious and shot with a black
humour quality about them.
''Manuel Busquets also works in fictitious films
and has two productions under way at the moment.
Peter Bryant is a filmmaker who has been operating
out of SFU. He recently made a major film on the
Indians of Bella Coola. It was shot this summer.
Previous to that he worked as a student filmmaker
at the National Film Board for a summer. He
directed the longest dramatic film this workshop has
ever done, Felix which was done last year.
Sandy Wilson made a film called Garbage about
garbage which was shown nationally on the CBC
this summer. She is currently editing an hour
documentary on the community of Penticton which
several members of the workshop shot this
summer."
The most ambitious thing for the workshop is
just beginning. We are going to be given time on
Cablevision to present the products of the video
workshop. Cablevision is going to do its own
programming on Channel 10 and they offered us
some oftheir time," said Fox.
He said the workshop operates on the portion
of the budget that the university gives it. The
money is stretched by making film in Super 8.
Students learn just as well on it. Advanced students
may pay for their own films. Bella Coola was
backed by various groups and the workshop was
asked to do Penticton by the Film Board and they
paid for the material and the processing.
Fox felt there was some threat to the existence
of the workshop if university budgets are cut back
any more. He felt that since film making is the
frilliest of educational frills it would be the first to
g°*
The film workshop itself was scarcely
over-equipped. There is one large room that serves
as an equipment, lecture and general work room.
There is a small room for the television equipment,
and another small room for film editing with film
editing equipment plus a film developing room. One
of their economies is developing their own film.
They have the equipment necessary to turn out
professional looking film but the operation is on a
modest scale.
jj*i**}*>i*>3*»*S3g383»y3Mi*Wiii>*^
■rr- ^x*****¥&&V&&&i
Underground film, (so-called), experimental
film, and general artiness on celluloid is all, as Stan
Fox says, flourishing here in Vancouver. And more
than a little credit for all this goes to the small
organization of mad artists who gather in and create
out of Intermedia.
Most underground film-makers in
town—Rimmer, Razutis, Le Nova, Saba, etc.—are, or
have at one time or another been involved in
Intermedia, and the latter serves as an effective
cohesive center for thier activities. Intermedia offers
equipment—cameras, editors, projectors, sound
equipment etc.—centralized organization, and a
place to share ideas.
Furthermore, the organization, with financial
support from the Canada Council and moral support
from the "established" Vancouver community,
serves effectively as somewhat of an agency~to
project local experimental films beyond this city.
(The Intermedia Film Co-op for instance—formed
last year—handles nation-wide distribution of
locally-made experimental films.)
Naturally, and by defintion, Intermedia
involves a lot more artists and art forms than
film-makers and film. But film is a definite and
important part of the whole techno-artistic process
in which Intermedia is involved.
What Intermedia actually is, is (1) a space, and
(2) lots of technological paraphanalia (including
film equipment). It is not a closed or in-group club
nor a profit-oriented organization. The space, and
the equipment is open to anyone with ideas.
So if you have a film idea, supplement it with a
script, and/or a past film, and trot on down to see
Werner Aellean, (present director of Intermedia)
and you may get some help and support.
Incidentally, Intermedia has recently had to
move from its old location on Beatty Street to
another (unfortunately smaller) one on the 1900
Block west Fourth Ave. -KALYNE.
■pt 2WO I
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October  10,  1969 mm
r
^
LUMSDEN
There is an atmosphere of tension and excitement about
him. The cigarettes are constant. Smoke, blond hair, blue
eyes. A relaxed, intimate voice charged with intensity of
purpose, of knowledge, of experience. The man is David
Lumsden: import, Assistant Professor with the
Department of Theatre in charge of the film program
(Theatre 330/History and Aesthetics of Cinema; Theatre
333j Film Production), BA. from Oxford University and
M.A. from U.C.L.A. One small step for mankind, one
giant leap for UBC. I invite you to meet him.
TRIPS
GP. After you received your B.A. you did some
travelling. Where have you been, what have you done and
why?
D.L. I guess I basically started to be interested in
writing. I was in Brazil then I went to Mexico and I think
that's when my interest in film really began: reading
Eisenstein's books, seeing the actual location where he
made his Mexican film. So I decided right then and there
that I wanted to specialize in that field. I went to New
York, to a film school run by a guy called Steve Brodie. I
also took sound courses at New York City College and
that developed the sound side. And then at night we were
filming all the time. Mainly with blacks who were acting
in Le Roi Jones' THE TOILET and things in the East
Village. And we'd film at night because really during the
day you had to get a tripod _permit. . . $50.00. We'd
always have someone looking out for the cops. I decided,
well, obviously, to get anywhere you either have to have
years of experience in the studio or really good footage.
So. I had been to Hong Kong and I decided to go back
and do a documentary on the "boat people". I taught
English and worked for RADIO HONG KONG. On the
weekends we'd go out and film these "boat people".
People said you'd never do it you know, you'll never get
on their junk. So we used to spend a lot of time just going
out fishing with this one family. And then after a time, we
suggested we might be able to make a good movie. We
shot some footage of them and showed it to the kids. The
kids loved it, you know how they rolled over and they
were splitting with laughter to see themselves. And of
course that drew the older people in. So we got all the
footage together and I decided to take it back to England.
On the way back I stopped off with Satyajit Ray. I had
done a lot of writing at the time and he was very
interested in my material. I spent two or three months
with him. He was shooting a film near Calcutta and so we
were in the editing room, on location, seeing the rushes,
going through the whole process. And he worked so
simply. You know it was quite an eye opener after seeing
some of the big productions.
GP. What do you mean when you say "simply"?
DX. He works from a story-board, no script. The
story-board is it. That's the language as far as he's
concerned. That is the script. It's all drawn out by frames,
every little scene, with just a little of the dialogue
scribbled on the right. He does improvise.
GP. Where did you go after India?
DX. I went up to Moscow, where I had some
material. I met Marie Seton and she had a good contact in
Moscow, Professor Wiessfeld, who is working on the
Eisenstein   Commission   which   is   going   to   publish
Friday, October 10, 1969
i Writer and film-maker Geoge Porkolab interviews David Lumsden about film- k
T making generally and about UBC's infant film production  course,  Theatre 330, J
| which began this year. Of 40 budding film makers who applied only 72 were oe- f
A cepted. I
Eisenstein's later written works. So I took one of my
papers to him and saw the film school. I left my papers
there and returned to England. I took my footage on the
"boat people" to the BBC. Unfortunately it was too
short. They wanted at least thirty minutes, my film was
about eighteen minutes. However, they did buy the
footage. Then I could have gotten a job as an editor. But
another friend of mine is an assistant director for
Woodfall and there are certain dead-ends. And I think one
of them is assistant director. You get stuck. You're
invaluable, you get very good employment, because
they're always needed. They're the fellows who really
make the liaison between the director and all the business
that has to be done. You know, getting everything ready
for the set, location, tremendous amount of tact is
required, PR work. But you never really move up from
there. The best way to go, I think, is to be an editor.
Certain directors find that you've saved them in tricky
situations. They recommend you to someone else.
Sometimes if the director is ill, the editor is the one who
will usually move in, maybe the camera-man. Whereas an
assistant director very rarely does that. I didn't
particularly want to go and edit for about three years. The
whole historical situation with regard to media is worth
studying. Jack Warner of Warner Brothers giving
Beaverbrook two Spitfires while negotiating for control of
ABC. One of the results being, besides winning the Battle
of Britain, that film distribution in the U.K. is today
controlled by two men, the head of RANK and the head
of ABC. When the U.K. government instituted the EADY
FUND to help new film makers, RANK used a lot of it to
make some travel films on Ireland, which were found to
do nothing more than to advertise the chain of hotels they
owned. John Grierson has summed the situation up very
well in the UK. I quote. "You might even say that the
political power has lost contact with the people most vital
to it, and it has lost it to a by-guess-and-by-God rabble of
reporters, entertainers, medicine men, quacks and
confidence men, of every known literate and illiterate
academic and pseudo academic type, ready, all of them,
to opine at the rustle of a contract. Grierson undertook
the situation in the UJC. so well that he was able to do so
much for the Canadian Cinema. Students will not be
wasting their time doing some of the homework Grierson
must have done in order to set up the NATIONAL FILM
BOARD OF CANADA.
THEATRE 330, THEATRE 333
GP. This is essentially why you were brought in to
UBC to handle Theatre 330 and 333. What do you hope
to accomplish in these courses?
D.L. 330 to start with. The main thing is to keep the
enthusiasm which is there. And if you kill that you're
obviously doing more bad than good. So the main thing is
to preserve that enthusiasm, which means doing a hell of a
lot of work to get the best prints of the best films. And
once you've got good films, I think then you can structure
intellectually and really go into theory and into history
and why things happened the way they did, the situation
in America, the situation in other countries ofthe world,
realization of the various forces which are there. So
starting from good films then you can work up into your
subject in a realistic way. The CANADIAN
FEDERATION OF FILM SOCIETIES has been of
outstanding value to us in getting the best prints available
for the course. 333 is a totally different thing really. It's
first of all choosing the best students, which you know is
why we sent out a circular with a story board as a
problem. Then it's combining creativity with competence
and basically to get the students to help each other to try
and structure a film which will not just express what they
feel, sometimes they really feel they've expressed it, but
to communicate it to a large audience who've had to pay
to come there.
DISTRIBUTION
GP. What are the problems of distribution with
16mm work done by students and independent filmmakers?
D.L. The basic problem with film distribution is, that
the film industry as such, has now become a real-estate
concern. They want to pay the rent on the prime
locations on all the theatres they have all over the world.
And therefore, they're not particularly interested in
speculative shorts. They want something which will insure
a big return and they're prepared to put quite a bit of
capital investment into such projects. And therefore, the
chances of individual film-makers of raising the money in
the first place, without distribution rights, is almost
impossible. So the individual film-maker is forced to make
these shorts and set up his own distribution system and
this of course is what's beginning to happen through
THE     UBYSSEY
various organizations like the SHORT FILM SERVICE
(122, Wardour Street, London, W.l. England), of which
the late Sir Herbert Reade was the director, and various
festivals, particularly the EDINBURGH
INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL(Film House, 3
Randolph Crescent, Edinburgh 3, Scotland).
VANCOUVER
GP. Have you been able to formulate any reactions
as to what's happening in films in Vancouver.
D.L. At the University, CINEMA 16 has a
tremendously well organized showing of very good films.
Of the film festivals here which are organized, I think the
VARSITY has the best program. It is one of the best film
festivals that I've ever seen for the top films in the world.
The Kurosawa series during the summer that was
organized by Pearl Williams was magnificient. There is a
fantastic amount of work in getting prints, going through
customs, etc.
GP. What do you hope to contribute to the film
scene in Vancouver?
DI. Among other things, I'm hoping that a
distribution system will be set up for 16mm film. THE
INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART in London is
getting together now the best films made in England by
students and the best film-makers. They're going to try
and establish a distribution chain through Universities.
This would be reciprocal. Therefore students and
film-makers here would be able to send their work to
Europe to be seen, to explain their country, their ideas,
on a basis that would be remunerative. This year I've sent
a lot of films from U.C.L.A. to the EDINBURGH
INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL and I believe
they've done quite well. I hope that well be able to get
the films over here to show students what's being done
elsewhere so they can improve their own film-making
abilities.
Lumsden (left) on location in Calcutta with Satyajit
Ray (right).
FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS
GP. What technical developments do you foresee.
D.L. There may be a revolution. The Japanese for
example may start producing immensely inexpensive
equipment for 16mm or some similar thing, where a
projection system will be set up in the home and films
may be sold eventually like you go and buy a record. The
possibilities are enormous.
HIS OWN WORK
GP. How do you conceive a film?
D.L. You know there are many different ways. A lot
of people work straight from a written script. My way is
always to start from a visual idea and literally a
story-board, which is frame-by-frame, drawing out the
story. And then I try to keep to that as much as possible.
Whereas other directors will, for instance, improvise.
Godard will come with a lot of hazy ideas and just shoot,
shoot, shoot and then see what comes out. Because his
brain works so rapidly, usually he manages to come out
with something. In fact he does a lot of his editing, so to
speak, in the theatre.
FINALE
GP. In what direction can the embryo of the film
program at UBC develop.
Di. It can either become a separate Department of
Film or move into an area of Communications which
would include all types of modern communications. It can
move into Media studies. It can be an incorporation of
theatre, television and cinema operating together with
inter-media playing an important part. It can become
separate small courses for film production. Or it can
become the academic approach which would be a large
introductory course on film and then seminars in
aesthetics, communication, media, television, etc.
pf 3hreei ORIENTATION
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I
$12 season ticket includes six plays, in the Q.E. Playhouse,
free coffee and wide-open discussion with the director,
designer, members of the cast and YOU!
Oct. 28-THE ROYAL HUNT OF THE SUN
Canadian premiere by
Peter Shaffer
Nov.  11-THE SHOW OFF
by Oeorge Kelly
Dec. 9- COLOURS IN THE DARK
by James Reaney
\xM0MW^m^
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M**;:
Feb. 24-THE SLEEPING BAG
by Arthur Murphy
Mar.   17—TANGO by Slawomir Mrozek
For Application Forms Call Mike Lewis, Playhouse Rep. at
U.B.C. 922-8916 or write 2005 Inglewood, West. Van.
Sex in Movies (Porno)
By JACQUES KHOURI
What's all this fuss about sex in movies? As long
as a movie deals with people, sex will continue to
underlie the medium. Human beings live to make
love and make love to live; how can a film depict
man and ignore his sexuality?
When plebians object to seeing copulating
couples on screen, I sympathize with them. Their
problem does not lie in what they see, but in how
Now, movies reflect a society's culture: they
contain its myths, frustrations, temptations,
degradations, demonstrations, castrations, alienation
and dreams. We can see this point better from a
historical perspective.
When Hollywood was in its infancy (not too
long ago), there developed a code which most
directors were supposed to adhere to—unless a
better idea came along. Among other things, their
they   view   life   in   general.   Many   will   piously
sermonize, "I don't mind it if there's artistic merit.
But sex for sex's sake is bad."
Shades of voyeurism! It's hard enough to tell
what is artistically meritorious and what is not
("Fuck" by Andy Warhol is a case in point). At the
same time, hundreds of films are churned out each
year where nudity and bedroom activities are the
main appeal ("Barbarella" and "Can Heronymous
Merkin Ever Forget Mercy Hump and Find True
Happiness" are but a couple of drops in the ocean
*-'*,*^5.|ffMMWIlI.'.'*|
confusion in morals to make an easy buck. Still,
they must be satisfying some need in the audience,
otherwise no one would see their shows.
Even psychologists admit that pornography
has a useful place in society. It provides a harmless
outlet for sexual feeling. Thus, even the sniggering
sex farces in movies may be desirable, while not
having any artistically redeeming values.
Ten Commandments banned scenes showing a
horizontal embrace, a woman's nipples and inner
thighs, vivid violence, and, of course, sexual
intercourse. (It would be pretty dull to portray
intercourse without revealing nipples and thighs and
other assorted limbs.. .)
Despite the code, sex flourished. On the back
seats of cars, on mountaintops, in valleys, on
millionaires' yachts and in peasants' huts: they were
never short of new angles. Cecil B. Demille directed
biblicals with a lot of gore and the ever-present
Roman orgy aad dance of the seven veils.
;V*xl|^^i*eMu^aboos, 4**,.o*M!iW>W.' \m&
cm^r&\pv&'&4itwzy of the Dodo WftSin «&
decade, as has occurred in Denmark and Sweden.
Films like "I am Curious (Yellow and Blue)" will no
longer shock. In fact, there is a distinct fear that
they will soon bore.
Eventually, moviegoers as well as moviemakers
will learn to accept their sexuality as joyfully and
naturally as they accept the sun each morning.
Then we'll all have a ball.
ipS 4ouuri
STARTS TODAY
He's a pacifist.
Adrcrftresister.
Tomorrow he goes
to basic training.
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this Sunday/*
PROTEST—ANTS AND
CELEBRANTS AND GRATEFUL
PEOPLE—WELCOME TO
WORSHIP THIS THANKSGIVING
SUNDAY, OCT. 12th 10:30 a.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE, UBC
5885 University Blvd.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10,  1969 xx°#v^v;V
By ANDREW HORVAT
Looking through Donald Richie's The Japanese Movie, can
make you feel that you've been robbed. No, not because it costs
$10.00, and not even because it isn't sold anywhere in town, but
because this collection of some more than 300 stills from about
as many movies is a vivid representation of a life you cannot
live—a testimony of experiences unavailable.
Matsui Chieko*, one of Japan's first movie stars holds a
rose between her chin and the top of her negligee in a pinup
picture from 1922. Or a publicity shot from the 1939 war movie
Five Scouts, completely unavailable because it was burned by the
American occupation forces.
There are many more reasons to feel cheated than the shots
collected in this book. Until recently the Japanese movie industry
produced some 400 feature films per year. Now, even if 90%
(that's 360 films) amount to sheer celluloid rubbish, that still
leaves some 40 pictures per year, or about a thousand good
movies from the end of the war until the present day.
How many of these films have come to Vancouver? If it
had not been for Pearl Williams' presentation of a Kurosawa
festival this past summer, and the trickle of art shows that comes
through Cinema 16, it would be safe to say that Vancouver has
been completely bypassed.
Of course, there is the Olympia Theatre out on Hastings
and Nanaimo which every Sunday from seven o'clock on shows
an interminable array of blind swordsmen and weeping suicides.
Violence and melodrama are the pitfalls of most films and
Japanese movies are no exception. However, on the other hand,
just since the end of the war, thanks to five or six now-famous
directors whose better pictures are to be seen on this page, the
Japanese film has achieved a powerful position as a tool of social
critism, as a mirror of social change in an industrial Japan, and as
a creator of beauty.
Kurosawa's RASHOMON was
the first Japanese film to gain
recognition abroad. It's first
western viewers immediately
launched into the
pseudo-intellectual and began
to compare the film with the
kabuki theatre, something
not well known in the west in
1950 and hence thought to
be safe to mention. On
further examination this
period film was found to have
closer connections to
Stanislawsky that kabuki, and
its 14th century setting was
but an exotic disguise for a
universal me sage.
Ikiru, again by Kurosawa, this one from 1952.
"Life is short," says the theme song, "especially
when you have been dead for 25 years," reiterates
a moralistic narrator. Without a doubt, Ikiru is the
best melodrama ever produced. How to erase a
life-time of apathetic timidity in the six cancerous
months left-how to do one good deed.
THE HUMAN CONDITION-
-Japanese self-criticism of
the Manchurian Occupation.
It's nine and a half hours long
and was made for manic
depressives.
Kawabata Yasunari's Nobel
Prize winning SNOW
COUNTRY made into a film
in 1957.
The great Kurosawa in action
in 1962 directing SANJURO
with Mifune Toshiro as the
hero.
* all  Japanese  names are in Japanese order, i.e. Ono Yoko and Lennon
John.
Photos are fromDonald Richie,The Japanese Movie Tokyo 1966, Kodansha
International. Available in North America from Japan Publications Trading
Co., P.O. Box 469, Rutland, Vermont, U.S.A. or C.P.O. Box 722, Tokyo,
Japan.
ipfi Sivei
Friday, October 10, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY jr3X**r a?   ©K^RBM
d'^-
y
1^-X-zJ
Film fan and selt-styled critic K. Tougas analyzes
novelle vague director Jean-Luc Godard and
other contemporary film quirks. No pre-reading
required.
"I see no difference between the cinema and life".
As always on the forefront of progressive cinema, French
director Jean-Luc Godard is intent on experimentation. His
film-making is a continuous discovery in cinematic language,
specifically searching for means suited to his cause, social criticism.
La Chinoise is of course the more famous of Godard's works: in it he
foresaw the crescendo of emotions resulting in France's searing May
revolution. But this aspect of prophecy and immediacy is less
important than his search to express and analyze his surrounding
world, to explain both the plight of the individual and the crisis of
the collective state. In this, Week-End Was an added step.
Wielding a multitude of ideas, Week-End primarily intended to
operate on the pyschological responses of the viewer. Godard
forces a complicity with his insensitive, mercenary bourgeois
creations. Choices between the many evils of society are preferred,
but the instant a choice is made he reminds us that we have
nonetheless settled for evil. The result is an embarrassing discomfort:
the finger of guilt is continually directed into the theatre.
In one of the film's more famous scenes, a tracking shot lasting
SlA minutes, the camera slowly reveals the seemingly unending line
of frozen, bumper-to-bumper vehicles . . . arriving Finally on the
deadly carnage of a highway accident. But during this shot Godard
offers the spectator various possibilities. Firstly, the drivers and
passengers forced to wait busy themselves amongst the ceaseless
honking horns with various games: throwing a ball, playing chess,
letting out a sailboat's sails, arguing back and forth, and so on. This
is an attractive substitute for the uncomfortable reality and symbol
of this menacing highway metaphor. The mind grasps at these
amusing games until it becomes evident that the same visual jokes
are repeating themselves. Then our choice shifts from the small
trivialities that attract us in a traffic jam to the pain of automobile
horns, reminiscent of an Anacin commercial. The result of this shift
in attention is identical to the real life situation:
"I've got to get away from that noise!"
So the end of it comes as an actual physical relief, and we
breathe easier as the car drives onwards, even as the blood dries on
the highway smeared with human debris. Bonnie and Clyde and Easy
Rider try in dramatic terms to evoke a response, an outcry against
such senseless butchery. Godard attempts to accomplish the same
task by forcing the audience to face their own guilt-ridden reactions.
This apathy, if anything, is Week-End's thesis. No one in the
film seems to care about the unrelenting plague charred life littering
the roadways. More to the point: no one in the audience cares.
Never before has Godard treated his characters with so great a
contempt, as objects moving with dehumanized indifference through
the slaughterhouse of civilization.
In a further attempt to evoke the emotions usually repressed
by phony masks, he butchers live animals on screen. "This is the
kind of horror man inspires in his fellow men" he adds... Reaching
above the silly cliches of "man's inhumanity", he attacks the thin
values and morals that conceal the obscene uncaring of man, his
gruesome brutality and the resulting condition of the world. This,
the horror of the bourgeoisie, is both ritualistically and realistically
unmasked on a screen acting as mirror to the theatre.
In a scene of faux-tography a group of casual bystanders look
onto an accident, then they are gathered in a group picture and stare
directly at the audience. The likeness is startling!
Similarily in another scene Godard forces recognition of his
audience's voyeuristic leaning. Mireille Care recounts an involved
orgy in monotonous voice and clinic detail. As the music swells, her
monologue is drowned out. Cursing this man who dares mask such a
delicious description, the viewer strains forward to catch every
audible word, and often cannot: frustration. The music subsides:
contentment. Despite the dull recitation and unchanging
photography, the theatre is attentive and anxious.
Contrast this with a later scene and Godard's point comes
clear. An Arab and a Negro (represented significantly as garbage
men, collecting the excrement of consumer society) voice some
political thought on their world condition, more relevant and
valuable than a half-fantasy description of sex games. A similar
scene, yet the theatre seats grow tremendously uncomfortable.
Godard pinpoints his audience's lack of interest in real issues.
"I was an idealist," he says "with the idea of death relating to
love and things like that .. But ifyou get too much involved in that,
you are going in the wrong direction. It's a bourgeois philosophy,
and ideology I was guilty of." Hence, romanticism, particularly that
of his earlier films, is de trop. "La tendresse" and even "la violence"
of Breathless, A Woman is a Woman and even Pierrot Ie Fou, are
foresaken to the never-never land of first filmic footsteps which have
since matured into "la politique" of La Chinoise and Week-End. In a
touching death scene, a young girl, shot, whispers a dying song in the
lap of her lover and then expires. But the red blood on her face is
blatantly fake, and almost instantaneously flash the words FAUX
RACCORD.  Such romanticism  is no  longer  applicable.  In his
I
— ■>
From Godard's La Chinoise.
Directions in World
contempt for his prostituted characters, it is no accident that their
names, Corinne and Roland, reek of tales of medieval chivalry!
As usual, Godard is also ambiguous. His films often revolve
around a series of images which in some way he considers relevant to
the concepts haunting him. In Week-End he sits a piano in a
farmyard and, camera in its centre, he traces a 360 degree pan
around the farmyard, then doubles back and finishes off with a
reverse pan of 270 degrees. During this scene the only real action
consists of a farm-hand going to a barn. He returns in the reverse pan
carrying a pitchfork. Otherwise, the shot reveals a gathering from
farm life, vaguely listening to a pianist hammer Mozart's sonata
K576. Does great art for a few moments dispel the flowing odors of
manure? This was a solution suggested in La Chinoise where Leaud
"through studying Mao's thoughts, has found his vocation, that is to
say politics has made him discover his art"—a door-to-door theatre,
art for the masses. Perhaps though the audience's response is again
indicative. The cumulative effect of this scene is negative: Mozart
and great art seem unsatisfactory in light of present reality. Possibly
the solitary drums of a band of guerilla-hippies at the conclusion of
Week-End from today's point of reference.
Yet, these guerillas prey on consumer society, literally
consuming the consumer in their canniballistic regime. Their
rebellion and existence as defined in this film cannot survive without
the bourgeoisie which is the source of their livelihood. Thus, while a
case demonstration of the absurdist results of Week-End's
metaphoric elaboration, this is no solution.
"A film is a theoretical rifle and a rifle a practical film.
Godard points his filmic rifle at society.
Fortunately, I don't have any gun for I am so short-sighted that I
would probably kill all my friends. I have the impression I'm less
myopic in a film, hence I prefer making films. "
Godard is, and always has been, a critic; he offers no answers.
Finally, Weekend terminates without hope.
ip£ 6ixi
THE AUDIENCE PARADOX
The phenomenon of actually
as Week-End is worth investig;
hypocritical as they may be, the'-
remain seated through such a fi
causes. It is fine that his films se
consider his proposals. But for ;
allowed for $2, and it is possibl;
walking out. If he demands imme
style is contrary to his purposes,
analysis, and a violence more int
weapons. In fact his combat is cu
political consciousness with the i
would be busying himself
film—propaganda—opposite in c<
doing this day.
Strangely, even the reactio
incomplete. For while he carries
wealth of jokes, humorous insigl
(except perhaps Truffaut's Stolen
rival those of Robert Duncan for I
poet's energetic outpourings a fev
understated wit is often similar
laughter heard in the theatre. Im
seem to elevate him to the sta
Godard's intention. He is non-he*
I'm not a President or a dictator"
pianist in that farmyard scene.
Possibly this different ai
injecting of political bias into
intended. He understands the s
continues his battle in the cult!
there with intellectual pompou:
audience lacks Godard's magnific
EXPDNDED CINEMA
Understandably, Godard's
film-makers is very special, for v
avenues of cinematic inspiration
closes them. His filmic coups are
through his work he exhausts t
"Godard" while watching t
film-maker's work, and the film
the master. More than actually
aspiring film-maker can work
"permission", inspiring experi
Additionally, audiences are mor
have to be slick Hollywood to be
This expermentation qui
refining to take on a valid form,
of "underground" and unive
Vancouver for example, Al Ru
Show Fire, a filmic idea that to
circus, he recaptures the excit
college of dazzling visual impre!
multiple exposure utilizes one
primary visual image (often sta
quite as successful but still inte
Fidler.  In  this he alternates
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1969 uy*L
Film
ing and watching a film such
. Generally, as biased and
' masochistic individuals that
ire already converted to his
noring for they are willing to
, only so much boredom is
re important to reach those
revolution, Godard's chosen
:htian exposition, metaphor,
ual than physical are limited
and he expresses his growing
ry of criticism. Otherwise he
the    only    true    political
tual content to what he is
his North American fans are
'Olemic imagery, he reveals a
matched by any film-maker
s). His parallels and analogies
3rivileged enough to hear this
ago on campus. Or again, his
. Schoenfeld's. Yet rarely is
; faces, intent on the screen,
if hero. This is contrary to
I have nothing special to say,
n part equates himself to the
j reaction comes with the
vork, greater than what is
■tween art and politics, and
dium of the cinema. Sitting
nd strained seriousness, the
se of humour.
ence on other developing
■ seems to reveal endless new
cpression, effectively he also
ped as required, and actually
e cannot be copied ... Say
position of some young
led, a shadow in the light of
niting new tools which the
ie distributes a world-wide
on iii the hands of all.
ive to new ideas; films don't
ting.
ously involves considerable
n then only a small minority
ms achieve excellence. In
is just completed his Sircus
l, and works. His subject the
the vibrant sound, and the
ery simply his technique of
levels of activity behind the
;nhance and qualify it. Not
s Under Ground by Gordon
f the Montreal subway in
Friday, October 10, 1969
stop-action photography with a darkened screen. The impression is
of actual subway travel, balancing the forward motion with static
flashes of observation and interpretation within the corridors and
chambers of this underworld.
Although someone like Godard approaches the philosophy of
expanded cinema, he and most other film-makers and viewers are
dissatisfied with most of it. The point of contention may well be the
mind's need for concrete images within visual outpourings, abstract
images. 2001: A Space Odyssey worked equally for the
chromosome-damaged peace-apes of this generation as well as for the
great un-hip. Kubrick goes beyond the simple lightshow. Reaching
above the abstract motion of forms and colours in linear implosion,
such a visual attack forces the spectator to grasp for concrete
associations of images. These in texture and content as you recall,
finally take the form of a chain of re-births. Surreal, but the
audience is eager to accept any images; the mataphor is complete.
Levels of the odyssey of both all civilization and the personal man
are represented.
THE AMERICAN FILM
While many European directors such as Resnais and Godard
are artistic innovators, Hollywood boasts of craftsmen such as
Robert Aldrich. You'll remember his garish What Ever Happened To
Baby Jane and Hush, Hush ... Sweet Charlotte with Bette Davis
providing some of her best performances. More recent, The Dirty
Dozen reveals Aldrich at his best: an action/adventure/suspense film
that doles out thick portions of comedy, psychology, battle, and
human philosophy. As always, his mind is on entertainment and not
statement, but while the plot may be fanciful, the film remains alive
and gutsy. Lovely scenes abound, such as a last supper scene in
which twelve murderous disciples gather around their equally
murderous commander, Lee Marvin, for pre-battle debauchery.
His Killing of Sister George howver proves disappointing.
Normally he steps from genre to genre with ease, but here he is
unable to expand the limiting theatrical "tempest in a teacup" into
exciting filmic terms. Such like Staircase with Burton and Harrison,
the original play flows between piquant dialogue and savoured
nuances, but even Peter Brook would have had trouble with a valid
film version. Mostly, the lesbian relationships are only alluded to and
the only possibly saving bits of sexual interplay have been censored.
Result: a disappointing zero.
In another vein, Roman Polanski, a European director working
in America, also forsakes message for the delicious mixture of black
humour and blatant burlesque. With the untimate effusion of spoof,
affectation, a momentuous castle of the un-dead, and a homosexual
vampire, this is the best filmic entertainment to be found.
Certain Hollywood films attempt to reach above the
superficial facade of American professionalism. Bonnie and Clyde,
Point Blank, Bullitt, and Midnight Cowboy have in common a
romantic realism. Retaining a Hollywoodish romanticism in order to
be salesworthy, they inject rather severe critical elements of reality,
and propose a statement about their civilization. The glamour of
Clyde and Bonnie forcibly broken by a staccato of bullets, a
statement on the explosive nature of America drives home. Authur
Penn manipulates his audience just as does Godard, but instead of
Brecht he uses dramatics, and reaches a larger audience.
Point Blank and Bullitt ^till offer a painfully false view of the
detective, but when a shotgun blast rips through a room, splashing
part of a man's shoulder and head up against the dirty wallpaper, the
scene also has impact. Generally, Midnight Cowboy depicts the
situation of a city and two of its lost and lonely victims in graphic
and potent terms. For the sake of the audience though, their
relationship is in part undermined by added daubs of sentimentality;
director Schlesinger eking out every drop of emotion unjustified or
not.
Except for the absense of Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway,
glamour, Easy Rider resembles Bonnie and Clyde. The final
conclusions are similar, except that Fonda permits no facile legal
excuses for the final massacre. The film expresses itself with truth
and sincerity. Its impact derives from its very personal feeling, and is
similar in this respect to Truffaut's Les Quatre Cents Coups, also a
first film telling,a personal story of childhood and rebellion. Easy
Rider is a film made freely, without pretension, and like Truffaut,
Fonda and Hopper will probably create many more valid films if
they continue in this personalized and graceful style. So much of our
civilization waits to be expressed so truthfully.
EUROPEAN CINEMA
Other than Godard, many French film-makers are finding an
expression in nostalgia and tenderness.
Claude Berri's The two of us is an "old film" in terms of
techniques, but generates warmth through the encounter of an old,
Jew-hating grandpa with a young Jewish child who impishly love to
tease him. Often amusing, always tender, This film joins in with
Truffaut's Stolen Kisses in providing some of the love and some of
the hope which, on the surface, Godard refuses to give.
Czechoslovakian director Milos Forman depends on the
surface reality to express "the most important thing, truth. For me,
what is most interesting is to understand the depth of people's
relations and lives through a surface, photographic reality that is not
destroyed." His Loves of a Blond exemplifies this philosophy.
Bergman also uses this surface reality to probe the persona, but also
expands this by means of symbol and metaphor, a process Forman
wishes to avoid.
Bite this you thilly thavage.
■pf 7evem
THE     UBYSSEY
French director Alain Resnais continues to investigate the
theme of time. Unlike the nouveau roman wanderings of Last Year
at Marienbad,, he proceeds in Je t'aime, je t'aime to observe the
working of the mind, and the effects of memory and past events on
human character. The growth of an individual through mental
fragments is a fascinating experience, particularly when lead actor
Claude Rich adds such richness to it... More than ever, Resnais
emphasizes the cut, demonstrating the cinema's parallel action to the
working of the intellect. -
In Spain, Carlos Saura strives for a different emphasis but
effectively uses Kubrick and Godard's penchant for allegory. Saura
differs from these however because he utilizes a plot and is
extremely succinct. His description of The Hunt with its ultimate
result of mass-murder develops very quickly, but always controlled
and powerful—tight, like a short story. The progression of levels
from rabbit-slaughter to man-killing are so finely handled, they are
almost imperceptible. Yet the end is a logical result of what
preceeded, and the viewer is left gasping and bewildered.
TRENDS FOR THE FUTURE
Although it is rather pointless to make predictions about the
future styles of the cinema, certain points are in evidence. For
example, not only is the general quality of the American cinema
improving, but individual directors now more in evidence, with their
message and their style. Films around the world are breaking away
from the plot to concentrate on the experiences of characters in
their world, (as in Godard's films or Easy Rider). The Kinetic Art
series of films at SFU also indicates the emphasis of visual poetry as
well as content in the minds of young film-makers. But then, in the
final analysis, film-making must always retain its sense of humour:
LETTER TO MY FRIENDS
TO LEARN
HOW TO MAKE
CINEMA
TOGETHER
—Jean-Luc Godard
I play
You play
We all play
At cinema
You think
That there are
Rules of the game
Childish you
Not knowing yet
That it's only a game
For adults reserved
A club you share
Because you forget
The game's for kids
It consists of what
Several definitions
Such as these
To see oneself
In another's mirror
To forget to know
Rapidly and slowly
The world
And self
To think to speak
Odd game out
Such is life. pS Sight i
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Today's lovely versions, however, have a gracefulness
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DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 75.00
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m as Oismess..
Being a comprehensive
introduction to the problems
of distribution, finance and
advertising of the film
industry in North America.
(I.E.-how come you see the
films you see here in
Vancouver.)
Followed by comments on
the films being shown today,
by individual Vancouver
theatre-managers.
As compiled diligently by
' ALAN DOBREY.
By ALAN DOBREY
The two major chains in
Canada, Famous Players and
Odeon, are complicated
extensions of monopolistic
organizations, i.e. Famous Players,
are owned by Paramount Films
who in turn are owned by Gulf
and Western etc., while Odeon
Theatres are extensions of R. J.
Rank organization in England,
etc.
Film distribution in Canada is a
complex procedure.
For example, films that
Famous Players put out in
Vancuover (with the exception of
Paramount) are generally played
by Odeon theatres back east and
vice-versa. Odeon theatres
generally play all United Artists,
Universal and R. J. Rank
Products, split with Famous
Players on Columbia and
Twentieth Century films. Famous
Players generally play Warner—7
Arts, MGM, Walt Disney products.
Other distributors share their
product with all chains.
Sometimes you'll see the title
of a picture (i.e. Castle Keep,
Hello Dolly) being advertised at
two chains of theatres. This is
because where distributors split
product between two companies
sometimes the one company will
show that particular film across
Canada instead of one company
showing it in the East and the
other in the west. In cases like this
say Odeon theatres were supposed
to play it in the west but Famous
Players played the film instead,
Odeon would then be allowed to
play a film that Famous Players
would generally play in the west.
There are also hassles if the
distributor and the theatre chain
cannot come to terms on who's
going to get what percentage of
the film, etc.
In figuring out percentages, a
general rule of thumb of a grind
picture is that on the opening
week the distributor gets 60 per
cent, the theatre chain 40 per
cent. Depending on how long the
theatre chain plays the particular
picture, a sliding scale comes into,
effect whereby the theatre chain
takes an increasing percentage
over the distributor. In some road
shows, the distributor will buy the
house and the theatre gets 10 per
cent clear profit from the total
amount taken in plus his expenses !
for operating the theatre which
can run from 6 to 8,000 dollars a
week in a downtown theatre, to
1,000 or more for a suburban.
Unfortunately for the west, the
home offices of all chains are in
Toronto. All orders about when
and where a film here in
Vancouver will play is decided
there. Regional offices of the
theatre   chains  have   very   little
Yes Yes
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CLAUDE CHABROL'S BEST MOVIE SINCE "THE COUSINE"
 A DEVIATE DOLCE VITE-N.Y. Times
EASTMAN COLOR
STARRING STEPHANE AUDRAN (BEST ACTRESS BERLIN FESTIVAL)  JACQUELINE SASSARD
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224-3730     V
4375 W. 10th
Showings
7:30-9:30
Sunday: 3:30. 5:10. 7:30, 9:30
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10,  1969 Film Business cont'd.
influence  in  this  regard except
with interior theatres.
The notable exception to this
rule is of course the Varsity
theatre-under the management of
Don Barnes. Barnes has turned a
theatre that was going on the
rocks into a money making
operation. He knows his audience
and tries to give them what they
want and is thus in a position to
make his own decisions.
The only influence regional
offices have is giving reports of
the audiences reaction to "sneak
previews". This more or less tells
the head office how a picture is
going to do and whether the
picture should be moved to
another theatre or double billed.
Thus when Toronto decides to
change theatres for a picture,
costs are immediately increased in
advertising because most theatres
do not use stock advertising
material. Most theatre chains feel
that an individually designed
theatre front for the particular
theatre where the film is going to
play is far more effective in
drawing the theatre going public.
I asked several theatre
managers as to how they
personally felt about the current
trend in motion pictures. Here is
what they had to say:
"The advertising media refuses
to use material which Mr.
McDonald has passed for
advertising use. The chief
offi^%*«t^^|pM<^#; the:
V-r*»oWwer-^<kll»'iowk^'VSon,
who, in their headlines to sell
newspapers will play up
prostitution and every shady thing
going but refuses to run my
newspaper ads because 'it's a
family newspaper'. If a child is old
enough to read my ad, he's old
enough to read newspaper
headlines.'-Syd Freedman, Studio
Theatre Manager.
Mr. Stratton-Strand
Theatre—"I'm not particularly
crazy about them. I like movies
that leave me with a nice feeling.
If you're to enjoy the picture
being shown, you have to be
ready for it. Although I feel that a
lot of good comes from the
current trend in that it helps one
to see the other side of a social
problem which one may feel that
the current trend of pictures
today are now trying to satisfy
the people's curiosity—am I going
to see something I shouldn't see."
Mr. Jenkins—Vogue Theatre;
"Current films are trying to outdo
each other by presenting sex and
violence therefore I don't like to
go and see a picture of this type
unless I feel in my own mind it's a
pertinent part to the telling of the
story."
Mr. Vanoord —C oronet
Theatre: "I think it's great. The
more realism we bring in the
better."
Mr. Bernard—Odeon Theatre:
"I don't go for it, if it's used as a
gimmick to sell tickets, because I
feel that scenes showing especailly
lovemaking are an invasion of
privacy. If the fflm expresses the,
idea of lovemaking without
showing the details or can put the
same idea across in another eay
and is a pertinent part of the
story, I'll go along with it."
Mr. Freedman —Studio
Theatre: "I have no objection to
this form of art. Anyone who has
an objection is, I feel,
narrow-minded.
Mr. Burdick—Downtown
Theatre: "I feel it's a phase we're
going through and it's being
overdone. For the most part,
unless it's extremely well done, I
wouldn't go to see the picture."
Mr. Regan-Fine Arts Theatre:
"Honest realism I don't mind but
I object to realism for shock
content only."
Mr. Letts-Capital Theatre:
"I'm for the current trend because
out of this evolutionary change in
themes and subject matter, which
is currently being abused, I hope
that the pictures that finally result
will be far more mature and real."
p£ 9inei
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Tickets $2 to $5
on sale at Vancouver
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charge at any
Eaton's store
Reservations:
683-3255
THE     UBYSSEY
THE NEW UBC
% $Mx^x.
-> X       '' i  - *    '    ■ * ' i*I%'*i v'*li
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$1.00
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for Directories
ONLY AT
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REVENGER'S TRAGEDY
by Cyril Tourneur
(An M.A. Thesis Production)
Directed by Jana Veverka
OCTOBER  15 - 18 - 8:30 P.M.
Reservations:  Room  207—Frederic Wood Theatre
SOMERSET STUDIO    -    UBC
ip6 lOen
-medium cool is dynamite!
"Dazzling...
Devastating...
Brilliant! Must be
seen by anyone
who cares about
the development
of modern movies!"
-Newsweek
"Staggering...
Illuminating...
Magnificent! It
is the stuff af now!
Young people...
should be required
to see 'Medium Cool'!"
-Holiday
"Stunning! One of
the best pictures
of 1969!"-Cosmopolitan
Paramount
Pictures
presents
As impassioned and
impressive a film as
any released so far
this year! Signals
perhaps anew boldness in American
cinema! Extraordinary!
-Time
'Powerful! The first
entirely serious,
commercially sponsored, basically
fictional film to
be born out of the
time of political
and social troubles
through which this
nation has been
passing!"-Life
presents mm a
medium cool
fobert forster/verna bloom/peter bonerz/marianna
hi       I   I       I I I     . produced
arold blankenship yiy
hii
written and directed by
12:40, 2:45
4:55, 7:05
9:15
friedman & haskell wexler/hasLcell wexler
technicolor/a paramount picture
Sunday: 2:45
WS
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER 18
Jay:	
4:55,7:05, 9:15
OPEN HOUSE 70-
To Everyone on Campus:
This year is a very special one for the University as on March 6th
and 7th we are throwing our doors open to the public. Open House 70
promises to be the best ever but it will be a success only if all members
of the University community help and, most important of all, participate.
No one part of the University, be it students, staff, faculty, or administration,
can make Open House work.
We have pride in our University and wish to show the public what
it's all about. Open House 70 will give us this chance; 200,000 people are
expected to come and visit. Faculties, clubs, and other organizations will
be putting on displays to show what they do and believe.
The University is a whole made up of many widely differing parts.
We have Engineers and Physiologists, Young Conservatives and Young
Socialists. Just as the University cannot truly exist without all these different
people and opinions, a successful Open House cannot be run without them.
There is much more to this University than hooks and tbe Library.
We are counting on you to join. Don't rely on the same old clique to do
all the work — YOU help and YOU do it. March 6th and 7th seems very
far away but will come quickly so get ready to start now. Join a club or
help your faculty for Open House.
GET INVOLVED FOR OPEN HOUSE !
Gordon McNob,
Chairman, Open House 70
Call 228-3709 or come see us in SUB 230
Aboveground Movies
By OLGA RUSKIN
My movie-going story I can see billed on some theatre marquee
as "Confessions of a Movie-going Square or Why I Really Went to
See Belle du Jour." Frankly, I go to movies that cost millions of
dollars, get lots of publicity, have won Oscars, broaden my
education, are escapist and funny, have been recommended by
"someone" and have convenient free parking.
The closest I've come to seeing an Underground movie was
thinking about going to Warhohl's Chelsea Girls when it was being
shown in the West End at midnight. However, just the idea of going
out at this time to see a long-winded movie was enough to keep me
at home looking at the late movie.
So what movies did I see the past year and why? The Lion in
Winter and Funny Girl were movies I felt I "ought to see" because
they had won Oscars and therefore had to be good entertainment.
The Lion in Winter didn't disappoint me because of the superb
photography and Katherine Hepburn's superb acting. However, I was
yawning towards the end of the first half when the cast seemed to be
involved in an endless game of hide-go-seek in dark castle rooms.
Funny Girl I waited till the last possible moment to see
because I was no Streisand or Fanny Brice fan. But, seeing the movie
changed that though not my view that too many Hollywood
screenplays are getting the Cadillac production treatment when all
they've got can be fitted into a Datsun. And do you thing any
gangster can look like Omar Sharif?
Star with Julie Andrews I went to see in January for pure
escapist reasons, to forget about January. On the whole, I found it a
better-produced musical than Funny Girl and more interesting.
The Night They Raided Minsky's I saw because the title made
the film seem like fun and there was lots of free parking. Well,
Minsky's was a bit of a bore, though there were a couple of good
scenes on burlesque which could be cut out as historic documents
and included on a visual social history of America in the thirties.
There's a film critic at large called "someone" who goes
around recommending films by word of mouth. It's amazing the
movies you go to because "someone" recommended then. Well,
that's why I went to see Newley's playboy film, the one with the
long title about can someone every find happiness with someone else
and so on. A "someone" from Toronto, a serious-minded swinger
who is really with it, told someone else who told another person
who told me that this was the greatest film ever.
After sitting through this film version of an issue of Playboy I
now distrust the film opinions of Toronto swingers.
Another "someone" labelled The Committee the funniest film
ever, which it wasn't quite. During The Committee's first few
minutes, I wondered how anyone could have the nerve to charge two
dollars admission to this purely amatuer film. Visually it was
imperfect but the film did bear out Marshall McLuhan's hot and cool
theory about the less defined a picture, the more the personal
involvement. Scenes from The Committee stayed with me much
longer than those from the visually perfect Lion in Winter which I
had just seen prior to it.
Rachel, Rachel I saw because I wanted to go to a movie and
there wasn't anything else conveniently on. It was worth going to for
any reason. Vanessa Redgrave's Isadora I went to for much the same
reason, and I have no regrets. Good acting is worth seeing.
I must be honest about Belle du Jour. It may have had an
avant-grade director but really, I went because I was curious,about
how business is conducted in a den of iniquity. Belle played for
weeks in Vancouver, an indication that there were others like me
who wished to broaden their education.
Finally, I experienced all six hours of War and Peace because I
wanted to, having been a fan of Tolstoy's from a way back. After
seeing Part I, I decided this was the Greatest Movie ever, an
audio-visual version of Tolstoy's novel. But Part II*. was like hitting
the low part of a roller coaster ride, a terrific anti-climax.
As for the coming year, I already know the movies I won't be
seeing. Anything that isn't a big-screen, super-duper extravaganza,
peppered with Oscars, laughs and gorgeous colour. Well, that's
Aboveground movies for you, isn't it?
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and1 Do Exactly
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UPPER TENTH
BARBER
4574 W. 10th Ave.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1969 The Cynic
A look back at W. C. Fields
and Charlie Chaplin.
As
By T.C.LIU
the   popularity   of  their
posters evidences, two heroes of
our subculture W. C. Fields and
Charlie Chaplin certainly are. The
fact that they both were, to use a
hackneyed term, anti-estab-
lishmentarian amply explains.
W. C. Fields on screen is an
anguished man, forever battling
petty harrassments. Witness his
argument with a rather formidable
waitress—
"I did not say this meat was
tough. I just said I didn't see the
horse that usually stands outside."
Fields unfailingly finds himself
in the wrong places, at the wrong
times, and being done in by the
wrong people. Nothing is above
his muttered derision. (With due
contempt Fields advises on
insomnia—"Go and get a lot of
sleep") One senses, however, that
behind his tough facade and
pompous pretensions there is the
helplessness of a man who expects
but the worst. In the extremely
farcical poker game in
'Mississippi', (1935), Fields, with
outraged dignity, holds his cards
tenaciously as a child his candy,
and surreptitiously exhumes from
his undersized eyes mistrust and
disdain, not comprehending and
not quite relishing his role of a
sucker. Fields' vaunted bravado
never materializes and he vents his
grief on more unfortunate people.
In a society where his secretly
cherished values and ideals (those
of a small-town*
lower-middle-class)  have  all   but
foundered, he assumes a cynic's
mask and snarls back with all the
meanness in him at the things and
people crushing him. In the final
analysis, Fields' is a defeatist's
attitude. He is but a somewhat
deliciously crooked guy trying
desperately not to be had in an
atrociously crooked world.
Grimly he confronts life, and
shields himself with malice and
never-ending braggadocio.
Chaplin the immortal tramp, as
his friend and biographer R. J.
Minney calls him, enchanted the
whole world for decades. He was a
screen artist with genuine
distinction. From 'A Dog's Life'
(1917) through 'City Lights'
(1931) to 'A King in New York'
(1970) Chaplin moved
generations of movie-goers to
tears of joy with his genius.
Before he played Judas to himself
in 'A Countess From Hong Kong'
(1966) Charlie has been the most
endearing name in show business.
On the screen Chaplin is
usually the nonchalant,
sophisticated, ever-contriving and
ever destitute little gallant.
Impeccably attired in gentleman's
outfit with the sizes all wrong,
Charlie swings his cane, walks the
Chaplinesque walk and conquers
the cinema as well as the world.
He is the embodiment of the rebel
spirit and champion of Everyman.
One good bloke against industrial
and dehumanizing America,
Chaplin hilariously channels the
frustration of the meek and weak
everywhere and socks it to the
Keystone Kops, the bosses, the
machine, the politicians and the
filthy wealthy. He acts out our
dreams and ridicules the follies of
man as no one has done before.
From money (or lack of it) to
war, from hypocrisy to hunger,
there is nothing under the sun
that Chaplin cannot and does not
transform into marvellous
comedy. (Remember how he eats
with gusto and style, his shoes?)
Constantly at war with his
environment, especially the Kops,
Chaplin, the little fellow,
nevertheless never loses. He takes
off his bowler hat to none but the
prettiest and he is mighty handy
with his cane. When circumstances
become topsy turvy even for him,
the little tramp shrugs his
shoulders, smiles his innocent
smile and off he goes to seek his
fortune elsewhere. He never wilts.
Behind the little tramp's
multifaceted adventures, one
discerns Chaplin's genuine
concern for humanity. What sets
him apart from the other
comedians, besides his inimitable
mannerisms, is that he employs
his tramp as a comment on human
conditions. Chaplin's great anger
of the inane society in which
decency perishes is often mingled
with the eminently laughable. We,
his audience, not only laugh the
cuckolds out of our hearts, we
sometimes shed grateful tears.
As our time is out of joint,
things have become too
complicated and involved and
even morbid for us to shrug our
shoulders and bid farewell. But
instead of Fields' pseudo-cynicism, couldn't we remember the
little tramp and (push our
Sisyphean rocks) with a twinkle in
our eyes, as Voltaire would wittily
agree?
and
the Tramp
p& lllevem
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Grad Class Meeting Today
Everyone in the 1969-70 Grad Class come to a meeting on
Friday, October 10 at 12:30. The meeting will be in the
S.U.B. Auditorium, and the executive of the Grad Class
will be elected at that time.
S.U.B. Management Committee Vacancy
There is one position on the S.U.B. Management Committee
now vacant. Anyone interested in applying submit a letter
with your qualifications to the A.M.S. Secretary no later
than Tuesday, October 14.
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- All 1970 Grads have paid $7 to a Grad Class Fund.
- Anyone and everyone interested in using this money
with WORTHWHILE and CREATIVE ideas to make
this Grad Class memorable, meet in
SUB A UDITORIUM
TODAY-12:30 NOON-TODAY
Friday, October 10,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY »j»aa<»>
Wffr»w«*rr^v*i*w^**'>-*w^
Odd-Ends
At thirty he married. Says He:
"My wife was an old tomato when
I was a dead-beat. She told me,
'You may be blind and bald, but
you have standard equipment.'
After we got married, she found it
was sub-standard—old Rabbi
Goldstein didn't do me any favors
when he circumsized me," He
shrugs. "But then, not all rabbis
are nearsighted."
^y^^^rM^•re-^w»«^^^>;P^fy^^^^^^^^rcy^rc^
"My mouth went dry and I*
sweated all over; but the audience
cheered and I was thrilled to make
them laugh," he says.
Zap put him on again.
Scriptless—but not speechless—he
wowed them.
Currie was billed recently in a
tavern in Portland, Oregon, as the
Comic from Canada. When the
manager found out he was blind,
he backed off.
"If you can pick your nose,
you're a sensation if you're blind.
People can't imagine a blind man
doing anything," he says
impatiently. "You know, I'm
darned near as normal as you
are."
Smitty strokes his head, then
interrupts himself.
"I was having a trim the other
day, and the barber told me, 'You
know, Al, your head feels just like
my wife's backside,' "
" 'You know, Giovanni,' I told
him, 'You're right. It does feel
just like your wife's backside!. ..
The joke isn't new, but
Smitty's enthusiasm is infectious,
his delivery fresh. He admits to
me that he writes poetry, and
recites one ofhis poems:
Blind Man's
Bluff
By JACQUES KHOURI
"People are too sympathetic to
the blind."
And Smitty's out to get them.
Laughing, that is.
"I want to show the other side
of being blind—the funny side,"
says Allan John Currie Smith,
moonlighting CNIB employee
who runs a confectionery stand in
the Education caf by day and is a
comedian at night. What Jimmy
Durante has done to the big
schnozzle, Al plans for the
"blind-as-a-bats".
"There are advantages to being
blind that most of us are unaware
of," he points out. "For example,
you never see your mother-in-law.
And you don't see your wife first
thing in the morning,"
"You are constantly being
raped by ugly women," Currie
adds. "I struggle for five seconds,
then I get comfortable."
Born in Vancouver in 1920 of
an Irish mother and a Scottish
father, Smitty was apprenticed at
sixteen to a lawyer at the Inns of
Court on Georgia and Howe. He
studied law by correspondence,
but his eyes started failing. The
war broke out and he had to quit.
To survive the hungry 30's, Al
pitched hay, picked tomatoes (4c
a case, earning 20c a day), pulled
nails out of old lumber (10c an
hour), stole cabbages from horses
in the interior ("a dollar a day
plus meals").
In the army he cheated on the
eye card but was caught and
kicked out.
"I'm a liar and a cheat," he
smiles, bald head gleaming.
"It pays."
Smitty
Smitty is a late bloomer to
show-biz. Six years ago he was at
a neighbor's party and did a
spontaneous mimic act that
delighted his friends. But he did
nothing about his new-found
talent until last spring, when he
bought a tape recorder to practice
on.
"But hell, you can't talk to
your thumb. What I needed was a
live audience," Al recalls. So, a
phone to Johnny Zap, M.C. at the
No. 48 Veterans' Club on Joyce
and Kingsway, and he got one-a
crowd of 300.
<>**■_»<)<*^_»0^_»0'<^►()■•■»0<**__»0*«—»0^__tO-^^O<4__'H><'^_»O-^_»O<'__»0<'^_»O*«__-H><'__»O<'a__K)
Tragic Revenge Begins
The Revenger's Tragedy, a play which was
probably written by Cyril Tourneur around 1607,
premieres at the Dorothy Somerset Studio next
Wednesday. (Oct. 15)
It is the first ofthe Freddy Wood's M.A. Thesis
Productions this year, and will be directed by Jana
Veverka. (M.A. Thesis Productions fulfill the
practical portion of the requirements for an M.A.
degree in Theatre. There are four plays planned for
this year.)
Jana Veverka, student in the Theatre Dept., is
also known around town for her involvement with
the Gallimaufry Theatre.
Larry Foden and Rona Altrows in "The Revengers
Tragedy ".
The play-first performed in 1607—is set in
Italy and plays upon the revenge tragedy motif so
popular in the theatre ofthe time. The Italy, and the
Italians which Tourneur creates, reflect not so much
the real country and people as they represent
symbols of treachery, corruption and violence of
the Jacobean world. The Jacobean theatre, with its
straightforward admission that it is a theatre, and
not a drawing room, involves us deeply in the
pulsebeat of this evil world, rushing headlong
towards its own destruction. In this complex, yet
highly exciting plot of disguise, intrigue and violent
death, we see a world which is all too easy to
understand today.
The set for this production is designed by
Michelle Bjornson, and the cast is composed very
largely of students in the Theatre Dept.
So come and see this play next week. It will run
Wednesday through Saturday, with a special student
performance on Thursday (Oct. 16) at 12:30.
Normal performances are at 8:30 p.m., and tickets
are available for $1.50 ($1.00 for students) at the
Freddy Wood Box Office, room 207.-N.R.
This special film issue of PF was made
possible by the hard work and dilligence of
many people. PF editors give many thanks
to artists Bruce Dolson, Tim Wilson and
John Kula; writers Kirk Tougas, Alan
Dobrey, Andrew Horvat, Olga Ruskin,
Jacques Khouri (twice), Georgie (porgie)
Porkolab, Fran McGarth and T. C. Liu; and
typists Pat Moan, Judy Young and
obnoxious Paul Knox.    —Fred Cawsey
—Norbert Ruebsaat
/ sat alone in the evening mist
To dream of lips I'd never kissed
When out ofthe darkening blue of
night
Came  the goddess of love full
draped in white
We  danced the  beautiful night
away
Till the chariot of dawn turned
our night to gray
And now I'm alone and ill at ease
For   she   melted  away   in   the
morning breeze
So   if   you   want   to   see   a
genuinely funny man, go.
Quick, before he's famous.
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Where are the leaders?
Anyone will tell you that the Leaders are enjoying the advantages of military training and
university subsidization through the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
If you are a full time male undergraduate
student with a successful academic record you
should know about the opportunities that the
Canadian Armed Forces can offer you as an
ROTP cadet. You will continue your civilian
studies towards a degree at your University.
Enquiries are invited to:
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST., VANCOUVER, B.C. 684-7341
The Regular Officer Training Plan
For University Undergraduates.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October  10, 1969 Friday, October  10,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
SUB checked out by nameless inspectors
By SANDY KASS
Today marks the end of SUB's one year
guarantee.
Three inspectors walked around SUB
Thursday looking for damage and deciding its
cause.
"The contractors are liable for everything
but malicious damage,'' said Dave
Cunningham, representing Grimwood
Construction, the company that built SUB.
The two other inspectors said they "had
no names," but were from "the designing firm
of architects", (also nameless) and the
university physical plant department. They
said it will be at least Tuesday before they are
finished their evaluation of SUB.
They agreed that, generally, the condition
of SUB is "very good, considering the amount
of use it gets."
Graeme Vance, acting SUB building
manager, said the Alma Mater Society is more
concerned with some aspects of the building
than others.
"Basically, everything works, but some
problems have developed. I can't say too
much, because we're trying to screw
somebody into paying, and I don't want to
jeopardize our chances," Vance said.
"There is a critical shortage of seating,
wherever you look. People are sitting on the
carpets, on stairs—there just isn't any more
room."
Vance said SUB has a definite need for
' some kind of security.
"I don't mean policemen standing around
with guns, but it is the university's
responsibility to provide some security against
all the vandalism taking place."
He said much of the vandalism was by
non-students. "Of course, this is only my
suspicion. At times, I just don't know where
to begin."
AMS co-ordinator Dave Grahame saids
"Only recently an empty cigarette machine
was found in the ladies washroom on the
second floor of SUB. Those must have been
some ladies."
Socred election victory
due to big money campaign
By JAN O'BRIEN
If more young people had
voted in the August provincial
election, it is possible that the
New Democratic Party would
have won, Dennis Cocke, NDP
MLA for New Westminster, said
Thursday.
"The majority of voters under
30 did not vote in the election,"
said Cocke. "This seems to be a
tradition in this country."
In a survey conducted at UBC,
students rated politics 16th out of
18 categories of things important
to life, Cocke said. He added that
until there is a change in our
desires and priorities political
change can not occur.
Cocke was speaking to 30
students in Bu. 102.
"Don't let anyone tell you that
Fired prof
lectures
at UCLA
LOS ANGELES
(CUP)-Approximately 2,000
students swamped the first
"non-lecture" given Saturday by
philosophy instructor Angela
Davis, fired last month by the
regents of the University of
California for her membership in
the  American Communist Party.
The students gave Davis a
standing ovation when she began
her lecture, only permitted
through a compromise between
the regents and UCLA chancellor
Charles Young, who resisted her
firing and said she could continue
to teach pending appeal of her
dismissal. The regents in return
said no credit would be given to
students attending her course,
which last year had an enrollment
of 163.
Davis urged the students to
resist the action of the regents,
but said it was up to the students
how they would register their
resistance. Her firing has already
touched off uneasiness on the
campus, especially because the
regents' decision to fire her
contradicted a ruling made only
weeks earlier, protecting
professors from dismissal over
their political beliefs.
The regents decided that her
CP membership meant Davis owed
allegiance to a foreign country,
and was thus subversive.
your vote is not important, only
10,000 votes re-distributed would
have won the NDP 31 seats,"
Cocke said.
"Particpate in your future,
participate in politics. Don't let it
be number 16 in your life."
He also blamed the NDP's
failure on the difference in
campaign funds available to the
Social Credit party and the other
parties; the NDP having only
$60,000 to the Socred's $2
million.
"We need a government like
the NDP because it has courage, is
people-oriented and is not afraid
to say no!" said Cocke.
He said the Social Credit party
has difficulty saying no to Kaiser
Coal and MacMillan Bloedel,
therefore "he who pays the piper
plays the tune."
In referring to an ad in a
California magazine that stated
"B.C. for sale", Cocke said, "We
better make damn sure its not for
sale. Ownership of land is one of
the greatest dangers."
"Land ownership is hostile to
the human climate, the resources
are ours, let us manage them.
When we lose control of water,
write Canada off."
International House
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10,  1969
Yes vote aids
educ students
The future of 72 industrial education studentsrests on the support
of the students in a campus-wide referendum Wednesday.
The referendum sponsored by the Alma Mater Society will call
for a $15 refund of AMS fees for the industrial education students.
"Since the students attending the industrial education training
centre in Burnaby do not even come out to the university they should
not be required to pay the $15 SUB capital fee levy," said education
undergraduate society treasurer Ron Gulmans Thursday.
"The students in third and fourth years of the medical school
do not have to pay the levy and they are in exactly the same situation
as we are."
"We can't support the students out there (in Burnaby) with the
education society money so they are virtually without funds."
The only way they can get any financial support would be to
get this referendum passed and the refund granted, said Gulmans.
"The industrial education students have come to the point of
taking a stand against the AMS if the referendum does not go
through," he said.
The referendum has to pass by a two-thirds majority with a
minimum voter turnout of 20 per cent.
A new shipment of 6000 birth control pamphlets arrived
Thursday and is being distributed at various spots around campus. A
further 4000 have yet to be delivered.
Liberated women
not sex objects
MONTREAL (CUP)-Montreal's first Women's Liberation
Movement was born Wednesday under the leadership of McGill
sociologist Marlene Dixon.' The group will press for day-centers for
working mothers, more flexible employment opportunities for
women, and an end to feminine oppression in universities.
Starting with university women, the organizers hope to
eventually reach working women too, because "younger women are
rejecting the popular image of women as sex objects," whether in
university or not.
Founder Dixon, an American, sparked a student occupation last
February at the University of Chicago after she was fired on the
grounds of "lack of scholarship"-she and the students who occupied
the building said she was being discriminated against for her sex and
her politics.
But when the administration finally offered to re-hire her, she
refused to return to Chicago, and despite the misgivings of the McGill
board of governors, came to Montreal.
She has been involved in women's liberation for about three
years.
A meeting of all people running for arts representatives on the
Alma Mater Society council will be held Tuesday noon in the arts
office (Buchanan 107.)
UBC poli-sci dept
appoints new head
The UBC political science department has a new head.
Dr. Walter D. Young, a former Rhodes Scholar and UBC
graduate, was named head of the department Wednesday. He had been
acting head since the resignation July 1 of Prof. R. S. Milne.
Also affected when the administration shuffled the cards were
the faculty of forestry and school of librarianship.
Dr. Donald Munro was named assistant dean of the forestry
faculty while Prof. Samuel Rothstein resigned as head of the school of
librarianship.
Prof. Rothstein will continue to hold his appointment as
professor of librarianship.
Tower undedicated
but who cares?
The Leon Ladner clock tower remains undedicated.
Ceremonies director Malcolm McGregor said Thursday he
has not been approached by any students requesting a formal
dedication ceremony.
However, even if he is approached, McGregor said he will
not necessarily accept the request.
"I won't be part of a ceremony that is for the benefit of
anarchists," he said.
The only official ceremony to date was a small private
dinner after which a commemorative plaque was unveiled.
INTERCOLLEGIATE    FOOTBALL
3rd ANNUAL SHRUM BOWL GAME
UBC "THUNDERBIRDS
ii
YS.
SFU "CLANSMEN
ii
MONDAY - OCTOBER 20th AT EMPIRE STADIUM
at 8:00 p.m.
SPECIAL  STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.50 or $2.00 Reserved Seat
(Advance Sale Only) on presentation of A.M.S. Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets
from Athletic Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM
UP TO AND INCLUDING NOON MONDAY, OCTOBER 20th
AMS Charter
Flights
SUMMER,  1970
VANCOUVER-Li
- May 16 - Sept. 3
- June 6 - Sept. 2
-VANCOUVER
$28500
VANCOUVER - LONDON
(one-way)   -** .4*13 O00
VANCOUVER - OSAKA -   -■--
VANCOUVER m,,,,*, $325 00
(We are currently negotiating  for another  Expo TO
flight for August 1970.)
For applications and/or further information see
MRS. VERENE SHEPARD
Rm. 237 B of the Student Union Building
Monday to Friday - 2 p.m .to 5 p.m. Friday, October 10, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 21
AMS
Budget
'69-70
PANGO PANGO (UNS)-Nine
of the notorious blue and green
blorgs emerged from their
century-long hibernation to
campaign for the position of chief
intellectual masturbator. Trie
three largest blorgs are even-odds
favorites, because of their equally
gross syntactical orgasms. The
remaining six have been largely
discounted, because of their
well-known tendency to dribble
during the moment of truth,
particularly when confronted by
established tree-colored great
blorgs.
¥
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORSI
549 Granville St.
3,800
2,500
4,040
	
	
1,231
$-459,315
$434,500
$448,887
$273,750
$270,000
$273,060
1,825
1,800
1,820
1,500
1,500
1,500
9,125
9,000
9,102
7,515
	
	
3,650
	
1,820
	
13,500
13,653
$297,365
$295,800
$300,955
$    8,355
$    7,430
$    9,292
200
—.
——
600
5,090
6,290
7,500
3,830
3,830
2,000
1,000
1,000
$  18,655
$  17,350
$ 20,412
$ 28,425
$14,750
$ 25,521
22,100
16,450
1-7,723
5,450
4,800
5,050
4,800
4,000
5,083
59,550
59,750
56,347
$120,325
$ 99,750
$107,714
$436,345
$412,900
$429^81
$ 22,970
$ 21,600
$ 19,806
$459,315
$434,500
$448,887
PRELIMINARY STATEMENT OF ESTIMATED NET REVENUE AND
PROPOSED  EXPENDITURE - YEAR ENDING  MAY 31,  1970
      (with comparative figures for 1969)
Proposed  Allocation Allocation Actual
 1970                               1969 1969
Revenue
Alma  Mater Society  Fees       ..... $448,000 $432,000 $443,616
Undergrad   Society   Fee   Levies   7,51'5  ■  ■
Interest   Income __	
Sundry   Income   _ _ 	
Total    Reveune     __.__	
Allocation of Fees Collected
Non-Discretionary
Student   Union   Building    _	
Accident Benefit Fund _ _.._ _.
S.U.B.    Art    Fund      	
S.U.B. Management Fund  	
Undergrad  Society  T._  l*vies  	
British  Columbia  Union of Students ...
Canadian  Union  of Students   	
Discretionary
Students'   Associations   (2) _
Radio  Society  _	
W.U.S.C. __  	
Intramural   Fund"     __	
Open   House —  1970  	
Expenditures
Campus  Activities  &   Events   (3)   _.
Publication*   (3)    _ __ ___.
Registration    Photographs    _	
University  Clubs Committee  ..       	
Admin.  &   General   Expense        	
Total Allocation  &  Expenditure	
Total          	
Schedule 1
PRELIMINARY STATEMENT OF PROPOSED ADMIN. AND GENERAL EXPENSES
 - YEAR ENDING MAY 31,1970	
Proposed Budget Budget Actual
1970 1969 1969
Office   Salaries    ...    $ 33,500 $ 34,676 $ 33,053
Student   Government   Expenses
Executive  Salaries   .           5,575                     • 5,500 6,209
Dinner    Meetings       600 400 329
Entertaining             500 500 439
Travel             _       450 300 228
Elections  &   General   Meetings        . 1,950 ',400 2,655
Council  Committees              800 844 790
Other   .         2,000 2,200 1,705
Stationery &  Office  Expenses  .. 1,000 ;*,400 785
Honoraria,   Gifts,    Donations     3,900 4,410 4,615
Insurance.              75 100 75
Telephone   &   Telegrams         3,000 3,300 2,051
Postage    .      750 500 510
Audit  &   Legal   2,000 1,300 2,000
Public   Relations  .                           1,500 400 595
Depreciation                                                   690                                              	
Repairs  &  Maintenance   ..  453 500 310
Salaries   -    Suspense    .. _  2,500 ___  ■ 	
 $ 59,530  $ 56,347
 Schedule 2
Proposed Allocation Allocation Balance
1970 1969 May 31, 1969
Students' Associations & Undergrad Societies
Agriculture      .   $        245 $        120 ($        522)
Architecture    ..        ...                                                                                             . (50)
Arts __ _   750 1,771 272
Commerce                                       1,020 4,910
Dentistry    150 150 127
Education        -    .        450 700 (22)
Engineering. _                                          1,224 3,152
Forestry      _  30 160 1,256
Grad.    Students             85                                                      1,942
Home   Economics   ...            _  150 150 336
Law  Students     __ _                                     467 (706)
Librarianship        _                                               ■ 100 (18)
Medical    ..           40 250 (151)
Music                                     155 100 (61)
Nursing    ....                          15 195 227
Pharmacy                                                         175 120
Phys   Ed.   ...    .              .          195 140 (567)
Rehab.   Med   90 105 80
Science.   .             __  500 465 (402)
Social   Work   Students                                                                        200 (241)
Undergrad  Society   Committee             ..  _.                                              ■ 5,766
Margin                    ...                1,000 1,300
Subsidiary    Publications                         500 3,467
Special   Editions 1,500
Anti-Calendars                     1400
Sundry   Others   . .   .     .  1,500	
Total. .         ._  $    8,355 $    7,430  $    9,292
Schedule 3
PROPOSED EXPENDITURES - CAMPUS ACTIVITIES &  EVENTS  AND
PUBLICATIONS - YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1969
Proposed Budget Actual
1970 1969 1969
Campus Activities & Events
Academic   Activities   Committee     $     1,200 $     1,750 $     1*,273
External   Affairs   (C.U.S.   in   1969)   . 500 250 341
C.U.S.O.        .   .  - 1,000 1,000 785
Conferences ...                   6,000 9,000 8.448
Debating   Union __                                             250 188
Frosh   Orientation            .    1,000 169 169
Frosh    Retreat                                                       ■ 208 208
High   School   Visitations  .                     500 850 946
Higher   Education   Promotion                                          1,200 758
Homecoming        .                        _    .                                          1,577 1,507
Trek  Week  1,500                                                                                                         	
Housing   Action    Program                                                         550 353
Performing   Arts 4,100 4,000 4,966
Speakers                                       2,025 2,000 2,596
Special  Projects  (see  below)         9,300                                                                                              	
Subsidiary   Symposia               ... 1,300 1,000 983
Total      	
Publications
Student    Directory
Sundry   Publications
Tuum   Est   .
Ubyssey   . 	
Total .    .
Special Projects
Unemployment   Action  $         500
Birth    Control    ..   1.000
Co-op  Housing          5,000
Mental Health __  . 500
Operation    Borderclose  1,700
Others       600
Total  _.... $    9,300
$ 28,425
$ 23,804
$ 23,521
($    2,000)
700
1,900
21,500
($     1.500)
300
1,031
17,000
($    1,413)
159
1,191
17,776
$ 26,100
$  16,831
$  17,713
PANGO PANGO (UNS)-Sixty
ninety zillion nihilistic apple-plum
blorgs today denied their
existence, claiming Max Brod
responsible for perpetuating life.
Sources close to President Alfredo
Monaker claimed the nairy,
ooze-dripping, occasionally
flapping frozelators had
attempted a sexual sabotage of
the entire question by hanging
binglethankdorptens in the main
lounge of the local thing. Grenfoll
himself declined.
No other words ever spoken
are so futile and forlown as "I
told you so".
U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry Brownlee,  Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma Mater Society
Committee Appointments
There are still positions on the following committees for
interested students:
Library committee 4 positions
Food services committee 4 positions
Residences committee 4 positions
Please submit all applications, in writing, to the A.M.S.
Secretary, second floor S.U.B., no later than Monday,
October 20.
and
others
now
available
from
the
«    ^g ^flk boutique:
4430 W. 10th AYE.
THE PIT
MEMBERSHIPS ON SALE
TODAY and NEXT MS. and WED.
12:30-2:30 IN BALLROOM EXTENSION
THIS IS THE LAST TIME MEMBERSHIPS WILL BE
SOLD THIS MONTH
(Last Year's Cards No Longer Valid)
PIT IS OPEN TUESDAY and THURDASY 4:30 - 11:30 Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1969
IRVING   WASHINGTON
conditions in residence.
has   no  complaints  about   crowded
Profs want more money
TORONTO (CUP)-Ontario's 6,500 university professors want
an average salary increase of 20 per cent—roughly $2,730—for the
1970-71 academic year.
Charles Hanly, executive vice-chairman of the Ontario
Confederation of University Faculty Association (OCUFA) said
Saturday the average salary for Ontario professors and deans for
1968-69 was $13,659. OCUFA represents the various faculty
association in negotiations with the Ontario government.
Hanly, a U of T philosophy professor, said the pay boost
"would have no effect on student fees." OCFUA will not actively
solicit student support in getting the hike, he added.
The per capita income in Canada as of January, 1969, was
$2,075 per year.
Ottawa cops refuse
call from students
OTTAWA (CUP)-It takes
more than a complaint to bring
police onto the campus at
Carleton University. It takes the
say-so of administration president
A. Davidson Dunton.
A group of 15 students tried
and failed to bring the forces of
law and order to their support
Friday when they confronted
Dunton in his office to demand he
repudiate the working paper of
the Committee of Presidents of
Universities of Ontario, and
guarantee non-interference in any
political activity on campus which
did not involve personal physical
injury or significant property
damage.
In the midst of a heated debate
with Dunton, one of the students
telephoned the Ottawa police to
demand they arrest "a man who is
occupying the president's desk
against the wishes of the people."
The response: "Only Dr.
Dunton can call us, not the
people," according to the desk
sergeant on duty.
Dunton had just claimed he
would not take the initiative in
calling police on campus; he later
modified his claim to say "he
would try not to call the police"
until the university's academic
senate had given the go-ahead.
The students told Dunton as
the "chief bureaucrat in an
oppressive capitalist university"
and    demanded    that    he    not
interfere with students who "quit
just talking about it, and tried to
do something."
Dunton replied that he was in
favor of "all points of view being
expressed at the university," but
indicated he would consider
disruptive activity in classes to
come "dangerously near the use
of physical force"-which he
would not permit.
The students left after Dunton
refused to reveal the names of the
drafters of the CPUO report,
which called for hard-line
disciplinary measures against
virtually all forms of campus
unrest except ordinary picketing.
"They're colleagues of mine,
and that's priveleged
information," he said.
Unrest takes toll
at America U.
WASHINGTON, D.C.
(CUP-CPS)-The final campus
disruption score card for the
United States last year reads: 900
students expelled or suspended
and 850 students reprimanded at
28 of the "major trouble"
universities in the U.S.
Six universities where unrest
occurred took no action. FBI
director J. Edgar Hoover reports
4,000 arrested in campus
disorders (during fiscal 1969).
College drop-out plans to organize
a free university in Vancouver
Does UBC make you feel like a
pea in a peashooter?
Like, is the institutionalized
■ degree-oriented lock-step
university got you down? Maybe
'its time you got back into the
educational stew.
• Gordon Mullen thinks he might
have the solution.
Mullen—a recent drop out
from an "institutionalized"
California college—is organizing a
"free university" in the
Vancouver area. No prerequisites,
no course credits, no degrees—just
education.
SPEC presents film
What do you know about pollution? What do you care about
pollution?
A talk, movies, and slides about pollution will be presented at
noon Thursday in Hebb Theatre.
Derrick Mallard, from the executive of the Society for Pollution
and Environmental Control, will be the speaker.
There is no charge for admission, and students will have the
opportunity to join SPEC.
Mullen said Thursday there are
several operating successfully in
California and he hopes to start
classes here in students homes
next month.
He is currently working on a
curriculum which will include
things like astrology, history,
microbatic dietetics and saddle
making. In fact, just about
anything the students or teachers
are interested in, added Mullen.
There will be a $2. charge to
take or teach a course.
Mullen would like to hear from
prospective teachers at 879-0477
from 3 to 9 p.m., Monday
through Saturday.
SYMPOSIUM
II
II
Education In An Age Of Meaninglessness
Dr. Viktor Frankl, M.D., PhD.
—internationally known psychiatrist, educator and author
—widely recognized as a founder of existential analysis and logo therapy
SATURDAY 9:00 a.m. - 12 noon, OCTOBER 11, 1969   HEBB THEATRE, UBC CAMPUS
"Already the young have hit upon the key idea of Dr. Frankl's proposals. They
are the voice of conscience for the age—in their rejection of war, "of business as
usual", and in their longing for a simpler life . . ." Manas
U.B.C. Faculty members involved in Symposium are Dr. Ron Jones, Dr. John Friesen and
Dr. Irwin Shaw, Faculty of Education.
Register early,  contact Extension  Dept. 228-2181. Registrations will be accepted at door.
STUDENT FEE $2.50 (card). OTHERS $5.00
where the heads of all nations meet
now you can SEE anything you want
6«SA      at —
ALICE'S
EESTAUEANT^
"ALICE'S RESTAURANT!. ARID GUTHRIE
featuring PAT QUINN * JAMES BRODERICK   Special Appearance PETE SEEGER * LEE HAYS    ***ith MICHAEL MC CLANATHAN
GEOFF OUTLAW • TINA CHEN ■ KATHLEEN DABNEY and Police Chief WILLIAM OBANHEIN        Original Music by ARLO GUTHRIE
scr«np,ay b,VENABLE H ERN DON an, ARTH U R PENN ^ronG;r,rsRes,au'an,Ma58"re*'
COLOR   bV  DSLUXS      | ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SCORE AVAILABLE ON UNITED
STARTS THURSDAY
ARTISTS RECORDS
CAMBIE al 18th
876-2747
Shows at
7:30, 9:30 Friday, October 10,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
Portland State will end
Thunderbirds winning way
Sportscene here
for this weekend
By STEVE MILLARD
- This Saturday, October 11, the Portland State
Vikings arrive on campus to play our Thunderbirds.
The Vikings are the most potent team that UBC will
play this year. "They got the best damned offense
that we'll see all year." says 'Bird Coach Gnup. This
year's Viking squad is rated far higher than the
Portland team that beat UBC 60-0 two years ago.
Portland State is fast becoming a team to be
reckoned with in American college football. Early
this season The Vikings upset a big-time U.S.
football team when they beat Montana State 22-6.
Quarterbacking the Viking's pro-style offense is
Tim Von Dulm, a sure-fire pro prospect. Van
Dulm's passing arm is accurate up to 60 yards and
he has plenty of support in the backfield with him.
Randy Jenson is Van Dulm's favorite receiver.,
and is currently leading the N.C.A.A. College
division both in receptions and in touchdown passes
caught.
About stopping the Vikings speedy offense
Gnup said, "We're gonna have to keep the ball away
from them or else we're dead." The Birds will
certainly find it harder to run up the middle against
Portland than they did against the Seattle Cavaliers
as the Viking defensive line averages 230 pounds.
The Birds, who continue to improve with each
outing, will be bolstered by the return of back Paul
Danyliu, however Bill Henderson still is not at full
strength and Ian Harriman will be missed in the
offensive line.
Thy Jayvee football club plays their second
game of the season on Monday Oct. 31 against
Western Washington in Bellingham.
Date
Oct. 11
Oct. 11*
Oct. 11
Oct. 11
Oct. 11
Oct. 11-13
Oct. 11-13
Oct. 12
Oct. 12
Oct. 13
Sport
Football
Soccer  (V)
Field  Hockey
Field   Hockey
Cross Country
Sailing
Rugby
Ice H'key(JV)
Soccer (JV)
Football (JV)
Opponent
Portland  State  U.
Pauls   (P.C.S.L.)
Jokers  "A"
Jokers   "B"
U. of Victoria
Canadian   Intercollegiate
Meraloma  Tournament
Grandview  Steelers
Columbus
Western  Wash.
Place
Stadium
Cctlister
Spencer field
Spencer field
Victoria
Kingston
Connaught Park
Grandview
Wolfson 1
Bellingham
Time
2:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
12:00 noon
All Day
8:00 p.m.
1:00 a.m.
2:00 p.m.
T'Birds re-enter league play
By TONY GALLAGHER
The UBC Basketball
thunderbirds have swung into
vigorous action with workouts
four times a week. The fate of this
year's Birds will depend rather
heavily on the 6'8" Terry
MacKay, as the absence of last
year's centre Neil Williscroft wil
leave MacKay as the only genuine
big man on the club.
Otherincumbents up front will
)e a sharp shooting Derek Sankey
rid versatile defensive ace Bob
dolinski, both expected to be
tarters this year.
The backcourt is probably as
strong as it has ever been with
veteran Alex Brayden and ex Lord
Byng star Joe Kainer both joining
junior Ron Thorsen. These three
will be joined by the presently
injured Bill Ruby, who is
expected back before Christman,
and newcomers Stan Callegari and
Rod Matheson.
UBC will compete in the 9
team Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association this year, with the
Canadian   finals   to   be  held in
Hamilton, March 12-14. The
schedule includes seven games
against American competition of
which four will be played on a
tough road trip to Seattle Pacific
and Portland State in early
January.
Jawee basketball practices will
start on Tuesday Oct. 15 at 4:30
with interim coach Bruce Jagger
handling the club until Nick
Korchinsky's return at the
duration of the football season.
Anyone interested in managing
the jayvees is asked to see Peter
Mullins in War Memorial Gym.
GET SET FOR WINTER
SKIS — Head, Kastle, Dynastar
BOOTS — Rosemont, Le Trappeur, Kof lack
POLES — Head, Scott, Colin
BINDINGS - Salomon, Nevada, Marker
CLOTHING — Head, Spinnerin, Montant
Watch For Our Sale Oct. 15
1030   DENMAN   PLACE
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone: 688-8365
GROUSE MOUNTAIN
North   Vancouver,   B.C.
Phone: 988-6838
KILLY IN VANCOUVER
OCTOBER 13th - HOTEL VANCOUVER
WHAT NOW SKISVILLE!
* The Mood of Skiing - 1970
* Movie Preview of "The Downhill Racers"
* The Latest in Ski and Apres Ski Fashions
* Prizes - New Skis and Clothing
* Music by Vancouver's Own Mock Duck
* Hosted by Bob Grain
it: Jean Claude Killy talking about his New
Challenges in Skiing
PROFITS TO THE ASSOCIATION FOR MENTALLY RETARDED
CHILDRENS SKI PROGRAM
Tickets for 1 p.m. Show only at
Grouse Mountain Ski School
5100 CAPILANO DRIVE -  NORTH VANCOUVER
Tickets for 8 p.m. Show only at
IVOR WILLIAMS
SPORTING GOODS
2120 West 41st Ave.
Vancouver — 261-6011
D and W
336 West Pender
Vancouver — 681-2004
SKI WORLD
1030 Denman PI.
Vancouver — 688-8365
JL. _* Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1969
FRIDAY
BOB   FREER   FAN   CLUB
Retirement party, 8:00 p.m. to morning, 6989 Arbutus. The glorious leper
withdraws from these environs.
SOCIAL  CREDIT CLUB
General meeting to formulate resolutions  for  convention,   noon,   Bu.   224.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
"Some Aspects of Contemporary Polish Art", noon, Bu. 202, by Dr. Jack
Wozniakowski, professor of Aesthetics
and History of Art, University of
Lublin.
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
UBC Symphony Orchestra directed by
Hans-Karl   Piltz,    12:30   p.m.    and    8
P.m.,  in the recital haU.
UBC CYCLE TEAM
Meeting   today,   noon,   SUB   113.   AU
cyclists invited to cycle in and attend.
CHINESE   OVERSEAS   STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
BBQ  dinner,   bridge,   chess,   dancing,
6:30 tonight,  International House.
SKYDIVING
General meeting,  room 111,  SUB,  at
noon.
LEGAL   AID
Legal  advice  Mon.,   Wed.,   and  Fri.,
noon, room 237 and 237-A of SUB.
CAMPUS  CRUSADE
Catgie,    at   9:19,    in    Marine    View
Chapel, 41st and Crown.
ALLIANCE    FRANCAISE
Meeting at noon in I.H. Cafe gratuis
puir les membres.
LEFT CAUCUS
Organizational meeting, noon, AUS
office, Bu. 107 for those interested in
establishing and independent socialist
UBC movement.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, Bu.  102,  noon, new
members welcome.
VARSITY    CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Marxism and Christianity: a dialogue,
noon,   SUB 207-29.
FOLK SONG SOCIETY
Jam  sessions  every   noon,   SUB   210!
Bring guitar,  harp,  pipe   organ,   etc.,
etc.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting today noon in Henry
Angus 24.
CHESS CLUB
Sign  up   for  the   UBC  chess  tournament on the notice board, room 216,
SUB  any time until 5:30 p.m. today.
BLACK   CROSS   FOOD  CO-OP
Meeting today noon in Clubs Lounge
to   choose   job   committee.   Everyone
come to work out how to be divided.
SATURDAY
IEEE.   (STUDENT   BRANCH)
Trip to San Francisco, leaving 9:00
a m., returning Oct. 17 p.m. Meet at
Electrical Engineering Bldg. Visiting
Ampex, Stanford Linear Accel., Hewlett Packard. 3 days in 'Frisco and
4 nights,  $55.00,  bus and room.
'tween
classes
NISEI  VARSITY  CLUB
Bowling    party    7    p.m.,    Brentwood
Lanes.   There   is  an   afterparty.
IWW   I.V.   620
Meeting to  divide  the  workload  7:30
P.m., 3791 W. 7th St   Ph. 224-3035.
SUNDAY
THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Club ride 10 a.m., SUB loop, one day
ride, open to ali riders and bikes,
bring a passenger if you wish.
MONDAY
AMERICAN   DESERTERS   COMMITTEE
Thanksgiving Dinner 5 p.m., 3490
7th St. Free for draft dodgers and
deserters.
TUESDAY
FOLK  SONG  SOCIETY
Meeting for all who volunteered to
perform, noon, SUB 210.
SAILING CLUB
Learn  to   sail,   lectures given by expert, noon, Bu.  102.
PHOTOSOC
Classes   for   new   members,   Tuesday-
Friday,  non,  SUB  245.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVE   CLUB
Meeting noon,  SUB 211
WEDNESDAY
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Student-Prof night, 7:30-12:00, SUB
clubs lounge. Wine and cheese party,
all welcome. Tickets. $1.75, on sale
at noon outside reading room or at
the door.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Experimental   College:   Dr.   Helliwell,
Karl Borau: What to do about inflation.   2:30,   SUB   125.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Hear Dave Pelon from activist group,
speak   on  social   work   12:30  in   SUB
119.
CAMPUS   COMMITTEE   TO   END
THE WAR  IN VIETNAM
Mini moratorium. SUB ballroom, Wednesday,  11 to 4 p.m. Films, speakers.
WOMEN'S   ATHLETIC   DIR.
Women's Curling Team practices
every Wed. 7-9:15 p.m and Sat. 10-12
a.m.,  Thunderbird  Arena.
THURSDAY
P.C.S.F.
Seminar on Urban Development 12:30,
SUB 119. All those interested are
cordially invited  to  attend.
AQUASOC
Sneaker with slides and movies'from
S.P.E.C     12:30.    Hebb   Theatre,    it's
free, maybe come and join S.P.E.C,
or  see   what's   dirty.
ED. U.S. AND COMMERCE
Commerce and Education mixer. 8-12.
Education  Building  Lounge.  Girls —
free,  guys — 25 cents.
ED.   U.S.
Film—"Uo the Down Staircase", 12:30
in   Ed.    100.   10   cents   with   activity
card. 25 cents without.
MARKETING CLUB
Mr.  A. Block of Block Bros.  Realty
will speak 12:30, Henry Angus 207.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO "WIGGY SYMPHONY
and Lemon, Friday, Oct. 17, SUB
ballroom,   8.45   to   1.   $2.50  couple.
CUT LOOSE AT UNDERCUT 69
bring your mother along and
have a ball Friday, Oct. 10, from
9:00   -  1:00  in   S.U.B.  Caf.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
14
FOUND 6 ROLLS OF 50c PIECES,
value   $60.   Phone  Chuck  228-3975.
LOST BLACK FOLDER CON-
taining undergraduate economics
essays. Property of Rob Grauer,
name on title page. Phone 278-
0523.
LOST ONE SUEDE JACKET IN
SUB, Sat., Oct. 4, at Inter-residence dance. Reward for return
offered. Ph. 224,9533, Harlan, Rm.
406.	
LOST GREEK PURSE FRI., OCT.
3. Leff in green sports car driven
by 4th yr. Forestry student.
Please  phone  Liz,   732-5295.	
SIX MONTHS OLD BLACK KIT-
ten with white feet and markings
in university area. Reward. Ph.
224-5243.
LOST:        BLACK       DRAWSTRING
purse.   Reward   for  return   of   I.D.
and   other   papers—No   questions.
Call   Barb—733-4785.	
LOST:      ONE      GOLD      CHARM
bracelet     in      Angus      washroom.
Please call 261-8533.  Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY — FREEDOM. $18.00
per month inc. insurance. See the
volume dealer in "Two-Wheel
Freedom" for details. Hi-Performance Honda 3712 W. 10th at Alma.
Phone 228-9077.
Special Notices
16
MARLENE CHARLES CONGRA-
tulations! Winner of Aqua Society's Scuba course draw on
Club's  Day.	
AQUA SOC. FIRST BOAT DIVE
of the term this weekend. Info.
and list in  Club's Lounge.	
SEX EDUCATION. — Any Student
interested in helping with organization of a campus wide sex-
cation   Bldg.,   Oct.   15  at   12.30.
SCIENCE STUDENTS! — Nominations are open for Executive positions: AMS reps., Publicity,
Athletic Co-ord., Academic Coord. Nomination forms are avail-
able  in  AMS  office.	
SCIENCE STUDENTS wishing to
sit on the Student-Faculty Lias-
son Committee apply to Box 178,
S.U.B.,  Campus Mail.	
FAITH AT WORK
(Interdenominational)
Conference—October 17-19
at
QUEENS AVENUE
UNITED CHURCH
COME as you are
GO . . . with renewed
Christian hope
INFORMATIONS
Phone 521-3341  or 224-6265
Write: 931-6th Street
New Westminster, B.C.
S.P.E.C/ SPEAKS — AQUA SOC.
presents speaker with films on
Thursday, Oct. 16, at noon in
Hebb Theatre. Everyone on cam-
pus  welcome.    Free.    	
HAVE A BALL AT BRENTWOOD
Lanes. Come to the N. V. C.
bowling party, Sat., Oct. 11, at
7   p.m.	
KILLY SHOW — Tickets being
sold at Henry Angus on Friday,
from  12  to 1.30.	
UNDERCUT COMES TO SUB
again! All UBC types welcome.
You are guaranteed the time of
your life! Tickets at AMS office
or from any Forester this week.
See you  there.	
BOB DYLAN'S PREVIOUSLY UN-
published Tarantula now avall-
able   U.B.C.   Bookstore.   Duthies.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.	
NOTICE: LOST/FOUND BEING
cleared out. Claim all goods by
Wednesday  next.	
ESE-A 48-HR. WEEK-END EN-
counter group. For information,
phone  Lihsa,   224-3582.
Travel Opportunities
17
STUDENT INTERESTED IN
filling out a charter to Europe
leaving approximately Jan. 1,
1970, returning approximately
May 1. One-way or return. Contact, Raven Committee, School
of   Architecture,   U.B.C.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1964    V.W.    1200    SUNROOF.   FAC-
. tory    rebuilt   engine,    3000    miles.
Many extras. Price $700.00.  Phone
263-7274.	
1960 FORD ZEPHYR '6'. CALL
Chris, 224-4635, 3866 W. 18th.
Reasonable condition. Any offers
considered. ^	
M.G.A. '59 — Needs body work;
engine & trans, good, $250. Ph.
224-9835.     Al   Gould,   Rm.   680.
'57 MORRIS — Good running cond,
$130.     Phone   224-7666.	
1964 DODGE, 330, 4-door Sedan,
6 cylinders, standard radio, new
tires & snowtires. Tel. 732-6449
evenings.   Excellent   condition.
1956 AUSTIN — Reliable, economical transportation, excellent mechanical   condition.    9 22-7526.
'63 VAN — Partially converted to
Camper, excellent shape, $650
offer, Sat. between 1-5. Phone
HE   3-4563.	
TR4, 1965, B.R.G., — Wire wheels,
new paint, air horns, wood rim
Michelin x. 1065 West 8th.
'56 FORD — New curberator, Runs
very well. Most offers consider-
ed.     Phone   Ron,   263-7748.	
ISETTA (BUBBLE CAR), 80 MPG,
50 mph, $150. One cylinder, sunroof, yellow, two passenger, phone
733-5288.	
62 CHEVY II, 2 DOOR, STNDARD,
6 cylinders, new generator, shocks,
brakelining, $395 or offer. Alex
228-9591  after  6  p.m.	
1966 ENVOY EPIC, $750 OR OFFER.
John   Fox,   room   320   Chemistry.
1966 FIAT 850 COUPE, REBUILT
engine and trans. Asking $850.
Phone    524-4611.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
WANTED—PLUS 4, OR SUPER
sports Morgan. No specific year.
Call David-Room No. 86. Phone
224-9834.
Automobiles—Paris
23
'57 LAND ROVER MILL. Over
$130 in new parts, B.O. over $35
takes,   after 6,   731-7659.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
FANTASTIC VESPA SCOOTER,
'69,   90   cc.   $300.   228-9441.	
1968 BSA ROYAL STAR 500 cc,
new cond., only 800 mi., $800.
433-1890  after 6:00,   Larry.
DAYTONA HELMET with visor,
nearly   new,   $25.   Phone   263-8631.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating &  Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS, Professional production of all kinds of
Graphs Illustrations, Maps For-
mulations.    Phone    733-4506   evgs.
EXPERIENCED DRAUGHTSMAN
and artist available for all kinds
graphs, diagrams, artwork. Very
low rates. Call John Kula, 224-
4146.
Photography
34
MODEL WANTED By Professional
photographer. Must have good
figure, be attractive and willing
to pose nude. Contact W. Tai at
732-5212 or 736-0571 after 9 p.m.
This   is   a     legitimate     business
offer.	
NIKON 35mm. CASE, F. 1.14, $350.
Wide angle Nikon 35mm F.2,
$150. Telephone 135mm. F. 2.8
Nikon, $190. UV Filters complete,   $900.     Phone   224-6113.
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
SEX EDUCATION — Any student
interested in helping with organization of a campus wide Sex-
Ed. course come to Room 5,
Educ.   Bldg.,   Oct.   15   at   12.30.
Scandals—Cont'd
37
DO YOU NEED A PLACE TO
Live? We offer the largest rooms
on the row, most cupboard and
drawer space, and much more.
Come    and    see    us.    Sigma    Chi
Fraternity,   5725   Agronomy   Road.
DAISY MAE LOVES SARGENT
Garcia. See the horror show at
Undercut '69, Friday, Oct. 10.
SUB Cafeteria 9:00 to 1:00. Tickets
in A.M.S. office or from any
forester.	
BLIND STUDENTS NEED VOL-
unteer readers to tape record
textbooks or read "live." No experience necessary. Mutual benefits. Leave name, time available,
and phone number at the Crane
Memorial Library, Branch 254,
daily 8:30-4:30 or phone 228-2373.
Please  help.
Sewing & Alterations 38
SEWING—GENTS—LADIES alterations—New work expertly done—
On  UBC  campus.  Call  224-7141.
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please   phone   277-5640.	
TYPING WITH DELIVERY. REAS-
onable rates. Phone days 733-
2042, eves, and weekends 732-6372.
EXPERT TYPING — THESIS 35c
page; Essays 30c page, 5c per
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545	
TYPING—PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00
to   5:00.    266-6662  after  6:00.	
TYPING DONE — 3589 WEST 19th
Ave.   Reasonable   rates.      733-5922
EXPERT, NEAT, ACCURATE TYP-
ing of essays, etc. Done quickly.
Reasonable rates. Tel. 224-0385
after 5  p.m. ,
EXPERT TYPING, COMPETITIVE
rates. Essays, papers, etc. Phone
879-1807.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.	
TYPIST — ELECTRIC. 224 - 6129.
Dunbar   Area.
EXPERT, NEAT, ACCURATE
typing on thesis and term papers
done quickly in my home. Low
rates.   Phone   266-4720.	
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED,
electric typewriters, UBC grad.
Will pick up and deliver. 30c per
sheet.   Phone   942-8144.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-
9253,	
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESES,
Stencils, etc. On 10th Ave., half
block outside gates. Phone 224-
0244.	
STUDENT TYPING DONE, 30c
per page. 5c per carbon copy.
Contact Heather DuBois, 327-
8450.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
18-30 FOR HOUSEKEEPING AND
cooking for 4. FREE room and
board and ride to campus. Open
mindedness an asset. 325-2866,
6 - 7:30.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
EARN EXTRA MONEY QUICKLY,
easily. Will not conflict with
studies. Larry after 6:00 p.m. Ph.
224-7352
WANT TO MAKE MONEY? 50c
for every invitation books you
sell.   Call   Mrs.   Duncan,   228-9597.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
Language Instruction
61A
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Learn Conversational French, Spanish, German or English (New Canadians for as low as
$67.50 FOR 60 LESSONS
Take   advantage   of   this   amazing
offer:   only  six students   maximum
per group.
For  the  best  tutoring  in  language
conversation,    call   us    today    (8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) at 736-5401.
CONVERSA-SCHOOL
OF LANGUAGES
(Recognized Educ. Institution)
1603 W.  4th  (at Fir)
Music
62
PIANO AND VIOLIN LESSONS.
Musical theory at all leveis (ex-
Royal Academy student). S. Cox.
733-3509.
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FRENCH TUTOR FOR STUDENTS
with high school or first year of
French, $2.00 hour. Phone Mar
Mayet,   224-9073   after   6   p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS Publication! Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
FREE PASSES TO GUESTS OF
Invitation 69/70 Book holders to
movies, restaurants, night clubs,
etc. Don'h miss yours, $1.75, at
SUB  Information.
FOR SALE: WAIS TESTING KIT
with zipper case and stop watch.
$40.00.   Call   Elrod   at   228-3510.
FOR SALE: BED, CHAIRS, DIN-
ette set, tables, rug, mirror, etc.
Cheap.   224-0534,   after   5 p.m.
GIRLS'  SKI BOOTS,  TYROL,   SIZE
6 y2,  excellent   condition.   Used one ?
season.    Phone    Rae    Stanley,    at
261-4341
FOR SALE—REIKER SKI BOOTS;
Buckle, 1967 model. Excellent condition,   $60.   Call   683-2872   after   7
p.m.
LABORATORY EQUIPMENT AND
Chemicals    for    sale.     Phone    Bill
224-6585
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS $40/MONTH; ROOM
with breakfast; girl student wanted; available immediately. Tel:
224-3162.
PLEASANT QUIET ROOM FOR
quiet male student, priv. entr. It.
ck. bathrm, near gates, $50. 224-
6795.
SINGLE ROOM — OR ROOM AND
breakfast, men only, Dunbar area,
priv.   entrance.  Ph. 224-3389.
ON CAMPUS. LARGE FURNISHED
rm. Private entrance, shower, etc.
Light housekeeping; female student.   224-6397.
L.H.K. 2 RM. BASE STE. COMP.
furn.   2   men.   733-4252.
FOR RENT TO MALE STUDENT,
third year or more advanced,
sleeping   room.    $35.00.    228-8096.
WANT TO LIVE ON CAMPUS?
Male accommodation. Room $50.
R&B $95. Kitchen privileges,
Parking, large study room &
loung. Weekly linen. 5760 Toronto
Road   or   phone   Ron,   224-0327.
Room & Board
82
MAKE THIS YEAR AT UBC A
memorable experience! Live at the
Sigma Chi House! We offer largest rooms, with w/w carpeting,
most cupboard & drawer space,
comfortable lounge areas, colour
T.V. Newest house on campus.
Come on over and see us Sigma
Chi Fraternity, 5725 Agronomy Rd.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SENIOR GIRL, FOR FURN. WEST
End apt. 26th floor, indoor pool.
$80.   681-7079.
GRADUATE COUPLE NEEDS Accommodation in or near the campus.   Phone   224-9001.
HOUSE TO SHARE, MALE OR
female. 596 W. 17th Ave. Private
rooms.   876-4607.
FEMALE GRAD TO SHARE
apartment. West 1st Contact room
208   Geography  Dept.
Unfurn. Houses  & Apts.        84
HOUSE, ENTIRE 1ST FLOOR,
near Univ. Gate, 13th Ave. Accommodate group 2-3 students or
family. Frig. & stove inc. Tel.
985-2743.
WANTED TO RENT: WORKING
couple desire 1 or 2 bedroom house
to $135 funr. or unfurn. Kits,
Jericho  or UBC  area.  Phone 224-
3839  after  5:30.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION

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