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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 2010

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Array But we're from two different worlds SINCE 1918
FROM HORROR STORIES
ON THE BUS TO CRINGING
AT COSTUMES,
THEUBYSSEY BRINGS
YOU THE BEST OF
HALLOWEEN.
PAGE 4
OCTOBER 28,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER XV3
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BUTLD3NG
• PUBL3SHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.    J
H
EU
BYSS
EY
FROM STUDENT
TO TEACHER
THE UBYSSEY
DOES EDUCATION
PAGE 6
SDS
DISTANCE
COURSES
HOME
SCHOOLING
SCHOOL
RANKING 2/U BYSSEY. CA/E VENTS/2010.10.28
OCTOBER 28,2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°XVI
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Jan Turner: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
Matt Wetzler: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Ginny Monaco Jenny Tsundu
Mandy Ng Kasha Chang
Karina Palmitesta Scott Orjala
Austin Holm Colin Chia
Jon Chiang Irene Lo
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
5£
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
pr:int~d onj[0.0%
reevcjedjDaaer
EVENTS
FRIDAY, OCT. 29
HALLOWEEN BZZR GARDEN
The UBC Agriculture Undergrad Society
presents their annual Halloween Bzzr Garden, including a contest for best costume
and featuring the ever-challenging mechanical bull. • 19+ event, 7-11pm, MacMil-
lan Building Basement in Agora, no cover
charge.
HALLOWE'EN BALL
One of the biggest events on campus in
first term! Come to the Cheeze dressed
in your best costume, and be ready for
a hell of a night! Featuring three live
bands, cheap beer, a ridiculous amount
of people and no cover, the annual engineering Hallowe'en Ball is a party that is
beaten by no other. • 19+ event, 7pm-
12am, the Cheeze Factory, no cover,
bring 2 pieces of ID.
SATURDAY, OCT 30
ISRAEL & PALESTINE: PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE
Dr Norman Finkelstein will speak on the
present situation in Gaza, the attack on
the Gaza Aid Flotilla, the current stage of
the peace process and the prospect of
further regional conflict. • 7:30-9:30pm,
Hebb Theatre, $10 students, $15 non-students, tickets available at the Outpost and
Co-Op Bookstore on Commercial.
CORRECTION
In the October 21st, 2010 issue, in the article entitled "Party of
five: AMS gets feedback on proposed SUB designs," Jennifer
Cutbill was credited as an architect when she is in fact a
esigner. The Ubyssey regrets this error.
SOLITU DE TRI LOG
Schubert, Faure, Brahms, O'Regan
8pm • Friday, November 5,2010
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts
Vancouver Chamber Choir * Pacifica Singers • Focus! Choir of College/
University Singers • Heidi Krutzen, harp • Vancouver Chamber Orchestra
The beautiful acoustic ofthe Chan Centre will resonate with Gabriel Faure's
luminous Messe basse, Schubert's haunting Song ofthe Spirits over the
Waters, Brahms' Four Songs for women's voices, horns and harp, and the world
premiere performance of Solitude Trilogy for choir, strings and harp by the
brilliant young British composer Tarik O'Regan. Meet Tarik at the pre-concert
talk with John Trotter at 7pm.
604.2803311 ticketmaster.ca
www.vancouverchamberchoir.com
THEWNOTVERSW
SEHIDU1LY WCJTCOMT
C0MET0SUB23F0R
(WHILE SUPPLIES LAST). 2010.10.28/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubysseyca
Researchers become increasingly concerned over activists
VP Research Hepburn claims one scientist has been threatened in her home
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
A university-wide email—and
the removal of rocks around
Kenny—are both a part of UBC's
response to the surge of interest
around their animal research
program.
On Monday UBC VP Research
John Hepburn sent out a broadcast email to all UBC students,
faculty and staff, defending the
university against "misleading
information" that they believe is
being spread by STOP UBC Animal Research (STOP).
"A group of activists is campaigning to end animal research
at UBC by distributing misleading information in an attempt
to recruit people to their cause,"
the email said. "They have succeeded in gaining some media
attention and we expect to see
more.
"Animal activists use shock
tactics in an effort to gain public sympathy via news media.
In other parts ofthe world, such
sensationalist tactics have escalated to violence against researchers, and in North Vancouver earlier this month a group
called the Animal Liberation
Front (ALF) resorted to acts of
vandalism against an individual in the fur trade."
Hepburn was referring to
Eugene Klein, the operator of
Capilano Furs, whose home was
vandalized on Thanksgiving
Sunday. His house was tarred
Douglas T. Kenny Building, where the psychology department is housed. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
and his son's girlfriend's tires
were slashed. The ALF, a self-
described 'animal liberation'
group that uses illegal tactics
that include vandalism and arson, took credit for the attack
on their website.
Brian Vincent, the spokesperson for STOP, said that it was
unfair for the university to associate his group with the ALF.
"Why throw that out there?
Clearly it's to whip up hysteria.
He paints a broad brush that
all animal advocates are this
way" Vincent said. "And for him
to imply that we are associated
with those kinds of activities is
flat wrong.
"However, I think [the email]
shows the effectiveness of our
campaign. If UBC didn't take us
seriously and didn't think we
were tarnishing the university's reputation, they wouldn't
be sending out an email."
Hepburn told The Ubyssey
that the email was sent out in
response to "researchers [who]
were getting concerned that UBC
wasn't defending them."
In addition, Hepburn said that
he knows of at least one UBC
neuroscientist who has been
threatened, although he only
found out about the incident after the broadcast email had been
sent out.
"The context ofthe call is important: this particular incident
was a late-night 'we know where
you live' call from an unidentifiable harasser, not a professional inquiry during office hours,"
said Hepburn.
He went on to say that "It occurred after the STOP campaign
was publicly underway" and that
"a concern is that STOP's activities, while legitimate to date,
will incite people capable of illegal activities."
Vincent, however, did not entirely trust Hepburn's claim that
a professor was threatened.
"I don't know if that's true,"
he said. "This is a very common
tactic that universities use to
deflect attention away from the
real issue. And the real issue is
that UBC is using taxpayer dollars to conduct experiments on
animals behind closed doors
with little public scrutiny.
"[However] if someone did
make such a call, I certainly
would condemn that."
Hepburn's broadcast email
appears to reflect a newfound
fear throughout parts ofthe research community at UBC. In an
internal departmental email obtained by The Ubyssey, Gary Ma-
clsaac, the director of IT services
for the psychology department,
told faculty and students to keep
objects away from the Douglas
Kenny Building, for fear they
could be used to vandalize it.
"A large rock has been sitting by the NE rear door of the
building. With some of the issues around campus it's been
suggested we not leave rocks
around where they can be pitched
through windows or jam doors
open after hours. So this rock will
disappear...preferablynot to be replaced by another." \3
—With files from Fabrizio Stendardo
A whale by any other name...
The Ubyssey tries—and fails—to name UBC's newest permanent resident
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
When The Ubyssey asked the
Beaty Biodiversity Museum if
they wanted to run a joint naming poll for their new blue whale
skeleton, we knew the answer
might be no. However, we never imagined the reason could
be so awesome—whales might
have names in nature. Or at least
that's what we were told.
Bep Schippers, acting education and community outreach
manager at the museum, said
that the museum's board had
already discussed the possibility of naming the whale. They
had decided against it for the
time being for two reasons. The
first was that it was not scientifically professional to name
specimens. The second, "rather complex" reason was essentially that whales use vocalizations in nature and that it was
possible that this means they
already have names.
Wayne Maddison, director of
the Beaty Biodiversity Museum,
clarified that the right to name
the whale was theirs and that
the reasons stated by Schippers
were secondary.
"The right to name the whale
is a big asset of ours: potentially worth a lot of money (in the
form of publicity)," said Maddison in an email to The Ubyssey. "We were reluctant because
we scientists tend not to name
specimens and because in nature the whale may have had its
own name. This assessment was
not based on detailed research
or consultation, but nor is it final or definitive."
Dr Andrew Trites, director
of the UBC Marine Mammal
Research Unit, was the leader
of the project to bring the blue
whale to the Beaty Biodiversity Museum. He said he was
amused to hear that the museum may not consider naming
the whale because it could already have a whale name.
"Someone said that to you?"
said Trites between laughs. "Oh
dear. Is that kind of like saying
that all animals have names,
and so we should not be giving
them names: cats give each other names, and dogs have names
for each other?"
However, Trites said that in
nature, "[whales] certainly do
recognize individuals.... Animals make calls, and they can
The sale of a whale's name is a shame. COLIN CHIA PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
recognize each other both visually and through sound... so
they're using their senses to recognize individuals." However, he
is skeptical whether this means
whales have names.
"Now, what goes on inside an
animal's head, do they put [those
senses] together and have a name,
or is it an image? I really don't
know. I even wonder just withhu-
mans, when did we start naming
each other? I'm sure there must
have been a time back in history
when we didn't use names."
Laura May-Collado is an associate researcher at the University of Puerto Rico who specialises in marine mammalian
acoustic communication.
"Some dolphin species, [such
as] bottlenose dolphins, emit
'signature whistles' that are
individual-specific," said May-
Collado. "Mother and calf emit
these signals while separated
to keep contact and close male
allies mimic each other to
strengthen their relationship."
May-Collado said that research conducted by other scientists into orcas has shown that
families of whales use unique
communication sounds. Larger
whales tend to use songs to communicate their locations over
long distances, although these
are not unique. May-Collado said
that this shouldn't lead us to assume these can be equated with
the use of names, however.
"If they use these individual
specific signals to 'name' each
other is another matter. The use
of names in dolphins seems to
me an anthropogenic approach
to dolphin communication."
Meanwhile, Trites said that
the team who recovered the museum's whale had an unofficial
name for the specimen.
"The people who dug up the
whale and put her back together, on the team, we always called
her 'Big Blue,'" said Trites.
"There's a whole human dimension to the skeleton. It touched
so many people's lives in PEI,
and we began to see her as more
than a specimen. She has a life
story." 4/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.10.28
0
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
Transit can be nasty, smelly and
unpleasant. But sometimes a
trip across town or a quick jaunt
on the Skytrain can be downright terrifying. In honour ofthe
scariest time of the year, Ubyssey writers have compiled these
true tales of transit horror. So
the next time you're boarding a
99 B-line, just remember: when
the doors close, you're locked in.
A CUT OF PORK?
Returning home from work, Kalian Dare received an offer he
couldn't refuse.
The first-year UBC student
was riding the late bus when
a disheveled man noticed him.
The stranger approached, offering to sell Kahan the contents of his bag at a very reasonable price.
The man pulled out...a package of ribs.
"I refused, of course," Kahan
assured me. Despite being a student on a tight budget, he hasn't
grown quite that desperate for
food. Qualms about sanitation
aside, the origin ofthe meat was,
shall we say suspicious.
Perhaps it was simply a daring sales tactic. Perhaps it was
a creative way to dispose of a
corpse. My mind took a sinister turn towards Mrs Lovett's
meat pies. An encounter with
the next Russell Williams is far
more frightening than bumping into one of Mary Shelley's
creations.
The ribs were a cut of pork...
or were they?
-Catherine Guan
PIGEON MAN
"Itwas a real pigeon," exclaimed
Milena Stefanovic, a first-year
student at UBC. Seeing a pigeon
is hardly cause for excitement,
but the circumstances were rather usual.
She was returning home by
Skytrain after a night of swing
dancing when the train came to
a stop. Standing on the platform
was an unremarkable man—unremarkable except for the pigeon sitting on top of his head.
He entered the compartment
where Milena was sitting with
some friends.
Nonchalantly the man donned
a top hat, covering the pigeon,
Becoming aware of the curious
looks, he affected a bewildered expression: "Did you see a pigeon?
I didn't."
Getting off at his stop, the man
removed the hat and strolled away
with the pigeon on his head.
Evidently the Skytrain is the
perfect place to go for those seeking some nighttime thrills. I can't
promise vampires or werewolves,
but you are bound to run into
some interesting characters on
the night train.
-Catherine Guan
"LOST TRAINS"
It was the train ride from hell, or
so my sister insisted. After the incident, she came home still a little
dazed and pissed off. Here's
what happened:
The day began like any normal day. She was riding the Skytrain to get to her school all the
way up in Renfrew. Morning rush
hours were the worst, so she and
a hundred other passengers were
crammed like sardines in that little train compartment. Only halfway through a dark tunnel, the
train suddenly stopped dead in
its tracks. The claustrophobia
and tension grew as the seconds
ticked by. From the overhead, a
voice suddenly announced: "Attention all passengers: we have
lost a couple of trains."
People started to scream
and panic, scrambling, pushing and shoving everywhere.
They banged the windows and
doors, and repeatedly punched
the emergency button. The mass
hysteria was sickening. What's
worse, that day was September
10. Everyone was imagining
some kind of terrorist attack.
Fortunately the overhead sounded again, this time rephrasing
the original message: "Attention all passengers: we just lost
contact with a couple of trains.
Please remain calm."
It turns out that some drunks
had thrown beer cans over the
tracks, which, when dragged by
the train, disrupted the communication mechanism. Naturally trains can't move without
knowing each others' exact location. It took another hour for
the train to move again, but days
for the passengers to shake off
the hysteria.
—Jenica Kim Yu Chuahiock
THE BAD MAN
I should know by the ring of empty seats around him on the at-ca-
pacity 99 that the man in the center of the bus is... off. I sit down
beside him anyways.
Not my wisest decision.
From the corner of my eye, I
see him turn to face me. I feel
his warm breath as he hisses in
my ear. It's just a low, toxic sound
at first, like a gas leak, and then
slowly the sounds form words.
"I hate you," he whispers. His
face is inches from mine. "You
motherfucker. Motherfucker." He
drives the point home by slamming his fist into the open palm
of his hand.
"I'm going to stab out your
eyes and piss in your daughter's mouth." He spits on the
ground in front of me.
I'm too afraid to move when
my stop is announced. As the
bus slows down, there's the
sound and glow of a police cruiser from behind. The doors open
and I rush to hide in the group
of people heading for the exit.
He grabs my wrist and squeezes hard enough that I think it
might break.
He only lets go when a distracted, hurried woman Red-
Rovers my arm free. I run.
From across the street, I
watch the cops escort the man
off the bus. His eyes lock with
mine as they lead him into their
cruiser. tl
—Ginny Monaco
BULL VS CHEEZE: WE BREAK DOWN THE
ANNUAL HALLOWEEN PARTIES
HALLOWEEN BZZR GARDEN
Agriculture
Undergraduate Society
MacMillan Building Basement
GO IF: Your balance is god-like.
AVOID IF: You're personally offended by topless women and/or
country music.
When asked why students should
attend this particular event, student senator Erik Hilmer included "mechanical bull" and "novelty
mugs" as just some of the reasons
for why this should be your obvious
first choice. The Bzzr Garden will
be hosted by the Agricultural Undergraduate Society and promises to have great music and a fun atmosphere
as well as prizes for the best costumes. Just remember to wear something you
won't be able to easily remove when the urge to take your clothes off whilst riding the mechanical bull takes over.
ew
HALLOWEEN BALL
Engineering
Undergraduate Society
The Cheeze Factory
GO IF: You prefer to be hit
on in ways that don't involve physical contact.
AVOID IF: You're claustrophobic. The Cheeze hits
capacity fast.
Oh, those engineers and
their drinking. The Halloween Ball is hosted by
UBC Engineering and
promises to be the "biggest and best Halloween
event on campus." It's free and will feature live band performances, a costume contest and a chance to win a free trip through S-Trip. There will also
bea barbecue from 5pm to 7pm, so you can make sure there's food in your
belly before you commence your wild night of alcohol consumption and
bad decision making. Best part about this one? $2 drinks. n
***
2010.10.28/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/5
Costume ideas for the lazy and the esoteric
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
Hardly anyone dresses as something scary for Halloween anymore. It used to be that the standard roster of outfits revolved
around supernatural terror—devils, ghosts, witches and for some
reason, hobos. Nowyou're more
likely to see a Halloween party
filled with dead celebrities and
sexually promiscuous service
personnel (nurses, police, prostitutes) than spectres from beyond the realms the living.
A lot of this has to do with the
prolonged childhood in which so
many currently in their early-to
mid-twenties see fit to indulge.
Halloween in North America was
originally a children's holiday. By
adolescence the candy and costume rituals were abandoned
in favour of plainclothes hooliganism, the "trick" half of Halloween's dual nature. The fact
that, at present, people well past
their teens continue to dress up
every October 31 has resulted in
a growing market for adult costumes and a shift in what, exactly constitutes an appropriate alter-ego.
Ifyou feel pressured by your
peers to wear a costume this Halloween, but don't really relish
the idea of buying or constructing one, you may be inclined to
take the easy way out. Plenty of
guys will be dusting off their funeral/interview/wedding suits
this year and going as characters from Mad Men. For females,
the same theme serves as an excuse to wear lipstick and an updo. But when we're at the point
where dressing up as an upper-
middle class fictional business
This year, go as a near-death experience. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
person from the early sixties
qualifies as a costume, we must
ask ourselves: what is a costume,
anyway?
The lines have become blurred
to the point where almost any
identity—fictional or otherwise —
can be taken on during Halloween. So why not experiment? Why
not push the idea of a costume to
the very limits of its definition?
Why not—to use the common parlance—"blow" a few minds?
Here are some costume
ideas—seeds of inspiration—to
help thisyear's revellers expand
Halloween beyond its traditional boundaries.
GUN VIOLENCE
Firearm-related violence kills or
wounds millions of people every
year. Its effects are felt in our own
communities as well as those on
the other side of the globe. This
tyranny of lead and steel robs
adults and children alike of their
lives. It's a terrifying subject to
meditate on—which makes it an
ideal Halloween costume. When
was the last time a vampire actually killed somebody? Gun violence easily beats out Dracula,
Cullen and L'Estat's collective
body counts.
For the costume, print out
some pages with statistics on
firearm-related deaths. Maybe include some maps of major trade
routes for illicit weapons. Then
staple them to your shirt. In fifteen minutes or less, you will
have put together a bone-chilling
costume. If anyone needs proof of
your powers, point to the relevant
statistics on your torso and make
sound effects with your mouth.
"Ra-ta-ta-ta-tat!" works. So does
"Blam! Blam!"
A NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCE
You've heard it before. Someone is on the operating room
table, or trapped in the wreckage of a totalled car. Their surroundings fade into obscurity
as a bright white light beckons
them towards the afterlife. Some
believe a supernatural entity is
to blame for these experiences.
Others say it's simply the result
of depleted oxygen flow to the
brain. Either way a brush with
the afterlife is sure to have a profound effect on anyone who experiences it.
The only item you require for
this costume is a flashlight. Keep
it in your pocket, and whenever someone asks whatyour costume is, shine it unrelentingly into their eyes. Do your best
to approximate the voice of a
dead relative, and say something
like, "OOooo, joooinus," or "Your
tiiime has coooome. Go into the
liiight." Watch as a mortal terror
ofthe Unknown washes over your
victim's face. Success!
THE DISAPPOINTMENT OF A
LOVED ONE
"I'm not angry just disappointed." Five words delivered by a
parent or significant other have
enormous power. Along with a
woeful expression and refusal
to make eye contact, this phrase
becomes an emotional combo
move. Tap into others' deep-seated fears of failure by dressing
up this Halloween as The Disappointment of a Loved One.
There are a few different approaches you can take. For one,
try dressing as an experienced
hunter and carry a fake rifle.
Wear a hardened, paternal expression, and shake your head
ruefully at anyone you meet.
"That doe was pregnant, boy. You
should know better than that. I
taught you better than that. I'm
so disappointed."
Or dress as a weeping bride.
"She's my sister! My own sister.
Why now? Why on this day? Oh
God, I'm so embarassed. Today
is supposed to be the best day of
our lives, and you've destroyed it.
You bastard! You horrible, cheating bastard!"
No matter what method you
choose, this costume is sure to
hit home. ^J
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room, and several focused
research centers.
The community has many things
to offer including: housing,
healthcare, shopping, dining,
parks and sport facilities
(including golf course, sailing
facilities, gyms with swimming
pools, running tracks, etc).
For more information about applying to KAUST please visit our web site at
www.kaust.edu.sa 6/UBYSSEY.CA/EDUCATION/2010.10.28
EDUCATION
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»features@ubyssey.ca
GUEST EDITOR SCOTT ORJALA»sorjala@ubyssey.ca
Welcome to the Education Supplement
SCOn ORJALA
Guest Editor
The practice of education has commonly
evoked traditional symbols, such as libraries, textbooks, classrooms, lecture
halls and professors. While we recognize that this iconography is linked to
learning, there exists a growing sense
of disparity between the usual methods
and how we actually seek out knowledge on a daily basis.
For instance, all inquiries great and
small are now answered instantly by
the myriad of results we get from search
engines. The rising prevalence of online courses and general information
coupled with increased technological
access demonstrates a clear and rapid
shift in preferential and practical methods of educating ourselves. We can use
technology to access information faster than any lecturer can deliver it. Research, for years now, has been conducted via online sources, and blogs
have quickly become the preferred forum for discussion.
Amidst all of these changes, we are
left to consider the implications that
are presented for current educational
institutions. How will the format of education change? Will online education
champion the physical, interpersonal
experience of education? What is certain is that we are now able to have a
greater degree of authorship over the
education we receive. However, what
remains unknown is how we will continue to conceptualize both education
and learning in the future.
In this supplement, we take a look at
some ofthe technology that is changing
the way education occurs. In addition,
we examine some issues with teaching
at UBC and in the province, vl
Private, public and home schooling
JENNYTSUNDU
nvestiga tive® ubyssey.ca
When I entered high school, I tried to
avoid telling people that I had been home-
schooled the year before.
Most students my age didn't understand how it worked and I never really felt like explaining it. To do so would
mean I'd have to get into the details of
why I'd chosen to do it, how I'd tried both
public and private schools in the past
and how I hadn't been able to find the
right kind of academic environment in
either. The majority of other kids in my
class had gone to the same elementary
and middle school their entire lives, and
I didn't know a single person there—the
last thing I wanted to do was stand out.
There is a point to this lengthy story.
The public school system is supposed to
serve all types of students, but it lacks
the flexibility to do so effectively. More
and more students leave for alternatives
each year.
It's a problem not only because the
needs of students aren't being met,
but because this trend contrib
utes to the disintegration ofthe
public school system in gen
eral. Schools benefit from
having a diverse student
population, but declining
enrolment means further
budget cuts and less funding for special programs.
My decision to try home-
schooling was a very spur-
of-the-moment one. I made
the decision just a few
weeks before I was supposed to return to school
for Grade 7 in September; my tuition had been
paid, and my uniform
was pressed and ready
to go. It's one of the most
impulsive things I've ever done, and I did
it out of desperation to find the motivation and enthusiasm for school I'd been
beginning to lose.
Like many other UBC students, I've always liked and done very well in school.
But at my public elementary school I started to find that the amount of new information we learned each year wasn't enough
to keep me interested. When I was in
Grade 4 or 5 the school created an "Individual Education Plan" (IEP) for me, a program custom designed to keep me challenged academically. In short, when everyone else did their daily grammar lesson, I got to sit at the back of a class and
do a typing program on a computer. Apparently, my school counsellor had decided that I didn't   .
need grammar lessons, so
learning to type would
be more beneficial.
It wasn't aca
demically motivating, and all I remember is my friends asking me at recess
why I got to play on the computer when
they had to learn stuff.
In Grade 6, I switched to a private
school in Vancouver. Information was
taught at a slightly faster pace, and my
smaller class of 13 students meant the
teacher was able to spend more time
with each of us. I was nervous because
I'd heard the common misconception
that private school kids were snobby and
mean, and I found that to be largely untrue. Private school students are very
aware of the stereotypes about them;
at the end of our class camping trip to
Galiano Island, our teacher explicitly told us that
we had to make an extra effort to strike
up conversations
with students
from   other
schools at the
:   same campsite
in order to dispel the stereo-
f type that pri-
l vate   school
kids    were
unfriendly.
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Because homeschooling is a less popular choice, it's the one that seems have the
strongest stereotypes. My parents faced a
lot of tough questions from their friends,
who strongly believed homeschooled children were socially deprived and would become awkward adults. Some kids I knew
really did fulfill that stereotype, and one
parent told my mother that she chose to
teach her child at home in order to protect them from the "dangerous influences" that lurked in public schools.
Homeschooling was an interesting experience because it gave me the flexibility
to pursue subjects that I liked at a higher
level than would ever have been possible
in a traditional school setting. I knew kids
who had chosen to work through certain
subjects, like math or science, at a slower pace. I also knew kids who were taking courses way beyond their age levels.
Not all students have the financial capability to go to a private school, and not
all parents can take the time and effort to
homeschool and monitor their children's
education. The parents who choose to
avoid sending their kids to public school
do so because they don't trust it to provide a quality education for their children; a lack of trust in the system further
worsens the situation in public schools.
It's a vicious, self-perpetuating cycle—and as students,
taxpayers and perhaps
even parents, it's an issue that affects us all.
At the end of the
year, I decided
that I was going
to go back to public school. Home-
schooling brought
the academic
challenge that
I'd been seeking,
but I wanted to
go back to school
, with other kids.
Luckily, I found
a program at
a public high
school that allowed me to experience both socialization and
academic challenge, tu 2010.10.28/UBYSSEY.CA/EDUCATION/7
Try it out: Student Directed Seminars
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
What if I told you that UBC, this university allows students to create their own
courses that people can take for three
credits? And that these courses can be
run with no professor ever entering the
classroom? And that, in a hilarious lapse
of judgement, the university has allowed
me to coordinate one of these courses,
and they could very well make the same
decision with you?
It's all true. It's been true for for over
a decade. They're Student Directed Seminars (SDS) and it's the best UBC program
you've probably never heard of.
Here's how it works. You have an idea
for a class: Physics of Hockey History of
Beards and Assorted Facial Hair, Cultural Legacy of Video Games, or what have
you. You find a professor who agrees to
sponsor the idea and do any marking or
administrative work needed. You then
pitch your idea to the university—how it
will run, why it has academic value and
whyyou are trustworthy enough to run it.
Then, you wait. A month or two passes.
Ifyou're lucky UBC approves the course,
leaving you to work with your faculty
sponsor to set up a syllabus, find a date/
time/location that works for your class,
register students—you know, like an actual course.
I'm not a professor and I don't mark papers. As soon as the class begins, I'm just
another student like anyone else. Nonetheless, I do get to design a syllabus for
a course, find amazing guest speakers
from across the Lower Mainland and provide a learning opportunity for a few students that wasn't available on campus—
and that's cool.
Oh, and as for my seminar? Journalism in the 21st Century. Or, in SSC terms,
"ASTU 400M." Spaces are running out, but
feel free to register ifyou're looking for
something to do Tuesdays and Thursdays
next term from 4-5:30pm. It's being run
as a joint partnership between The Ubyssey and the Graduate School ofjournalism, which means a few things. First,
there will be some amazing guest lecturers. Second, it's a chance for students to
see their assignments end up on these
pages. Outside of a special program for a
few first-year Artsies, there are no journalism courses for undergraduate students, and I'm hoping this course will
help entice UBC to make a change. Even
if it doesn't, though, I get to take direct
control of my educational experience—
at least for one course.
The other great thing about the SDS
program? You can set it up pretty much
however you want. Do you think the class
should be self-evaluated, or be full of
guest lecturers or have plenty of field
trips? You can do that. Each seminar is
completely unique, and predicated on the
idea of 15 students, the maximum number allowed in an SDS, working and learning together to explore a topic and broaden their horizons. It's directed studies on
steroids, and it's emblematic of what a
university is, or at least should be, about.
Despite the fact that the program was
started at UBC in 1999, the number of SDS
courses available in anyyear never exceeds
a couple dozen. Margot Bell, the student development director who oversees the program, said she thought the relatively low
numbers were due to the time commitment and ambition required to coordinate
a class, which most students simply don't
have. However, I think the real reason is
due to a larger problem at this university:
the disconnect between what UBC offers
and what it communicates to students.
Efforts are made all the time to improve student engagement, and despite
this, UBC still languishes near the bottom on most surveys on the classroom
experience at Canadian universities.
Point this out and UBC will cite all the
wonderful initiatives being done to
ensure that students get an ultra-modern, dynamic, sustainable, interactive
"Place of Mind" experience "From Here."
While it's true the university is trying,
it's just that the information doesn't often reach the masses.
Students will complain that they get
20 emails a day from ten different accounts, their professor hasn't marked
the midterm yet, and that WebCT is
broken for the eighth time this semester. This is perhaps natural in a giant,
SCOTT ORJALA ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
decentralized yet horribly bureaucratic
university. It is a pain and a paradox: a
place often criticized as an impersonal
degree-factory is often on the cutting
edge of teaching.
That's UBC for you, though. Our motto
is Tuum Est. That means "it's yours," but
it also means "it's up to you"—a wonderfully true split meaning. This university
is here for the taking, ifyou know how.
There's no better example than Student
Directed Seminars. ^J
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(5     (0? education alternatives
3
Distance education: behind the scenes
JONATHAN LOPEZ
Contributor
The department running it has changed
from the Office of Learning Technology
(OLT) to the Centre for Teaching, Learning
and Technology (CTLT). But a main service
they provide, distance education, remains
the same.
UBC has been offering distance education courses for over 60 years. While they
were once called correspondence courses, they are now mostly in an online format. Students can now pick from about 130
courses in just about every faculty at UBC.
According to distance education statistics
from the CTLT, in 2009 8414 students opted to take courses in a distance education
format. Of these students, 79 per centresid-
ed in the GVRD area.
Paul Poole, Program Manager for CTLT,
says that "most [students] are also taking
courses on campus." The reason for taking
distance courses, he says, is increased flexibility. Poole added that all these distance
courses "are taught by experienced UBC professors," giving students the same quality
of education as if they were in a traditional lecture format class.
Jeff Miller, senior manager for Distance
and Blended Learning at CTLT, said that
the involved process of developing a course
may take anywhere from 8 to 18 months
of working with the teaching faculty. During this time the instructor, along with
designers at CTLT, develop resources that
will best facilitate student learning. The
online format increases the potential resources for students and makes it easy
for instructors to communicate via online discussions.
As a result ofthe increased communication and accessibility made possible by the
course development, these courses can now
SCOTT ORJALA ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
be taught in the same time as a regular on-
campus course. Whereas a student in a traditional lecture course gets three hours a
week with a professor, an online student
easily has the same level of accessibility at
the interval of their choosing across a whole
week. Jeff calls this similarity in timelines
"cohort pacing" and it is one more factor
that allows students to seamlessly mix distance courses into their schedule.
But can an online course replicate a classroom experience? Dr Tom Stork, associate
dean of external program & learning technology, says replicating a lecture-style course
isn't the issue.
"[A] distance education course may be a
different experience. A sense of community can easily be established with a good design of a course," he said. Stork added that
there is definitely a lot of value in classroom
learning, but blending distance and tradition is what yields the best results. It's not
a matter of which is better, but how well the
courses are designed, tl
Online universities challenging traditional schools
CLAIRE EAGLE
Contributor
With online schools such as the University
of Phoenix experiencing a boom in recent
years, well-established universities are feeling the need to keep up with the competition. Online institutions are currently drawing many students with promises of lower
tuition fees, more course options and increased flexibility.
A recent study done by City University of
New York suggested that students participating in accelerated online courses perform
better academically than students in semester-long classes. However, students in online classes expressed dissatisfaction with
the amount of teacher and peer contact they
received. Success in online universities requires strong time management skills and
many students soon find themselves falling
behind. Beyond this, some students feel that
peer-to-peer and student-instructor interaction is equally important.
"Online school isn't personal," said Arts
student and future Education hopeful Leslie Thomson. "You lose so many important
social and interpersonal connections. And
to succeed at a job, you need to understand
teamwork. You just can't get that online."
A growing number of informal online
learning forums such as Wikiversity aim to
remedy this by sharing independent learning exposure with students who are too
shy to sacrifice their 'traditional' university experience.
"Wikiversity was created after Wikipedia
to help build material and information specifically focused on education and curriculum," says Jay Walsh ofthe Wikimedia foundation. "Wikiversity is still a young project,
[but] the potential for Wikiversity to grow
in new languages and to reach more users
is quite high."
Another education-enabling online source
is iTunes U, where lectures from top universities can be downloaded for free by anyone.
The institutions receive no payment for participation in the program, yet it has expanded rapidly. In 2007 it had only 16 schools,
while now it has over 600 participating universities and 350,000 free lectures. These
examples of independent learning demonstrate the future of online schooling—no
longer just institutions^but an entire open
network of resources, vl
HOW DOES UBC RANK?
This graph shows the average world rankings of UBC, University of Toronto,
McGill University, University of Alberta and Simon Fraser University, some of
the top-ranked and largest universities in Canada. The circles' distances from
the top demonstrate their average rankings among Ranking Web, Times Higher Education, QS Top Universities and SCImago Institutions Rankings, whereas
the sizes of the circles are their relative sizes to each other.
—David Chen graphic & text
I
-
A 2010.10.28/UBYSSEY.CA/EDUCATION/9
UBC Education grads face difficult job market
TREVOR RECORD
features@ubyssey.ca
Thinking of becoming a teacher? You
may want to wait a few years. Graduates
of UBC Education are having increasing difficulty finding jobs in BC schools,
forcing many to leave the province or
work abroad.
"I have always known that an amazing,
full-time teaching position in the city I
want to live in probably wouldn't await
me at graduation from UBC Ed," said recent UBC Education graduate Nadine Bou-
liane. "[But] I do question the integrity
of UBC's policy of taking as many tuition
dollars as possible to churn out professionals where jobs don't exist. Entering
teaching was my decision, but I wonder
if our certifying institutions don't have
a responsibility to acknowledge the realities of the job market in the number of
teachers they qualify each year."
UBC Faculty of Education Director of
Teacher Education Sydney Craig says
that the trend has been growing over
recent years.
"We're quite aware this year that the
graduates of lastyear are having quite a
difficult time," said Craig. "Certainly for
many years we've been telling our students that they would most likely begin
their careers as teachers on call. And
that's been the case for more than five
years...I think that what you're hearing
now is that even those part-time positions are not as available."
Craig claims that there are a number
of contributing factors to the decline in
available positions. Declining enrolment,
linked to a low birth rate, is one factor.
Lower funding given to public schools
is another.
"Certainly in BC right now, the governments are not providing boards with
a lot of financial resources," said Craig.
Officials from the recently-disbanded Ministry of Advanced Education and
Labour Market Development declined to
comment. However, they did send employment statistics showing that the number
of teachers employed in public schools
has stayed relatively the same over the
years; there were 33,704 total teachers in
2004-2005 and 33,692 in 2009-2010 (although the number of full-time teachers
dropped by 300). Further, the majority
of education graduates are listed as "in
the workforce," though this number includes graduates who are simply searching for work or have found employment
in other sectors. They do nothave statistics for the number of new teachers who
are being employed.
Craig says budget cuts have meant the
loss of many programs, which means that
teachers from disbanded programs are
also in competition for teaching jobs.
"If the special education classes or
resource rooms [are cut], those are the
teachers that move into the classrooms,"
said Craig. "If the music program is cancelled, and that is happening everywhere,
then those music teachers become regular classroom teachers. In some cases
they're even closing libraries."
Meanwhile, some Education graduates are looking for teaching jobs in
other countries where their degrees are
highly valued. Bouliane recently took a
SCOTT ORJALA ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
job at a girls' middle school in Mokpo,
South Korea.
"I was hired through a recruiting
agency I encountered at a UBC career
fair last year," said Bouliane. "If I had
plentiful work in Vancouver, I would
still take the opportunity to be teaching abroad while I have no mortgage
and child-rearing obligations. For me,
working overseas is a big part of my
professional practice as a teacher....
It helps me understand what kind of
teacher I am and what kind of teacher
I want to be."
Craig pointed to Canada's strength in
exporting educators to schools abroad.
"There are many provinces in Canada
that have developed a partnership with
schools in Asia," said Craig. "Many have
chosen the BC curriculum, possibly because we're on the Pacific Rim, but also
because it's fundamentally a very good
curriculum. So naturally enough, they're
happy to get grads from BC university
teacher education programs."
Craig says, however, that here in BC
there are only a few areas looking for
teachers, including kindergarten, and
subjects such as French, math, science
and home economics.
There maybe some hope for graduates
specializing in other subjects soon, however. Craig said that a large number of
baby boom teachers are expected to start
retiring soon, which will occur near a
time when a larger number of students
begin entering schools.
"There is talk of a renewal by 2015,"
said Craig. "Quite a significant renewal." U
THE ROLE OF
INSTRUCTORS
IS CHANGING
SCOn ORJALA
Guest Editor
As our ability to access information increases, we find ourselves less reliant
on the testimony of instructors. The guidance of instructors will remain a part of
our school experience. But as all other
aspects of education change, so will that
of the educator.
Traditionally, the role ofthe teacher has
been that of the gatekeeper of knowledge. The instructor essentially determines what knowledge is relevant for
their pupils to elicit the highest rate of
success for this large group of individuals within a specific subject area. It is
the subject knowledge, experience and
success of the instructor on which students have been dependent.
This critical role as a primary source of
knowledge is now challenged by advancements in our ability to access, create and
share knowledge online. Given that the majority of students in any lecture hall can access any information they desire on their
smartphones, it seems only necessary
to consider the impact this will hold upon
how education is structured in the near future. Technology has immense potential for
personalized learning and the accessibility and academic rigour of online information sources is rapidly advancing. Professionals can use online tools to participate
amongst peers in the process of collectively developing information and thought
in their respective disciplines.
Of course, this comes with dangers.
Access to information alone—some of
which is dubious—does not amount to an
education. So what will the place of the
instructor be? The instructor will continue to be a key component in making education work, but the way in which this
is facilitated will require some changes.
Pedagogical theories, such as those
outlined by Paulo Freire, have been inserted into teacher education programs
for years now. Freire argues that perhaps the student-instructor relationship
may become less of a top-down transmission of information and more of a cooperative exchange.
The role of the instructor enables students to share their own experiences and
interpretations of material, taking greater
authority in the path to and formation of
knowledge to satisfy one's own purposes. The instructor would then assist the
student in navigating the field of knowledge, using their own expertise while remaining open to the idea of being an active and objective learner alongside their
students. This potentially broadens the existing knowledge of the educator as well.
For years now we have been witnessing these changes take hold. Initiatives such as Student Directed Seminars, where the material of the professor is extrapolated upon or supplemented by student interpretations of course
content, have further been abstracting
the notion of what teaching is.
Certainly the line between teacher and
student is not as defined as has historically
been the case, but perhaps identifying the
instructor purely as thus has always been
a somewhat misguided convention. tl
Where is your degree
taking you?
UNUMIT i
YOURSELF 10/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/2010.10.28
GAMES & COMICS
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EDITORIAL
FAIL WHALE
"The time has come," The Ubyssey said, "to talk of
naming whales. Of cetaceans and vocalizations;
of stadium christening tales. And why the sea is
boiling hot, and whether publicity fails."
We recently entered into conversations with the
Beaty Biodiversity Museum about holding a poll
or contest to name their recently acquired blue
whale skeleton. The museum's director, Wayne
Maddison, said that at the moment they are not
interested in holding a contest and did not want
The Ubyssey to hold one either. Officials in the department made three parallel, semi-contradictory arguments: (1) that as owners ofthe whale they
hold the rights to the whale's name, (2) that itwas
not scientifically professional to name specimens
and (3) that it is possible the whale already had
a name in nature, given to it through cetacean
vocal communication.
We don't feel that it follows that specimens
should never be named by unprofessional non-
scientists and have found that argument three
is lacking in scientific evidence. This leaves us
with their primary argument. What are names,
and what grants the right to bestow them?
"As you know from sports stadiums and UBC
buildings, the right to name something can cost
a lot of money," Maddison said in his email. "Insofar as we prepared the whale, it sits in our museum and is under our care, we believe that we
are the current 'rights holders' with respect to
naming the whale."
Although they could not stop us from holding an
independent contest, they would nothave to consider the name legitimate. Essentially this amounts
to a causal theory of reference for naming, as expressed commonly by Saul Kripke. When an infant
is born, it is given a name by its family or caregiver in a process Kripke refers to as a "baptism." In
this case, the parents would be the museum. However, since Andrew Trites, the project lead from the
whale's excavation, informed us that his team already informally 'baptised' it as 'Big Blue.'
Obviously, the Museum should adopt a linguistic school of thought such as Bertrand Russell's
descriptivist theory, which holds that an entity
can hold multiple names which funtion as synonyms. The natural drawback to adopting such a
philosophy, however, is that if we or anyone else
ran a contest to come up with our own name, they
would have to hold this name as also legitimate,
as would 'Big Blue,' or anything else it might be
popularly referred to. Names for things are inevitably what the public wants it to be. And your
drunken nicknames for landmarks on campus—
from stadiums to whales—mavhave more legitimacy than you once thought, vl
PETA PROTEST LEAVES A BAD TASTE IN OUR MOUTHS
Last week, local animal advocacy group Stop UBC
Animal Research seemed to be a rather charming example of the way in which protesting can
effect change. By drawing consistent and (mostly) respectful attention to their issue, they have
succeeded in creating a fair amount of interest.
Local and provincial news outlets were reporting
fairly regularly on the story. The university was
provoked enough to have sent out a few mass e-
mails responding to their claims.
So itwas, in public, a fairly low-key campaign.
But it was also working. On Sunday, STOP joined
forces with animal rights megagroup PETA for
a protest in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery.
Activists braved intemperate weather to make
their case for animal rights. There were the usual
paraphernalia: sandwich boards, signs, slogans,
volunteers in matching parkas. And then, there
were the women in underwear and body paint
pretending to be research animals.
Setting aside the mind-bogglingly shitty optics of naked women in cages, these new tactics
and partners seem like a bad decision. PETA
may be a Great Big National Organization, but
their tactics often fall short of the mark. When
you're trying to engage a group of scientists—people by and large perceived as rational, educated
and sensible—in debate about their methodology, "Hey, look! Naked chicks!" may not be the best
approach. These 'controversial' protests attract
attention but it is, as our mothers would say, the
wrong sort of attention, tl
MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
TOO SEXY
DEAR TOO SEXY,
So there's this girl; but I wasn't initially attracted to her physically. Instead,
lam attracted to her personality. She's
intelligent, kind and nice. But, I'm just
a little hesitant making the first move,
not because I'm nervous or anything,
but because I'm afraid it'll interfere
with my studies.
I'm aiming for a particular graduate
school that requires an 84 per cent average across the board, so I'm not sure
how good a boyfriend I'd make under
these studious circumstances. I'm hesitant about getting involved in a "potentially" serious/committed relationship
if I "can't commit" as much time to her
as I can to my studies.
Here's the problem I'm asking you,
Too Sexy: Should I give it a try and see
what happens?
If it does go anywhere, should I make
it very clear to her that I'm not looking
for anything serious/committed early
on? Is this an instant turn-off? What
would a non-serious relationship even
be like? I'm not looking for a relationship that isn't exclusive, serious or not
serious.
Yours truly,
-Anonymous
OKAY, ANONYMOUS,
There's so much shite to deal with in
your letter that I don't think we can do
it in 200 words. But here goes.
Point the first: In our humble opinion, being too busy is always a stupid
reason to eschew relationships. This
is how you end up 48 years old, with
a million degrees, a sweet job, but
no friends and no love life. Life's triumphs are made sweeter when you
share them, Anonymous.
But point the second, you're not really into this girl. Personality is the
most important factor in choosing a
relationship partner, but attraction is
important too (to mostpeople). There
are girls out there who are intelligent,
kind, nice and attractive to you. Wait
for those girls. The girl you're writing about deserves to be in a relationship with someone who thinks she's
attractive.
Point the third: Declaredly uncommitted relationships are fine, as long as
you're not a jerk about them. Tell potential partners ofyour situation as soon as
you start seeing them-don't wait to see
if it's "going anywhere". Also, uncommit-
tedness isn't a get out of jail free card.
You still have responsibilities, emotional and physical, to your partner as you
would in a serious relationship.
At the end of the day, Anonymous,
relationships determine their own
seriousness based on how much you
like someone and want to spend time
with them.
It's hard to keep them from getting
serious if they just are. And ifyou like
someone so little thatyou are able to
constantly give them the brush-off for
studies, then why bother?
To answer your question about what
an "uncommitted" relationship looks
like, that's really up to you. We propose the following:
Anon: Hey girl, I'm finished my exams/paper/boring crap, wanna get a
drink and bone like til daybreak?
Girl: Sure, after I finish my exam/
paper/boring crap. I've got another
midterm in a week, so let's get all the
fucking and emotional intimacy out of
the way so I can study without feeling
like I haven't had sex in three weeks.
Anon: Awesome, see you at nine.
Ta-dah! Now, it's just like you're actually dating, except you have a busy
schedule! Who knew it could be so
easy?! tl
That's it for this week. As always, ifyou
have any questions for us, send as an
email at toosexy@ubyssey.ca. 12/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2010.10.28
JUSTIN MCELROY
The beginning of the bas-
■ ketball season brings with
I it the return of beer gardens
I at War Memorial Gym. For
I $4 a glass, students with two
pieces of ID can cheer on
_ the basketball and volleyball teams throughout the
year with a little more gus-
- to than usual. In 2005, beer
- gardens were cancelled at
j$> UBC home games for ova
I six months after a number
I of fans attending a Trini-
I ty Western-UBC men's basketball match wore "pope
hats" and shouted deroga-
, tory chants throughout the
I game, tl J
MILK
SLAM
Milk Slam is happening on campus from Oct. 12 to Dec. 3, 2010
these eyes catch all mistakes in our	
paper, ifyou want to help catch mistakes
too, email copy@ubyssey.ca  ^
W
MCC THRIFT SHOP
CLOTHING • FURNITURE • APPLIANCES • MORE
WowlWvou
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No. Put I did
go to the MCC!
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Si
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5914 Fraser Street (Corner of Fraser & 43rd)
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(604)325-1612
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WHERE EVERY PURCHASE IS A GIFT TO THE WORLD I bc.mcc.org
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oiu

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