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The Ubyssey Mar 14, 1969

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Array CUS loses in UBC referendum: 2 to 1 vote
By   JOHN   GIBBS
UBC may have dealt the
decisive blow' in the death of
the Canadian Union of Students in this week's two to one
vote to withdraw.
A turnout of 4659 students
Tuesday and Wednesday, voted
2946-1701, about 63 per cent, in
favour of withdrawing. (UBC
voted 70 per cent of a 5565
total in November of 1967 to
stay in the union.)
Although the vote didn't
reach the 65 per cent normally
needed for a referendum, council had voted Monday to a 50
per cent decision binding.
The result leaves CUS with
21 out of a previous 46 schools
which president-elect, Martin
Loney, said could mean the end
of the union as it now exists.
"It's probably the end of a
broad coalition union in Canada," he said. "If any, the result will be a largely conservative union of student councils
interested in annual dinner
meetings, and a separate radical organization to work on
the fundamental problems."
In a rare case of agreement
with Loney, Fraser Hodge, AMS
president-elect, said "in effect,
it is the end of CUS."
He added that UBC didn't
want to kill CUS "technically"
because of the valuable information in its files.
Hodge said UBC will take
the initiative this spring to
form an alternate union of
other dissident schools and
formulate "policy that is acceptable to at least the majority of Canadian students."
Loney was skeptical, to say
the least, and cautioned UBC
students to watch the council
closely. "See if its able to substitute action for rhetoric and
build a viable national union,"
he said.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said he was pleased and
the result was as he expected.
"Student dissatisfaction has
been registered," he said, "and
CUS really has nowhere to go
but up."
Bret Smiley, arts vice-president-elect, and chairman of the
pro-CUS committee said the
vote was the rseult of a "smear
campaign by the establishment
press."
"The idea of a moderate student association is ludicrous,"
he said. "The vote will polarize
Canadian student opinion which
will ultimately help the radicals.
Despite the official announcements after the vote, nearly
all pro-CUS workers admitted
privately before the polls opened that CUS at UBC was a lost
cause. The CUS executive members on campus for the campaign left for the east before
the polling was finished.
THS UdVSSSY
Vol. L, No. 50
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1969
48
228-2305
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AHH, THE JOYS of springtime . . . "Now as I was young and easy under the  apple boughs. About the lilting house and happy as the grass was green . . ."
—Dylan Thomas
I      UNDER THE COVERS Kates rocket; residents reel
i \ By  ERIC BRYNJOLFSSON in   summer   session rates  has rate increase  places   an addi-
1 Get Beeped, Herb         p.3 | Ubyssey Housing Reporter already been approved by the tional  burden  on   out-of-town
1 Ginsbera aoodies                                                      n 3 I Residence rates for the win- UBC board o£ governors, students who are already at a
I              ....       . "~  ** ter session are to be increased,         Rohringer   said   he   is   still disadvantage compared to Van-
I Scathing editorials  _..    p.4 | says housing director Les Ro- w°rking   out  the  winter   ses- couver residents," he said.
I Now UkvccAv «*rlif-nr                                            r» 17 ^ hringer.   The   size   of  the   in- sion rent  increase  to  present McNish said residences in all
I iww  uuywcy euirur     p. 1/ ^ crease   has  not   yet  been   de- to the board for approval. Pre- other provinces are subsidized.
I Athlete Of the year      P.19 i cided. sent winter rates are $709 for "The  B.C.   government  subsi-
1           „                        .                         * T>«v,*^r.»«--  *.-*.*j *--„,•      ~   ~ a single and $672 for a double dizes other housing in the pro-
1          Page Friday this week is entirely turned over to ; . finger said the increase room vince fa   ^   ^  Qf ^
I Bert Hill who has worked for two months investigating !*      ™         S . wa*  needed t0   *** "The increase will not be as owner grants "
I ownership, management and quality of the media all debts owing for new residence Wgh as that fQr the summer „Any action we tafce ^ be
g over North America, especially in Vancouver. This is Place Vanier. session," he said. province-wide   in  cooperation
j a very rare opportunity to find out why the Vancouver "This   is   in line   with   the Ross McNish( president-elect with the Alma Mater Society
I Times folded, who owns most papers in Canada, why policy that residences be en- of the Totem Park resident as. and the other residences" (The
j advertisers control the media, where the Sun and Prov- tirely    self    supporting,"    he sociation,   Thursday  criticized AMS  has  a   $14 000 political
I mce came from, and the profitable future of cablevision. said. the p^y that university resi- education fund for these pur-
i%i%*f%?n&m'    ~->    >■?<■> ~                                  *. -**•-        An increase of 22  per  cent dences be self-supporting. "The poses.) Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  14,  1969
CANADIAN  PREMIERE
U.B.C.
MANY HAPPY RETURNS, PRATT
by  Douglas  Bankson
"AN OUTRAGEOUS FARCE"
March   19-22, 8:30 p.m.
DOROTHY  SOMERSET   STUDIO
Special Student Matinee — March 20, 12:30 Noon
Students  $1.00 —  Reservations  228-2678
Room 207,   Frederic Wood Theatre
Now Showing
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT*. ...ONE WEEK ONLY I
FFT T TNT'S MASTERPIECE
r JC/LfL/lll 1 O HIS FIRST IN COLOR!
W OF THE
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SYLVA KOSCINA
West Van
ODEON
Adult Entertainment Only
Showtime - 7:05, 9:35
922-6343
1565 Marine Drive
Doors Open 6:45    Adults $1.75    Students $1.25 (with card)
A Flower in a Concrete Plant
By MAURICE BRIDGE
Ubyssey Flower Child
Do you have any kind of a
problem concerning UBC? If
so, put it in writing and send
it to Flower in a Concrete
Plant, Ubyssey office, SUB, or
leave it in the ombudsman's
office in the main foyer of
SUB.
Q. I want to know why and
how I have been refused the
fundamental voting right in
Wednesday's CUS referendum.
I am a concerned UBC student
and simply because I did not
have my pink AMS card with
me I was refused the basic
right of our so-called democratic society. What gives?
A. Unfortunately, voting at
UBC needs some sort of regulation, or it becomes more of
a farce than it already Is.
The referendum on CUS
concerns CUS members so let
ting non-students vote defeats
the whole purpose of the vote.
AMS cards (pink) are CUS
membership cards, and the
only proof of identity to the returning officer.
Ombudsman Bob Gilchrist
has about 100 AMS cards which
have managed to come adrift
from their owners. He will be
posting a list outside his office
in the main foyer of SUB during the next week. So if you
have lost your identity in this
vast campus. He may be able
to help you find yourself again.
Q. When is the exam schedule going up and why can't it
be published earlier in the
year?
A. We checked with the Registrar's assistant and discovered
that with any luck, the schedule will be up sometime on
Monday afternoon.
As   to   not   making   it   up
sooner, the registrar's office
must check with each department to find out what exams
they intend to give. The size
of this operation, and the
consequent time lag, make it
impossible to get the schedule
out any sooner.
O. Universities are supposed
to be liberal places, but I find
my on-campus love life cramped by the fact that I cannot
buy contraceptives here. Can
you give me any information
to help me get out of this
bind?
A. Due to current licensing
procedures, which are currently being revised in Ottawa, the
only place on campus where
you can buy prophylactics is
the village drugstore. However, if the law changes, the
Thunderbird Shop will save
you the walk.
J^C*******   %s     \**-\*v.£-..\     s.*     '      •■ -4-.      -v.*: ** *v '•>. *■*■■'•'*      M
I Walking to Hope?    FILL IN THE BLANKS
B.C. Indian organizers are looking for
organizers to organize a walk from Vancouver to Hope to help the newly-organized Resources for Native Progress Association.
The walk will be the first project of
the association, and will raise money for
legal aid, research and field-worker projects.
The plan is for a three-day trek from
city hall to Hope, camping in the evenings, with each hiker being paid per mile
by a rich sponsor.
If you want to help organize, be at
the Vanacouver Indian Friendship Centre,
1655 W. Broadway (two blocks west of
Granville) at 1 p.m., Saturday.
^Formula for locating a new library: find
where everyone's coming from and going to
and put library at centre of heaviest traffic.
That is essentially the reason for the questionnaire that will be distributed in campus
libraries next week.
The first of a series of three questionnaires,
this will help to determine the flow of student
bodies on campus.
Questionnaires will be distributed in the
main library, Sedgewick, and Brock. Students
are asked to fill them out when they come upon
them and then to deposit them in boxes provided.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING
Thursday, March 20th
Noon
I Rain - Armouries - Shine - SUB Plaza |
(This meeting is required by law, and 2000 are necessary for a quorum.) Friday, March   14,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Parking  prices  up
— visser photo
"MAY THE FLYING fickle finger of fate never  shaft you with a bummer," poet Allen Ginsberg
comments lovingly upon hearing John Diefen baker's opinion of him.
GINSBERG GOES BLAKE
About 1200 students shoe-
horned themselves into SUB
ballroom Tuesday to hear Allen
Ginsberg sing, drone, orate,
and  shout poetry.
On seeing the overstuffed
ballroom, Ginsberg promised to
repeat his performance for a
second hour for the overflow
crowd.
Fervent applause greeted the
opening chants from Blake's
"Songs of Innocence" with fellow madman Peter Orlovosky.
Ginsberg apologized for not
knowing any but simple chords
to sing to.
He recited "I Am a Victim
of a Telephone" Message II"
and another,  thirty-minute  ti
rade concerning lust for money,
lovelessness, etc.
All the money raised by
Ginsberg's three appearances
in Vancouver will presumably
go to the Georgia Straight defense fund.
Students who bring cars on
campus will be dinged for even
more money next year if the
traffic and parking committee
has its way.
The committee has recommended to itself that student
preferred parking be increased
to $15 from $10, faculty and
staff from $15 to $22.50, but
regular parking lots are to
stay the same at $5.
When asked whether the
boundaries of preferred parking lots will be enlarged, committee chairman J. F. McLean
replied   that   no   decision  has
yet been made.
The committee, which has
four out of eight student members, also looked at a proposal
for a parkade to be built where
the current Brock lot exists.
It would be partially underground and would have three
stories above the ground. It
would provide parking for 1300
cars.
At present rates for covered
parking, cars in this lot would
pay $100 per year.
Beeping in the B.C. legislature
an artificially-inseminated crisis
By PETER LADNER
Ubyssey Political Analyst
Really, Mr.. Capozzi, we received with shock and dismay
your statement in the legislature recently that you were offended
by our unorthodox way of informing our readers. Not to mention
our more red than Socred political views.
If we may be allowed to thrust yet another nasty into your
poor raped ear-hole; we were damn surprised.
You see, we were only doing our duty as the organ —
oops, the medium — of the student body — err, populace, ah,
make that population.
And alas — sorry, arear — we occasionally turn our thoughts
to where your pure, political tee-totalling — whoops, scratch
that — Socred — pardon again, make that Socblue — mind
never seems to wander. But I guess we just blew it — pardon
me, blue it — that time.
But after all, even motherhood starts with a good beep, no
matter who you approach the subject — oops, another boner,
oh do pardon us. No doubt you, being a good politician, may one
day be blessed with a beeproduct of your spouse and yourself,
who will be truly screwed — oh, defecate, that is only figuratively, or shall we say, not literally, speaking.
The poor little tad will never know what to make of all
those beep signals between his navel and his knees. Unless he's
a B.C. ferry, one of the esteemed premier's navel flotilla.
No matter how you kiss — oh heck, put your lips to — his
cheek in your election campaigns, he will still have to rely on
The Ubyseey and the Georgia Straight to show him he's the
only child in the world born of a man who refuses to admit
he beeps.
In extending ourselves — oh shucks, exerting ourselves —
to try and please the members — sorry, citizens —> of our community, we must apologize for going beyond the bounds of good
clean political fun to enter — oops, come into, or rather venture
into — the filthy arena of love — sorry, may that non-political
interpersonal relationships.
It may beepresumptious of us to state it — ah, stay abreast,
darn, say it — but may we recommend that a little beeping in
the classroom is wonderful therapy — err, theraurinate.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March   14,   1969
THEUBYSSEY      Statement of the SFU six:
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
MARCH  14,  1969
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
May I be allowed to comment on the "harassment" of the
Inter-High School Students Union, as reported in Tuesday's
Ubyssey?
1. There is still much room for improvement in our schools,
but they are fast becoming less authoritarian and less structured.
(Visit the "Self" projects in Prince of Wales or in Lord Byng.)
2. Members of the Vancouver School Board welcome the
chance to discuss ideas with any group of students. Among the
27 meetings I'm attending as Trustee during March, there have
been meetings with groups from Templeton, from Graham Bruce,
and from Vancouver City College. If they accept our invitation,
we will meet on March 25 with members of the Inter-High
School Union.
3. At these metings, all ideas are considered on their merits.
However, the Inter-High Union represents a very small minority
of students, and some of their proposals, as for a trimester system, may well be far from popular among the majority.
4. Like most organizations, the schools do exercise some
control over material distributed within them by individuals.
However, the Board is encouraging members of the Inter-High
Union to form clubs in any school (with a sponsor teacher assured). As clubs they may then use the regular publicity facilites
of the school.
5. If members have difficulty forming such clubs, or if
they can document other harassment, I would like to hear from
them. We need allies, not enemies, in our efforts to improve
the school system. FRITZ BOWERS, School Trustee
Why did several hundred
students and other youth take
part in the occupation of the
SFU administration building
last November ? Why did the
114 submit to arrest after the
RCMP invasion of the campus ?
Who is the guilty party in this
whole struggle ? Who is really
on trial now, when we are faced with criminal charges
against 114 people ?
The Social Credit government and its educational system are on trial. The accused
114 have become the accusors !
Our cause, the cause of the student movement is entirely justified and the militant action we
took during the occupation was
just and necessary.
We, along with a great many
other students, supported the
occupation as a last resort. The
student movement presented its
four demands to the president
of SFU who said we "had a
good case". We then presented
them to the university Registrar who said he "had no
power". The University Senate
rejected our demands out-of-
hand. Just as workers are forced to resort to strike action to
defend their living standards
we resorted to occupying the
administration building to
force the government to deal
with our grievances.
Our demands are clear and
simple. The universities should
be open and accessable to all
who wish to use them. Our
actions were legitimate. We are
not guilty of any of the charges
that the courts and the attorney
general have considered laying
against us — be they indictable
or non-indictable .
We accuse the government!
It is anti-labor and anti-student.
The educational policy of the
Socred government gives away
the fact that it represents the
same vested interests, the corporate elite who control our
universities through the Board
of Governors. You and your
educational system are responsible for the educational crisis
that besets our schools and universities !
The government is well
aware that it is on trial in the
case of the 114. The government wants to save face and get
rid of the case of the 114 as
quickly as possible. They want
us to plead guilty in the courts
and thereby justify their police
raid on the campus. They want
us to justify their "rule of
law" and their use of force to
resolve the crisis in education.
Guilty of what? The guilt
rests on the side of the government. We demand amnesty for
the accused 114. Drop all
charges! Let the government
get down to the real problem
of solving the crisis that is
mounting throughout the whole
educational system.
By its RCMP raid on the
campus, the government has
served notice that its formula
for solving the educational crisis is to crush the student movement — by any means necessary.
Our position is firm. We are'
not guilty. We stand our
ground. The student struggle
is legitimate and just — not
criminal. The struggle to democratize the university and wrest
it from; big business control is
just beginning. The example
we set will be one of a principled political defense.
Our victory will not be determined by the verdict itself, but
by the defense of the student
struggle that the case of the
114 represents.
On the side of government
are the cops, the paddywagons
and the courts. On the side of
the 114 is the whole student
movement and the union move*
ment. There is no doubt in our
minds where we must turn for
support and for victory in our
defense.
KEN HIEBERT,
CAROL OLENIUK,
MIKE JONES,
DENA BLUMENTHAL.
RON DICKSON.
LYLE OSMUNDSON
Canadians know, even if Germans didn't
By MELODY KILLIAN
Another deportation inquest against a deserter
from the U.S. has been begun by the Immigration
department. This time the deportation order has
become a public issue because Robert Wilder
was arrested while "vagrant" in the SFU rotunda.
Robert is now serving a seven-day sentence for
vagrancy in Oakalla. The Committee to Aid American War Objectors will launch an appeal on
the deportation order on his behalf. Then, as in
the past, it will be up to Ottawa and the intricacies of the Immigration Act.
As U.S. imperialism in Vietnam continues and
the growing numbers of U.S. youth say no to
killing Vietnamese and to being channeled by
Selective Service increases, the Committee to Aid
American War Objectors wages a daily struggle
against the Immigration Act. The Committee tries
to obtain Landed Immigrant status for dodgers
and deserters so that they will be able to remain
in Canada safely and legally. With the help of
many anti-war Canadians the Committee tries to
provide shelter, jobs and legal aid to refugees
from the draft and the war.
The case of Robert Wilder brings to the public
the crux of the struggle for asylum for war objectors: the class bias and racism inherent in the
Selective Service Act and the Canadian Immigration Act.
It is fairly well known that the U.S. Selective
Service System "selects" for service those American youth who are superfluous to the domestic
economy of America. Those who lack skills
useful to the defense industries, those who haven't
the money and background to get into or stay in
university, those who are not articulate enough
to launch draft appeals are denied deferrals. This
fact is reflected in figures on blacks and the war:
10% of the U.S. population, 22% of the military,
37% of casualties in Vietnam. The Selective
Service and the universities in the U.S. act together to form an airtight youth channeling
system which siphons off surplus youth manpower into the military and sentences them to
death in Vietnam. Grades can be death sentences.
It's called youth genocide.
Immigration Act also channels
What is much less known is that the Canadian
Immigration Act is also a youth channeling device, paire dalmost perfectly to the Selective
Service in its youth channeling effects. This is
not surprising in the light of John Porter's find
ing on the share interests of the U.S. and Canadian power elites. The corporate interests served
by these legislative tools are nearly identical.
The Immigration point system allows into
Canada only those young people who will be useful to the Canadian economy: the skilled, the
educated and those with "personality assessments" favorable to individual Immigration officers. The chances of a guy with only a high
school diploma, or of a black guy from a ghetto
becoming landed are almost nil. These are, of
course, the very people most likely to end up in
Vietnam.
Just as the poor, the non-white, the unskilled
and inarticulate are channeled into the army because they are useless to turn the wheels of
capitalism within the U.S., the poor, the non-
white, the unskilled and inarticulate are denied
entry to Canada, left to fend for themselves in
the Third World or to face the draft in the U.S.
Skilled and educated middle class (and therefore mostly white) young men are welcomed to
Canada because they are potentially useful to
the branch plant corporations. Once in Canada, it
becomes obvious to the refugee from the U.S.
that the youth channeling system is continental
and that moving from one part of the U.S. empire
to another does not remove him from it.
Serving the branch-plant economy
Here, instead of serving the interests of the
military-industrial complex, the universities serve
the interests of the branch-plant corporations.
Just as in the States the admissions policies and
the grading systems channel youth manpower.
The choices open to youth are to get an education
or work in the extractive industries which ultimately serve that same U.S. military-industrial
machine. It is clear that the life choices of youth
in Canada are no less pre-determined by class
background and the needs of "the system" than
they are in the U.S.
It is clear that the demand to open the universities to working class students in Canada (the
demand of the SFU 114) and the demand of U.S.
students that the military get off the campuses
is the same demand: END YOUTH CHANNELING.
What about the people caught by the total
nature of the channeling system: the deserters.
Because of the class nature of the draft law, they
ended up in the military. Because  of the class
nature of the immigration law, they can't stay in
Canada. If deported, they face imprisonment in
military stockades. The latest edition of LIFE
magazine has an article on the horrible conditions
in the military stockades and on the nature of
U.S. military justice.   .
Canada is already complicit in the Vietnam
war, mainly as a supplier of raw materials to the
war machine. Copper from B.C. goes to the
smelter in Tacoma. Electricity from our dams
powers the Seattle-Tacoma military industrial
complex. Lenkurt Electric here in Vancouver
makes electronic equipment for Vietnam and
hires people to go there to service it.
Is Canada to be also complicit in the genocide
against surplus youth in America as well as complicit in the genocide being carried out against
the Vietnamese people?
McEachen, Minister of Immigration is soon to
make a policy statement regarding deserters in
Canada. Canadians who feel that deserters should
be given asylum should send telegrams to him in
Ottawa immediately..
Strand plays the same tune again
Students at Simon Fraser have asked President Strand to publicly state that he does not
want Robert Wilder to be deported back to the
U.S. and the stockade. President Strand has so
far refused to do so, saying that after the police
were called by the university, it is no longer any
concern of the university's what happens to
Robert.
But Robert Wilder and the situation of all
deserters is the concern of all Canadians. We will
not be able to say, as do the Germans, that we
did not know. We know what is happening in the
United States. When will Canadians join the
youth all over the world who are risking so much
to say no to the war?
Canadian students should demand anti-imperialist universities — universities where cops cannot be called on campus.
Students should control admissions policies so
that the draft status of applicants can be looked
into. Those with no other alternative to the stockade could be admitted regardless of academic
standing. This would guarantee refugees from the
war student visas and therefore safety in Canada.
Canadians who wish to help draft dodgers and
deserters should offer places to sleep and money
for legal aid to The Committee to Aid American
War Objectors, 144 West Hastings, Vancouver. Today's weather
Bland
NEWZAK
Todays papers
Blander
a special page friday report on our squalid media by bert hill
Managing the news for power and profit
If you were to learn that General Motors has just hired
Henry Ford as president, sold him shares of GM stock, and
announced that GM had owned Ford Motors since 1960 would
you not expect the following?
• Lengthy analytical articles in the press.
• Angry editorials demanding why the public was not made
aware earlier that the number one and two companies in
an important field were jointly owned for the last eight years,
• Some anti-trust action by the justice department in response
to a concerned public.
Recently, B.C. Packers announced its president had 'retired'
and Dick Nelson of Nelson Brothers Fishing Co. was the new
president. Together these two companies control at least sixty
per cent of the salmon pack on the West Coast. Their only other
real competition is the Canadian Fishing Company.
Both the Sun and the Province, in their relatively short stories,
chose to focus on the personalities involved. The Province article
noted that the companies controlled 75 per cent of the salmon
pack but this is now thought to be high. The Sun article focused
on the fact that Hyland, the ex-president of B.C. Packers, was
probably pushed out by the new manager of the George Weston
financial empire which controls B.C. Packers. It also carried
an interview with Dick Nelson who had little to say about anything including how much B.C. Packers stock he was getting.
Nowhere in the articles was there any critical evaluation of the
fact that B.C. Packers had controlled Nelsons since 1960 and
the public knew nothing about this. There were no editorials
and the only other reference was a gossipy little item in Fother-
ingham's column sometime later, that the Vancouver business
community was still buzzing over the deal. This was the only
part of the story to make it outside the business sections of the
two papers concerning an industry of prime importance to British
Columbia.
Why? Was it just another report on the present consolidation of
our economic system into a few giants enjoying an oligopolistic
relationship in many industries? Perhaps it was that Pacific
Press is sensitive itself to merger-monopoly issues much like
Trudeau who gives Biafra only superficial aid because it is a
separatist state and separatism is the dominant political problem
that Canada is wrestling with now.
In addition to the usual problems of putting out a paper, there
are also the matters of social and advertising pressure. Newspaper
publishers and owners are usually part of an upper class which
means they have some biases. And because they are businessmen
they are usually careful not to angle their biggest source of
income, the advertisers.
See: NEWS
continued on pf 4our
A  history  of Vancouver's  press
The weak slat under the cradle of democracy
For a city less than a century old Vancouver has been very hard on its communication media. More than three
hundred daily and weekly newspapers,
magazines and other periodicals have
come and gone. Today the city has
two daily newspapers; three Chinese
language dailies; several weeklies, a
monthly magazine, three television
stations, cable television, and seven
radio stations.
Like most media in North America
they are all top-heavy with advertising. Prime time television (including
the American educational channel)
gives only about eight per cent of the
time to public service, cultural pro
grams and the like. Publicly-owned
CBC sells almost as hard as CTV. The
newspapers are little better. Only
about twenty per cent of a newspaper
is news, columns and editorials; the
rest is advertising, and space-eating
features, like comics.
The television stations, the newspapers and the radio stations are in
most cases owned by chains whose
head offices are outside the community.
In some cases there is cross-media
ownership. The wire services that
feed these media are likewise all privately or co-operatively owned from
outside the community and in several
important cases from outside Canada.
For all of these reasons the news
media is "the weak slat under the
cradle of democracy" (as one critic
put it) and a constant source of worry
to many citizens. For if a society proposes to function democratically it
must have information and must have
it from a variety of independent
sources. As the sources die or are
bought up the options close and with
them the possibility of democracy.
What follows is a history of the newspaper media in Vancouver and the
closing of its options.
Vancouver's first newpaper of any
consequence was  the Vancouver
NewsxAdvertiser, a morning paper
edited by Francis Carter Cotton at
the turn of the century. He was given
to essay writing and his paper was
filled with long boring reports on
political meetings. In 1894 he spent
several months in the New Westminster jail for refusing to tell his partner or the courts what he had done
with some land and stock. From his
jail cell he continued to edit the paper
and was re-elected to the provincial
legislature. He was an early chancellor of UBC and something of a
wheel in Conservative political circles.
See: DEMOCRACY
continued on pf 7even
Friday, March  14,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
pfage lne Canada's Media Barons
ROY THOMSON
.   .   .   small   town   Lord
"Freedom of the Press is
guaranteed only to those who
own one."
—A.  J.  LlEBLING
In 1900 there were 35 Canadian cities and towns with
two or three daily newspapers. There were about as
many owners as there were
papers.
Today there are 11 Canadian
cities with two or more papers. If we exclude the cities
where one paper is French
and one is English there are
eight two-paper towns. There
are only five cities where
newspapers of the same language compete in the same
time slot.
Eight of Canada's 17 urban
centres with a population of
more than 100,000 are one-
paper towns.
Nine companies own 65 of
Canada's 107 newspapers and
take up 66 per cent of Cana-
MAX BELL
.  .  .  FP  Publications
da's total newspaper circulation.
Of Canada's 14 newspapers
with a circulation over 100,-
000, four are independently
owned. Two of these are
French language. One of
these, Montreal-Matin, is believed to be owned by Quebec's ruling Union Nationalist
party.
By comparison in the United States there are over 100
newspaper chains with a total
circulation of about 46 per
cent of the total daily U.S.
newspaper circulation. The
largest of these chains,
Hearst, has only about seven
per cent of the total U.S. circulation as of 1960.
Half of America's 50 biggest
urban centres are one-paper
towns.
Outside North America there
are cities in Latin America
and Scandinavia and Japan
that have 10 to 20 daily news
papers in direct and close
competition.
Yet in Canada the major
newspaper chains continue to
grow. In recent years the
Thomson newspaper chain
has bought the Peterborough
Examiner and the New Glasgow .N.S.) News. PF Publications has bought the Vancouver Sun and the Toronto
Globe and Mail. Southam has
bought the Owen Sound
Times, the English gave him
Times and the Montreal Gazette. They have all expanded into other media.
Roy Thomson owns 29 Canadian newspapers all under
35,000 circulation. All in
one-paper towns, they account
for less than eight per cent of
Canada's daily circulation.
He also owns 11 weeklies, biweeklies  or tri-weeklies.
Thomson owns 36 American
dailies, largest number in
U.S.A., all of which are part
PAUL DESMARAIS
.  .  . french  language press
of an communications empire
that covers five continents
and numbers close to 200
newspapers.
Only interested in the content
of his newspapers as they relate to the balance sheet, his
open statements that newspapers are cashboxes has
made him unpopular among
other newspaper publishers
who dislike this honesty.
He was in the bidding for the
Montreal Gazette, but was
unsuccessful. Big city publishers have refused his bids
for their papers.
When he bought the London
Times, the English gave him
his much desired title of Lord
Thomson of Fleet, perhaps in
an effort to civilize him. His
Canadian papers are of a variety of politics, but few if
any are worth reading.
Thomson has indirect holdings in television and radio
outlets in Ontario.   Through
St. CLAIR BALFOUR
. . . Southam Press
recent acquisitions in the
U.S.A. he has control over
some radio and cable television franchises. In Scotland he has owned television
but appears to stick to the
newspaper media predominately in North America. He
is at present selling his other
media to an Ottawa broadcaster.
The biggest and oldest newspaper chain in Canada is the
Southam family chain. It directly controls 10 and. has 49
per cent or less ownership of
another three with a circulation of about 22 per cent of
Canada's daily newspaper circulation. Southam also publishes the B.C. Journal of
Commerce and the Financial
Times of Canada. In partnership with the Toronto Star, it
publishes the Canadian, a
weekly color supplement that
appears in many papers in-
See: FREEDOM
Continued pf 8ight
Anti-trust: shaking up the barons
There has not been a comprehensive
survey of the total media concentration
in Canada but this doesn't mean there
isn't any. The Sifton family owns
radio, TV and a newpaper in Regina.
Roy Thomson owns radio, TV and a
newspaper in Peterborough, Ontario,
and radio and TV in Kingston. Thomson is at present selling his radio and
TV media. K. C. Irving owns radio,
TV and newspapers in Saint John, New
Brunswick. Paul Desmarais has the
same media control in Sherbrooke,
Quebec.
In most of the major Canadian cities
there is some inter-media and cross
media ownership.
In Vancouver CKNW and CKWX are
part owners of Channels 8 and 6.
Southam controls the Province and
and part ownership of CKWX. CKLG's
owner is a director of CTV.
American publishers have been aggressively assembling media empires in
recent years. TIME Inc., publisher of
Fortune, Sports Illustrated, Life and
TIME owns television and cable TV
outlets. It was unsuccessful in its attempt to purchase a New Jersey newspaper but recently purchased Little-
Brown, the book publishers. RCA owns
Random House. Cowles Publishers
owns the monopoly papers in Des
Moines and Minneapolis, LOOK magazine and Harper and Row publishers.
In thirty of the U.S.'s 50 biggest cities
newspaper publishers own radio and
television outlets. In all fifty there is
some joint ownership within each
media.
Though somewhat slower, the U.S.
Justice Department is moving equally
pfage 2wo
aggressively to break up these media
concentrations on the grounds that
they limit diversity of opinion and retrain competition. In Los Angeles and
Cincinnati newspaper publishers were
ordered to sell recently acquired
papers. In Boston a publisher was
ordered to sell a TV station.
Many of these smaller empires are
susceptible to takeover by the huge
conglomerate corporations because
they are exceptionally profitable and
because they add prestige to these recently formed companies.
One such conglomerate, International
Telephone and Telegraph tried to buy
the American Broadcasting Corporation
a couple of years ago. In the course of
hearing before the Federal Communications Commission to study the merger it was revealed that ITT officials
were pressuring reporters to write
'positive' stories on the merger.
Nicholas Johnson, a young lawyer appointed to the FCC to inject new blood
into this moribund regulatory body,
has written articles on the merger-
prone media and the special problems
of the conglomerates in several magazines.
Johnson points out that these conglomerates are built frequently on defence
contracts and have foreign holdings.
In such politicaly sensitive situations
there is a marked danger that the
conglomerates might use their media
as extensions of their public relations
departments. This is not to forget that
chain-owned media often lose their
autonomy through the head office links
as well as theid individuality, partisanship, and analysis in favour of an all-
purpose mass product.
In 22 U.S. cities 44 newspapers have
joint publishing arrangements much
like that between the Sun and the Province. As part of its assault on the
media barons the U.S. Justice Department has taken one test case into the
U.S. Supreme Court. In 1940 the two
newspapers in Tucson, Arizona merged all their operations except for their
news and editorial departments. Since
then cities including Atlanta, Boston,
Portland and San Francisco have joined
the ranks*.
On Monday of this week, the U.S.
Supreme Court found the Tucson agreement illegal 'beyond peradventure of
doubt'. According to the AP story that
appeared in the Toronto Globe and
Mail. Chief Justice William O. Douglas
said, "three types of controls were imposed to end any business or commercial competition between the two
papers: price-fixing profit-pooling and
market control." Thus they broke the
U.S. anti-trust laws.
The Sun and Province have separate
circulation departments and the advertising departments are physically separate if not completely autonomous in
operations. They pool their profits and
have raised prices simultaneously.
The U.S. assistant attorney-general for
anti-trust action in the Johnson administration had indicated that he
would proceed against the other joint-
operations if he won the Tucson case.
These cases would be necessary to
determine what kind of a joint-agreement, if any, would be lawful, since
there was not a strict definition in the
Supreme Court decision.
While the newspaper publishers have
some imporant friends in congress who
THE     UBYSSEY
might yet pass a law to exempt the
papers from further anti-trust action,
their best friend may be the new Nixon
assistant attorney general who is a
veteran defender of corporations under fire from the anti-trust laws.
Canada's anti-combine division of the
Justice Department has not been nearly as aggressive. In 1960 the Sun-Province combination was accepted even
though the Province was making profits before and taking heavy losses
after the merger. In 1962 the Justice
Department found nothing wrong with
Roy .Thomson buying up the second
newspaper in the Lakehead cities of
Port Arthur-Fort William.
However, the Canadian Radio and Television Commission may yet shake up
the media barons. It succeeds the old
Board of Broadcast Governors and has
been given increased powers and
muscle to back up its decisions.
But no matter how hard government
and regulatory commissions prod the
media giants there is no guarantee they
will encourage diversity of opinion
and abandon the generally bland and
profitable products they are producing.
As John Porter points out in Vertical
Mosaic the media are owned by businessmen who look to them for profits
and growth. Coupled with this is the
serious prediction that most business
(barring revolution) will be conducted
by 200 giant corporations by the end
of this century.
This means that the present break-neck
rate of consolidation should pick up.
The regulatory commissions will be
like Canute commanding the tide to
turn.
Friday, March  14, 1969 Advertising makes weird things
happen
Recently the head of a major Canadian advertising firm got up on his hind
legs, picked the lint off his grey flannels and stated (with a straight face)
that advertisers were the very backbone of freedom of the press. He was
pointing out that advertising accounts
for about 75 per cent of the revenue of
Canadian newspapers.
He must have had his eyes in the sky
and thinking in a very optimistic, one-
dimensional fashion for somehow he
missed the wreckage of dead newspapers, magazines and other periodicals strewn around his feet.
These publications died not because
they were unpopular with readers but
because they hadn't won the advertising revenue necessary to pay their
debts.
Take the Star Weekly for instance. It
was an authentic Canadian magazine
with a circulation of over 860,000 in
1958 and it paid its bills with more
than a million lines of advertising.
Under pressure from Time and Readers
Digest and the few remaining general
interest Canadian magazines it began
to slip.
In 1965 its circulation was only down
to 683,000 but its advertising stood at
400,000 lines. It tried to transform its
image to appeal to the affluent, educated urban middle classes. It took
tentative steps in the direction of nationalism like its parent company, the
Toronto Sar.
But that year the Toronto Star in conjunction with Southam launched the
Canadian, a weekend supplement to
compete with Weekend, the other
supplement (published by the Montreal Star) for the declining share of
the Canadian advertising market that
was going into Canadian magazines.
The new Star Weekly never had a
chance.
By 1966 its advertising lineage was
down to 178,000 and it was killed in
October 1968 though at least 650,000
Canadians thought enough of it to buy
it.
The American version of the Star
Weekly is  Saturday Evening  Post.  It
was   immensely   successful with   the
middle   classes   of   a   less urbanized
America    of   a   generation ago   and
was immensely fat with advertisements.
Between 1961 and today it lost $62 million because it still had seven million
subscribers that advertisers didn't
like. These subscribers paid the subscription or newstand prices but this
didn't even remotely cover the cost
of producing each copy.
In the fall of 1968 the magazine's new
publisher Martin Ackerman decided
that "readers are a liability". So he cut
out the half of the suscribers that
weren't good enough consumers to attract the advertisers.
But even this failed to bring in the advertisers, who can be pretty conserva
tive. Ackerman's only regret was at
the death of the SalEvePost was that
he hadn't slashed the subscriber list
to one million; a select breed of educated, affluent readers — a tribe of
Super Consumers.
In recent years advertisers have lost
interest in the broad mass audience and
thus the weaker newspapers and general interest magazines like the Saturday Evening Post and Colliers in the
USA and Liberty and Star Weekly in
Canada have died.
With these magazines have died the
rights of an individual to select and
purchase his own reading matter. The
wave of the future is the special interest controlled circulation magazine
being launched in countless numbers
every year. The prospective publisher
first picks out a small demographic
group of individuals who have the
inclination and money for a certain
range of products. The publisher then
approaches the advertising agencies
handling these products for manufacturers and tells them he will send his
advertisements into a certain number
of households that are most likely to
buy these products. The least of the
publisher's problems is to secure
articles to put in his magazine since
'talent' costs amount to only about
15 per cent of his expenses.
Soon the reader-consumer receives free
in the mail a magazine that he has not
consciously chosen to read. An example
for UBC students is Campus, a magazine that all students in third or
higher years receive free.
The reader is someone to be sold a
certain range of goods not an individual to be enlightened and informed.
The writer is someone who pads out
the publication in such a way to make
the reader look at every page but
not engross him sufficiently to miss
the advertisements.
In an age of non-writers formulating
non-articles for non-magazines, what
we have in all its glory is the advertisement and the high-paid copy
writer. In a future age archaeologists
will ignore and dismiss what we call
our art and culture and look to the
commercial and the advertisement as
the authentic trademark of our civilization.
Since newspapers are financed in the
same way as magazines they are not
immune to the same  influences.
New York Times publisher Punch Sulzberger was distressed at the collapse
of the Herald-Tribune. Not only did
he lose the only meaningful morning
competition (forget the sex, crime and
patriotism formula of the Daily News)
to keep the Times sharp but the new
added circulation was cutting into the
Times profit at seven cents a copy.
As the middle classes have escaped
the city the big dailies have watched
their advertising slowly fall off. Many
have started or bought out existing
papers   in the  suburbs  so  that  they
Power  of advertising
Leonard H. Lavin has pulled his
Alberto-Culver Company from somewhere in the neighborhood of $300,-
000 to more than $127-million in annual sales in 14 years. And he has
done it with a strong belief in the importance of new products and the
power of advertising.
V05 hair preparations, Calm deodorants, the Command line. If you
watch television you've heard of
them.Alberto-Culver is big in television.
"If you don't have new products
you can't go ahead. If you want to
grow you have to have new products,"
said the 49-year-old and sparely built
Leonard Lavin. He has got about 50
new products in various stages of
development and is so committed to
advertising that he has had his agencies develop commercials for nonexistent products. If they scored well
when tested, then the products could
be developed.
—Feb. 9, 1969
New York Times
•w.
Almost half of all
New\orkTlmes
readers live in
families owning
two or more cars.
Almost half ?
YOUR NEWSPAPER is watching you . . . and it isn't just for news — a typical
ad from a newspaper trade journal.
could keep their advertising revenue.
In Long Island, New York, one major
U.S. newspaper chain carefully surveyed the affluent suburbanites and
found that they wanted for example,
more sports and less society news.
They incorporated it into the Suffolk
Sun which has recently completed a
very successful first year. The Toronto
Telegram has bought eight suburban
weeklies in recent years and converted most of them into controlled-
circulation free papers published out
of a couple of Telegram plants.
The slightest decline in advertising
can kill a publication. A contributing
factor in the death of the New York
World-Journal-Telegram was that there
was a slight decline in the total advertising market at the time it
emerged. A newspaper that has less
than 50 per cent of a competitive
field can expect to die since advertisers want the outlet with the biggest
circulation.
The fatter publication that controls a
single field can offer a code of ethics
to advertisers which they must meet.
This may mean that we see fewer of
the four-inch truss ads in our newspapers but what of the full page colour
ads that promote the toothpaste with
sex appeal or he sports car that gives
your ego a trip? Obviously these are
blatant examples of manipulation and
exploitation but the media is unlikely
to reject them because they bring in
so much revenue.
Every year the newspapers must sell
more ads and expend even more
energy in soliciting and placing them.
Every year they have to offer the advertiser better guarantees that their
ads are getting into the households that
buy the products. Every year the
papers get bulkier and the columns
of news get skinnier jammed beside
or on top of ads. The Los Angeles
Times, the biggest advertising carrier
of North American newspapers
routinely exceeds one hundred pages
weekdays. Sunday editions weigh
eight pounds and have approached a
thousand pages. They all begin to look
like dinosaurs.
Today in the USA radio and TV have
passed the newspapers in securing advertising, in Canada they have not as
yet.
When the federal government finally
moved to save the one Canadian magazine in four that Canadians read by
removing the tax reduction on the 40
per cent of all Canadian advertising
that goes into American magazines,
the newspapers fought the law.
Friday, March  14,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Some pointed out that by exempting
the 'Canadian editions' of Time and
Readers Digest, the lawmakers "were
shutting the door after the foxes were
in with the sheep." The most ferocious
opposition came from the FP papers
who saw the law as a potential threat
to the freedom of the press. Obviously
the dividing line between advertisements and news has disappeared.
Of course the sheep were losing on several counts. For one thing they would
not compete like the American magazines. Time for example prints six regional editions within Canada which
soak up advertising within these regions though there is no change in the
news content. The Canadian magazines
don't chase the advertisers nearly as
hard.
Probably most important, the Canadian newspaper and periodical press
has never been able to define a distinctive Canadian identity that the citizens
might have moved to protect when
foreign investors moved in a generation
ago.
Even independently-owned Saturday
Night, Canada's only large magazine
with intellectual pretensions advertises itself to potential advertisers as
having "200,000 educated, affluent,
acquisitive readers and buyers for the
things you sell" (48 per cent own hi-
fi's, 23 per cent own tape recorders
. . . ).
Obviously a big mistake was made a
centur|r ago when the publishers first
let advertisers into their publications.
Today no better view of the wretched
excesses of our consumer-oriented society can be found than in the state
of our media.
American critics have suggested that
our media should be subsidized like
universities and colleges are by the
public. Americans have obviously had
no experience with the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation,
In his book the People Machine Robert MacNeill quotes an observer as saying that "At ABC the salesman is
king, at CBS and NBC merely royalty."
At CBC the king is obviously the politician. Every backwoods demagogue
can be sure of getting his name in the
paper by blasting the CBC for being
too expensive or being too provocative
or both.
The problem is who is going to pay the
bills? There must be some solution and
judging from the media we had better
find it soon.
pfage 3hree Vbur Psychology
professor lives
with his mother?
Think it over, over coffee.
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NEWS
from pf  lne
The newspaper publisher, who
is part of, or identifies with,
the local establishment can kill
or shape news stories. This
doesn't mean he is always successful.
When St. Anselm's Anglican
Church on the UBC endowment lands was holding a meeting prior to firing Jim Mc-
Kibbon, a young minister who
was too radical for their tastes,
Sun publisher Stuart Keate
was standing at the door making sure no Sun reporters got
in to cover the meeting. Unfortunately for Keate, he did
not know the Southam reporters and the Province carried
the story.
The big dailies have always
done a better job of covering
the better-off sections of their
cities than they have of the
ghettoes, the racial minorities
and the poor. The reasons
were partly that the papers
were middle class insitutions
and partly that the poor were
lousy consumers of advertised
goods.
But as the middle classes became concerned with the poor
principally because the poor
made it clear they weren't
putting up with the status quo
much longer, the big dailies
have finally come to cover the
ghetto.
Pacific Press has never done
a very good job of covering
the" more than half of Vancouver east of Cambie. Now there
are occasional stories on Indians, public housing and attempts to revive political life
in east Vancouver to go along
with the usual stories on husbands shooting their wives (or
vice versa) and skid row hotels going up in smoke. It is
also worth noting that both
papers have fought the return
of the ward system of local
government, the ending of
which in the 30's effectively
disenfranchised the poor and
gave political hegemony over
to the more affluent west
which has the time and money
to mount effective campaigns.
A measure of the estrangement
and alienation that the east
feels for Vancouver politics
can be seen in the seven per
cent spread in turnout between
east and west in the recent
election.
Newspapers are fond of justifying their policies with a we-
are - only - giving - the - public-.
what - it - wants type of statement. The whole area of labour
coverage rips this argument
apart and shows another example of class bias by the
newspapers.
Labour is numerically a greater
force than business. Studies
have shown that only about
ten per cent of the Canadian
population holds stocks and yet
there are usually two or three
pages of business news (often
rewrites of corporate annual
reports) and full pages of stock
quotations in every newspaper.
But as major professional
groupings previously thought
as being part of the middle
class, e.g. teachers and some
other professionals show militancy and move toward union-
formation, labour still only
gets about a third of the space
given to business and no regular spot in the papers.
pfage 4our
THE      UBYSSEY
Conversely the newspapers do
not use their business writers
to examine critically some of
the financial news. A recent
example was the stock trading
boom and the role of promoters  in speculative  stocks.
Since advertisers pay the bills
and provide the profits the
newspapers  treat  them well.
Every weekend there plenty
of canned wire stories on far
away places to go with the
pages of travel agency ads.
And at mid-week there are
pages of recipes to accompany
the big advertisements from
the supermarkets.
Department stores provide important advertisements which
also attract other smaller advertisers. But to prove they
exercise direct influence on
news content would not be
easy. It is a question of self-
censorship; the paper voluntarily changes a story that
might reflect badly on the big
stores.
For example if department
stores were to reorganize their
charge accounts, the average
reader would only find out
wheii he looked at his bill the
next month and noted an increase in interest charges. A
more careful reader would find
deep in the paper a short article giving the essentials of
the change.
The exact level of advertiser
influence over news coverage
in Canada has never been accurately assessed. However a
survey of American business
-writers and editors showed
that 22.6 per cent were expected to write or shape articles for major advertisers.
The special tragedy of newspapers becoming pawns of
establishments and private
greed is that they and other
media have the potential to
uncover information of public
interest and get it to the citizens of the community.
Without them, there is really
no one who will defend the
public interest. Politicians respond to private interests simply because there are no power
blocs for the public interest.
Our cities are graphic examples of how the mass of
private interests, big and small
are rendering them increasingly uninhabitable. If the
media will not devote its resources to expose the thousand
defeats of public interest by
private, then we will be left
with little more than despair.
Some papers are getting at individual problems in an ambitious fashion. Consider the
months long team research that
went into a recent Toronto
Star series on the conditions
in public housing in Toronto.
But the idea is to get at different problems and reveal how
they interact to produce even
wierder problems. Hopefully
the papers will describe the
problems intelligibly enough
for the individual citizens to
pick out a course of action
that he might take. The day
of charismatic politician leading the Ibabbling urbanized
masses out of their peculiar
hell has ended with John
Lindsay and his string of disasters as mayor of New York-
City.
To do the job the newspapers
will need more space and have
to make better use  of it.  A
Friday, March  14,  1969 content analysis of a recent
week's issues of the Pacific
Press showed that the Sun
contained an average 63 per
cent ads, the Province 52 per
cent. The Globe and Mail was
about the same as the Province.
An analysis of one mid-week
Sun showed it was more than
than 70 per cent ads. Only
about 20 per cent of that issue
was given to news, editorials
and columns. The rest was
made up of space eaters like
comics, stock quotations and
trivial features.
An analysis of the news stories
showed that they were split 60-
40 in favour of wire stories
over stories originating in Vancouver. Studies show this is
the split to expect from a
newspaper in a non-competitive position.
The second most interesting
find was the incredible number of individual articles (225)
and their relative shortness
(average seven inches). Only
about a third of the locally
written stories exceeded seven
inches.
It is local coverage that makes
the difference between a great
newspaper and a mediocre paper. The Sun falls down because it lacks the analysis to
go with the bare news stories.
The reason is that the Sun
makes only superficial use of
the beat system which has one
reporter or more covering a
news source over a long period of time. The Sun prefers to
use a pool of general reporters
to cover stories on a day to
day basis, this gives the reporter little chance to get to
know issue thoroughly and
thus incorporate intelligent
analysis into the bare bones of
the story.
Instead the Sun tries to buy its
expertise by phoning up professors, other experts and professional people in hopes of
picking their brains for interpretation.
If the beat system is more expensive (the reporter may not
file a story for several days
and he has to be paid better
than a general reporter) the
beat system is rapidly becoming a necessity. Public relations officers, politicians and
other public officials are becoming more and more sophisticated in handling news
media. By inundating the reporter with brochures, releases,
and speeches they can effectively tie up a reporter, who'
under the pressure of daily
deadlines has only a short time
to weed out the garbage and
put across the) hard news, usu-
aly with no analysis.
The result is that the reporter
is 'water carrying' for the
news source. Lyndon Johnson
and his administration made
effective use of the media to
launch attacks on its dovish
enemies through unnamed 'reliable resources.'
Take as an example of superficial coverage the Block 42-
52 (Pacific Centre) redevelopment story that has been a constant source of uproar in Vancouver for several years.
Looking through the Sun and
Province file on the story I
found that a variety of reporters covered it methodically for several years. In all
articles there was limited continuity and virtually no analysis. The only full blown cov-
Friday, March  14,  1969
erage occurred when the private developers unveiled their
grandiose scale models.
But by reading all the articles
and then checking out some
obvious speculations through
interviews I found that there
was a lot more to the story.
Placed in the context of the
total aims of the planning department of the city and the
wills of the private developers,
it offered startling insights into the political health of the
city. Simply by looking hard
at the contract between the
city and the developers a reporter could have kept his
columns filled for a long time.
Some of these things are being
disclosed as the development
proceeds.
By comparison the Toronto
Star's Ron Haggart pursued a
similar development in Toronto and in several hard hitting columns disclosed giveaways that eager politicians
were offering developers. Haggart no longer works for the
Star and part of the reason
seems to be that the Star now
favours these type of developments.
Publishers would probably prefer superficial stories since
superficial   articles   by   defini-
age people to learn more about
individual stories through the
papers.
Many newspapers have moved
in the direction of greater in-
depth analysis of fewer subjects but these are usually in
competitive situations.
In an effort to win back readers from other media both
Toronto evening papers have
developed ombudsman - like
columns. Like The Ubyssey's
Flower in a Concrete Plant
they provide readers with
hard - to - get information and
straighten out injustices by
bureaucracies, public and privately-owned. In Vancouver the
radio open line shows are the
existing channels for angry
citizens.
Because the Sun is so wealthy
there is probably a tendency
not to prod the golden goose
no matter how fat and slow-
moving it gets. The Sun shows
a greater profit than the New
York Times which has four
times the circulation and two
and a half times the advertising of the Sun.
As a consequence Pacific Press
has been caught standing still
on some important stories.
The   public   controversy   over
The function of the press in society is to
inform, but its role is to make money. The
monopoly publisher's reaction, on being told
he ought to spend money on reporting distant
events, is therefore exactly that oi the proprietor or a large, iat cow, who is told that he
ought to enter her in a horse race.
— A. J. Liebling
tion are those that do not
raise the kind of troubling
matters publishers might prefer not to face.
Urban development has become like clean streets, charities and other apple pie issues
that newspapers support in a
knee jerk fashion.
This of course does not mean
that the modern newspaper
cannot do tough investigative
reporting. It is only a question
of who or what your targets
are. Phil Gaglardi found this
out when the Sun revealed the
financial deals his sons were
involved in which led to his
resignation as highways minister.
But why was there not a similar examination of the use of
the lower mainland's rapidly
disappearing fertile farming
land and planning studies for
the area?
Why for instance does the Sun
conduct an interesting study
of the West End but has not
as yet followed it up with analysis of other areas with serious social and political problems like the East End?
Television is forcing the newspapers to concentrate on their
abilities to give space to analytical and background articles.
If a television newscast were
set in type it would only occupy about three quarters of
one page of a newspaper. Most
television newscasts are com-
prehenstive but they lack
length and depth. The obvious
route for newspapers is to
throw out the short articles
and concentrate on lengthy
features. TV news reaches an
accurate cross section of the
populace which should encour-
the strip mining techniques to
be used in the East Kootenays
by Kaiser Coal predictably began in the, fall of 1968 with a
hard - hitting documentary on
CBS television. Both papers
carried the charges and counter-charges of both sides methodically without taking any
initiatives. Finally after the
debate had been going for a
very long time, the Sun finally sent a reporter and photographer to Kentucky to get
some first hand reports—what
used to be a destinctive trade
mark of the Sun. The Province
carried a valuable two page
story that backgrounded the
whole issue but like the Sun
it was way over due.
Yet another controversy may
be triggered by a tough CBC
documentary on the disolution
of the Lower Mainland Planning Board and the rape of the
1966 Plan by the railroad access route into Roberts Bank.
Again Pacific Press has covered this story but without
depth, without imagination and
without really getting concerned about it. Editorials aren't
enough.
Between September 1964 and
August 1965 the Vancouver
Times competition made the
Sun noticeably jump. Not only
did it use colour in pictures
once again but its news coverage improved. Penny Wise
was in Cyprus and Jack Scott
was in Latin America reviving
the tradition of globe-trotting
Sun reporters. Scott wrote his
series on Latin American military dictatorships but never
returned to the Sun.
The Sun showed its old power
in the coverage of the Granduc
continued pf 6ix
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OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
The following committees require chairmen and interested individuals to participate as working members.
Chairman for:
1. Frosh Orientation
2. Academic Activities
3. Speakers Committee
4. Performing Arts
5. C. U. S. O.
6. Intramurals
7. World University Service
8. S.U.B. Committee
Two co-chairmen for Homecoming and Open House.
Two students to sit on Management Committee of Winter Sports Centre.
One male student to sit on Men's Athletic Committee and
one female to sit on Women's Athletic Committee
Four Students for the Discipline Committee.
Student Court — Judges (5) — 2 from Law and two
alternate judges.
SUB Management Committee — 5 students.
Clerk of the Court.
If descriptions of these positions are desired please contact AMS Vice-President Room 258 SUB or AMS Secretary Room 248 SUB. Application letters should be
handed into AMS secretary before 4:30 Wednesday,
March 19th and should contain qualifications and reasons for interest in a position. Applicants will be notified as to when they will appear before a selection committee.
GENERAL MEETING
EVERYONE  out  to  General Meeting  of  Alma  Mater
Society  on  Thursday,  March  20th  at   12:30.  Vote  on:
1. Undergraduate societies levying own fees.
2. Representation by population on student council.
REFERENDUM
March 18th and 19th, please get out and vote on Alma
Mater Society $4.00 fee raise and Athletic $5.00 fee raise.
NEWS
continued from pf 5ive
avalanche tragedy which featured lengthy stories and great
pictures. But the Vancouver
Times died and the only place
you see colour in the Sun today
is in the advertisements. The
struggling Province occasionally uses colour pictures in its
women's  section.
Newspapers are having a great
of trouble in holding their top
personnel. Reporters are not
well paid and have little professional status to protect them
from manipulation by news
sources or editors.
Television has taken much of
the prestige that newspapers
had and also some of their
talented personnel. Douglas
Leiterman, one-time producer
of Seven Days and free lance
documentary producer at one
time was a Southam reporter.
Stanley Burke, the CBC national news announcer was at
one time Sun Ottawa reporter.
George Peloquin, the Sun
city hall reporter is going to
CTV.
There is a constant drain of
Pacific Press staff into advertising and public relations..
Surveys of ex-newspapermen
elsewhere in Canada show that
they leave because the magic
of newspapers quickly disappear when a reporter is forever
writing banal stories on service
club luncheon speakers and
cats and dogs human interest
stories. Then it becomes a
question of which pays better,
newspapers or related fields.
PR and advertising pay better
and get the personnel.
At one time the Sun was a
great place to -work. Cromie's
Sun was the first to recognize
reporters' unions in Canada.
He  paid  the  annual banquets
out of his own pocket and subsidized the office cafeteria.
Working conditions were great,
hours were short, pay was
good and the publisher was
called by his first name by
everyone. There was a profit-
sharing program.
A year ago, the Sun and Province were hit by a Newspaper
Guild strike over wages. The
Sun has an incredible turnover
in staff—a talent agency for
the rest of Canada.
To remedy this situation managing editor, Erwin Swangard,
had his contract bought and
his assistant, Bill Gait, was
elevated to managing editor.
Swangard was considered a
tyrant by some; a father-figure
by some girl reporters. In any
case the atmosphere around
the Sun newsroom has reportedly improved.
Many of the reforms took the
form of improvement of working conditions. Carpet was laid
in some offices, anti-glare material was placed on desk surfaces.
Senior reporters were given
expense accounts to take news
sources to lunch. This fell
through when the reporters
turned in the same bland
stories.
Younger reporters still curse
the deskmen who slash up stories automatically according
to Sun policy. Sun publisher
Stuart Keate predicts that university-educated reporters will
improve the content of the Sun.
But most leave.
Some reporters work part time
while getting professional degrees at UBC. Other Ubyssey
alumni have gone directly into
public relations. There are at
least three recent Ubyssey
writers who have left the Sun
for the Toronto Globe and
Mail.
The Province is a much smaller
operation having cut back its
news staff and its size to minimize losses. It is thought to be
a better place to work than the
Sun.
But as long as the Pacific Press
remains one of the most profitable businesses in North
America there seems little reason to expect improvement in
news reportage in Vancouver.
competit ion
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pfage 6ix
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  14,  1969 DEMOCRACY
continued from  pf   lne
While Carter-Cotton was rot-
' ting in jail, Adolp Ochs bought
another morning, the New
York Times, at a bankruptcy
action for $75,000 and it began
its rise to greatness.
Carter-Cotton's c o m p e tition
was the World, a sickly evening paper and several vehicles mounted by timber and
real estate barons to get their
side of the truth out. Most of
these died. (Before it did, the
World donated The World Cup.
to be given for competition between UBC and California College rugby teams).
In 1898 the weekly Province
moved from Victoria and went
into the evening daily field in
competition with the World.
By cutting prices and emphazi-
ing news the Province quickly
established itself in one year
as Vancouver's largest and
most popular newspaper.
With the financial backing of
the Canadian Pacific Railroad,
its editor Walter Nichol bought
out the original owners. The
price was that he support
Laurier and the Liberals. He
' put out a paper that enjoyed
taking potshots at the many
vaguely corrupt politicians in
Victoria of that day. But after
several law suits Nichol lost
his crusading zeal and became
more concerned with counting
the money that his entertaining paper was piling up. His
politics became Conservative
but charges that the Province
was CPR owned continued
especially when the city was
engaged in its periodic disputes
with that railroad.
The Sun began as the Saturday
Sunset, a weekly paper that
called for pasteurized milk. It
was also racist and implicated
in the anti-Oriental race riots
of 1907.
Some prominent Liberals
bought the paper after a disastrous election and turned it
into a morning daily in 1912.
It lost a lot of money and went
through several changes of
ownership. One early editor received his political plum; diplomatic posting to London
after a successful election but
the party wouldn't pay his
debts.
The Sun next fell into the
hands of major construction
firm struggling vigorously to
get out of an unprofitable contract to build the Pacific Great
Eastern Railroad. After pouring money into the coffers of
both provincial parties and into the Sun, the construction
firm was successful and had no
further need of the Sun.
The office manager of the firm,
Robert J. Cromie, received the
Sun for nothing or next to
nothing. The exact circumstances surrounding the transfer  of  ownership  were  never
made clear
Cromie then bought the News-
Advertiser in 1917 and took
over the morning field. In 1924
he bought the World which had
run into financial troubles
after a real estate boom collapsed and with it a lot of advertising revenue. The World
became the Evening Sun.
In the process of acquiring his
news outlets (Morning Sun,
Evening Sun) Cromie himself
ran into troubles and his only
competition, the Province held
a mortgage for a time.
The papers of the day reflect—
Friday, March  14,  1969
ed the active society life of the
city's wealthy. There was some
artificiality in this highly organized social life centering
around Shaughnessy. Earlier
generations of entrepreneurs
had come to make their fortunes fast and then get out. All
the under-achievers were left
behind,.
Cromie neglected to get a guarantee from the World's last
owner Charles Campbell that
he would not re-enter the Vancouver daily newspaper field.
Campbell, who had made his
fortune selling his liquor warehouse to the newly organized
provincial liquor control board
jumped back into competition
with the Evening Star.
The Province and Sun were unsuccessful in pressuring street
vendors not to handle the Star.
The Province started publishing seven editions a week
which lasted until 1933. The
Star and Sun had a short price-
cutting war which ended with
an agreement to fix prices.
Then the Sun sold the Morning
Sun to the Star which vacated
the evening field.
In 1920 Walter Nichol was appointed Lieutenant General
of B.C. and by 1923 decided he
liked Victoria better than Vancouver. He sold the Province
to the Southam newspaper
chain in 1923 for $3.5 million.
By the end of the Nichol era
the Province editorials waffled
ridiculously —> Nichol believed
newspapers were a business
and in any business it is foolish
to offend the customers.
For more than thirty years the
Vancouver newspaper market
was stabilized. The Sun and
the Province had the evening
field. In 1932 the Star folded
and its successor in the morning field was the News-Herald,
which -was co - operatively
owned by newsmen thrown
out of work by the death of
the Star. Like all Vancouver
morning newspapers it was
never prosperous.
In 1933 the Sun pressed the
leading Province to 'rationalize' their competition. The
papers called off their circulation battle by fixing the
Sun's circulation at 86 per
cent of the Province's. Cromie
was unable to get to the
Province to split up the advertising market similarily.
All this time the Sun -was
blasting the Province as the
voice of the East, the voice of
St. James Street (Montreal's
financial district). Cromie
fought long editorial crusades
against high railroad freight
rates imposed on the west
from the east.
Cromie went globe-trotting as
did his writers though there
was only one writer stationed
regularly outside British Columbia (in Ottawa). After receiving yards of telegrams
from Cromie, Mackenzie King
offered him a cabinet post, perhaps to get him off his back.
Cromie's Sun was independent
Liberal which meant in practice it backed the Liberals only
at election time. He didn't accept the post.
In British Columbia, the Sun
pushed for the extension of the
PGE into the Peace River
Country and went on a number
of other crusades. While
Cromie opposed vaccinations
and was anti-vivisectionist his
paper was as pro-labour as
establishment newspapers can
get.
At one city council meeting
deep in the depression a family
man on relief made a superb
effort to throttle an alderman
who had thought the poor
could show more decorum.
After proceeding through the
usual law-and-order introduction the Sun editorial noted
the man had a good case.
The Province by comparison
was the reliable grey old lady
of Victory Square. It had no
trouble maintaining its lead in
the evening field. Among its
writers was former Ubyssey
writer Robert Elson who went
on to Time magazine and is
the writer of the official history of that corporation and its
builder Henry Luce. Among
its publishers was Frank Burd,
at one time a member of the
UBC board of governors and a
man Cromie found difficult to
negotiate with. The Province
continued to sit on the fence
in elections or call for a union
government.
In 1935 Robert Cromie died
at the age of 49 apparently
overdoing a health food-jogging
kick. The Sun was divided up
among his wife and five children.
By 1942 the directors of the
Sun were ready to sell the
paper to the Sifton chain,
publisher of several large
dailies on the prairies. Don
Cromie along with managing
editor Hal Straight (now publisher of the weekly North
Vancouver Citizen and Sun
director) organized a revolt.
Cromie persuaded his mother
to refuse the takeover bid and
thus found himself at age 26
publisher of the Sun.
DON CROMIE
Donald C. Cromie was the only
child of Robert Cromie to take
an active participation in the
Sun. A younger brother Sam
was active for a time but was
killed in an accident.
His paper was just as parochial
and just as raucous as his
father's. Getting a national or
international story in a prominent front page position was a
small miracle. Sun columnists
fought with the editorials, with
the publisher and with one
another. In one year there were
14 libel suits; the Sun lost one
at a cost of a dollar. The Sun
sent heart-defect blue babies to
the Mayo Clinic and tired
housewives to Hollywood.
The Sun stridently demanded
the evacuation of the Japanese-
Canadians in 1942 after Japan
entered the the world war and
the West Coast felt especially
vulnerable. It attacked the federal government for moving
too slowly, for separating families, for not properly handling
'troublemakers' who put up
resistance. In one editorial the
Sun noted happily that finally
serious thought was being
given in Ottawa to the idea of
returning the Japanese to
Japan at the end of the war.
continued   pf   9ine
THE      UBYSSEY
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Times in...
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On September 5,1964, Vancouver was once more
a competitive newspaper town. That day the
Vancouver Times began publication.
Careful planning over several years had laid
the base for the Times. Citizen support had been
solicited at all levels of Vancouver society. The board of
directors of the Times read
like a Vancouver Who's Who.
Victor Odium, a member of
a promiment investment investment house and associate
of Vancouver newspapers
over sixty years was the
chairman of the board. The
WARREN population put up its own
money to raise the Time's working capital of
$3 million. The Times had 4500 shareholders;
the Sun has 1295.
The Times attracted a competent news staff as
well as columnists like Jack Webster and Doug
Collins. It experimented with different layout
styles and was printed on technologically advanced presses.
The driving force behind the Times, promoter-
publisher Val Warren, was also largely responsible for undoing what chances the Times had
of success. Warren grossly under-estimated the
losses the Times would have to take. He thought
that after an initial loss of $175,000 the Times
would start showing profits with its second
year. In seven months the Times lost $1.7 million.
Warren had disagreements with some of his
best staff and they left.
Warren paid himself indirectly or directly
$175,000 in the course of the three years he
was associated with the Times. He had put up
only $30,000 of his own money but it was
evidently enough to give him all of the class B
shares and voting control. v~
The Times was grossly under-capitalized; it
needed at least three times the $3 million it
had raised and even then its chances would
have been only three or four to one to survive
and hopefully sometime in the future show a
modest profit.
Getting a Canadian Press wire service franchise
cost $100,000 or twice the yearly rate for established newspapers. These and other expenses
left the Times with only $200,000 in its treasury
on its first day of publication.
Editorially the Times published few tough
editorials and these were aimed at subscribers
who had left; major advertisers who hadn't
bought ads and the Pacific Press.
The Times never substantiated its vague charges
again the Sun and the Province.
In March, 1965, the Times published a blank
full page reserved for Woodwards which the
Times charged was a local company that failed^
to support Vancouver's only locally owned and
controlled paper. Advertisers looked on the
Times as a project of dutiful Vancouver citizens
who also continued to take the Sun.
Warren quit or was kicked off the sinking ship
in June, 1965 and handed over his shares to
the board of directors.
Last minutes attempts to raise additional capital had little success. Creditors were persuaded"
to hold off for a while.
On August 6, 1965 the last issue of the Vancouver Times appeared. Shareholders and the
handful of remaining staff scrambled for what
capital was left.
Val Warren turned up in Edmonton to try the
same trick. Nothing came of it.
Odium was left to liquidate the Times, the last
of his three papers — all losers.
FREEDOM
continued from pf 3hree
eluding the Province. Southam also publishes 50 trade
magazines and has begun to
move into the trade show
business in a big way. It has
large job printing plants in
Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.
Southam has a 30 per cent
interest in Selkirk Holdings
which has control of minority
interest in eight radio stations, seven radio stations and
three cable television franchises. These include CKWX
radio in Vancouver, CJVI
radio Victoria, CJIB radio in
Vernon and a Kelowna television station. The Canadian
Radio and Television Commission (a regulatory commission) recently refused Selkirk's bid to increase its 26
per cent interest in British
Columbia Television Broadcasting System (Channels six
and eight) to a controlling interest.
Southam appoints the publishers of each of its newspapers and gives him freedom
to direct his newspaper. However there are restrictions on
his fiscal powers which he
must clear with his head office. Fred Auger, the Province's publisher joined Sou-
thams in 1950 from his position as advertising director of
a major soap company. He
became Province publisher in
1959 and is a member of the
Southam board of directors.
Southam's main compeitor in
the big cities of Canad is FP
Publications In Vancouver,
Winnipeg, Ottawa and Calgary they each own the only
papers In Vancouver they
have a joint publication arrangement  The   'competition'
frequently is ludicrous.. Recently the Winnipeg. Tribune
(Southam) and the Free Press
(FP) announced that because
of rising costs they would no
longer publish morning editions.
In Ottawa they had a profit-
splitting   arrangement.
Now that both have broken
into the major cities of Canada
(Southam—the Montreal Gazette in 1968; FP —the Globe
and Mail (Toronto) in 1965;
they are firmly anchored in
every Canadian region except
the Maritimes.
There are companies on which
representatives of both media
empires have shares or directors. These include Quality
records; All Canada Radio and
Television (a sales and transcript service), a (Hamilton
radio and TV station, and a.
Lethbridge TV station. Thus
there is a tendency to slice up
the pie rather than to compete
for it.
In 1953 the Sifton brothers,
Victor and Clifford, split up
the family news empire. Clifford took the Saskatoon Star-
Phoenix and the Regina Leader
Post. Victor took the Winnipeg Free Press and with Max
Bell formed FP Publications
Ltd. in 1959. Bell owns the
Calgary Albertan (inherited
from his father) the Victoria
Times and the Victoria Colonist (bought in 1949 and 1950);
the Lethbridge Herald, some
horses and oil wells.
FP Publications acquired the
Ottawa Journal in 1961, the
Vancouver Sun in 1963 and the
Toronto Globe and Mail in
1965. Altogether it controls 10
papers with 21 per cent of
Canada's daily newspaper circulation.
The Globe has a long history
elating back to Confederation
when it was owned by George
Brown, an important political
figure. In 1936 it was purchased by a financier who merged
it with its only morning competition, the Mail and Empire
to form the Toronto Globe and
Mail. In 1955 it was purchased
by Montreal financier Howard
his Globe shares for FP shares
and ownership passed to the
FP Publications.
Webster appears to have got
along with FP Publications,
unlike the Sun's Don Cromie,
for he is still chairman of the.
Globe and Mail. During the
depression he is reported to
have twice raised the price of
coal which he controlled in
Montreal. When the federal
government fined him he raised the price again to cover the
fine. Webster today has important real estate holdings in
Montreal and Chicago and is a
director of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.
The Globe and Mail is the
closest thing to a national paper that Canada has. It sells
about 300 copies weekdays,
600 copies Saturday in Vancouver. Its editorials and news
interpretations are required
reading in Ottawa and among
the best in Canada.
While both Southam and FP
Publications have their own
news - gathering networks to
supplement the wire services,
the Sun and the Globe and
Mail have their own special
correspondents.
There are Liberal and there
are Conservative papers within Southams and FP Publications. Take your pick.
FP   Publications   is   privately
owned and does not publish an
See: FREEDOM
continued pf lOen
pfaga  Sight
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   14,  1969 DEMOCRACY
from pf 8ight
Obviously the racism of the
old Saturday Sunset and many
British Columbians was not
dead. The Province was little
better.
In 1946 the Typographers
Union took on the Southam
chain in a bid to win a rule
change that the Southam's
Winnipeg Tribune had refused. The Province had agreed
to the rule but the -onion cancelled the contract and tied up
the Province for six weeks.
The Province thought it had an
agreement with the Sun that
it would print the Province in
the event it was struck. By
printing the Province the Sun
would also be struck.
Both papers had conducted
joint negotiations with the
unions. Cromie backed out
claiming the Province had not
made adequate preparations
for a printers' strike and he
wasn't prepared to fight without full Southam co-operation.
In 1945 the Province had 56
percent of the circulation and
55 per cent of the advertising
for the Vancouver newspaper
market. By 1948 when the full
effects of the strike had set
in the Province had 40 per cent
of the circulation and 46.5 per
cent of the advertising. In 1945
it had profits of $260,000; in
1948 lossess of $143,000. By
comparison in 1945 and 1948
the Sun had profits respectively of $124,000 and $223,-
000.
The Province found that it
could not regain its lead. It
lacked the presses and plant
to meet the Sun's technical
sophistication. In 1951
Southam shipped in a new
publisher, Arthur Moscarella
from Winnipeg. Promotional
expenses jumped but Moscarella found for every $5000
contest, Cromie would offer a
$10,000 contest to readers.
Southam bought some land
suitable for a plant but refused
to produce the $5,000,000 investment the Province needed
to turn it around and put it
into a profitable position. It
didn't want to take the risk.
Merger negotiations were inevitable. But Southam was
angry with the Sun, which it
alleged was telling potential
advertisers that they need only
put their ads in the Sun. There
may have been some discussion prior to the 1946 strike,
but both parties only got together seriously in the early
1950's.
Early negotiation proposals
amounted to one party controlling the other. In 1956 aboard
Cromie's yacht in Howe Sound,
St. Clair Balfour of Southam
and Cromie agreed on a joint
publishing venture which had
become a popular idea among
U. S. newspaper publishers.
However, with only one press
it is physically impossible to
print simultaneously two newspapers in the same evening
field. Thus the Province
shifted into the morning field.
Both the Sun and Southams
would own half of the company
that printed their papers and
would receive half the profits.
The details of the agreement
were settled in early 1957 and
announced in April, 1957.
Both Southam and the Sun
sold their assets   to   the new
Friday, March 14, 1969
company, Pacific Press in return for half the debentures
and half the shares issued by
the company. Southam paid
the Sun $3,850,000 to make up
for its shoddier physical assets. Pacific Press took over
the press, accounting, business,
credit, personnel and statistical
departments of both newspapers.
Each paper maintained its own
circulation and advertising offices. Each selected its own
publisher who had control over
his own paper. Each selected
half of Pacific Press' board of
directors.
Moving into the morning field
was not difficult. The News-
Herald was struggling along
making no money. Cromie had
bought the paper in 1951 to
get its surplus newsprint and
sold the paper to Roy Thomson
the next year. Thomson found
he couldn't make a profit and
almost immediately began suggesting to the Province and
Sun that they buy him out.
The day before the official announcement of the Pacific
Press the News-Herald obediently folded and sold for $260,-
000 its subscription lists, the
morning franchise to the Canadian Press wire service and
the comic strip Blondie and
other assets to the Pacific
Press.
Observing the Province's retreat into the morning field on
June 17, 1957, the Victoria
Times noted piously that "the
first duty of a newspaper is the
economic duty of staying
alive."
It should have said the prime
duty of the modern newspaper
is to maximize its profits. The
Province was in no danger of
extinction. In 1956 and 1957
it was showing a modest profit. Cromie might have taken
on the Province in continued
direct competition if it hadn t
been that the Southam company with all its wealth was
backing up the Province. And
there was always the chance
that an incident like the 1946
strike could reverse the competitive situation once again.
Both papers had adequate capital to finance separate presses.
The real reason for the merger
was that it would minimize
profits by splitting capital expenditures on a new plant, cutting back on promotional expenses and eliminating redundant expenses. Thus it did not
matter that the morning field
was traditionally a poor spot
for Vancouver newspapers for
Southam would be getting half
of all the Sun's profits and its
only concern would be to minimize  the  Province's  loss.
There is another reason for the
merger: corporate incest.
Southam owned 12 per cent of
Sun voting stock at the time of
the formation of the Pacific
Press and the Sun had a substantial number of Southam
shares.
At the announcement of the
formation of the Pacific Press,
Don Cromie emphasized that
the autonomy clauses would
let one paper eat up the whole
profits of the Pacific Press
without the other paper being
able to do anything to stop it.
The Province's Arthur Moscarella said the Province would
continue to scoop the Sun.
Scott Young of the Toronto
Globe and Mail was less than
impressed. "Each paper has
assured its readers that it will
retain its former character.
Since the chief characteristic
of each paper was its bitter
competitive spirit toward the
other, this character-retention
will be quite a trick, something like watching a wrestling
match between Siamese twins."
In 1960 the restrictive Trade
Practices Commission of the
Federal government investigated the merger. After
lengthy hearings it ordered the
papers to stop insisting that
national advertisers place ads
in both papers. It also suggested that a judicial order be passed requiring both papers to
have approval of the court before changing the agreement .
The Sun and Southam agreed
to inform the Combines Investigation Branch if they should
change the agreement and no
court order was issued. In advertising directories today one
rate is listed to cover both the
Sun and the Province with the
addition that an individual rate
for the papers is available on
request. People phoning the
Pacific Press to place other
classes of ads today are asked
if they wish to plase an ad in
the other paper as well.
The commission apparently
accepted the statements that
both papers could not continue
to compete and show a profit
too. Yet in 1959 the morning
Province was losing half a million dollars. Its circulation had
dropped from its post-merger
high of 130,000 to about 106,-
000 when both papers raised
their prices to a dime in 1958.
Since then the Province's circulation has been static at 106,-
000. It refuses to release its
advertising lineage which is
usually an accurate indicator
of a paper's financial state of
health. However it is thought
to carry about half the advertising of the Sun and may be
making minimal profits.
The price hike hit the Sun
as heavily but it quickly recovered the lost circulation. By
1965 the Sun needed a new
press and building to handle
its expanding circulation and
advertising*-laden bulk. Until
then the old Sun presses had
been adequate for both the
Province and the Sun. The new
Pacific Press building cost $12
million. The Sun now has a
circulation of about 255,000.
In circulation the Sun is Canada's third biggest paper behind the Toronto Star and the
Toronto Globe and Mail.
In classified advertising lineage
it is the biggest in Canada and
the fourth in North America.
In total advertising it trails La
Presse (Montreal) and the Toronto Star.
Circulation income only covers
about a quarter of the cost of
pr oducing the newspapers.
Thus the paper that can cover
a market (thus getting the ads)
with fewer papers will make
the biggest profits. While the
Toronto Star received about
ten per cent more advertising
than the Sun, it has about one-
half more circulation than the
Sun. Thus the Toronto Star
showed profits in 1968 of $1.5
million. Without the competition that the Star gets from the
Te*legrair\ the Sun showed a
profit of about $3.3 million.
This assumes the Province is
is contributing only minimal
profits at best to the Pacific
Press pot.
Following the formation of the
Pacific Press the Sun continued
to prosper but Cromie was
finding himself in a familiar
problem. He was losing voting
control over the newspaper. In
1956 the Sun had split its stock
into common (A) and voting
(B) shares. By paying slightly
higher dividends on A shares it
was hoped that investors would
allow B shares to come under
control of the Cromie family.
But there had been at least two
take-over bids or purchase
offers by American chain owner Sam NewhOuse and Swedish
industrialist Axel Wenner-Gren
which may have sprung some
B shares lose from the various
branches of the Cromie family.
In 1955 Albertan publisher Max
Bell had tipped off St. Clair
Balfour  of Southam that Sun
voting shares were available.
Both began buying up the
stock. y~~
By 1957 Southam had 12 per
cent of the Sun stock but Cromie didn't know who was buying
it since Southam bought
through an agent on the Vancouver stock exchange. Balfour
then informed Cromie he had
the stock. He agreed to buy no
more stock without informing
Cromie. The reason for Bell
and Southam buying the stock
according to the official
Southam history was that they
didn't want control to fall into
other than Canadian hands.
In 1957 the various branches
of the Cromie family controlled
60 per cent of the Sun stock.
Caught in the Southam-Bell
squeeze the Cromie control
dropped away dramatically until 1963 when the Cromies
could count on only having 40
per cent of the voting stock.
Cromie had apparently agreed
to have Southam re-enter the
market and it had 18 per cent
of the B voting stock in 1963.
Encouraging the diffusion was
the fact that second generations of Cromie families
which along with inheritance
taxes was diffusing the voting
control.
Cromie noted "If control were
to be directed to any chosen
professional newspaper group
the sale had to be determined
soon." In June 1963 Don Cromie went out to lunch with Max
Bell and sold him controlling
interest in the Sun Publishing
Company. In a news story Max
Bell noted that he was happy
to be able to increase his interest to control. Southam's
subsequently sold its Sun stock
to Bell of FP Publications
which   today   has   an   80   per
continued pf lOen
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THE      UBYSSEY
pfage 9ine FREEDOM
continued from pf 8ight
annual report or disclose its
holdings outside the newspaper
media. In the Vertical Mosaic,
John Porter reports that Sif-
ton owns a television station
in Lethbridge, a radio station
in Winnipeg and radio and
television stations in Regina.
Until a few years ago Quebec's
media was controlled for the
most part by indepent families. But in the last few years
a major French language
media empire has been assembled by a young financier.
A generation ago Paul Des-
marais inherited a nearly bankrupt   Northern   Ontario   bus
line and proceeded to form a
major conglomerate financial
empire. Acquiring influential
friends in English and French
Canada, Desmarais' four billion dollar empire reaches into
insurance, and trust companies, gas, oil, mining and even
a horse racing track.
He recently bought out most
of the print media of his nearest competitor, Jacques Bril-
lant, an Eastern Townships
businessman. His daily French-
language newspapers in four
Quebec cities including the
largest Montreal's La Presse,
accounts for 42 per cent of Quebec's daily circulation. He also
owns most of the French
language Sunday press, the
only   place   in   Canada   where
GRADUATE
STUDENT ASSN
The proposed new constitution is now
posted at the Centre. This will be presented at the Spring General Meeting ol
the Association scheduled lor March
27th. Please leave any comments, suggestions etc. re. the constitution with
the secretary at the Centre.
the Sunday paper has been
tried with success.
Using his Sherbrooke television station as a base, Desmarais has made some moves in
the direction of forming a third
television network in Canada.
He proposed recently to assemble a satellite communication system.
Pierre Peladeau owns two
struggling dailies in Montreal
and Quebec. A one time fascist-
sympathizer and scandal press
publisher, Peladeau has apparently gone respectable. He
is a nationalist and covert in-
dependentist.
Le Devoir is among the best
newspapers, in Canada. It was
the only Quebec newspaper to
resist the despotic regime of
Premier Maurice Duplessis.
Today it is edited by Claude
Ryan easily French Canada's
most influential journalist. It
traces its roots back to Henri
Bourassa, a major political figure who ensured Le Devoir's
independence through a trust.
K. C. Irving of the petroleum
and marketing Maritime empire is believed to own the
three biggest of New Brunswick's five newspapers and
other  media.
John Bassett owner of the
Toronto Telegram and the CTV
television station in Toronto is
the former owner of the Sherbrooke Daily Record. He owns
CFTO, a Toronto CTV station
and eight Toronto area weekly
newspapers.
The importance of chain ownership becomes obvious when
we examine British Columbia,
Hear these artists at a
JAZZ
UiiilMtlviiHiiiJiHli^Miilfc;
llH'DmcHnilMfkhiiilciiliniiiitlit'mMiillbii'
PACIFIC COLISEUM
MARCH 20th
And On Columbia Records
which has 14 daily newspapers.
Thomson owns four of these
in Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo and Penticton. They account for six per cent of B.C.'s
total daily newspaper circulation. Like most Thomson papers they take the cheapest
service that Canadian Press
Wire  Service offers.
North West Publications publishes dailies in Prince George
and Prince Rupert and a number of weekly newspapers
throughout the province.
Brewer-builder Ben G i n t e r
owns the Prince George Progress, a bi-weekly newspaper.
North West accounts for three
per cent of the province's daily
circulation.
There are four independently-
owned papers left in this province and they are published in
Kimberley, Nelson, Trail and
New Westminster. They represent 8.4 per cent of the province's daily circulation.
If "Not a damn one of the
Thomson papers are worth
reading" in the words of one
observer, the rest of the papers, independent or not, are
probably worse.
Generally they offer a couple
of pages of local news sandwiched between pages of wire
copy. They are uniformly un-
inspired and uninteresting.
Most lift most their editorials
from Victoria and Vancouver
newspapers and one another
and call them guest editorials.
The New Westminster Columbian makes no attempt to compete with the Vancouver pa-
DEMOCRACY
continued from pf 7even
cent control over Sun voting
shares.
Cromie had planned to stay
on as chairman and director of
the Sun Publishing Company
and president and publisher
of the paper. But by February
1964 he had severed all his
ties with the paper in protest.
"I disagree with FP Publication Ltd. leaders over some
policies, procedures and manners. As chairman I had hoped
to be useful to the staff, the
community and the new majority owners. On review the association seems fruitless. I wish
them every success in continuing the Sun's prosperity and
community confidence."
The man possibly responsible*
for Cromie's displeasure was R.
S. Malone, executive vice president of FP Publications. For
some time afterward he held
the top spot on the Sun's masthead which at the time of sale
had dropped the proud claim
that the Sun was owned and
operated by Vancouver people.
In 1962 the Sun had sold radio
station CHUB in Nanaimo and
a small California newspaper.
In 1963 the Sun disposed of its
Southam shares and also its
shares in Grouse Mountain Resorts Limited.
In retrospect it is interesting to
speculate whether the Cromie
family could have continued
control of the newspaper. Most
of the great newspapers of the
world are or were family-owned: the McConnell's Montreal
Star, the Oehs-Sulzberger New
York Times, the Chandler's
Los Angeles Times, Bourassa's
Le Devoir (Montreal) the Graham's Washington Post, the At-
pers and advises its readers
to subscribe to them. The
Columbian emphasizes local
news in Surrey, New Westminster, Port Coquitlam and
Burnaby. It has local editions
for these areas.
The Vancouver Province accounts for 20.7 per cent of all
B.C.'s circulation and the FP
papers (both Victoria papers
and the Sun) account for 61.7
per cent of the province's daily
circulation.
The world-wide wire services
that feed into these media empires are as concentrated. The
major American wire services
are Associated Press (co-operatively owned by its members)
and United Press International
(the merger of two privately
owned networks). Reuters is a
European-based wire service
that recently ended an agreement which made AP its North
American feeder. A n o t h e r
news service which is privately
owned is Los Angeles Times -
Washington Post (TPS), one
of the newest. In addition TPS
carries a number of features
and columnists like Art Buch-
wald. Among the best of the
wire services is that offered
by the New York Times.
In Canada the cooperatively-
owned Canadian Press feeds
news to its member - owners
who pay an annual levy based
on size. Many of these news
and features services give exclusive local franchise to newspapers which hurts the chances
of just-beginning newspapers
to win circulation even though
the established newspaper may
not use a particular feature.
pfage lOen
THE      UBYSSEY
kinson's Toronto Star, and the
Pulitzer's St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
By putting controlling interest
in these papers into a trust the
founders could let their children share in the profits of the
paper without diffusing control.
Once voting control was secure
from take-over by a chain, the
staff could work in confidence
to build and shape the paper
as is the case with the New
York Times. And the great
papers are generally known for
the independence of their staff.
By contrast the only way Roy
Thomson could get a great
newspaper was to buy the London Times. As a rule most
chain-owned papers are thoroughly uninteresting because
their local autonomy is usually
eroded by the ties with a head
office.
The Cromie's Sun was not a
great newspaper but it was exciting and entertaining paper
that reflected its community
and its owners who were a
maverick group within the British Columbia establishment.
Today it is remembered as
something of a golden age in
local journalism.
The man who bought the Sun
is G. Maxwell Bell today a director of the CPR, the Bank of
Nova Scotia, and Northern
Electric. He is also a member
of the McGill University board
of governors.
He had inherited the Calgary
Alberian from his father and
in 1949 and 1950 bought both
Victoria newspapers. He now
also owns the Lethbridge Herald. He also owns oil and
See: DEMOCRACY
continued pf 12elve
Friday, March  14, 1969 Media Epi pi res
Southam Press Ltd. (St. Clair Balfour)
Daily  Newspapers:
Ottawa Citizen, Hamilton Spectator, North Bay Nugget, Winnipeg Tribune, Medicine Hat News, Calgary Herald, Edmonton
Journal, Vancouver Province, Owen Sound Times, Montreal
Gazette, London Free Press (25 per cent), Kitchener Waterloo
Record (48 per cent), Brandon Sun (49 per cent).
Total Circulation: 968,000. Per cent: 21.7.
Magazines: 50 trade magazines, Financial Times of Canada,
B.C. Journal of Commerce, The Canadian (50 per cent).
Radio and Television: Selkirk Holdings (30 per cent).
Radio: Lethbridge, Edmonton (60* per cent), Calgary (60 per cent),
Grande Prairie (38 per cent), Hamilton (28 per cent) Vernon
(50 per cent), Victoria (CJVI — 75 per cent), Vancouver (CKWX
— 100 per cent), London, Ottawa.
Television: Lethbridge (50 per cent), Vancouver and Victoria
(CHAN—8, CHEK—6) — 26 per cent), Calgary, London, Hamilton (7 per cent), Kelowna (33 Vz per cent) and nine rebroadcast
stations.
Cable Television Franchises: Ottawa (30 per cent), Lethbridge,
Winnipeg (25 per cent).
Roy Thomson
Daily  Newspapers:
B.C.: Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, Penticton.
Sask.: Moose Jaw, Prince Albert.
Ont.: Barrie, Brampton, Chatham, Cornwall, Fort William, Gait,
Guelph,  Kirkland  Lake,   Oakville   Orillia,   Oshawa, Pembroke,
Peterborough, Port Arthur, Sarnia, Sudbury Timmins, Welland,
Woodstock.
,   P.Q.: Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph
N.S.:  New  Glasgow.
P.E.I.:   Charlottetown.
Circulation:  347,000.  Per Cent:  7.8.
Radio: Timmins, Peterborough, Kirkland Lake, Kingston, London,  North Bay.
Television: North Bay, Peterborough, Kingston.
FP Publications Ltd.
Daily  Newspapers:
Vancouver Sun, Victoria Colonist, Victoria Times, Calgary Al-
bertan, Lethbridge Herald, Winnipeg Free Press, Toronto Globe
and Mail,  Ottawa Journal.
Sifton: Regina Leader-Post, Saskatoon Star-Phoenix.
Circulation: 927,000. Per Cent: 20.7.
Radio: Regina,  Winnipeg, Hamilton.
Television: Regina, Lethbridge.
North West Publications
Daily Newspapers:
Prince Rupert, Prince George.
Circulation:  16,000. Per Cent: 0.3.
Several weekly newspapers.
Other Media Holdings: unknown.
Maclean-Hunter
Magazines: 60 trade and professional magazines; Macleans: 625,-
500 (also French language); Chatelaine: 1.2 million; Homemakers
Digest (free, controlled circulation): 800,000; Financial Post.
Radio: Toronto, Chatham, Kitchener-Water loo, Calgary, Orillia.
Television: Calgary, Halifax (sold it).
Cable television franchises: North Bay, Guelph, Owen Sound,
Midland-Penetang, Collingwood, Huntsville, St. Catharines,
Toronto, London, Hamilton, Peterborough (75 per cent), Sarnia
(66% per cent).
John Bassett
Daily Newspapers: Toronto Telegram, Sherbrook Daily Record
(sold controlling interest in 1968). Circulation: 251,000. Per cent:
5.6.
Other papers: Eight Toronto area weekly newspapers.
Television: Toronto (CTV).
Other media holdings: Unknown.
Regional Media Empires
Power Corporation (Paul Desmarais)
Daily Newspapers:  La Presse  (Montreal),  Granby  La  Voix  de
l'Est, La Tribune (Sherbrooke), Le Nouvelliste (Trois Rivieres).
Circulation: 295,000. Per cent:  6.6.
Other newspapers: Five Montreal Sunday papers, other papers.
Radio: Sherbrooke, Montreal.
Television: Sherbrooke.
Le Journal (Pierre Peladeau)
Daily Newspapers: Le Journal de Montreal, Le Journal de Quebec.
Circulation: 51,000. Per cent: 1.1.
Other Newspapers; Seven weeklies (two Sunday papers).
Other media holdings: Unknown.
K. C. Irving
Daily Newspapers: Moncton Times and Transcript, St. John Telegraph-Journal,   St.   John   Evening   Times-Globe,    Fredericton
Gleaner. Circulation: 100,000; Per cent: 2.2.
Radio: Saint John.
Television: Saint John.
Cable Television: CFTC rejected bid for CATV Saint John franchise.
Moffatt Broadcasting
Radio: Moose Jaw, Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver (CKLG), Winnipeg.
Television: Winnipeg, Regina, Moose Jaw..
Friday, March 14, 1969
SUZUKI CENTRE
All '68 Models
Reduced To Clear
2185 W. Broadway
731-7510
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
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TO  CHOOSE   FROM
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• Morning Coats
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• Shirts & Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe 688-2481
UNION COLLEGE
Invites You to attend an
OPEN  HOUSE TONIGHT
between  the  hours  of  8:00  p.m.
and  11:00 p.m.
ART DISPLAY
FIRESIDE - SING-SONG
DISPLAY  OF  RARE BOOKS,
SLIDE SHOW, ETC.
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used   University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite  Woodwards
681-4931
CAR INSURANCE
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Save with
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See me.
8455 GRANVILLE ST..
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Edmonton Public School Board
SPECIALIST TEACHERS 1969-70
The Edmonton Public School System subscribes to a philosophy of education
which places the emphasis on the development of the pupil rather than on
subject matter or course content, believing that the ultimate purpose of education  is that of fitting man for life.
Staffing   requirements   are   adequately   supplied   "in   most   areas   for
1969-70. Some  specialized personnel are  still required.
Applications   are   solicited   from   well-qualified,   certificated   teachers   in   the
following   areas   only:
1. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST
(minimum of Master's degree or equivalent in  clinical psychology)
2. SPEECH CLINICIAN
(minimum of Bachelor's degree or equivalent)
3. SPECIAL EDUCATION
(a) Educable  Mentally  Retarded
(b) Hard of Hearing
(c) Neurologically  Impaired
(d) Emotionally Disturbed
(e) Low Vision
4. SECONDARY VOCATIONAL IN THE FOLLOWING TRADES
ONLY:
(a) Horticulture
(b) Custodial Services
(c) Food Preparation '(Chef qualifications)
5. TEACHER LIBRARIANS
(minimum  of 3 university courses in library science)
6. ORAL/AURAL   FRENCH   SPECIALISTS   AT   MOST   GRADE
LEVELS
7. SECONDARY  INDUSTRIAL ARTS-(MULTI-ACTIVITY)
All applicants must be eligible for Alberta teacher certification requiring a
minimum of two years post-secondary education beyond British Columbia
grade  13 including formal teacher education.
For application forms and employment information, write giving a brief
outline of qualifications and experience to the address below. Also indicate
which hours from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, April 2, would be convenient for a Vancouver interview with a Board presentative. In writing refer
to Recruiting  Competition  1969-5.
write: Personnel Department
EDMONTON PUBLIC SCHOOL BOARD
10010-107 A  Avenue EDMONTON   17,  Alberta
u£? *49 *>
Any Color-ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
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VANCOUVER
677 Granville        —        Opp. The Bay
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NORTH VANCOUVER
-        681-6174
-      521-0751
1825 Lonsdale
987-2264
THE     U BYSSEY
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IMPORTANT NOTICE
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STUDENTS & FACULTY
THE
BOOK STORE
will be
CLOSED
ALL DAY
TUESDAY, APRIL  1st and
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2nd
FOR ANNUAL STOCK TAKING
The store will be open Thursday, April 3rd
before the Easter holidays
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Hot Flashes!
the press!
Stop
If television has forced newspapers into greater
in-depth reporting, community antenna television (CATV) may push them out of business.
Television, individually-wired (via telephone
connection) into the best receiving antenna in
a community), has been part of the North American scene for some years. Recent discoveries
and refinements should permit each home to
have its own facsimile printer to receive special
material. Not only will this permit citizens to
ignore the usual run of trash available on television but it will permit readers to receive
magazines, books, news stories and anaylses
minus advertising, comic strips, and other trivia
if they so desire.
Justifiably concerned about this development,
major media owners have turned CATV franchises into one of the hottest contests in North
America.
TIME Inc. has $15 million invested in CATV
franchises or about the amount you would
need to start the equivalent of TIME today.
Times-Mirror, publisher of the Los Angeles
Times, books, magazines and features has recently reorganized itself to provide for a vice-
president to supervise its CATV franchises.
The huge conglomerate corporations have moved into this field. Gulf and Western has franchises in 19 cities and seven U.S. states.
Gulf and Western owns Famous Players which
operates more than 300 Canadian cinemas and
drive-in theatres, owns 20 per cent of TV
channels 8 and 6 in Vancouver as well as several
CATV Canadian franchises.
Toronto was the scene of a recent major dispute before a hearing of the Canadian Radio
and Television Commission (successor to the
BBG). One small CATV company charged five
major media companies including Maclean-
Hunter and Roger Broadcasting with muscling
in on its franchises. The small company had
been given a large area of Toronto to itself by
the BBG but Bell Telephone had restricted it
to a smaller area. Bell had become the de facto
licenser by insisting that CATV companies
which have to negotiate with Bell for use of
its telephone wires could only wire a limited
area at one time.
Rogers is owned by Argus Corporation (E. P.
Taylor) and has extensive radio and television
holdings as well as CATV franchises.
Maclean-Hunter, the major magazine publisher
in Canada, owns half a dozen radio and television stations and has CATV franchises in a
dozen Ontario towns and cities including a piece
of Toronto.
Through Selkirk Holdings, Southam is known
to have interests in CATV franchises in Winnipeg, Lethbridge and Ottawa.
FP Publications does not disclose its holdings
and Thomson is thought to own a few CATV
franchises in the USA as part of recent acquisition of a group of newspapers. He is now selling
a Belleville, Ont. CATV franchise.
Vancouver Cablevision is one of the largest
CATV operations in North America and is part
of one company with CATV franchises in Victoria, Montreal and Toronto. While it refuses
to disclose its ownership, TIME reports that
it is largely owned by the Columbia Broadcasting System, the American network.
As in the USA, CATV in Canada has only come
under strict regulation in the last few years.
In the USA the Federal Communications Commission only established its jurisdiction after
lengthy court battles last year. Until recently
would-be Canadian CATV operators could get
their licenses from the Department of Transport as easily as you can get a driver's license.
CATV has a commercial potential that more
than balances its threat to the conventional
media. And because of its commercial potential
we can pretty well forget about the visionary
possibilities of CATV.
The CATV cable can carry a very large number
of channels. Thus it would be possible for a
corporation's head office to supervise a distant
automated plant via a rented channel. Every
CATV operator is given an exclusive geographical area for his personal monopoly. This
means that advertisers can select the market
which is most likely to buy their products.
So much like TV and radio before it and perhaps the newspapers before them all, the fantastical potential for education and entertainment of this fascinating new media seems consigned to its commercial grave before it even
begins.
Punchy Davey
The latest in a long series of proposed enquiries into the media was made last month
by Senator Keith Davey. Davey's 'criticism' of
the media shows more the power of the press
than it does any real critical thoughts on his
part. He pulled punches right down the line.
The press has always been super vigilant about
any possible government regulation. And they
have used their media to pound the message
of importance of freedom of the press into the
public and the politicians. They have also done
a good job on their own image.
Davey wondered if the concentration of ownership might not be bad. But then he even seconded the usual argument that monopoly is produced by some mysterious law of economics.
He thought the study might take a look at the
level of editorial independence within the
chains. Liberal Davey had no embarrassing
questions about the lack of a social democratic
(NDP) daily Canadian newspaper.
Davey wanted to know why newsmen were not
well-paid as, for example in Peterborough, the
site of a recent strike where the newsmen were
getting $120 a week.
Senator Davey went on to say according to the
Canadian Press story that the occasional abuses
of the press were "swallowed up in a sea of
solid grey journalism".
Davey noted the press was inclined to police
itself with reasonable effectiveness and he certainly wouldn't argue for any press control
(perish the thought). (Let us now worship the
sacred cow of your choice.)
However he thought a couple of broadcast
regulations (55% Canadian content, contribute
to national unit) might be "unofficially" applied to newspapers.
This month publishers have nothing to worry
about. Once they get their monthly profit statement together and off to the board of directors
they can go firing off outside Canada to fight
battles for freedom of the press content in the
knowledge their freedom, control and profits
are secure.
DEMOCRACY
from pf lOen
racing  horses   and   is  said to
divide his reading between the
Racing Form and the Bible.
In 1953 the Sifton brothers,
Victor and Clifford split their
news empire. Clifford took the
Saskatoon Star Phoenix and
Regina Leader Post. Victor took
the Winnipeg Free Press and
with Max Bell in 1959 formed
FP Publications. A second generation of both Sifton families
is now in control. In 1961 both
families joined together along
with other prominent figures
in the Winnipeg power struc-
THE     UBYSSEY
ture to try to win a Canadian
Television (CTV) network franchise for Winnipeg. They were
unsuccessful. Souttiam and the
Sun were also unsuccessful in
1960.
It is ironical to remember that
it was this same Sifton family,
now co-owners of FP Publications and the Sun whose takeover bid Don Cromie had stopped twenty years before.
FP Publications brought in
Stuart Keate as the new publisher of the Sun. He had begun
his newspaper career in Vancouver as a sports writer for
The Ubyssey and the News
Herald. He was a BA graduate
of UBC and Vancouver native.
Following the war he worked
for Toronto newspapers, wrote
for Maclean's magazine and
served Time as Montreal bureau chief. In 1950 he was appointed publisher of the Victoria Times, a paper Max Bell
had recently acquired. While in
Victoria he was a president of
the Chamber of Commerce.
He was named publisher of the
Sun in May 1964 and is a member of the UBC board of governors.
Friday, March  14, 1969 Friday, March  14,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  17
BLURBLURBLURBLUR
Church tells all
Got premarital, emotional,
or religious hangups?
Discuss them -with the "poor
man's psychologists" in the interview room beside the ombudsman's office in SUB.
The UBC Chaplain's Committee has arranged to provide
counselling services by various
chaplains on Mondays from 12
noon and 2 p.m., Wednesdays,
between 12 and 3, and Fridays
between 11:30 and 12:30.
Chaplains participating are
Neil Kelly, Roman Catholic,
Gene Baade, Lutheran, Ber-
nice Gerard, Pentecostal, Jack
Shaver, United, and Bob Pearson, Lutheran.
New Arts I open
A meeting of Arts students
is scheduled for Tuesday,
March 18 in the Buchanan
Lounge. Included in the agenda
will be the selection for the
new Arts building.
Other   matters  will  include
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating    _    Al   Birnie
Managing     Bruce  Curtis
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner
Associate   Paul Knox
Wire     Irene  Wasilewski
Page  Friday     Andrew  Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
Photo      Fred   Cawsey
Ass't  News   John  Gibbs
The old regime grinds to a halt and
the masses go into hiding. Only a hand-
the fee referendum that is
scheduled for the AMS general
meeting, arts fees, "Pro-calendars" and other administrative
rubber stamp decisions.
New Psych head
Psychology department head
Douglas Kenny has been named
associate dean of arts.
Kenny has been on the UBC
faculty since 1950. He is a
former president of the UBC
faculty association and the
B.C. Psychological Association.
He will continue to teach
psychology after taking office
on April fool's day.
AUS general meet
Teachers and students from
high schools all over B.C. are
descending on the campus this
weekend to find out where it's
at.
It's a symposium at the Arts
I building, Thursday to Saturday.
The purpose of the symposium is to explain -what Arts I
is all about and how it works.
, *'*f-'".VfS-'fli*. " >,-»    -v
ful of stalwart hacks, including Nate
Smith, Eric B., Maurice Bridge, Frank
Flynn, Keith Routley, Elaine Tarzwell,
Kirsten Emmott. and Nader Mirhady
continue to rattle around the near-
deserted office, listening to the agonized cries of "never again** from Curtis
on the news desk. Maddin labored alone
in the jock shop, resisting Gordie Tone's
religious advances. Shuttering in the
darkroom were Dirk Visser and John
Frizell.
il
GENETIC ENGINEERING AND THE CHURCH
PANEL AND DISCUSSION
SPEAKERS:  DR. JAMES MILLER, Head,
Division of Medical Genetics, UBC
SISTER DIANE DUPRE, Headmistress,
Convent of the Sacred Heart
DR. W. S. TAYLOR, Principal,
Union College of  B.C.
AT UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED CHURCH
5375  University  Boulevard
SUNDAY, MARCH 16th - 11:00 A.M.
a
1ST   YEAR   ENGINEERS
CROFTON PULP & PAPER LIMITED
Summer employment opportunities exist at
Crofton for students who intend to become
Mechanical or Chemical engineers.
Company representative will be on campus
for interviews on March 26 & 27. Appointments
can be made by contacting the University
Placement office.
Fame and fortune for fiddley Finlay
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Appointments
Editor
Well-known social
drinker Mike Finlay was
elected editor of The
Ubyssey at a marathon
4V2 hour staff meeting
Friday.
The blonde, baby-faced
part-time hack for The
Sun promised a crackdown on extremists believed to have infiltrated
the very editorial board,
according to usually reliable sources close to the
big wheel.
"By the beard of Allah,
they shall not pass," said
Finlay. "I run a taut ship;
shape up or ship out.'*
Council reporter for
Canada's greatest university newspaper in 1967-68,
Finlay    will     lead    The
Ubyssey into its second
half-century, following in
the illustrious steps of
such journalism greats as
Himie Koshevoy, John
Turner, Stuart Keate and
Ann  Arky.
He replaces present editor Al Bernie, who goes
on to bigger and better
things.
In an interview following his appointment, Finlay said certain reforms
will be instituted in next
year's paper.
"Persons complaining
about "Tween Classes will
be shot on sight," he said.
"The job of a newspaper
is to educate and lead, not
to bicker with the unwashed."
When asked about editorial policy, Finlay, a
confessed   pederast,   said
FINLAY
there will definitely* be
one. "Some people will
agree with us and some
won't," he said.
,*BO'*MMhW
NDP must build new movement
"The New Democratic Party
must become a mass movement
working toward the creation of
an independent socialist Canada," says NDP provincial
leadership candidate John Conway.
"Canada cannot be independent without being socialist or
socialist without being independent," Conway, a student
senator at Simon Fraser University, told 30 students in the
SUB party room Tuesday noon.
Conway said the NDP no longer sees itself as a mass people's
movement but as an electoral
machine like the other parties.
"The party must become an
alliance of workers, students,
farmers, professional groups
and even small businessmen,"
he said.
"It must toe a mass movement
of people who are politically
active on a day to day basis
and willing to confront the
power structure at every
point."
Cotnway Baid present 'NDP
policies only provide for a
fairer administration of capitalism.
He said it is still important
for radicals to work within the
NDP because there is no viable
alternative.
Conway said he expects his
support in the leadership race
will come from a section of the
young NDP organization, old
Cooperative Commonwealth
Federation members, tand some
union officials.
"There are no MLAs supporting me," he said, although I've
heard a rumor that Bob Strachan (current NDP leader) got
drunk one night and put on one
of my campaign buttons."
DEFFNER KNOCKS HEFNER
"Man is not in search of
himself; he is in love with himself."
Rev. Donald Deffner, sponsored by the Campus Lutheran
Society, spake these words
Thursday noon. He was talking
on the image of modern man
as presented by the mass media.
"The  media   are   promoting
BE THERE
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12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:00
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the "I" philosophy," said Deffner. He referred to several
songs by Paul Simon of Simon
and G-arfunkel which he said
promoted isolationary individualism.
"Man has sinned against God,
only God can forgive him, and
that forgiveness can be found
was Deffner's main theme, as
COME FOR COFFEE
AND FIND OUT
HOW YOU CAN
"TELL IT HOW IT IS"
TO NEW FOREIGN
STUDENTS COMING TO
STUDY AT UBC  IN
SEPT.   1969
.  .  TURN  ON  TO SOME
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NEW PLACE . . .
he held that media had failed
to answer the basic existential
questions facing man, but tiie
church held the final solution.
Speaking on sex, Deffner refuted the Hefnerian idea of
guilt and shame being antiquated concepts, and came out
in favor of pre-marital chastity.
Deffner will be speaking
again at noon today in Angus
110; and also in the Lutheran
Campus Centre tonight.
Wear
Rentals and Sales
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ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
Latest Styles
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JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER *
2046 W. 41st 263-3610 Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March   14,   1969
SPOR TS
Soccer players
sock it to em
At Callister Park the Soccer Birds overcame several
obstacles last Sunday to increase their league lead to three
points by beating second-place Columbus 2-0.
Midway into the first half Ash Valdai was sent to the
hospital for ten stitches after knocking heads with Bob Hazeldine.
Then just before the half Wayne Thompson was sent off for
fighting with Gene Vazzoler who also departed.
Starting the second half at ten-a-side, the Birds struck
quickly on a pretty passing play that saw Robin Elliot send Jim
Briggs. into the clear. Although on a bad angle, Briggs hit the
near top corner to put the Birds in front.
Columbus then threw everything they had into the attack,
but the defence, led by a busy Barry Sadler in goal, proved a
match for all Columbus efforts.
A disputable tripping call inside the Birds' area gave Columbus a chance to tie the score.
Sadler topped off his record-tying thirteenth league shutout performance by saving brilliantly on the penalty kick.
The Birds, however, were to suffer yet another setback as
Len Lendvoy was sent off for pushing and his Columbus counterpart was allowed to remain in the game.
Shortly after that the under-manned Birds broke upfield
and Ken Elmer converted a cogent Gary Thompson pass with a
first-time shot that curved into the upper corner of the net.
Intramurals
ALL EVENTS START AT  12:30 at the JOHN OWEN TRACK
Monday, March 17 — 1 hr. — 100 yd. Heats.
Tuesday, March 18 — 1 hr. — 880 yds. — Discus.
Wednes., March 19 — 1 hr. — 440 Heats — Javelin.
Thursday, March 20 — 2 hr. — 2 Mile Walk — 100 yd. Final —
Long Jump — Shot Put.
Monday, March 24 — 1 hr. — 220 Heats — 4 x 110 Heats.
Tuesday, March 25 — 1 hr. — 1 Mile — 220 Final.
Wednes., March 26 — 1 hr. — 440 Final — Triple Jump.
Thursday, March 27 — 2 hr. — High Jump — 4 x 440 Final —
4x110 Final.
JOY WARD and Gunther
Klaus, were the top UBC
skiers last weekend at the
Tryol Giant Slalom. They
both won the overall championships, Gunther by 1.6
seconds and Joy by 1.3 seconds. The event was held
on Whistler Mountain, and
as well as getting the winning spots, in both men's
and women's events, UBC
picked up second and third
as well.
Intramural posts open
Applications   are   now   being   accepted   for   the   following
positions within the administrative structure of the men's and
women's intramural program-
Director — men's and women's.
Assistant Director — men's and women's.
Referee-in-chief — men's and women's.
Assistant referee — men's and women's.
Co-rec Director — men's and women's.
Publicity Director — men's  and women's.
Preference for these positions will be awarded to first and
second year students with:
a) an interest in the intramural program;
b) some administrative experience, not necessarily in
the area of athletics;
c) good academic standing.
These positions involve a commitment of some 10-15 hours
per week with a salary range of $15O-$l,000 per academic year
depending upon position, qualifications and available budget
allocation.
Interested students are asked to apply in writing before
March 18 stating position applied for, qualifications and experience to:
Office of the Director,
School of Physical Education and Recreation,
Memorial Gymnasium, Campus.
For further information regarding the various positions call
in person to the men's intramural office, Room 308, Memorial
Gymnasium, Monday through Friday, 12:30-1:30.
The Men's Athletic Association is accepting applications
for the positions of President, Vice-president, and Secretary-
Treasurer. Letters of application should be sent to Mr. R. J.
Phillips, Athletic Director, War Memorial Gym, by Tuesday,
March 18.
WEEKEND   ACTION   STAR
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20 days from London and back. _..
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20 days from London and back.	
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5. ITALIAN HIGHLIGHTS
14 days London to Rome and back..
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21 days return to London	
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14 days return to London..
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8. BEST OF BRITAIN
9 days. — :	
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9. ROUNDABOUT IRELAND
8 days. _ 	
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10. SCENIC SCANDINAVIA
15 days return to London.	
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B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization
ON CAMPUS        570°u™BtVD
This week we have two women athletes
who have demonstrated their skill at the recent
W.C.I.A.A.   competition   in   Winnipeg.   Anne
Covell and Betsy George each won two events
and established new records in both.
Anne Covell moved from out of obscurity
into Olympic class. Last year, she placed
second in the 400 meters at the Canadian Open
Championships. Her time of 55.0 was a qualifying time for the Olympics in Mexico. At the
Olympics she just failed to make the semifinals with a time of 54.3.
As a competitor for UBC Track Team she
has had many wins and established many new
records. At the W.C.I.A.A. meet she set a new
60 yds., and 300 meter record. In the Telegraphic Meet she broke the 60 yds., and 100
yds. record. Also at the Alberta Provincial
Open Championships she won the 50 yds. in
6.0 seconds. This weekend she is competing
in the Canadian Indoor Championships in Edmonton. Anne is in first year Physical Education, so we'll hear quite a lot from her.
Another outstanding member of the Track
Team is Betsy George. She's in second year
arts. She set new records in the hurdles and
broke her own record in the long jump at the
W.C.I.A.A. meet. She placed fifth in the long
jump at the Achilles Meet and third in the
same event at the Alberta Indoor Championships.
Greydon Moore
reads poetry from
"THE PLANET MEN
ii
THIS ALBUM
SOON TO BE
RELEASED
Tuesday, Mar. 18
PARTY ROOM - SUB - NOON Friday, March   14,  1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
Athlete of the Year
is ice hockey star
The man who won this year's
Bobby Gaul Trophy said that
he was laying bets with the
toastmaster, Frank Gnup, as to
who would win the award;
when it was announced, he
said, 'It was unbelievable, I
was really shocked."
With tears in his eyes,
Mickey MlcDowell, a member
of the Thunderbird Ice Hockey
team accepted his award
which is emblematic of "excellence in athletics and scholastics combined", at UBC.
The award is named after a
former UBC athlete who died
shortly after his graduation
and in his memory his friends
and fellow competitors donated
the trophy to UBC.
Mickey in his acceptance
speech, summarized the attitude of many of the athletes
who were present at the annual Big Block Club banquet
when he quoted and then modified, a passage from George
Bernard Shaw, who once said,
"Getting the Noble Prize in
Literature is like being thrown
a life line when you have
reached shore safetly."
Mickey qualified that saying, "The greatest thing about
being an athlete is that you
never reach shore safetly."
"Thank you," he ended, "I
really appreciate that."
The athletes were also treated to UBC's Mr. Gravel-tongue,
Frank Gnup, who pointed out
to the assembled Big Block
club members that the constitution of their organization
allows them to supply ushers
and promote sports.
After   various   derogatory
comments about athletes trying to help coaches in other
sports from the sidelines, he
finally drew a great laugh by
pointing out some of his problems with the tight money
situation at UBC.
He said that in talking to
Jack Parnell, the registrar, he
was warned that with the higher marks needed to get into
UBC next year he would have
to start looking for some of
the big husky girls to play on
his football team because he
Mcdowell
won't  get  any more  football
players.
Defending himself and the
other coaches he said that they,
who knew best, doubted like
hell that the coaching on campus was lousy.
He didn't however, even let
the coaches off that lightly, as
he threw a few stones at Lionel
Pugh, the track coach.
"Some sports aren't as tough
as others," he said, "why look
at Lionel there, if it weren't
for girls he'd be a hell of a
bad coach. Lionel," he went on,
"stole a seven foot jumper
from the hill, he don't care if
the kid has long hair." But
then philosophically he added,
"but for that matter, if they
win, neither do I."
Sports in general caught
some blows in passing, "I
played volleyball when I was
in high school. It's a great
game. But then I grew out of
it."
Gym team
is champ
Two UBC women were
named to the Canadian team
to compete in the Student
World Games.
Sandi Hartley, for getting
first place in the Canadian Intercollegiate Championships,
and Leslie Bird, for picking up
the third place spot, were the
girls choosen.
Along with Terry Cotton,
their team, coached by S. Heig-
berg, finished first of the eight
Canadian schools who competed.
The second place team was
the University of Alberta while
Western College finished in
third spot.
What makes this a more impressive victory is the fact
that the girls had to raise all
the money for their trip by
themselves.
The girls wish to thank all
those people who donated
money to the team.
Sj
V tit A &
PATIG
• EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY-
ANNUAL
General Meeting
Mar.   20 —Noon
MARCH EASTER SUNDAY APRIL 6
-END CANADIAN COMPLICITY
-SUPPORT ANTI-WAR Gl's
-WITHDRAW U.S. TROOPS
Your   help   is   urgently   needed   to   build   the   mobilization.
Bring   Mind,  Muscles,   MONEY  to   18  W.   Hastings,   Headquarters,  APRIL  6th   MOBILIZATION   COMMITTEE.
On Campus contact    BOB McKK, 224-7578,
or HILDA THOMAS, Bu. 2277, 224-4678
ANNUAL STORE-WIDE SALE
Friday, March 14—Saturday 22
CO-OP   BOOKSTORE
341 West Pender Street 685-5836
Entire Stock discounted 20%   80%
Store   hours  9:00  a.m.   -  5:30  p.m.  Monday -  Saturday
Except 9:00 a.m.  - 9:00 p.m.  on Fridays
Dr. Donald L. Deffner
B.A., B.D., M.A., M.Th., Ph.D.
DEFFNER
on
MASS MEDIA
and
SEX
Today
noon
Henry Angus 110
TODAY &
SATURDAY
MARCH 14 & 15
FRIDAY
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:15, 10:30
SATURDAY
6:00, 8:15, 10:30
SUB  THEATRE
ADMISSION  50c
Advance  Tickets  On   Sale!
Get tickets early to avoid
disappointment.
^]E)lJlSiL^^lZ^^I?
IBOIMINIMJEL ^g fBlE^lpJDJE)
They put together the strangest damned gang you ever heard of. Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March   14,   1969
UBC LIBERALS
present
RAY
PERRAULT
M.P.
8      SUB Noon
8    Rm. 207       Monday
TODAY
PERFORMING  ARTS
Manadala soul crusade sings in SUB
ballroom, noon, 50 cents.
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
General Meeting to elect new committee today at noon. I.H. upper
lounge. Talk by Mr. Sigauz on Sunday at 8 p.m.  at 3746 W. 13th Ave.
Sullivan - Zirnhelt - and
Hodge - All at once?
THURS. MAR. 20
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
•BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
CANADIAN  PREMIERE -  U.B.C.
MANY HAPPY RETURNS, PRATT
by  Douglas Bankson
"AN OUTRAGEOUS FARCE"
March  19-22, 8:30 p.m.
DOROTHY   SOMERSET   STUDIO
Special Student Matinee — March 20, 12:30 Noon
Students $1.00 — Reservations 228-2678
Room  207,   Frederic  Wood  Theatre
Acorn Florists
The Best In Flowers
Worldwide Service
20% DISCOUNT
on   corsages   &   focal   orders   for   Students, Faculty  &  Staff.
Vancouver Airport  Service
Phone day - 731-8312
night - 733-9997
2232 West 4th  Ave.
Horse Back
Riding
Special
at Coquitlam Branch Only
1375 Pipe Line Rd.
near  Westwood
3  hrs. $5.00   -  2 hrs.  $4.00
1   hr. $2.50
For     information     on     lessons,
hayrides  &  barn  dances phone
ACTIVE STABLE LTD.
1385  Steveston   Highwy.,  Rich.
277-8662	
THE BIG MOTHER
Good Music
In a
Relaxing
Atmosphere
PHONE:
688-7638
Jr^v^^3t^T^^^T^r^T^r=ii==ii==iT==ir=it=iT=ir==ir=ir==ir==it=ic=ir=
GENETICS?
THE FUTURE OF MANKIND?
SEMINAR - DISCUSSION WITH
DR. PERSON, Genetic Scientist
-EUGENICS
-ACHIEVING GENETIC CHANGE
-GENETIC  REPAIR
-PREDETERMINATION
& MEDICAL IMPLICATIONS
SPONSORED  BY PRE-MED. SOC.
 Coffee & Donuts    —
7:00 p.m., SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 1969
ROOM 211 - S.U.B.
EVERYONE WELCOME!!
:***j**-*a****ar****J******J******Ji*****ui****-Jr****J*^
HILLEL   HOUSE   UJA
Film on Israel. Bruce Zien speaks
today  noon.
CLASSICS CLUB
Prof.   A.   G.   Woodhead   on   "In   Defense   of   Clodius",   Buch.   Penthouse
8 p.m.  today.
CHINESE VARSITY  CLUB
Year   end   banquet   and   dance   held
March 15 at Sands Motor Hotel. Pick
up your tickets today.
VCF
VCF, a student's viewpoint, in SUB
ballroom  today noon
THE   PIT
The pit is open tonight from 4:30-
midnight. Next week the Pit will be
open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
nights.
CIASP
Banter  with  SGM'ers,  noon  today  in
SUB  117.
VOC
Introductory ski touring this Sunday.
Opportunity for pre-sphinx came
equipment tryout. Meting Club room
today noon.
NEXT WEEK
T.BIRD   M.C.
Meet 10 Sunday for ride to Westwood
scrambles   at   SUB   loop.   Meeting   in
SUB 211 Wednesday
NEWMAN   CENTRE
Car rally! Cars leave St. Marks College 12 noon. Sunday. Dash plaques
awarded to 3 winning cars.  Costs  50
cents per person. Party at destination
point.
PREMED SOC
Genetics    seminar    with    Dr.    Person
Sunday at 7 p.m.,  SUB 211. Free refreshments.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLESE
Karl   and   D.   Sage   on  how   to   teach
Canadian   history.   Monday  noon,  Bu.
100.
ALPHA   OMEGA
Special    meeting    for    all    members,
Monday in SUB 212A.
'tween
classes
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK CLUB
Elections  and sign up  for  Riverview
trip.  Monday  noon,  SUB F.
WOMEN'S   BIG   BLOCK   CLUB
Meeting     Monday    for    presidential
elections, SUB room A.
UKRANIAN   VARSITY   CLUB
Very  important  meeting   Monday  in
SUB  212A.
DEPT. OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Dr. A. G. Cross lectures on Letter of
a   Russian   Traveller   next   Friday   in
Bu.   214.
UBC   LIBERALS
The Giant  Killer  Ray  Perrault   (M.F)
speaks  Monday  noon  in  L&M. v«
EL   CIRCULO
Rapsodia    y    verborrea-caricature    of
orators  by Sir Bartroli.  International
House, Monday noon.
ACE
A   panel   of   first   year   teachers   will       t^
talk about their experiences on Monday, noon in Ed. 1006. Non-members
10 cents.
CHINESE  VARSITY   CLUB
General meeting Tuesday noon in Bu.
205. Elections of officers for 69-70.
ANTHROSOC   UNION
Last general meeting Tuesday, March
18, noon, in SUB 215.
COMMERCE  U.S.
Giant   general  meeting.  Party   room.
Wednesday.   Freer   is   coming.
THUNDERBIRD   M.C.
Meeting in SUB 211, Wednesday noon.
EDUCATION   U.S.
Education      direction      day     discuss
courses   with   department   heads   and
senior students, Thursday, Ed. lounge
ALPHA OMEGA
Annual meeting and elections Thursday,   March20   at   7:30   p.m.   in   SUB
Council  Chambers.
ALPHA OMEGA
General  meeting  Monday  noon,  SUB
212A.
COMMERCE SCHOLARSHIP
High   is   cumming—SUB   aud.,   March
26.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
U.B.C.'s LAST COLOSSAL CONCERT
- Dance with Poppy Family and
Wiggy Symphony, S.U.B. Ballroom,
Mar.  14, $2.00.  9 p.m.  - 1 a.m.
BIG SOUL DANCE: KING BLUE
and the Epics, Place Vanier, Friday,   Marchl4,9-12,$1.3B.
IDES OF MARCH, FRI. 14-15 ALL
night dance. Floor show starts at 10
p.m. Friday. Dance starts at 11:30
p.m. Breakfast at 4:00 a.m. Saturday. Admission $1.00. At International House.  Drinks served.
LAST BIG DANCE AT PLACE
Vanier. Friday, March 21. Come and
have your last big fling before
exams.
SPRING SWING - POLKA PARTY,
Sat., March 22, 9 p.m.-l a.m. in
International House. Admission $1.0$
person. Germand band, bar, prizes.
Sponsor German Club.
DANCE AT I.H. SAT., MAE. 15, 8:00-
1:00.  Bar 2.50 couple.
DANCE ON SUB PLAZA FOLLOW -
ing Annual General Meeting. Noon,
Thurs.,  March 20 — FREE!
Lost  &  Found
13
LOST: GOLD BRACELET. ONE
ivory charm at Place Vanier. Dance
Sat. Nite or Dick in your car. Call
Rm. 351, 224-9883.
FOUND 2000 IN CASH, MEET ME
at SUB Plaza, noon, March 20 for
negotiations.
Rides  &  Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
Premiums? If you are age 20 or
over you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott   299-9422.
AGGIES! FOR A NEW YEAR WITH
new ideas vote Lome Borgal for
A.U.S.   President.
BLOW YOUR MIND WITH SOUL—
The Mandala direct from Toronto,
SUB   Ballroom,   noon   today.   50c.
FEEL GUILTY? IF YOU HIT BLUE
sports car in staff lot last Thurs.
Behind Brock, please contribute $20
toward $38 cost. I will pay rest.
Ted Price 266-9296, 7250 Marguerite.
Or leave  in  Lib.  Circ.  Office.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS, C O M -
plete Theses and Publications, High
Calibre Typing, Graphs, Illustrations, Formulations. Special Student
Rates.   Phone   733-4506(   evenings).
Travel Opportunities
16
Information Wanted
17
Wanted Misc.
18
THE BOOK "MAINSTREAMS of
Modern Art" by John Canaday or
information on. Phone Connie.'* 926-
3351.
WANTED — A QUORUM FOR GEN-
eral meeting. Applicants should
present themselves at SUB. Plaza
12:30 noon,  March  20.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1966 SUNBEAM 1725 4-DOOR SEDAN
17,800 miles one owner. Excellent
condition. Contact Geoff Matthews.
228-2181,   596-7860.
1965 VIVA EXCEL. CONDITION.
$850. Radio, 23,000 miles. Phone
Dawne 325-1494.
1963 TRIUMPH TR4. NEW TON-
ueau, new brakes. Top condition.
736-6840.
'67 EPIC TAKE OVER PAYMENTS
$73/mo. 11,000 mi. Excellent shape.
'57 Chev., std. shift, great shape.
$250.00.  929-1635.	
MERCEDES 180, 1959, WELL CARED
for, '69 plates, extra tires, $529,
876-5077 after 6 p.m.
Automobiles For Sale (Cont.)    21
'61  MGA MK1
Rebuilt    engine.    New    tires,    British
Racing   Green   with   Maroon   Upholstery.    Excellent   cond.    261-0569    or
733-4121.
'69 MAZDA FOR SALE, 5000 MILES,
radio, W.W., etc. Will swap for
fairly new sports car. Ted, 731-3706.
VOLVO 142 S, 2 DR. 14,000 MI. NO
exhaust emission control, 736-7064.
Eves,  private.
SAVE ON TOYOTA! $400 OFF 1969
Crown "Wagon, 2500 miles. Warranty. Extras. My loss is your gain.
Lorne,  AM 3-3557.
1958 HUMBER,  VERY GOOD COND.,
auto.   Solid   English   car,   good   buy.
Phone  261-2826.	
AUSTIN    1100,    1965.    34,000    MILES.
Top  condition,   radio,   $950.   Ph.   224-
0918.
Auto Wanted
22
WANTED
MGB   MIDGET   OR   SPRITE.   HAVE
cash.  Phone RE  3-7628.
Automobile—Parts
23
Motorcycles
26
'65 SUZUKI 80CC 5,500 MI. 150 M.P.G.
helmet included $135.00 full price.
Phone 681-2016 eves.
'64    HONDA    300.    EXCELL.    COND.
$250.00.  Ph.  Dave  731-2808.
Photography
34
Scandals
37
GRADUATING SCIENCEMAN QUES-
tions his education. Wishes copy of
"Naked Poems" by Phyllis Webb.
Phone Fred  988-8532.
HIGH IS CUMMING!
SUB Aud.  March 26,  12:30,  3:30, 7:00,
9:30.  Admission $1.00.	
KENTUCKY BLEW GRASS! MAN-
dala Blow Soul! SUB Ballroom noon
today. The rock soul sound of the
Mandala — 50c.
EARTHQUAKE COMING! PAPA
Bears leaving. Catch them at the Big
Mother before the disastrous ending.
GRAD REEF RAMPAGE, FRIDAY,
Mar. 14, 7:30 p.m., from SUB. $1.75
person. AMS ticket office. 	
IT'S SCANDALOUS THAT 2000 STU-
dents can't get together once a
year. Try it — Thurs., March 20 —
SUB  Plaza  (or Armouries)  noon.
Sewing &  Alterations
38
Typewriters-Rental 8t Rep.       39
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR  4-9253
ESSAYS AND SEMINAR PAPERS
expertly typed. 25c per page, 5c
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.
TYPING DONE, MY HOME. PHONE
255-9483.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC TYPIST.
Dunbar & 29th. Phone 224-6129.
Well versed in all phases of typing.
Will  edit and  correct  spelling.
TYPIST AVAILABLE FOR EFFICI-
ent essays, reports etc., in my
home,    North   Vancouver.   988-7228.
EXP. TYPING, REASONABLE
rates, quick service from legible
drafts. Call 738-6829 after 10:00 a.m.
to   9:00  p.m.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
TYPIST   5   BLOCKS   FROM   GATES.
Call  Mrs.  Woodward  228-8536.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
M.A.    IN    ENGLISH    WILL    TUTOR
English   100.   Phone  Cathy,   224-9249.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR   SALE
71
VIKING AM - FM - MB RADIO 13
Trans. $85 in Oct. '68, sell for $50.
Leather case,  earph.  988-5405.
ELECTRA 210 PORT. l-YR.-OLD,
changeable types for sale. $150 or
near offer. Call J. Bak, 2161 or
home.   738-4655.
CANON    FP    36 MM SLR    (WITH
meter)   $150.   200 mm 4.5   auto,   lens
$80.    Also   ace.   for above.    Phone
Dave,  987-2601.
BEOMASTER 1000, DUAL TAPE &
record decks, Noresco speakers, teak
stand stereo system. Excellent, as
new.   Offers!   736-6197   evenings.
FOR SALE. ELECTRIC SEAL (Rabbit) fur coat. Excellent condition.
Must  sell!   266-5167.
SIX 5:60-15 TIRES AND WHEELS,
$15 each. 50CC pedal bike $60. Jim,
683-0136'.
RENTALS &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS — GIRL TO SHARE
basement flat. Private entrance,
furnished, toilet, cooking facilities,
refrigerator. $37.50 a month. FREE
APRIL 1st. Phone 224-4941.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS
$85.00 a month at D.U. Fraternity
House; good food, short walk to
classes, quiet hours for study; phone
228-9389,   224-9841.
ON CAMPUS RESIDENCE ACCOM-
modation in Carey Hall for balance
of term in double room. University
rates. Phone W. E. Wilburn, 224-
6939 or 224-5086.
PRIVATE ROOM, BATH & BOARD
in exchange for babysitting, light
housework. Available May 1st. Kerrisdale.  263-7952.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
BACHELORETTE PAD: PRIVATE
rooms, Sauna, T.V., Stereo, Washer-
Dryer. $45.00 per month. Apply 1874
W.   16th  after  6 p.m.
GRADUATE STUDENT TO SHARE
house with 3 of same. Dunbar area.
Bob  or Ken  228-3089.
KITS. RESP. PERSON REQ. TO
share house, semi-furn. private
room.  $50.  Call  John 732-7918.
WANTED TMMED. ONE GIRL TO
share large three bdrm. suite. $33.
Phone after 10:00 p.m.,  733-3827.
84
Unfurn. House 81 Apts.
WANTED:    MAY    1st,    1    BR.    APT.
unfurn.    S.C.    Kits   area.    Respons.
young  couple.   Phone  874-6678  after
5 p.m.	
WANTED SELF CONTAINED SUITE
—   single   girl,   for   May   1.    Phone
228-8216,   5:00-6:30  p.m.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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